US20100005655A1 - Tubing installation tool for a peristaltic pump and methods of use - Google Patents

Tubing installation tool for a peristaltic pump and methods of use Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20100005655A1
US20100005655A1 US12/421,578 US42157809A US2010005655A1 US 20100005655 A1 US20100005655 A1 US 20100005655A1 US 42157809 A US42157809 A US 42157809A US 2010005655 A1 US2010005655 A1 US 2010005655A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
tubing
pump
installation tool
peristaltic pump
tool
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12/421,578
Inventor
John Nguyen
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Blue-White Industries Ltd
Blue White Ind Ltd
Original Assignee
Blue White Ind Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US8064208P priority Critical
Application filed by Blue White Ind Ltd filed Critical Blue White Ind Ltd
Priority to US12/421,578 priority patent/US20100005655A1/en
Assigned to Blue-White Industries, Ltd. reassignment Blue-White Industries, Ltd. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: NGUYEN, JOHN
Publication of US20100005655A1 publication Critical patent/US20100005655A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B25HAND TOOLS; PORTABLE POWER-DRIVEN TOOLS; MANIPULATORS
    • B25BTOOLS OR BENCH DEVICES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR, FOR FASTENING, CONNECTING, DISENGAGING OR HOLDING
    • B25B33/00Hand tools not covered by any other group in this subclass
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49229Prime mover or fluid pump making
    • Y10T29/49236Fluid pump or compressor making
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49229Prime mover or fluid pump making
    • Y10T29/49236Fluid pump or compressor making
    • Y10T29/49238Repairing, converting, servicing or salvaging
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49229Prime mover or fluid pump making
    • Y10T29/49236Fluid pump or compressor making
    • Y10T29/4924Scroll or peristaltic type
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/53Means to assemble or disassemble
    • Y10T29/53909Means comprising hand manipulatable tool
    • Y10T29/53943Hand gripper for direct push or pull
    • Y10T29/53952Tube sleeve or ferrule applying or removing

