US20100098919A1 - Flame-retardant cellulosic nonwoven fabric - Google Patents

Flame-retardant cellulosic nonwoven fabric Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20100098919A1
US20100098919A1 US12616475 US61647509A US2010098919A1 US 20100098919 A1 US20100098919 A1 US 20100098919A1 US 12616475 US12616475 US 12616475 US 61647509 A US61647509 A US 61647509A US 2010098919 A1 US2010098919 A1 US 2010098919A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
fabric
retardant
nonwoven
fiber
flame
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12616475
Inventor
Herbert Hartgrove
Gregory Rabon
Russell Tindall
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Avintiv Specialty Materials Inc
Original Assignee
Avintiv Specialty Materials Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B5/00Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts
    • B32B5/22Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by the presence of two or more layers which are next to each other and are fibrous, filamentary, formed of particles or foamed
    • B32B5/24Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by the presence of two or more layers which are next to each other and are fibrous, filamentary, formed of particles or foamed one layer being a fibrous or filamentary layer
    • B32B5/26Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by the presence of two or more layers which are next to each other and are fibrous, filamentary, formed of particles or foamed one layer being a fibrous or filamentary layer another layer next to it also being fibrous or filamentary
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B5/00Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts
    • B32B5/02Layered products characterised by the non- homogeneity or physical structure, i.e. comprising a fibrous, filamentary, particulate or foam layer; Layered products characterised by having a layer differing constitutionally or physically in different parts characterised by structural features of a fibrous or filamentary layer
    • B32B5/022Non-woven fabric
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H1/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres
    • D04H1/40Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties
    • D04H1/42Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties characterised by the use of certain kinds of fibres insofar as this use has no preponderant influence on the consolidation of the fleece
    • D04H1/425Cellulose series
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H1/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres
    • D04H1/40Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties
    • D04H1/42Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties characterised by the use of certain kinds of fibres insofar as this use has no preponderant influence on the consolidation of the fleece
    • D04H1/4282Addition polymers
    • D04H1/43Acrylonitrile series
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H1/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres
    • D04H1/40Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties
    • D04H1/42Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties characterised by the use of certain kinds of fibres insofar as this use has no preponderant influence on the consolidation of the fleece
    • D04H1/4382Stretched reticular film fibres; Composite fibres; Mixed fibres; Ultrafine fibres; Fibres for artificial leather
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H1/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres
    • D04H1/40Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties
    • D04H1/44Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties the fleeces or layers being consolidated by mechanical means, e.g. by rolling
    • D04H1/46Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties the fleeces or layers being consolidated by mechanical means, e.g. by rolling by needling or like operations to cause entanglement of fibres
    • D04H1/492Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties the fleeces or layers being consolidated by mechanical means, e.g. by rolling by needling or like operations to cause entanglement of fibres by fluid jet
    • D04H1/495Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties the fleeces or layers being consolidated by mechanical means, e.g. by rolling by needling or like operations to cause entanglement of fibres by fluid jet for formation of patterns, e.g. drilling or rearrangement
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2307/00Properties of the layers or laminate
    • B32B2307/30Properties of the layers or laminate having particular thermal properties
    • B32B2307/306Resistant to heat
    • B32B2307/3065Flame resistant or retardant, fire resistant or retardant
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B32LAYERED PRODUCTS
    • B32BLAYERED PRODUCTS, i.e. PRODUCTS BUILT-UP OF STRATA OF FLAT OR NON-FLAT, e.g. CELLULAR OR HONEYCOMB, FORM
    • B32B2307/00Properties of the layers or laminate
    • B32B2307/30Properties of the layers or laminate having particular thermal properties
    • B32B2307/308Heat stability
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10S428/92Fire or heat protection feature
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10S428/92Fire or heat protection feature
    • Y10S428/921Fire or flameproofing
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/24Structurally defined web or sheet [e.g., overall dimension, etc.]
    • Y10T428/24802Discontinuous or differential coating, impregnation or bond [e.g., artwork, printing, retouched photograph, etc.]
    • Y10T428/2481Discontinuous or differential coating, impregnation or bond [e.g., artwork, printing, retouched photograph, etc.] including layer of mechanically interengaged strands, strand-portions or strand-like strips
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/10Scrim [e.g., open net or mesh, gauze, loose or open weave or knit, etc.]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/30Woven fabric [i.e., woven strand or strip material]
    • Y10T442/3707Woven fabric including a nonwoven fabric layer other than paper
    • Y10T442/3772Hydroentangled
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/659Including an additional nonwoven fabric
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/674Nonwoven fabric with a preformed polymeric film or sheet
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/689Hydroentangled nonwoven fabric
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/696Including strand or fiber material which is stated to have specific attributes [e.g., heat or fire resistance, chemical or solvent resistance, high absorption for aqueous compositions, water solubility, heat shrinkability, etc.]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/697Containing at least two chemically different strand or fiber materials
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/697Containing at least two chemically different strand or fiber materials
    • Y10T442/698Containing polymeric and natural strand or fiber materials