Abstract

A peristaltic pump is provided that can comprise a safety switch in order to control an operational parameter of the pump in response to a state of the pump. Additionally, methods are provided for maintaining and replacing tubing of the pump. A tubing installation tool is also provided for handling industrial tubing during installation or removal of the tubing from a pump.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/080,642, filed Jul. 14, 2008, the entirety of which is incorporated herein by reference.
  • BACKGROUND
  • 1. Field of the Inventions
  • The present inventions relate generally to peristaltic pumps. More particularly, the present inventions relate to a uniquely-configured peristaltic pump tubing installation tool and related methods of pump maintenance, such as replacing pump tubing.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • A peristaltic pump typically has one or more rollers that rotate and urge material through a flexible tubing, but may have other configurations. If a plurality of rollers is used, the rollers are spaced circumferentially evenly apart and are mounted on a rotating carrier that moves the rollers in a circle. A length of flexible tubing is placed between the roller(s) and a semi-circular wall. In medical applications, the tubing can be a relatively soft and pliable rubber tubing. For relatively high pressure industrial applications, however, the tubing can be exceedingly durable and rigid, albeit flexible under the high pressure of the rollers.
  • In use, the rollers rotate in a circular movement and compress the tubing against the wall, squeezing the fluid through the tubing ahead of the rollers. The rollers are configured to almost completely occlude the tubing, and operate essentially as a positive displacement pump, each passage of a roller through the semicircle pumps the entire volume of the fluid contained in the tubing segment between the rollers.
  • As a positive displacement pump, relatively high positive pressures (e.g., 125 psi) can be generated at the pump outlet. Peristaltic roller pumps are typically driven by a constant speed motor that draws fluid at a substantially constant rate. Over time, the high pressures at the pump outlet can wear on the tubing and result in the development of small pinholes in the tubing. If unnoticed, the pinholes can grow and eventually result in failure of the tubing.
  • Ruptured tubing can lead to internal leakage and the cessation of proper function. When the pump is used to move a corrosive chemical, such as chlorine, internal leakage can be particularly hazardous. As the chemical comes into contact with the pump components, the pump may become irreparably damaged. This is a serious shortcoming because the costs associated with replacement of the pump can be very substantial.
  • When tubing is replaced, the placement of the tubing underneath the rollers of the pump can be a very difficult task, especially in industrial applications. Typically, a user will attempt to replace the tubing by connecting one end of the tubing to one port of the pump and then forcibly bending the tubing around the rollers of the pump and connecting the other end of the tubing to the other port of the pump. This task is extremely difficult considering the narrow spacing between the rollers and the pump wall.
  • SUMMARY
  • In accordance with an aspect of at least one of the embodiments disclosed herein is the realization that various types of tubing can be exceedingly difficult to manually bend, manipulate, and stretch during replacement due to the rigidity and strength of the tubing. Further, in accordance with another aspect of at least one of the embodiments disclosed herein is the realization that the connectors, fittings, or ends of a tubing assembly are not large enough so as to allow an operator to grasp and manipulate the tubing assembly. Indeed, it is exceedingly difficult to use the connectors, fittings, or ends of a tubing assembly to manipulate and bend the tubing assembly or interconnect the connectors with the respective inlet and outlet ports of the pump during installation. Therefore, in accordance with an embodiment, a tubing installation tool is provided that can be securely attached to a given end of the tubing and is formed to include a user-grippable handle that allows a user to easily exert significant force upon the given end of the tubing to bend, stretch, and thread the tubing under the pump roller(s) during replacement.
  • Embodiments of the tubing installation tool can greatly facilitate installation of a tubing assembly into a peristaltic pump. The installation tool can be selectively interconnectable with an end of the tubing assembly such that the tubing assembly can be stretched and manipulated by the operator during installation. For example, a first or inlet end of the tubing assembly can be attached to an inlet port of the pump, and with the installation tool interconnected with the second or outlet end of the tubing assembly, the tubing assembly can be guided into an internal cavity of the pump head and aligned with a roller(s) of a rotor of the pump. Subsequently, the tubing assembly can be pulled and positioned into the outlet port of the pump. In some embodiments, the tubing assembly can comprise an inlet connector and an outlet connector that can engage the respective inlet and outlet ports of the pump. In such embodiments, the installation tool can be extremely useful in pulling and positioning the outlet connector into the outlet port of the pump.
  • In accordance with an embodiment, a method is provided for installing a tube for a peristaltic pump. The method can be performed for various types of peristaltic pumps having one or more rollers. The method can comprise attaching a tubing installation tool the a distal end of the tube, placing a proximal end of the tubing into a first port of the peristaltic pump; grasping the handle of the tubing installation tool to guide a portion of the tube under a roller and into a gap between the roller and a head of the pump as the roller rotates within the head; and placing the distal end of the tube into a second port of the peristaltic pump.
  • In accordance with another embodiment, the method can comprise the steps of: threadably attaching a tubing installation tool to a distal end of the tube, the tubing installation tool having a handle and an engagement section attached to the handle; placing a proximal end of the tubing into a first port of the peristaltic pump; rotating a rotor of the pump until an alignment roller of the rotor is aligned with the tube; grasping the handle of the tubing installation tool to guide a portion of the tube under the alignment roller and into a gap between the alignment roller and a head of the pump as the alignment roller rotates within the head; using the tubing installation tool to urge additional portions of the tube into the gap and underneath the alignment roller as the alignment roller rotates within the head of the pump; and manipulating the tube with the tubing installation tool to stretch the tube and place the distal end of the tube into a second port of the peristaltic pump.
  • In accordance with another embodiment, a method of installing tubing for a peristaltic pump is provided in which the method comprises: attaching a tubing installation tool to a distal end of the tubing, the tubing installation tool having a handle and an engagement section attached to the handle; placing a proximal end of the tubing into a first port of the peristaltic pump; rotating a rotor of the pump until an alignment roller of the rotor is positioned adjacent to the proximal end of the tubing; grasping the handle of the tubing installation tool to guide a portion of the tubing under the alignment roller and into a gap between the alignment roller and a head of the pump as the alignment roller rotates within the head; using the tubing installation tool to urge additional portions of the tubing into the gap underneath the alignment roller as the alignment roller rotates within the head of the pump; and manipulating the tubing with the tubing installation tool to stretch the tubing and place the distal end of the tubing into a second port of the peristaltic pump.
  • Some embodiments of the method can comprise causing the peristaltic pump to enter a maintenance mode. Further, the step of causing the peristaltic pump to enter a maintenance mode can comprise moving a head cover of the peristaltic pump into an open position. In this regard, the head cover can be removed in the open position. Furthermore, rotation of the rotor during the maintenance mode of the peristaltic pump can be slower than rotation of the rotor during a normal operation mode of the peristaltic pump. Additionally, the step of attaching the tubing installation tool to the distal end of the tubing can comprise snap-fitting the tool onto the distal end of the tubing. The step of attaching the tubing installation tool to the distal end of the tubing can also comprise threadably attaching the tool to the distal end of the tubing.
  • In yet another embodiment, a method of installing tubing for a peristaltic pump is provided in which the method comprises: attaching a tubing installation tool to a distal end of the tubing, the tubing installation tool having a handle and an engagement section attached to the handle; guiding the tubing under an alignment roller of the peristaltic pump and into a gap between the alignment roller and a head of the pump; and grasping the handle of the tubing installation tool to position the distal end of the tubing into an outlet port of the pump.
  • Some implementations of the method can provide that the step of attaching a tubing installation tool to a distal end of the tubing comprises threadably attaching the tubing installation tool to the distal end of the tubing. Further, the step of attaching the tubing installation tool to the distal end of the tubing can comprise snap-fitting the tool onto the distal end of the tubing. The method can further comprise placing a proximal end of the tubing into an inlet port of the peristaltic pump before guiding the tubing under the alignment roller. Furthermore, the tubing can be guided under the alignment roller as the alignment roller rotates within the head.
  • In addition, the method can further comprise rotating the alignment roller while urging the tubing into the gap underneath the rotating alignment roller. The tubing can also be installed while the rotor of the peristaltic pump is operating in a maintenance mode. Moreover, rotation of the rotor during the maintenance mode of the peristaltic pump can be slower than rotation of the rotor during a normal operation mode of the peristaltic pump.
  • Various embodiments of a tubing installation tool are disclosed herein for facilitating installation of a tubing assembly in a peristaltic pump. For example, in an embodiment a tubing installation tool can be provided that comprises a handle portion and an engagement portion. The engagement portion can extend from the handle portion and comprise an interior cavity that defines a longitudinal axis. The interior cavity can be attachable with a connector of the tubing assembly. The interior cavity can comprise at least one slot formed therein for engaging a protrusion of the connector. Further, the engagement portion can comprise an opening formed along a side portion thereof that extends lengthwise relative to the longitudinal axis. The slot can be exposed through the opening of the engagement portion. The engagement portion can be coupled to the connector of the tubing assembly such that a protrusion of the connector is insertable into the slot by moving the connector in a direction generally perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the engagement portion and into the opening of the engagement portion. Further, upon engagement of the protrusion with the slot and upon insertion of the connector into the cavity, the slot of the engagement portion can restrain axial movement of the connector relative to the tool.