Abstract

The present invention is directed to a hydroentangled flame retardant nonwoven fabric, and more specifically, to a cellulosic flame retardant fabric comprising a self extinguishing fiber so as to minimize the total percentage of fabric weight lost upon burning in accordance with technical bulletin 604. Use of natural fiber fabrics in bedding components is desirable due to the softness and durability associated with the fabrics; however, natural fiber, such as cellulose, is highly flammable and therefore lacks the ability to provide the proper flammability protection often sought out in bedding components. In accordance with the present invention, a small amount of self-extinguishing fiber, such as a modacrylic fiber, was blended with the natural fiber and hydroentangled to form a nonwoven composite fabric that is soft, flame retardant, and suitable for bedding articles.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • [0001]
    This application claims the priority of Provisional Application No. 60/542,964, which was filed on Feb. 9, 2004, and the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • [0002]
    The present invention generally relates a hydroentangled flame retardant nonwoven fabric, and more specifically, to a cellulosic flame retardant fabric comprising a self extinguishing fiber so as to minimize the total percentage of fabric weight lost upon burning in accordance with technical bulletin 604.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    More than thirty years ago, flammability standards were instituted by the Consumer Product Safety Commission under 16 C.F.R. §1632. These standards addressed the flammability requirements of mattresses to resist ignition upon exposure to smoldering cigarettes. However, the Code of Federal Regulations failed to address the need for mattresses to resist ignition upon exposure to small open flames, such as produced by matches, lighters, and candles.
  • [0004]
    Technological advances have proven to provide mattresses, as well as bedding constituents, with significantly better flammability protection. In light of these advancements, California Legislature has mandated that the Consumer Product Safety Commission establish a revised set of standards that will ensure mattresses and bedding pass an open flame ignition test. Known as Assembly Bill 603 (AB 603), California Legislature has further mandated that the revised set of standards go into affect Jan. 1, 2004.
  • [0005]
    Flame retardant staple fiber is known in the art. Further, flame retardant fiber has been utilized in the fabrication of nonwoven fabrics for bedding applications. Nonwoven fabrics are suitable for use in a wide variety of applications where the efficiency with which the fabrics can be manufactured provides a significant economic advantage for these fabrics versus traditional textiles. However, nonwoven fabrics have commonly been disadvantaged when fabric properties are compared, particularly in terms of surface abrasion, pilling and durability in multiple-use applications. Hydroentangled fabrics have been developed with improved properties which are a result of the entanglement of the fibers or filaments in the fabric providing improved fabric integrity. Subsequent to entanglement, fabric durability can be further enhanced by the application of binder compositions and/or by thermal stabilization of the entangled fibrous matrix.
  • [0006]
    U.S. Pat. No. 3,485,706, to Evans, hereby incorporated by reference, discloses processes for effecting hydroentanglement of nonwoven fabrics. More recently, hydroentanglement techniques have been developed which impart images or patterns to the entangled fabric by effecting hydroentanglement on three-dimensional image transfer devices. Such three-dimensional image transfer devices are disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,098,764, hereby incorporated by reference, with the use of such image transfer devices being desirable for providing a fabric with enhanced physical properties as well as an aesthetically pleasing appearance.
  • [0007]
    Heretofore, nonwoven fabrics have been advantageously employed for manufacture of flame retardant fabrics, as described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,489,256, to Kent, et al., which is hereby incorporated by reference. Typically, nonwoven fabrics employed for this type of application have been entangled and integrated by needle-punching, sometimes referred to as needle-felting, which entails insertion and withdrawal of barbed needles through a fibrous web structure. While this type of processing acts to integrate the fibrous structure and lend integrity thereto, the barbed needles inevitably shear large numbers of the constituent fibers, and undesirably create perforations in the fibrous structure. Needle-punching can also be detrimental to the strength of the resultant fabric, requiring that a fabric have a relatively high basis weight in order to exhibit sufficient strength.
  • [0008]
    A need exists for a more cost effective flame retardant nonwoven fabric that is cost effective, soft, yet durable and suitable for various end-use applications including, but not limited to bedding constituents, such as mattress components, mattress pads, mattress ticking, comforters, bedspreads, quilts, coverlets, duvets, pillow covers, as well as other home uses, protective apparel applications, upholstery, and industrial end-use applications.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0009]
    The present invention is directed to a hydroentangled flame retardant nonwoven fabric, and more specifically, to a cellulosic flame retardant fabric comprising a self extinguishing fiber so as to minimize the total percentage of fabric weight lost upon burning in accordance with technical bulletin 604.
  • [0010]