  • In some embodiments, the engagement portion of the tool can be generally cylindrical, and the opening can extend circumferentially about less than half of the circumference of the engagement portion. Further, a width of the slot exposed through the opening can be less than an inner diameter of the slot. The protrusion of the connector can also be a generally annular ridge that defines an outer diameter that is less than the inner diameter of the slot to thereby enable the annular ridge to be receiving within the slot. The width of the slot can be less than the outer diameter of the annular ridge, and the connector can be receivable into the cavity of the tool through a snap fit.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The abovementioned and other features of the inventions disclosed herein are described below with reference to the drawings of the preferred embodiments. The illustrated embodiments are intended to illustrate, but not to limit the inventions. The drawings contain the following figures:
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a peristaltic pump, according to an embodiment of the present inventions.
  • FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view of components of a peristaltic pump, in accordance with an embodiment.
  • FIG. 3A is a perspective view of a tubing installation tool, according to an embodiment.
  • FIG. 3B is a perspective end view of the tubing installation tool of FIG. 3A being attached to a tubing assembly.
  • FIG. 3C is a perspective view of the tubing installation tool being used to install a tubing assembly in a peristaltic pump, according to an embodiment.
  • FIGS. 4A-D illustrate steps of a method of installing tubing in a peristaltic pump, according to an embodiment.
  • FIG. 5A is a perspective view of a tubing installation tool for connecting with a tubing assembly, according to another embodiment.
  • FIG. 5B is a perspective view of the tubing installation tool of FIG. 5A being used to install the tubing assembly in a peristaltic pump, according to another embodiment.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • While the present description sets forth specific details of various embodiments, it will be appreciated that the description is illustrative only and should not be construed in any way as limiting. Furthermore, various applications of such embodiments and modifications thereto, which may occur to those who are skilled in the art, are also encompassed by the general concepts described herein.
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a peristaltic pump 100, according to an embodiment of the present inventions, and FIG. 2 is an exploded perspective view of components of a peristaltic pump, in accordance with an embodiment. As illustrated, the peristaltic pump can comprise a pump housing or head 202, a rotor 204 that rotates within a cavity of the pump head, a tube or tubing assembly 206, and a pump head cover 208 that encloses the rotor 204 and the tubing assembly 206 within the cavity of the pump head 202. The pump housing or head 202 can be formed such that the tubing assembly 206 is positioned in a loop. However, in some embodiments, the pump housing or head 202 can be formed such that the tubing assembly 206 passes in a straight line through the pump housing or head 202. In other words, the pump housing or head 202 can be configured such that the inlet or outlet ports formed therein provide for a loop or straight-line arrangement of the tubing assembly 206 when installed therein.
  • The tubing assembly 206 can comprise a tube 240 having connectors 242, 244 that are disposed at the opposing ends of the tube 240. It is contemplated that the connectors 242, 244 may be modified and even omitted in some embodiments. The rotor 204 can comprise a one or more rollers that compress a tube of the tubing assembly within the pump head in order to force fluid through the tube. The rotor can rotate in a clockwise or counterclockwise direction. As will be appreciated, fluid in the tube can be urged within the tube along the direction of travel of the rollers.
  • As shown in FIG. 2, the illustrated embodiment of the peristaltic pump comprises a plurality of rollers. The rollers can comprise at least one alignment roller 220 and at least one compression roller 222. The alignment roller 220 can be formed to comprise a smaller diameter in a central portion thereof and a larger diameter along sides of the roller 220. In this manner, the roller 220 can be configured to maintain the tube within a gap between the rollers and a wall of the pump head. The unique shape of the roller 220 allows the tube to be urged toward a center of the roller by side edges thereof.
  • In some embodiments, the compression roller 222 can be configured to compress or pinch the tube 240 against an interior surface of the pump head 202 as the roller 222 rotates within the pump head 202. The compression or pinching of the tube 240 occurs along a length of the tube as the compression roller 222 rotates. The movement and compression urges material disposed within the tube 240 to move through the tube 240 in the direction of rotation of the roller 222. Thus, the compression roller 222 can serve to urge fluid or other material through the tube 240 in the direction of the roller's rotation. In use, an industrial peristaltic pump may operate such that the ends of the tube are subjected to at high pressures. Additionally, such pumps can also be employed in pumping harmful chemicals.
  • In prior art peristaltic pumps, the rotor can rotate at approximately 125 rpm (if turned “on”) or not at all (if turned “off”). Therefore, replacement of the tubing assembly of the peristaltic pump, one must thread the tubing under the rollers of the rotor. According to prior art methods, the replacement of the tubing assembly has been performed while the pump is in the “off” mode and the rotor is not moving at all, thus avoiding injury. However, due to the rigorous physical demands on such a tubing assembly, the tubing assembly is very durable and typically very difficult to manipulate or bend. Consequently, replacement of the tubing assembly is exceedingly difficult using prior art methods.
  • In accordance with at least one of the embodiments disclosed herein is the realization that the installation or threading of the tubing assembly is much easier if the pump is turned “on” and the rotor is in motion, as described further herein. Further, in accordance with at least one of the embodiments disclosed herein is the realization that it is possible to exert greater force on a tubing assembly if an end thereof can be firmly grasped during installation. Furthermore, it is contemplated that in some embodiments, tools can be used that interconnect with a free end of the tubing assembly, thus allowing an operator superior mechanical advantage in manipulating the tubing assembly during installation.
  • In some embodiments, the peristaltic pump can comprise a safety switch mechanism that causes a peristaltic pump to slow down during use for a given reason. For example, the mechanism can be configured such that removal of the head cover can cause the peristaltic pump to slow down for maintenance purposes. Thus, an operator may be able to remove the head cover and thread the tubing under slower-moving rollers of the rotor without the danger of a fast-moving rotor.
  • Further, the peristaltic pump can comprise a maintenance mode that is triggered when a head cover is removed. The head cover can comprise a first sensor component that is disposed adjacent to the pump when the head cover is properly fitted onto the pump and is disposed away from the pump when the head cover is removed from the pump. The pump can also comprise a second sensor component that is operative to detect whether the first sensor component is disposed adjacent to the pump. Further, the second sensor component can be in electrical communication with the pump in order to affect an operational or functional characteristic of the pump. In some embodiments, the second sensor component can trigger a reduction in the rotational speed of the rotor.
  • For example, the head cover can comprise a magnet and when the head cover is removed, the sensor can detect the absence of the magnet and can trigger the maintenance mode, or slowdown of the rotor. Once absence of the head cover is detected, the rotor of the peristaltic pump can slow from 125 rpm to 6 rpm. It is contemplated that the sensor can be used to trigger other changes in the operation of the pump, such as stopping operation of the pump or simply reducing the rotational speed of the rotor.
  • In addition, as shown in FIG. 2, some embodiments of the pump can be configured such that the head cover of the peristaltic pump comprises an axle support portion 230. The axle support portion can be configured to provide support for an end of an axle of the rotor. As such, and axle can be disposed through the pump head, pass through a core or central portion of the rotor, and be supported by the axle support portion of the head cover. In such an embodiment, when the head cover is mounted on the pump head, it can support an end of the rotor axle which contributes to the longevity and durability of the peristaltic pump.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 3-7B, various embodiments and uses of a tubing installation tool are illustrated. As will be appreciated, the tubing installation tool can be configured to comprise various features and components that facilitate interconnection of the tool with a connector and/or end of a tubing assembly. Further, the tool can also comprise an engagement portion that can be easily grasped by an operator such that the operator is enabled to transfer a pushing, pulling, or other manipulating force to the tubing assembly.
  • FIG. 3A is a perspective view of a tubing installation tool 300, according to an embodiment. The tool 300 can include an engagement portion 302 and a handle portion 304. FIG. 3B illustrates that in some embodiments, the engagement portion 302 can be formed to comprise a plurality of internal threads 306 along an interior portion thereof. FIG. 3B also illustrates that the threads 306 of the tool 300 can be used to threadably attach the tool 300 to an end 320 of a tube or to a connector 322 of a tubing assembly 324. In this manner, it is contemplated that the tool 300 can be securely attached to the end 320 of the tube or connector 322 of the tubing assembly 324. Thus, an operator can attach the tool 300 to the tubing assembly 324 and grasp the handle portion 304 of the tool 300 in order to guide an end 320 of the tube or tubing assembly 324 during removal or installation of the tube or tubing assembly 324 with respect to the pump.
  • As noted above, prior art methods indicate that in order to replace the tubing assembly, one must thread the tubing under the rollers of the rotor while the pump is turned “off.” This can be an extremely difficult process depending on the application of the peristaltic pump. For example, industrial tubing for a peristaltic pump is extremely durable, less pliable than other types of tubing (such as medical tubing), and quite rigid. As a result, it is very difficult to manually thread industrial tubing under the rollers of the rotor. Indeed, the tubing is difficult to physically bend or deform by hand. Therefore, replacing tubing can be an extraordinarily difficult task. However, through the use of embodiments of the tool disclosed herein, the removal or installation process of such tubing can be greatly facilitated.
  • FIG. 3C is a perspective end view of the tubing installation tool 300 shown in FIG. 3A, wherein the tool 300 has been attached to the tubing assembly 324. As illustrated, a distal end 330 of the tubing assembly 324 has been inserted or mounted into a respective lower port 332 on a peristaltic pump 334. The goal in installing the tubing assembly 324 is to attach the distal end 330 with the lower port 332 and to attach a proximal end 338 of the tubing assembly 324 with an upper port 340 of the pump 334. As discussed herein, deformation and manipulation of the tubing assembly 324 can be difficult, but is greatly facilitated with use of the tool 300.
  • FIGS. 4A-D illustrate steps of a method of installing tubing in a peristaltic pump, according to an embodiment. The method and steps illustrated and discussed herein can be used with various embodiments of the tubing installation tool, as well as with various embodiments of the pump and the tubing assembly. While variations in the configuration of these components may occur, the methods disclosed herein can be advantageously practiced to facilitate installation of the tubing assembly in a pump.
  • In contrast to other prior art apparatuses and methods, embodiments disclosed herein uniquely provide that the tubing assembly can be installed or removed while the pump is “on” and the rotor is allowed to rotate. Further, the direction of rotation of the rotor can be altered depending on whether the tubing is being installed or removed and based on the position of the inlet and outlet ports of the pump. Additionally, this unique concept of maintaining or servicing the pump while the rotor is rotating and a reduced speed in a maintenance mode can allow the operator to more easily guide the tubing into alignment with the rollers in the pump cavity.
  • As shown in FIG. 4A, the tubing installation tool 300 can first be attached to a first or proximal end 350 of tubing 352. A second or distal end 354 of the tubing 352 can be placed into a first or lower port 356 of the pump head 348. As shown from FIGS. 4A-B, with the pump “on,” an alignment or centering roller 360 can be rotated to an initial position denoted by the line 362 in FIG. 4A. It is possible that the centering roller 360 needs to be rotated from some other position (such as that denoted by the line 364) in order to be in an appropriate initial position. As will be appreciated by one skill in the art, the initial position of the centering roller 360 need not be a precise or exact rotational position, but should merely allow the centering roller 360 to be generally aligned with a portion of the tubing extending from the first port of the pump.
  • Referring now to FIG. 4B, with the centering roller 360 in the proper initial position for beginning installation of the tubing 352, a portion of the tubing 352 can be urged in to a gap 366 between the centering roller 360 and a wall of the cavity of the pump head 348. As will be described, the gap 366 moves with the rotational movement of the centering roller 360 and allows the operator to urge the tubing 352 into the pump head 348 to be actuated by the rollers of the pump. Once inserted into the gap 366, the tubing 352 can generally be retained within the gap 366 by the action of the centering roller 360. As such, the rotor can then be rotated such that the centering roller 360 moves from the initial position denoted by the line 362 to a second position denoted by the line 370.
  • During rotation of the rotor, the operator can use the tool 300 to urge additional portions of the tubing into the gap 366. The tool 300 provides the operator with significant leverage and control over the first end 350 of the tubing 352 as the operator exerts great force on the tubing 352 to push the tubing 352 into the gap 366 ahead of the rotating centering roller 360. In this manner, upon rotation of the centering roller 360, additional portions of the tubing 352 can be urged into and received within the gap 366. Additionally, a compressive roller 372 follows the centering roller 360 and begins to exert a compressive force against the tubing in order to pinch the tubing 352.
  • As shown in FIG. 4C, the centering roller 360 moves from the second position denoted by the line 370 towards a third position denoted by the line 380. As discussed above, the operator can continue to use the tool 300 to urge the tubing 352 into the gap 366 ahead of the centering roller 360. During this portion of the operation, the leverage and control provided by the tool 300 become extremely important to the operator. In particular, the operator must aggressively stretch and pull the tubing 324 in order to ensure that the tubing 324 becomes aligned with a second port 390 of the pump. As the rotor continues to rotate, the operator can urge the tubing 324 into the gap 366 and the centering roller 360 draws the tubing into alignment with the compressive roller 372 of the rotor.
  • FIG. 4D illustrates that the centering roller 360 can move from the third position denoted by the line 380 to a fourth position denoted by the line 392. Once the tubing 324 is fully received into the pump head 348, the first end 350 of the tubing assembly 352 can be placed in to the second port 390 of the pump head 348. The operator can then ensure that both ends 350, 354 of the tubing 352 are securely fastened into the ports 356, 390 of the pump head 348. Once finished, the alignment and placement of the tubing 352 can allow the operator to install a pump head cover and/or other components of the pump in order to ready the pump for full operation.
  • Accordingly, the tool 300 provides an operator with the necessary leverage to aggressively pull and bend the tubing during replacement of the tubing. These same advantages can be achieved whether installing or removing the tubing from the pump.
  • Referring now to FIG. 5A, another embodiment of a tubing installation tool 400 is shown. The tubing installation tool 400 can connect with a tubing assembly 402 and facilitate installation of the tubing assembly 402 in a pump head. The tool 400 can comprise a handle portion 410 and an engagement portion 412. The tool 400 can be configured such that the engagement portion 412 is operative to connect to one or more protrusions of a tubing assembly, such as to a connector attached to an end of the tubing assembly. For example, the engagement portion 412 fit over at least a portion of the connector in order to be attached thereto. In some embodiments, the engagement portion 412 can comprise an interior cavity 414 and a slot 416 extending at least partially along a surface 418 of the interior cavity 414.
  • In accordance with some embodiments, the slot 416 of the engagement portion 412 can be configured to receive a corresponding protrusion or ridge 440 of a connector 442 of the tubing assembly 402. The connector 442 can be a structure that attaches to an end of a tube 444 to thereby form the tubing assembly 402. The connector 442 can be formed to comprise a mounting portion 446 that attaches to a port of the pump head of the peristaltic pump. For example, the mounting portion 446 can comprise one or more flanges or collars that fit against contours of the port to secure the mounting portion 446 thereto. The protrusion or ridge 440 can extend from a portion of the connector 442. For example, as shown in FIG. 5A, the protrusion or ridge 440 can comprise an annular flange that extends about a central portion of the connector 442.
  • In use, the tool 400 can be attached to the connector 442 when the protrusion or ridge 440 is received into the slot 416. The tool 400 can then be used to pull or position the end of the tubing assembly 402, and in particular, the connector 442, in a desired location, such as the proper mounting area, such as a port, of a peristaltic pump. One of the unique advantages of this embodiment of the tool 400 is that it can be used with connectors having any of a variety of thread patterns. In other words, no particular thread type (or any thread at all) is necessary to facilitate connection between the tool 400 and a connector. A connector can simply attach to the tool 400 using the ridge-slot interaction.
  • With regard to some embodiments, the slot 416 can be configured to define an inner diameter. In some implementations, the inner diameter of the slot 416 can be slightly larger than an outer diameter of the protrusion or ridge 440 of the connector 442. Moreover, the slot 416 can have a sufficient depth relative to the surface 418 of the interior cavity 414 such that when the protrusion or ridge 440 of the connector 442 is received within the slot 416, the protrusion or ridge 440 is constrained from movement in a longitudinal direction of the connector.
  • As illustrated by the embodiment shown in FIG. 5A, the interior cavity 414 of the engagement portion 412 can define an opening or entry section 448 formed in the engagement portion 412. The opening or entry section 448 can be configured to allow at least a portion of the tool 400 to encircle or enclose at least a portion of the connector. The opening or entry section 448 can be formed in a sidewall of the engagement portion 412. For example, the opening or entry section 448 can extend along a portion of the sidewall of the engagement portion 412, as shown in FIG. 5A. The opening or entry section 448 can define a width and a height that are configured to be sufficient to allow at least a portion of the connector 442 to pass therethrough. For example, in order for the protrusion or ridge 440 of the connector 442 to be inserted or engaged within the interior cavity 414 of the tool 400, the connector 442 must pass through the opening or entry section 448, and the protrusion or ridge 440 must enter the slot 416.
  • The slot 416 exposed through the opening or entry section 448 can define a width 450. The width 450 can be defined as the distance of a segment defined between upper and lower exposed edges of the slot 416. In other words, the width 450 can be the distance measured in a plane of the opening or entry section 448 between lowermost points of the slot 416. According to at least one embodiment, the opening or entry section 448 can be formed along less than half of the circumference of the engagement portion 412 of the tool 400. Accordingly, in an embodiment such as that illustrated in FIG. 5A, wherein the engagement portion 412 of the tool 400 is generally cylindrical, the opening or entry section 448 can extend along less than half of the outer circumference of the engagement portion 412. In this manner, the size of the width 450 of the slot 416 can be less than the interior diameter of the slot 416. Further, in some embodiments, the width 450 of the slot 416 can also be less than the outer diameter of the protrusion or ridge 440 of the connector 442.
  • Therefore, in some embodiments, the width 450 can provide that the protrusion or ridge 440 of the connector 442 to be snap-fit or force-fit into the slot 416. Such an engagement can allow the tool 400 to be snapped onto the connector 442 and retain the connector 442 therewithin during use of the tool 400. After the tubing assembly has been installed or removed, the tool 400 can then be snapped off or forcibly removed from the connector 442. This advantageous feature of such embodiments allows the operator to confidently manipulate the tubing as though the tool and the tubing were a single component. In other words, the operator can confidently pull, push, and exert the necessary force to manipulate the position of the tubing without the tool accidentally disconnecting from the tubing. In some implementations, the tool 400 can be made from a generally rigid material with a degree of flexibility such that the opening or entry section 448 of the interior cavity 414 can be deflected to increase the width 450 of the slot 416 as the protrusion or ridge 440 is inserted therein.
  • FIG. 5B is a perspective view of the tubing installation tool 400 of FIG. 5A being used to install a tubing assembly 460 in a peristaltic pump head 462, according to another embodiment. Similar to the process described above with reference to FIGS. 4A-D, a distal end 464 of the tubing assembly 460 can be initially interconnected or seated into a lower port 466. Subsequently, a proximal end 468 of the tubing assembly 460 can be interconnected or seated into an upper port 470, using the tool 400 to manipulate and guide the tubing assembly 460 into properly alignment with rollers of the pump. Additionally, the connector 442 can be configured such to comprise a slot 472 that facilitates alignment with the respective port of the pump head 462.
  • Although these inventions have been disclosed in the context of certain preferred embodiments and examples, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the present inventions extend beyond the specifically disclosed embodiments to other alternative embodiments and/or uses of the inventions and obvious modifications and equivalents thereof. In addition, while several variations of the inventions have been shown and described in detail, other modifications, which are within the scope of these inventions, will be readily apparent to those of skill in the art based upon this disclosure. It is also contemplated that various combination or sub-combinations of the specific features and aspects of the embodiments may be made and still fall within the scope of the inventions. It should be understood that various features and aspects of the disclosed embodiments can be combined with or substituted for one another in order to form varying modes of the disclosed inventions. Thus, it is intended that the scope of at least some of the present inventions herein disclosed should not be limited by the particular disclosed embodiments described above.