    Use of natural fiber fabrics in bedding components is desirable due to the softness and durability associated with the fabrics; however, natural fiber, such as cellulose, is highly flammable and therefore lacks the ability to provide the proper flammability protection often sought out in bedding components. In accordance with the present invention, a small amount of self-extinguishing fiber, such as a modacrylic fiber, was blended with the natural fiber and hydroentangled to form a nonwoven composite fabric that is soft, flame retardant, suitable for bedding articles, and exhibits a minimal amount of mass lost when tested in compliance with technical bulletin 604, which is a technical standard for measuring open-flame resistance in filled bedding articles.
  • [0011]
    It has been contemplated that the cellulosic fabric of the present invention may be a single layer or may comprise additional layers, wherein the additional layers may be chosen from nonwovens, wovens, and/or support layers, such as scrims.
  • [0012]
    Further, the nonwoven fabric may be hydroentangled on a foraminous surface, including, but not limited to a three-dimensional image transfer device, embossed screen, three-dimensionally surfaced belt, or perforated drum, suitably further enhancing the aesthetic quality of the fabric for a particular end-use application.
  • [0013]
    Other features and advantages of the present invention will become readily apparent from the following detailed description, the accompanying drawings, and the appended claims.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0014]
    FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic view of apparatus utilized in accordance with the present invention so as to manufacture the flame retardant nonwoven fabric;
  • [0015]
    FIG. 2 shows photographs of samples of fabric embodying the present invention, and comparative samples; and
  • [0016]
    FIG. 3 shows data generated in connection with the samples shown in FIG. 2.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0017]
    While the present invention is susceptible of embodiment in various forms, there is shown in the drawings, and will hereinafter be described, a presently preferred embodiment, with the understanding that the present disclosure is to be considered as an exemplification of the invention, and is not intended to limit the invention to the specific embodiment illustrated.
  • [0018]
    The flame retardant nonwoven fabric of the present invention is cost effective, soft, yet durable and suitable for various bedding articles including, but not limited to a mattress component, mattress covers, comforters, bedspreads, quilts, coverlets, duvets, pillows, pillow covers, in addition to other home uses, protective apparel applications, and industrial end-use applications.
  • [0019]
    U.S. Pat. No. 3,485,706, to Evans, hereby incorporated by reference, discloses processes for effecting hydroentanglement of nonwoven fabrics. With reference to FIG. 1, therein is illustrated an apparatus for practicing the present method for forming a flame retardant cellulosic nonwoven fabric. The cellulosic and modacrylic fibrous components may be carded and optionally cross-lapped to form a precursor web, designated P, which is consolidated by hydraulically energy to form a nonwoven fabric.
  • [0020]
    Optionally, the precursor web is further entangled on a foraminous surface, including, but not limited to a three-dimensional image transfer device, embossed screen, three-dimensionally surfaced belt, or perforated drum, suitably further enhancing the aesthetic quality of the fabric for a particular end-use application.
  • [0021]
    It is in the purview of the present invention, that additional flame retardant fibers be incorporated into the precursor web, these fibers include, but are not limited to melamine fibers, phenolic fibers, such as Kynol™ fiber from American Kynol, Inc., pre-oxidized polyacrylonitrile fibers, such as Panox® fiber, a registered trademark to R.K. Textiles Composite Fibres Limited.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 1 further illustrates a hydroentangling apparatus, whereby the apparatus includes a foraminous forming surface in the form of belt 12 upon which the precursor web P is positioned for entangling or pre-entangling by manifold 14.
  • [0023]
    The entangling apparatus of FIG. 1 may optionally include an imaging and patterning drum 18 comprising a three-dimensional image transfer device for effecting imaging and patterning of the lightly entangled precursor web. The image transfer device includes a moveable imaging surface which moves relative to a plurality of entangling manifolds 22 which act in cooperation with three-dimensional elements defined by the imaging surface of the image transfer device to effect imaging and patterning of the fabric being formed.
  • [0024]
    It is also contemplated that one or more supplemental layers be added to the fabric of the present invention, wherein such layers may include a spunbond fabric. In general, the formation of continuous filament precursor webs involves the practice of the “spunbond” process. A spunbond process involves supplying a molten polymer, which is then extruded under pressure through a large number of orifices in a plate known as a spinneret or die. The resulting continuous filaments are quenched and drawn by any of a number of methods, such as slot draw systems, attenuator guns, or Godet rolls. The continuous filaments are collected as a loose web upon a moving foraminous surface, such as a wire mesh conveyor belt. When more than one spinneret is used in line for the purpose of forming a multi-layered fabric, the subsequent webs are collected upon the uppermost surface of the previously formed web. Further, the addition of a continuous filament fabric may include those fabrics formed from filaments having a nano-denier, as taught in U.S. Pat. No. 5,678,379 and No. 6,114,017, both incorporated herein by reference. Further still, the continuous filament fabric may be formed from an intermingling of conventional and nano-denier filaments.
  • [0025]