Claims (20)

1. A method of installing tubing for a peristaltic pump, the method comprising:
attaching a tubing installation tool to a distal end of the tubing, the tubing installation tool having a handle and an engagement section attached to the handle;
placing a proximal end of the tubing into a first port of the peristaltic pump;
rotating a rotor of the pump until an alignment roller of the rotor is positioned adjacent to the proximal end of the tubing;
grasping the handle of the tubing installation tool to guide a portion of the tubing under the alignment roller and into a gap between the alignment roller and a head of the pump as the alignment roller rotates within the head;
using the tubing installation tool to urge additional portions of the tubing into the gap underneath the alignment roller as the alignment roller rotates within the head of the pump; and
manipulating the tubing with the tubing installation tool to stretch the tubing and place the distal end of the tubing into a second port of the peristaltic pump.
2. The method of claim 1, further comprising causing the peristaltic pump to enter a maintenance mode.
3. The method of claim 2, wherein the step of causing the peristaltic pump to enter a maintenance mode comprises moving a head cover of the peristaltic pump into an open position.
4. The method of claim 3, wherein the head cover is removed in the open position.
5. The method of claim 2, wherein rotation of the rotor during the maintenance mode of the peristaltic pump is slower than rotation of the rotor during a normal operation mode of the peristaltic pump.
6. The method of claim 1, wherein the step of attaching the tubing installation tool to the distal end of the tubing comprises snap-fitting the tool onto the distal end of the tubing.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein the step of attaching the tubing installation tool to the distal end of the tubing comprises threadably attaching the tool to the distal end of the tubing.
8. A method of installing tubing for a peristaltic pump, the method comprising:
attaching a tubing installation tool to a distal end of the tubing, the tubing installation tool having a handle and an engagement section attached to the handle;
guiding the tubing under an alignment roller of the peristaltic pump and into a gap between the alignment roller and a head of the pump; and
grasping the handle of the tubing installation tool to position the distal end of the tubing into an outlet port of the pump.
9. The method of claim 8, wherein the step of attaching a tubing installation tool to a distal end of the tubing comprises threadably attaching the tubing installation tool to the distal end of the tubing.
10. The method of claim 8, wherein the step of attaching the tubing installation tool to the distal end of the tubing comprises snap-fitting the tool onto the distal end of the tubing.
11. The method of claim 8, further comprising placing a proximal end of the tubing into an inlet port of the peristaltic pump before guiding the tubing under the alignment roller.
12. The method of claim 8, wherein the tubing is guided under the alignment roller as the alignment roller rotates within the head.
13. The method of claim 8, further comprising rotating the alignment roller while urging the tubing into the gap underneath the rotating alignment roller.
14. The method of claim 8, wherein the tubing is installed while the rotor of the peristaltic pump is operating in a maintenance mode.
15. The method of claim 14, wherein rotation of the rotor during the maintenance mode of the peristaltic pump is slower than rotation of the rotor during a normal operation mode of the peristaltic pump.
16. A tubing installation tool for facilitating installation of a tubing assembly in a peristaltic pump, the tool comprising:
a handle portion; and
an engagement portion extending from the handle portion, the engagement portion comprising an interior cavity having a longitudinal axis, the interior cavity being attachable with a connector of the tubing assembly, the interior cavity comprising at least one slot formed therein for engaging a protrusion of the connector, the engagement portion further comprising an opening formed along a side portion thereof and extending lengthwise relative to the longitudinal axis, the slot being exposed through the opening of the engagement portion,
wherein the engagement portion is configured to be coupled to the connector of the tubing assembly such that a protrusion of the connector is insertable into the slot by moving the connector in a direction generally perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the engagement portion and into the opening of the engagement portion,
wherein upon engagement of the protrusion with the slot and upon insertion of the connector into the cavity, the slot of the engagement portion restrains axial movement of the connector relative to the tool.
17. The tubing installation tool of claim 16, wherein the engagement portion is generally cylindrical, and the opening extends circumferentially about less than half of the circumference of the engagement portion.
18. The tubing installation tool of claim 17, wherein a width of the slot exposed through the opening is less than an inner diameter of the slot.
19. The tubing installation tool of claim 18, wherein the protrusion of the connector is a generally annular ridge defining an outer diameter that is less than the inner diameter of the slot to thereby enable the annular ridge to be receiving within the slot.
20. The tubing installation tool of claim 19, wherein the width of the slot is less than the outer diameter of the annular ridge, the connector being receivable into the cavity of the tool through a snap fit.
US12/421,578 2008-07-14 2009-04-09 Tubing installation tool for a peristaltic pump and methods of use Abandoned US20100005655A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US8064208P true 2008-07-14 2008-07-14
US12/421,578 US20100005655A1 (en) 2008-07-14 2009-04-09 Tubing installation tool for a peristaltic pump and methods of use

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/421,578 US20100005655A1 (en) 2008-07-14 2009-04-09 Tubing installation tool for a peristaltic pump and methods of use

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20100005655A1 true US20100005655A1 (en) 2010-01-14

Family

ID=41503815

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/400,637 Active 2031-11-20 US8418364B2 (en) 2008-07-14 2009-03-09 Method of extending tubing life of a peristaltic pump
US12/400,639 Active 2030-11-07 US8215931B2 (en) 2008-07-14 2009-03-09 Safety switch on a peristaltic pump
US12/421,578 Abandoned US20100005655A1 (en) 2008-07-14 2009-04-09 Tubing installation tool for a peristaltic pump and methods of use

Family Applications Before (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/400,637 Active 2031-11-20 US8418364B2 (en) 2008-07-14 2009-03-09 Method of extending tubing life of a peristaltic pump
US12/400,639 Active 2030-11-07 US8215931B2 (en) 2008-07-14 2009-03-09 Safety switch on a peristaltic pump

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (3) US8418364B2 (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2012044837A3 (en) * 2010-10-01 2012-06-14 Zevex, Inc. Method for improving accuracy in a peristaltic pump system based on tubing material properties

Families Citing this family (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
USD745963S1 (en) * 2010-05-03 2015-12-22 Medical Vision Ab Cassette for a peristaltic pump
USD721801S1 (en) * 2010-05-03 2015-01-27 Medical Vision Ab Cassette for a peristaltic pump
CN102743803B (en) * 2012-07-25 2015-01-28 重庆山外山科技有限公司 Peristaltic pump control system for purifying blood and method thereof
CA2791344C (en) 2012-09-26 2019-07-16 Capmatic Ltee Peristaltic pump
CN104718483B (en) 2012-10-04 2018-01-23 西澳大利亚大学 For characterizing the method and system of biological tissue
GB2538556B (en) * 2015-05-22 2017-09-13 Verder Ltd Peristaltic pump
US10578097B2 (en) 2016-12-15 2020-03-03 Perkinelmer Health Sciences, Inc. Peristaltic pumps and related methods
WO2019106185A1 (en) * 2017-12-01 2019-06-06 Christophe Blanc Peristaltic pump cassette