    It has been contemplated that the nonwoven fabric of the present invention incorporate a meltblown layer. The meltblown process is a related means to the spunbond process for forming a layer of a nonwoven fabric is the meltblown process. Again, a molten polymer is extruded under pressure through orifices in a spinneret or die. High velocity air impinges upon and entrains the filaments as they exit the die. The energy of this step is such that the formed filaments are greatly reduced in diameter and are fractured so that microfibers of finite length are produced. This differs from the spunbond process whereby the continuity of the filaments is preserved. The process to form either a single layer or a multiple-layer fabric is continuous, that is, the process steps are uninterrupted from extrusion of the filaments to form the first layer until the bonded web is wound into a roll. Methods for producing these types of fabrics are described in U.S. Pat. No. 4,041,203. The meltblown process, as well as the cross-sectional profile of the meltblown microfiber, is not a critical limitation to the practice of the present invention.
  • [0026]
    In accordance with the present invention, the hydroentangled flame retardant fabric may comprise a film layer. The formation of finite thickness films from thermoplastic polymers, suitable as a strong and durable carrier substrate layer, is a well-known practice. Thermoplastic polymer films can be formed by either dispersion of a quantity of molten polymer into a mold having the dimensions of the desired end product, known as a cast film, or by continuously forcing the molten polymer through a die, known as an extruded film. Extruded thermoplastic polymer films can either be formed such that the film is cooled then wound as a completed material, or dispensed directly onto a secondary substrate material to form a composite material having performance of both the substrate and the film layers.
  • [0027]
    Extruded films can be formed in accordance with the following representative direct extrusion film process. Blending and dosing storage comprising at least one hopper loader for thermoplastic polymer chip and, optionally, one for pelletized additive in thermoplastic carrier resin, feed into variable speed augers. The variable speed augers transfer predetermined amounts of polymer chip and additive pellet into a mixing hopper. The mixing hopper contains a mixing propeller to further the homogeneity of the mixture. Basic volumetric systems such as that described are a minimum requirement for accurately blending the additive into the thermoplastic polymer. The polymer chip and additive pellet blend feeds into a multi-zone extruder. Upon mixing and extrusion from the multi-zone extruder, the polymer compound is conveyed via heated polymer piping through a screen changer, wherein breaker plates having different screen meshes are employed to retain solid or semi-molten polymer chips and other macroscopic debris. The mixed polymer is then fed into a melt pump, and then to a combining block. The combining block allows for multiple film layers to be extruded, the film layers being of either the same composition or fed from different systems as described above. The combining block is connected to an extrusion die, which is positioned in an overhead orientation such that molten film extrusion is deposited at a nip between a nip roll and a cast roll.
  • [0028]
    In addition, breathable films can be used in conjunction with the disclosed continuous filament laminate. Monolithic films, as taught in U.S. Pat. No. 6,191,211, and microporous films, as taught in U.S. Pat. No. 6,264,864, both patents herein incorporated by reference, represent the mechanisms of forming such breathable films.
  • [0029]
    Subsequent to fabric formation, the cellulosic fire retardant fabric may be subjected to one or more variety of post-entanglement treatments. Such treatments may include application of a polymeric binder composition(s), mechanical compacting, application or incorporation of performance enhancing additives, electrostatic compositions, and like processes.
  • [0030]
    In accordance with the present invention, a representative sample comprise 60% staple length Tencel® lyocell fibers, Tencel® is a registered trademark of Courtaulds Fibres (Holdings) Limited, and 40% PBX® modacrylic fibers, PBX® is a registered trademark to Kaneka, with a basis weight of about 2.0 oz/yd2. Preferably, the nonwoven fabric comprises a 65/35 blend, and more preferably a 70/30 blend, in order to optimize cost effectiveness, yet still provide the desired performance. Subsequently, the fiber blend was consolidated into a composite flame retardant nonwoven fabric by way of hydroentanglement and tested in accordance with Technical Bulletin 604 to determine the weight of fabric lost when exposed to open-flames.
  • [0031]
    The burn test was conducted utilizing a “sewn in” construction and a “bag in bag” construction. A “sewn in” construction is a layered construction, wherein the two layers of the cellulosic fire retardant fabric is position between two outer shell layers. The layered construct is sewn along three of the four sides, fiber-fill is loaded within the inner most cellulosic fire retardant fabric layers, and the forth side subsequently sewn. A “bag in bag” construction utilizes a bag made of the cellulosic fire retardant fabric that is loaded with fiber-fill and sewn closed. The cellulosic fire retardant fabric bag is then inserted into a shell bag, wherein the shell bag that encapsulates the cellulosic fire retardant fabric is sewn closed.
  • [0032]
    The fabric of the present invention preferably loses between 0.5%-5% of its basis weight after 360 seconds, and more preferably between 1%-4%, when tested by a “sewn in” construct (see FIG. 2, 6 a). The fabric of the present invention preferably loses between 3%-15% of its basis weight after 360 seconds, and more preferably between 6%-12%, when tested by a “bag in bag” construct (see FIG. 2, 6 b).
  • [0033]
    FIG. 3 illustrates the physical test results of the aforementioned fabric, as well as test results for comparative samples illustrated in FIG. 2.
  • [0034]
    From the foregoing, it will be observed that numerous modifications and variations can be affected without departing from the true spirit and scope of the novel concept of the present invention. It is to be understood that no limitation with respect to the specific embodiments illustrated herein is intended or should be inferred. The disclosure is intended to cover, by the appended claims, all such modifications as fall within the scope of the claims.

Claims (7)

  1. 1. A flame retardant nonwoven fabric consisting essentially of a hydroentangled fiber blend consisting essentially of from 60% to less than 65% lyocell fiber and from more than 35% to 40% self-extinguishing modacrylic fiber, wherein said fabric exhibits a basis weight loss of no more than 3% after 360 seconds when tested in compliance with Technical Bulletin 604 using a bag in bag construct.
  2. 2. (canceled)
  3. 3. A flame retardant nonwoven fabric as in claim 1, wherein said fabric further comprises at least one additional layer selected from the group consisting of an additional nonwoven, a woven, a scrim, and a polymer film.
  4. 4. A flame retardant bedding article consisting essentially of a hydroentangled fiber blend consisting essentially of from 60% to less than 65% lyocell fiber and from more than 35% to 40% self-extinguishing modacrylic fiber, wherein said fabric exhibits a basis weight loss of no more than 3% after 360 seconds when tested in compliance with Technical Bulletin 604 using a bag in bag construct.
  5. 5. A flame retardant nonwoven fabric as in claim 1, wherein said fabric comprises a three-dimensionally imaged nonwoven fabric.
  6. 6. A flame retardant nonwoven fabric consisting essentially of a hydroentangled fiber blend consisting essentially of 60-65% lyocell fiber and 40-35% self-extinguishing modacrylic fiber, wherein said fabric exhibits a basis weight loss of between 0.5%-5% after 360 seconds when tested in compliance with Technical Bulletin 604 using a sewn in construct.
  7. 7. A flame retardant nonwoven fabric as in claim 6, wherein said fabric exhibits a basis weight loss of between 1%-4% after 360 seconds when tested in compliance with Technical Bulletin 604 using a sewn in construct.
US12616475 2004-02-09 2009-11-11 Flame-retardant cellulosic nonwoven fabric Abandoned US20100098919A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US54296404 true 2004-02-09 2004-02-09
US11053138 US7638446B2 (en) 2004-02-09 2005-02-08 Flame-retardant cellulosic nonwoven fabric
US12616475 US20100098919A1 (en) 2004-02-09 2009-11-11 Flame-retardant cellulosic nonwoven fabric

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12616475 US20100098919A1 (en) 2004-02-09 2009-11-11 Flame-retardant cellulosic nonwoven fabric

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20100098919A1 true true US20100098919A1 (en) 2010-04-22

Family

ID=34860354

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11053138 Active US7638446B2 (en) 2004-02-09 2005-02-08 Flame-retardant cellulosic nonwoven fabric
US12616475 Abandoned US20100098919A1 (en) 2004-02-09 2009-11-11 Flame-retardant cellulosic nonwoven fabric

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11053138 Active US7638446B2 (en) 2004-02-09 2005-02-08 Flame-retardant cellulosic nonwoven fabric

Country Status (6)

Country Link
US (2) US7638446B2 (en)
EP (1) EP1716276A2 (en)
JP (1) JP2007523269A (en)
CN (1) CN1946892A (en)
CA (1) CA2555532A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2005077035A3 (en)

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8540846B2 (en) 2009-01-28 2013-09-24 Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products Lp Belt-creped, variable local basis weight multi-ply sheet with cellulose microfiber prepared with perforated polymeric belt
CN105220245A (en) * 2015-10-16 2016-01-06 天津工业大学 Spinning solution suitable for electrospinning polytetrafluoroethylene superfine fiber film
US9765459B2 (en) 2011-06-24 2017-09-19 Fiberweb, Llc Vapor-permeable, substantially water-impermeable multilayer article
US9827696B2 (en) 2011-06-17 2017-11-28 Fiberweb, Llc Vapor-permeable, substantially water-impermeable multilayer article
US9827755B2 (en) 2011-06-23 2017-11-28 Fiberweb, Llc Vapor-permeable, substantially water-impermeable multilayer article

Families Citing this family (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7326664B2 (en) 2004-03-05 2008-02-05 Polymergroup, Inc. Structurally stable flame retardant bedding articles
US7849542B2 (en) * 2006-06-21 2010-12-14 Dreamwell, Ltd. Mattresses having flame resistant panel
US8273163B2 (en) * 2009-09-30 2012-09-25 Mann & Hummel Gmbh Flame-retardant hydrocarbon adsorption trap

Citations (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3180775A (en) * 1960-09-09 1965-04-27 Johnson & Johnson Method of making non-woven fabrics
US3485706A (en) * 1968-01-18 1969-12-23 Du Pont Textile-like patterned nonwoven fabrics and their production
US3494821A (en) * 1967-01-06 1970-02-10 Du Pont Patterned nonwoven fabric of hydraulically entangled textile fibers and reinforcing fibers
US3752733A (en) * 1969-10-29 1973-08-14 Monsanto Co Bonded nonwoven fibrous product
US4041203A (en) * 1972-09-06 1977-08-09 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Nonwoven thermoplastic fabric
US5098764A (en) * 1990-03-12 1992-03-24 Chicopee Non-woven fabric and method and apparatus for making the same
US5236769A (en) * 1991-02-25 1993-08-17 Lainiere De Picardie Fire-resistant composite lining for a garment
US5609950A (en) * 1994-11-07 1997-03-11 Lenzing Aktiengesellschaft Flame-retardant non-woven textile article and method of making
US5678379A (en) * 1995-03-15 1997-10-21 Quattrociocchi; Luciano Bottom plate anchor for building frames
US5766746A (en) * 1994-11-07 1998-06-16 Lenzing Aktiengesellschaft Flame retardant non-woven textile article
US6114017A (en) * 1997-07-23 2000-09-05 Fabbricante; Anthony S. Micro-denier nonwoven materials made using modular die units
US6153544A (en) * 1995-12-20 2000-11-28 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Flame inhibitor composition and method of application
US6191211B1 (en) * 1998-09-11 2001-02-20 The Dow Chemical Company Quick-set film-forming compositions
US20020002764A1 (en) * 2000-01-20 2002-01-10 Putnam Michael J. Durable and drapeable imaged nonwoven fabric
US20020004348A1 (en) * 2000-03-02 2002-01-10 Kelly Karl Dewayne Imaged nonwoven fire-retardant fiber blends and process for making same
US6489256B1 (en) * 1997-09-26 2002-12-03 George M. Kent Fire escape blanket and other melamine resin containing compositions and products with fire blocking properties
US6491727B1 (en) * 1999-06-09 2002-12-10 Cotton Incorporated Methods for reducing the flammability of cellulosic substrates
US6596658B1 (en) * 2000-01-24 2003-07-22 Polymer Group, Inc. Laminated fabric with fire-retardant properties
US6660503B2 (en) * 1997-12-19 2003-12-09 Novozymes A/S Modification of polysaccharides by means of a phenol oxidizing enzyme
US20040121114A1 (en) * 2002-11-29 2004-06-24 Neworld Fibers, Llc Methods, systems and compositions for fire retarding substrates
US20040132368A1 (en) * 2002-09-10 2004-07-08 Tex Tech Industries, Inc. Enchanced energy absorbing materials
US20040198125A1 (en) * 2001-09-12 2004-10-07 Mater Dennis L. Nonwoven highloft flame barrier
US6823548B2 (en) * 2002-10-01 2004-11-30 Spungold, Inc. Composite fire barrier and thermal insulation fabric for mattresses and mattress foundations
US20040242107A1 (en) * 2003-05-30 2004-12-02 Collins Loren M. Non-woven flame blocking fabric and method
US20050118919A1 (en) * 2002-10-01 2005-06-02 Eberhard Link Flame blocking liner materials
US20050170732A1 (en) * 2004-01-30 2005-08-04 Knoff Warren F. Multilayer spunlaced nonwoven fire blocking composite
US7125460B2 (en) * 2000-03-13 2006-10-24 L&P Property Management Company Fire resistant nonwoven batt having both charring and oxygen-depleting fibers
US7326664B2 (en) * 2004-03-05 2008-02-05 Polymergroup, Inc. Structurally stable flame retardant bedding articles