Citations (39)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2123781A (en) * 1936-06-16 1938-07-12 Charles J Huber Pump
US4231725A (en) * 1978-10-16 1980-11-04 Cole-Parmer Instrument Company Peristaltic pump
US4307635A (en) * 1979-12-11 1981-12-29 Genova Ralph F Locking plier and adapter
US4341002A (en) * 1980-11-28 1982-07-27 Bio-Energy Systems, Inc. Tool for flexible tube installation
US4518327A (en) * 1981-11-25 1985-05-21 Hackman Charles Henry Rotary peristaltic pump
US4527323A (en) * 1983-10-11 1985-07-09 Cole-Parmer Instrument Company Tubing loading key
US4558996A (en) * 1983-06-30 1985-12-17 Organon Teknika Corporation Easy load peristaltic pump
US4673334A (en) * 1984-05-25 1987-06-16 Isco, Inc. Peristaltic pump
US4925376A (en) * 1987-06-26 1990-05-15 Tek-Aids, Inc. Peristaltic pump with tube holding mechanism
US5190448A (en) * 1991-07-12 1993-03-02 Sherwood Medical Company Tube placement and retention member
US5201711A (en) * 1987-09-30 1993-04-13 Sherwood Medical Company Safety interlock system for medical fluid pumps
US5267956A (en) * 1992-02-05 1993-12-07 Alcon Surgical, Inc. Surgical cassette
US5356267A (en) * 1992-10-27 1994-10-18 Beta Technology, Inc. Peristaltic pump with removable collapsing means and method of assembly
US5370510A (en) * 1992-06-12 1994-12-06 Bee Chemical Company Liquid metering system
US5375309A (en) * 1993-07-19 1994-12-27 Trebor Incorporated Hand held tool for inserting a cylindrical insert in an open end of a tube
US5387088A (en) * 1994-01-18 1995-02-07 Haemonetics Corporation Peristaltic pump tube loading assembly
US5388972A (en) * 1994-03-09 1995-02-14 Medical Laboratory Automation, Inc. Peristaltic pump with removable tubing of precise length
US5484239A (en) * 1993-12-22 1996-01-16 Baxter International Inc. Peristaltic pump and valve assembly for fluid processing systems
US5588815A (en) * 1995-11-15 1996-12-31 Alcon Laboratories, Inc. Surgical cassette loading and unloading system
US5871341A (en) * 1996-12-31 1999-02-16 Melody; Brian J. Peristaltic pump driven pump roller apparatus and methodology
US5915932A (en) * 1990-02-02 1999-06-29 Isco, Inc. Peristaltic pump having a roller support
US5991997A (en) * 1998-02-06 1999-11-30 Schley; Paul E. Hose pliers & method
US6203295B1 (en) * 1996-07-11 2001-03-20 Seiko Epson Corporation Ink-jet recording device and pump used therein
US6213739B1 (en) * 1997-01-17 2001-04-10 Niagara Pump Corporation Linear peristaltic pump
US6523862B1 (en) * 2001-03-14 2003-02-25 James MacDuff Tubing connector with integrated crimp ring and reaming tool for use therewith
US6658711B1 (en) * 2002-02-12 2003-12-09 Joel Kent Benson Hose fitting insertion apparatus
US6695807B2 (en) * 2002-01-18 2004-02-24 Dsu Medical, Inc. Blood flow reversing system
US6731216B2 (en) * 2002-05-20 2004-05-04 B. Braun Medical, Inc. Proper tubing installation testing method and apparatus for a peristaltic pump
US20040179907A1 (en) * 2003-03-12 2004-09-16 Macduff James Reaming tool for flexible tubing
US20050085699A1 (en) * 2000-10-17 2005-04-21 Sol Weiss Attachment devices for surgical instruments
US20060251532A1 (en) * 2003-03-18 2006-11-09 Junya Fujii Roller pump
US20070140880A1 (en) * 2005-12-20 2007-06-21 G.H. Stenner & Co., Inc. Peristaltic pumping mechanism having a removable cover and replaceable tubing, rollers and pumping mechanism
US7275293B2 (en) * 2003-08-08 2007-10-02 S.U.R. & R. Auto Parts Inc. Fuel line assembly tool
US7300264B2 (en) * 2003-09-08 2007-11-27 Hewlett-Packard Development, L.P. Peristaltic pump
US7347457B2 (en) * 2004-02-10 2008-03-25 Schieffer Gmbh & Co. Hose connection piece, a hose coupling and a hose fitting having a hose connection piece
US20080101969A1 (en) * 2005-08-26 2008-05-01 Ahmad-Maher Moubayed Rotary axial peristaltic pumps and related methods
US7434312B2 (en) * 2001-04-13 2008-10-14 Medtronic, Inc. Method for manufacturing an implantable drug delivery device with peristaltic pump having a retractable roller
US20090053084A1 (en) * 2007-08-21 2009-02-26 Klein Jeffrey A Roller pump and peristaltic tubing with atrium
US8091193B1 (en) * 2008-03-06 2012-01-10 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Tool for inserting fuel tubes

Family Cites Families (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4576553A (en) * 1980-12-22 1986-03-18 Black & Decker Inc. Painting applicator with remote supply
DE3827405A1 (en) * 1988-08-12 1990-02-15 Manfred Streicher peristaltic pump
WO2006119557A1 (en) * 2005-05-09 2006-11-16 Holden Phaco Pty Ltd Aspiration tube vacuum sensor, connector and connector assembly