Patent Citations (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3180775A (en) * 1960-09-09 1965-04-27 Johnson & Johnson Method of making non-woven fabrics
US3494821A (en) * 1967-01-06 1970-02-10 Du Pont Patterned nonwoven fabric of hydraulically entangled textile fibers and reinforcing fibers
US3485706A (en) * 1968-01-18 1969-12-23 Du Pont Textile-like patterned nonwoven fabrics and their production
US3752733A (en) * 1969-10-29 1973-08-14 Monsanto Co Bonded nonwoven fibrous product
US4041203A (en) * 1972-09-06 1977-08-09 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Nonwoven thermoplastic fabric
US5098764A (en) * 1990-03-12 1992-03-24 Chicopee Non-woven fabric and method and apparatus for making the same
US5236769A (en) * 1991-02-25 1993-08-17 Lainiere De Picardie Fire-resistant composite lining for a garment
US5609950A (en) * 1994-11-07 1997-03-11 Lenzing Aktiengesellschaft Flame-retardant non-woven textile article and method of making
US5766746A (en) * 1994-11-07 1998-06-16 Lenzing Aktiengesellschaft Flame retardant non-woven textile article
US5678379A (en) * 1995-03-15 1997-10-21 Quattrociocchi; Luciano Bottom plate anchor for building frames
US6153544A (en) * 1995-12-20 2000-11-28 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Flame inhibitor composition and method of application
US6114017A (en) * 1997-07-23 2000-09-05 Fabbricante; Anthony S. Micro-denier nonwoven materials made using modular die units
US6489256B1 (en) * 1997-09-26 2002-12-03 George M. Kent Fire escape blanket and other melamine resin containing compositions and products with fire blocking properties
US6660503B2 (en) * 1997-12-19 2003-12-09 Novozymes A/S Modification of polysaccharides by means of a phenol oxidizing enzyme
US6191211B1 (en) * 1998-09-11 2001-02-20 The Dow Chemical Company Quick-set film-forming compositions
US6491727B1 (en) * 1999-06-09 2002-12-10 Cotton Incorporated Methods for reducing the flammability of cellulosic substrates
US20020002764A1 (en) * 2000-01-20 2002-01-10 Putnam Michael J. Durable and drapeable imaged nonwoven fabric
US6596658B1 (en) * 2000-01-24 2003-07-22 Polymer Group, Inc. Laminated fabric with fire-retardant properties
US20020004348A1 (en) * 2000-03-02 2002-01-10 Kelly Karl Dewayne Imaged nonwoven fire-retardant fiber blends and process for making same
US7125460B2 (en) * 2000-03-13 2006-10-24 L&P Property Management Company Fire resistant nonwoven batt having both charring and oxygen-depleting fibers
US20040198125A1 (en) * 2001-09-12 2004-10-07 Mater Dennis L. Nonwoven highloft flame barrier
US20040132368A1 (en) * 2002-09-10 2004-07-08 Tex Tech Industries, Inc. Enchanced energy absorbing materials
US6823548B2 (en) * 2002-10-01 2004-11-30 Spungold, Inc. Composite fire barrier and thermal insulation fabric for mattresses and mattress foundations
US20050118919A1 (en) * 2002-10-01 2005-06-02 Eberhard Link Flame blocking liner materials
US20040121114A1 (en) * 2002-11-29 2004-06-24 Neworld Fibers, Llc Methods, systems and compositions for fire retarding substrates
US20040242107A1 (en) * 2003-05-30 2004-12-02 Collins Loren M. Non-woven flame blocking fabric and method
US20050170732A1 (en) * 2004-01-30 2005-08-04 Knoff Warren F. Multilayer spunlaced nonwoven fire blocking composite
US7326664B2 (en) * 2004-03-05 2008-02-05 Polymergroup, Inc. Structurally stable flame retardant bedding articles

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9382665B2 (en) 2006-03-21 2016-07-05 Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products Lp Method of making a wiper/towel product with cellulosic microfibers
US9051691B2 (en) 2006-03-21 2015-06-09 Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products Lp Method of making a wiper/towel product with cellulosic microfibers
US9057158B2 (en) 2006-03-21 2015-06-16 Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products Lp Method of making a wiper/towel product with cellulosic microfibers
US8540846B2 (en) 2009-01-28 2013-09-24 Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products Lp Belt-creped, variable local basis weight multi-ply sheet with cellulose microfiber prepared with perforated polymeric belt
US8864944B2 (en) 2009-01-28 2014-10-21 Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products Lp Method of making a wiper/towel product with cellulosic microfibers
US8864945B2 (en) 2009-01-28 2014-10-21 Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products Lp Method of making a multi-ply wiper/towel product with cellulosic microfibers
US8632658B2 (en) 2009-01-28 2014-01-21 Georgia-Pacific Consumer Products Lp Multi-ply wiper/towel product with cellulosic microfibers
US9827696B2 (en) 2011-06-17 2017-11-28 Fiberweb, Llc Vapor-permeable, substantially water-impermeable multilayer article
US9827755B2 (en) 2011-06-23 2017-11-28 Fiberweb, Llc Vapor-permeable, substantially water-impermeable multilayer article
US9765459B2 (en) 2011-06-24 2017-09-19 Fiberweb, Llc Vapor-permeable, substantially water-impermeable multilayer article
CN105220245A (en) * 2015-10-16 2016-01-06 天津工业大学 Spinning solution suitable for electrospinning polytetrafluoroethylene superfine fiber film

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
CN1946892A (en) 2007-04-11 application
US20050215158A1 (en) 2005-09-29 application
JP2007523269A (en) 2007-08-16 application
WO2005077035A3 (en) 2006-09-14 application
WO2005077035A2 (en) 2005-08-25 application
CA2555532A1 (en) 2005-08-25 application
US7638446B2 (en) 2009-12-29 grant
EP1716276A2 (en) 2006-11-02 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3511740A (en) Tufted fabrics and methods of making them
US3506530A (en) Reversible non-woven needled fabrics and methods of making them
US4931355A (en) Nonwoven fibrous hydraulically entangled non-elastic coform material and method of formation thereof
US4631933A (en) Stitch-bonded thermal insulating fabrics
US6381817B1 (en) Composite nonwoven fabric
US6989194B2 (en) Flame retardant fabric
US5104703A (en) Non-woven fabric suitable for use as a cotton bale covering and process for producing said fabric
US5279878A (en) Flame barrier made of nonwoven fabric
US4891957A (en) Stitchbonded material including elastomeric nonwoven fibrous web
US4847140A (en) Nonwoven fibrous insulation material
US3935046A (en) Non-woven fabrics
US4522876A (en) Integral textile composite fabric
US5624729A (en) Increased pile density composite elastic material
US4879168A (en) Flame retarding and fire blocking fiber blends
US20040198125A1 (en) Nonwoven highloft flame barrier
US20080050565A1 (en) Fire retardant nonwoven material and process for manufacture
US20040028958A1 (en) Recyclable fire-resistant moldable batt and panels formed therefrom
US20030134094A1 (en) High bulk composite sheets and method for preparing
US5685757A (en) Fibrous spun-bonded non-woven composite
US5874159A (en) Durable spunlaced fabric structures
US5806154A (en) Method of making textile laminate
US6596658B1 (en) Laminated fabric with fire-retardant properties
US20050144728A1 (en) Flame resistant filler cloth and mattresses incorporating same
US20050170732A1 (en) Multilayer spunlaced nonwoven fire blocking composite
US20040062912A1 (en) Flame blocking liner materials