Patent Citations (39)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2123781A (en) * 1936-06-16 1938-07-12 Charles J Huber Pump
US4231725A (en) * 1978-10-16 1980-11-04 Cole-Parmer Instrument Company Peristaltic pump
US4307635A (en) * 1979-12-11 1981-12-29 Genova Ralph F Locking plier and adapter
US4341002A (en) * 1980-11-28 1982-07-27 Bio-Energy Systems, Inc. Tool for flexible tube installation
US4518327A (en) * 1981-11-25 1985-05-21 Hackman Charles Henry Rotary peristaltic pump
US4558996A (en) * 1983-06-30 1985-12-17 Organon Teknika Corporation Easy load peristaltic pump
US4527323A (en) * 1983-10-11 1985-07-09 Cole-Parmer Instrument Company Tubing loading key
US4673334A (en) * 1984-05-25 1987-06-16 Isco, Inc. Peristaltic pump
US4925376A (en) * 1987-06-26 1990-05-15 Tek-Aids, Inc. Peristaltic pump with tube holding mechanism
US5201711A (en) * 1987-09-30 1993-04-13 Sherwood Medical Company Safety interlock system for medical fluid pumps
US5915932A (en) * 1990-02-02 1999-06-29 Isco, Inc. Peristaltic pump having a roller support
US5190448A (en) * 1991-07-12 1993-03-02 Sherwood Medical Company Tube placement and retention member
US5267956A (en) * 1992-02-05 1993-12-07 Alcon Surgical, Inc. Surgical cassette
US5370510A (en) * 1992-06-12 1994-12-06 Bee Chemical Company Liquid metering system
US5356267A (en) * 1992-10-27 1994-10-18 Beta Technology, Inc. Peristaltic pump with removable collapsing means and method of assembly
US5375309A (en) * 1993-07-19 1994-12-27 Trebor Incorporated Hand held tool for inserting a cylindrical insert in an open end of a tube
US5484239A (en) * 1993-12-22 1996-01-16 Baxter International Inc. Peristaltic pump and valve assembly for fluid processing systems
US5387088A (en) * 1994-01-18 1995-02-07 Haemonetics Corporation Peristaltic pump tube loading assembly
US5388972A (en) * 1994-03-09 1995-02-14 Medical Laboratory Automation, Inc. Peristaltic pump with removable tubing of precise length
US5588815A (en) * 1995-11-15 1996-12-31 Alcon Laboratories, Inc. Surgical cassette loading and unloading system
US6203295B1 (en) * 1996-07-11 2001-03-20 Seiko Epson Corporation Ink-jet recording device and pump used therein
US5871341A (en) * 1996-12-31 1999-02-16 Melody; Brian J. Peristaltic pump driven pump roller apparatus and methodology
US6213739B1 (en) * 1997-01-17 2001-04-10 Niagara Pump Corporation Linear peristaltic pump
US5991997A (en) * 1998-02-06 1999-11-30 Schley; Paul E. Hose pliers & method
US20050085699A1 (en) * 2000-10-17 2005-04-21 Sol Weiss Attachment devices for surgical instruments
US6523862B1 (en) * 2001-03-14 2003-02-25 James MacDuff Tubing connector with integrated crimp ring and reaming tool for use therewith
US7434312B2 (en) * 2001-04-13 2008-10-14 Medtronic, Inc. Method for manufacturing an implantable drug delivery device with peristaltic pump having a retractable roller
US6695807B2 (en) * 2002-01-18 2004-02-24 Dsu Medical, Inc. Blood flow reversing system
US6658711B1 (en) * 2002-02-12 2003-12-09 Joel Kent Benson Hose fitting insertion apparatus
US6731216B2 (en) * 2002-05-20 2004-05-04 B. Braun Medical, Inc. Proper tubing installation testing method and apparatus for a peristaltic pump
US20040179907A1 (en) * 2003-03-12 2004-09-16 Macduff James Reaming tool for flexible tubing
US20060251532A1 (en) * 2003-03-18 2006-11-09 Junya Fujii Roller pump
US7275293B2 (en) * 2003-08-08 2007-10-02 S.U.R. & R. Auto Parts Inc. Fuel line assembly tool
US7300264B2 (en) * 2003-09-08 2007-11-27 Hewlett-Packard Development, L.P. Peristaltic pump
US7347457B2 (en) * 2004-02-10 2008-03-25 Schieffer Gmbh & Co. Hose connection piece, a hose coupling and a hose fitting having a hose connection piece
US20080101969A1 (en) * 2005-08-26 2008-05-01 Ahmad-Maher Moubayed Rotary axial peristaltic pumps and related methods
US20070140880A1 (en) * 2005-12-20 2007-06-21 G.H. Stenner & Co., Inc. Peristaltic pumping mechanism having a removable cover and replaceable tubing, rollers and pumping mechanism
US20090053084A1 (en) * 2007-08-21 2009-02-26 Klein Jeffrey A Roller pump and peristaltic tubing with atrium
US8091193B1 (en) * 2008-03-06 2012-01-10 Honda Motor Co., Ltd. Tool for inserting fuel tubes

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
WO2012044837A3 (en) * 2010-10-01 2012-06-14 Zevex, Inc. Method for improving accuracy in a peristaltic pump system based on tubing material properties
CN103269731A (en) * 2010-10-01 2013-08-28 泽维克斯公司 Method for improving accuracy in a peristaltic pump system based on tubing material properties
US8539672B2 (en) 2010-10-01 2013-09-24 Zevex, Inc. Method for improving accuracy in a peristaltic pump system based on tubing material properties
AU2011308782B2 (en) * 2010-10-01 2014-11-06 Zevex, Inc. Method for improving accuracy in a peristaltic pump system based on tubing material properties

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US8418364B2 (en) 2013-04-16
US8215931B2 (en) 2012-07-10
US20100008755A1 (en) 2010-01-14
US20100008793A1 (en) 2010-01-14

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US10184615B2 (en) Peristaltic infusion pump with locking mechanism
US8986252B2 (en) Cassettes and methods of using same
AU2011202262B2 (en) Roller pump
US6494693B1 (en) Peristatic pump
JP4040469B2 (en) Actuating mechanism and pressurizing device for fluid displacement
EP1092907B1 (en) Swivel coupling for a hose
US4178138A (en) Cartridge for peristaltic pump
US8062008B2 (en) Peristaltic pump and removable cassette therefor
DE10349222B4 (en) pumping device
AU2003257919B2 (en) Valves
US5433588A (en) Peristaltic pump with one piece tubing insert and one piece cover
US5380173A (en) Peristaltic pump
JP5214617B2 (en) Tube connector
US5110270A (en) Peristaltic pump with spring means to urge slide members and attached rollers radially outward on a rotor
TWI519294B (en) Feeding set for a peristaltic pump system
US8377000B2 (en) Enteral feeding apparatus having a feeding set
JP5663145B2 (en) Pipe joint improvement technology
US4473342A (en) Peristaltic pumping device
US9816520B2 (en) Pump fittings and methods for their manufacture
JP4394706B2 (en) Cassette clamp mechanism
US8807517B2 (en) Rotary pinch valve
JP2005351131A (en) Fluid transport device
US5630711A (en) Peristaltic pump having a loop-shaped tube path
US20050283112A1 (en) Breast pump
US10443592B2 (en) Roller positioning system

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: BLUE-WHITE INDUSTRIES, LTD., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:NGUYEN, JOHN;REEL/FRAME:022608/0821

Effective date: 20090417

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION