US20090313873A1 - Auxiliary grips for firearms - Google Patents

Auxiliary grips for firearms Download PDF

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Publication number
US20090313873A1
US20090313873A1 US12/138,262 US13826208A US2009313873A1 US 20090313873 A1 US20090313873 A1 US 20090313873A1 US 13826208 A US13826208 A US 13826208A US 2009313873 A1 US2009313873 A1 US 2009313873A1
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Prior art keywords
grip
axis
locking
firearm
operative positions
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US12/138,262
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Marc Roth
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Heckler und Koch GmbH
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Heckler und Koch GmbH
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Priority to DE102008007341 priority Critical
Priority to DE102008007341A priority patent/DE102008007341A1/en
Priority to US3832008P priority
Application filed by Heckler und Koch GmbH filed Critical Heckler und Koch GmbH
Priority to US12/138,262 priority patent/US20090313873A1/en
Assigned to HECKLER & KOCH GMBH reassignment HECKLER & KOCH GMBH ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: ROTH, MARC
Publication of US20090313873A1 publication Critical patent/US20090313873A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41CSMALLARMS, e.g. PISTOLS, RIFLES; ACCESSORIES THEREFOR
    • F41C23/00Butts; Butt plates; Stocks
    • F41C23/16Forestocks; Handgrips; Hand guards

Abstract

Disclosed are firearms and grips for firearms. An example grip includes an ergonomic grip element with a plurality of operative positions that overhang from the firearm. The example grip element is rotatable about an axis of rotation, which is substantially perpendicular to the axis of the bore of the firearm, to one of the plurality of operative positions.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This patent claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/038,320, filed Mar. 20, 2008, and also to German Patent Application 10 2008 007 341.5, filed on Feb. 4, 2008, both of which are hereby incorporated herein by reference in their entireties.
  • FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE
  • This disclosure relates generally to firearms, and, more particularly, to auxiliary grips for handheld firearms.
  • BACKGROUND
  • With rapid rate firearms, a marksman typically grasps a hand guard running in a longitudinal direction of a weapon scope with a hand that is not actuating the trigger. However, grasping such a hand guard typically does not provide enough support to reliably align the weapon and/or pull the weapon onto the shoulder of the marksman. Auxiliary grips are frequently fastened in the front region of the weapon—often in the area of the hand guard—to be grasped by the hand that is not actuating the trigger to improve a grasping and holding of the weapon with both hands. Auxiliary grips for firearms, in particular for shoulder-supported assault rifles, sub-machine guns and machine guns, have been known for decades.
  • Such auxiliary grips are often assembled onto a firearm via dovetail profiles or prism rails fastened or constructed on the weapon. A foot fitting such rails is slipped onto the weapon and mounted or clamped by means of, for example, screws, a pin or a lever.
  • Typically military weapons use Picatinny rails as profile rails. For the fastening of auxiliary elements on the Picatinny rails, the Picatinny rails typically have transverse slots exposed to the outside. Picatinny rails can be removably arranged on the top side, the lateral sides and/or the underside of a weapon.
  • Known grips have been described in various publications. For example, WO 2004/068057 and WO 2005/019762 A2 describe pivotable front grips having round cross-sections arranged on a hand guard of a rapid-fire weapon. These front grips can be swiveled around the axis of the bore of the weapon or around the hand guard; however also around their own longitudinal axis.
  • Additionally a rigid front grip for a hand firearm is known from U.S. Pat. No. 6,487,807 B1, said grip having a round cross-section and being convertible into a tripod and being altogether removable. In its operating position as a tripod, three legs are swiveled downward via a hinge mechanism. As a result, the marksman can prop the firearm on the tripod for sighting and—via a movable ball and socket joint—align said firearm by means of turning and/or swiveling.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 5,946,842 shows a grip coupled to a weapon at an oblong recess. The grip can be swiveled around a pivot/hinge pin running diagonally to the axis of the bore; to be precise the grip can be swiveled between its resting position—resting on the weapon (i.e., in the oblong recess)—and its operative position—overhanging almost perpendicular from the weapon.
  • U.S. Pat. No. 2,826,848 shows a hand firearm with a front grip that is arranged on the repeater/repeating shaft and can be swiveled around the axis of the bore. This grip includes an ergonomically designed grip element, which is slipped on a sleeve.
  • Finally U.S. Pat. No. 5,417,002 shows a hand firearm with a removable front grip that is fastened on the front shaft, fixed there via an unlockable/lockable mortise and tenon joint with the help of a push button spring mechanism and can be swiveled in different positions around the hand guard or around the axis of the bore.
  • Such known auxiliary grips have many advantages; however such auxiliary grips also have the disadvantage that they are awkward and uncomfortable in operation. Firing with known auxiliary grips is strenuous and can lead to cramps and muscle irritations. This can be unpleasant for the user, in particular when patrolling for hours with a weapon pointed down, but also after the long impact of the weapon when positioned for readiness for battle.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a side view of a portion of an example weapon with an example auxiliary grip mounted on a Picatinny rail.
  • FIG. 2 is an enlarged view of the encircled D region of FIG. 1, showing the example auxiliary grip of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a portion of the example weapon of FIG. 1 from the rear right with the example auxiliary grip aligned with the barrel.
  • FIG. 4 is a view similar to FIG. 3 with the example auxiliary grip twisted with respect to the barrel.
  • FIG. 5 is an enlarged view of a portion of the example auxiliary grip of FIG. 1 showing an example catch/lock in a released state.
  • FIG. 5 a is a partial cross-sectional view of the example auxiliary grip shown in FIG. 5.
  • FIG. 5 b is a schematic representation of an alternative example tool interface of the example auxiliary grip shown in FIGS. 5 and 5 a;
  • FIG. 6 is a perspective view from beneath of the example auxiliary grip of FIG. 1 separated from an example connection element.
  • FIG. 7 is perspective view of the example connection element of FIG. 6.
  • FIG. 8 a shows an example auxiliary grip with an alternative locking mechanism.
  • FIG. 8 b shows an example auxiliary grip with an additional alternative locking mechanism.
  • FIG. 8 c is a cross-sectional view of the example auxiliary grip of FIG. 8 b taken along the C-C line of FIG. 8 b.
  • FIG. 9 is yet another illustration of an example auxiliary grip with an yet another additional alternative locking mechanism.
  • FIG. 10 a is still another illustration of an example auxiliary grip with another additional alternative locking mechanism.
  • FIG. 10 b is a cross-sectional view of the example auxiliary grip of FIG. 10 a taken along the D-D line of FIG. 10 a.
  • FIG. 11 a is still another illustration of an example auxiliary grip with an additional alternative locking mechanism.
  • FIG. 11 b is a cross-sectional view of the example auxiliary grip of FIG. 11 a taken along the E-E line of FIG. 11 a.
  • FIG. 12 is a schematic cross-sectional representation of an example auxiliary grip with an example ball and socket joint fastened to a Picatinny rail.
  • FIG. 13 a shows a further example auxiliary grip with a further example alternative ball and socket joint arrangement.
  • FIG. 13 b is a cross-sectional view the example auxiliary grip of FIG. 13 a.
  • FIG. 14 is a cross-sectional view of still another alternative example auxiliary grip with yet another alternative example ball and socket joint arrangement.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Throughout this description, all positional terms such as, for example “top,” “right”, “back” or “in front” are made in the context of a firearm held in a normal firing and shooting position with a horizontal barrel. The reference point is always the position of the weapon during the process of shooting, at which “in front” refers to the “shooting direction.”
  • This description relates to auxiliary grips for hand firearms, also called “storm grips” that have an ergonomic grip element. The grip overhangs at about a right angle from the barrel of the hand firearm when in an operative position.
  • The term “ergonomic grip element” describes a grip element type that includes an outer contour that is, or may be adapted to the inner contour of a hand in a gripping position. Accordingly, the cross-section of such a grip element is not round, but rather another non-circular shape such as, for example, oval, rectangular, rectangularly rounded off, polygonal or the like. This shape improves the hold of the hand on the grip. The term “ergonomic grip element” may also refer to grips that are slightly inclined to the front or the rear when in an operative position relative to a vertical axis to the axis of the bore defined through the weapon scope. The cross-sectional contour of these example grips may be symmetrical—e.g. in the case of rectangular or oval cross-sectional profiles; however, the cross-sectional contour may also be asymmetrical—e.g. in the case of one-sided flat surfaces or profiles for adaptation to the inside contour of the clutching hand of the marksman.
  • FIG. 1 is a side view of a portion of an example weapon with an example auxiliary grip 1 mounted on a Picatinny rail 3. The example grip 1 shown in FIG. 1 is an ergonomic auxiliary grip 1 shown from a lateral view. The Picatinny rail 3 may be, for example, a MIL-STD-1913 “Picatinny,” which is mounted to the underside of a hand guard 5 of a weapon 7. The auxiliary grip 1 overhangs downward from the weapon 7 and is slightly inclined to the rear to an axis of rotation or adjustment 26.
  • The hand guard 5 is coupled around the barrel 6 of the weapon 7 and includes, in this example, two lateral Picatinny rails 19 a and 19 b (rail 19 b is on an opposite side of the weapon 7 from rail 19 a), and one upper Picatinny rail 19 c on a topside of the weapon 7. The lower Picatinny rail 3 extends parallel to the axis of a bore 8 of the barrel 6 from a magazine compartment 9 to an end of the hand guard 5. The upper Picatinny rail 19 c bears a sighting device 21.
  • The example weapon 7 also includes a trigger 13 arranged within a trigger guard 11. Further, there is a rear grip 15 also included.
  • FIG. 2 is an enlarged view of the encircled D region of FIG. 1, showing the example auxiliary grip 1 of FIG. 1. The example auxiliary grip 1 includes an outer grip element 23, which forms the grip base, an adjustment device 25 and a base plate 27. The example adjustment device 25 is used to adjust or turn the grip element 23 around the axis of adjustment 26 and/or about a longitudinal axis of the grip 26 a (i.e., another example axis of rotation). In this example, the longitudinal axis of the grip 26 a is inclined by 15° to the axis of adjustment 26. In other examples, the inclination of the longitudinal axis of the grip 26 a to the axis of adjustment 26 range from 5-30°, preferably 10-20°.
  • FIGS. 3 and 4 illustrate movement of the example grip 1 about the axis of adjustment 26. In FIG. 3, the grip 1 is aligned with the barrel 6 so that an axis transverse to the axis of adjustment 26 is parallel to the axis of the bore 8. In FIG. 4, the grip 1 is turned about the axis of adjustment and the transverse axis of the grip 1 is no longer parallel to the axis of the bore 8.
  • The example grip element 23 includes several interchangeable grip panel elements: a grip back strap 31, a grip front 33 and two grip flank elements 35. The grip panels 31, 33 and 35 together form an asymmetrical oval-like ergonomic grip profile. The grip element 23 and/or the grip panel elements 31, 33 and 35 may be made of a dimensionally stable, fiber-reinforced synthetic material, but may also be produced of other suitable materials such as, for example, a light metal.
  • The grip panel elements 31, 33 and 35 are interchangeable with other panel parts of alternative sizes and/or shapes, so that the grip profile of the grip element 23 can be adapted to the anatomy of the hand of the respective marksman and/or to the use of the weapon 7. In addition, the grip panel elements 31, 33 and 35 may be slipped on the auxiliary grip 1 from below or laterally such as, for example in grooves or guide rails (not shown). The grip panel elements 31, 33 and 35 may also be fixed via one or more (not shown) spring-loaded pin(s), snap-on connections or any other suitable mechanical or chemical fasteners.
  • In addition, in other examples, instead of the multiple interchangeable grip panel elements, a one-piece grip element, for example constructed as a U-shaped “receiver cover” (not shown) may be used. Such a grip element includes two rockers that correspond to the above described grip flank elements 35, and a yoke element coupling the rockers. The yoke element is able to form the grip back strap 31 and/or the grip front 33. The example grip element 23 may also alternatively be constructed as a one-piece, sleeve-like component without grip panel elements, similar to a tool grip.
  • In the illustrated example, there is a two-part structure shown between the grip element 23 and the adjustment device 25. Alternatively, the adjustment device 25 may also be molded in one piece on the grip element 23.
  • The example adjustment device 25 includes a connection element designed as a counter holder or adapter 43 (FIGS. 5, 5 a, 5 b and 6). The connection element 43 includes s on its topside 43 a an interface to the weapon 7 and on its underside 43 b, the connection element 43 includes an annular toothed locking plate 45 a as the upper part of the rotating adjustment device 25. A complementary toothed counter-locking plate 45 b of the adjustment device 25 is coupled (e.g., firmly fixed) to the grip element 23, for example via an adhesive, welded or other type of suitable coupling. However, in other examples, the complementary toothed counter-locking plate 45 may also be integrally constructed with the grip element 23. The locking plates 45 a, 45 b form the interface between the adapter 43 and the grip element 23. In addition, the locking plates 45 a, 45 b may be made of metal, plastic and/or other suitable materials.
  • For the fastening the example auxiliary grip 1 to the Picatinny rail 3, the adapter 43 includes a shoe-like formation 36 (FIG. 7) complementary to one of the rails of the Picatinny rail 3. The formation 36 is formed on the topside 43 a of the adapter 43 pointing to the Picatinny rail 3. The formation includes two lateral engagement rockers 37 for coupling to corresponding flanks 42 of the Picatinny rail 3. The adapter 43 is slipped from the front or from the rear onto the Picatinny rail 3. The engagement rockers 37 fit with their inner surfaces on the corresponding dovetail-like outer areas of the flanks 42 of the Picatinny rail 3.
  • In the illustrated example, the example adapter 43 is coupled to the Picatinny rail 3 and, thus, to the weapon 3 via one or more screws 39. The screws 39 secure the adapter 43 at a right angle to the axis of the bore 8 (i.e., the fasteners run at a right able to the axis of the bore). In other examples, any suitable fastening means (at any suitable angle) may be used in addition or as an alternative to the screws 39.
  • The screws 39 can be clamped, locked, tensioned via a head formed as a dial adjustment (not shown) or with a tool, for example an Allen wrench or screwdriver, or also with a spring-loaded bolt and/or with some other quick clamp. The screws 39 may also be loosened to enable the adapter 43 (and the grip elements 23) to be shifted slightly to the front or to the rear on the Picatinny rail 3. In addition, the auxiliary grip 23 and adapter 43 are removed from the Picatinny rail 3 by means of loosening the screws 39 until the adapter 43 can clear the Picatinny rail 3. In an alternative example (not shown), the adapter 43 serving as a connection element to the weapon 7 may include a projecting part (not shown), for example a cam-like locking pin, arranged between the engagement rockers 37. The locking pin engages in a corresponding receiving opening (not shown) in the Picatinny rail 3 and additional support to positively fix the adapter 43 in the direction of the axis of the bore 8. The projecting part may also be constructed as a spring-loaded bolt. The receiving opening may be a borehole or also one of the transverse slots 41 (running between the projection parts or flanks 42 at regular intervals) of the Picatinny rail 3.
  • In yet another alternative example (not shown), a quick clamp with movable or partially movable profile elements, e.g. diagonally adjustable engagement rockers like the illustrated rockers 37 may also be used.
  • For the adjustment of the example grip element 23 to different operative positions the adjustment device 25 includes, on the adapter underside 43 b, the annular toothed locking plate 45 a and, on the topside of the grip element 23, the complementary toothed counter-locking plate 45 b. The grip element 23 can, thus, be turned in different operative positions and can be detachably locked in a respective operative position. In FIGS. 2, 5 and 6, the two complementary locking/counter-locking plates 45 a, 45 b are shown locked (FIG. 2), released (FIG. 5) or separated from each other (FIG. 6). The various operative positions of the example grip element 23 are defined by the rotational angular position of the grip 23 and the tooth intervals around the axis of adjustment 26. Locking plate 45 a and counter-locking plate 45 b interlock with their tooth profiles when they are braced against each other via a tensioning device designed here as a screw 49 (though any suitable fastener may be used as well). The minimum angle of rotation by which the two adjacent operative positions differ corresponds to exactly one tooth interval.
  • As shown more precisely in FIGS. 5, 5 a and 5 b, the adjustment and mutual locking of the locking plates 45 a, b takes place by means of the loosening/tightening of the screw 49 via a tool (e.g. Allen wrench 48). The screw 49 protrudes with a thread segment 49 a from below through a recess in the counter-locking plate 45 b into a corresponding thread in the locking plate 45 a and counter-locking plate 45 b on the adapter 43. For loosening, the screw 49 is unscrewed so far that the teeth of the locking plate 45 a and of the counter-locking plate 45 b disengage. The grip element 23 may then be twisted or rotated around the axis of adjustment 26 to a desired position and fixed again by means of tightening the screw 49. When tightened, the screw head 49 b of the screw 49 presses the teeth of the counter-locking plate 45 b. In other words, the screw 49 engages with its head 49 b on a surface of the counter-locking plate 45 b opposite the teeth, and the screw 49 is supported with its (outer) thread 49 a in a complementary thread in the locking plate 45 a. The screw head 49 b is accessible with the help of the tool 48 through the base plate 27 and the hollow interior 28 of the grip element 23. The locking plates 45 a, b are again in engagement with their notches/teeth when the screw 49 is tightened. In the illustrated example, the locking plate 45 a and the counter-locking plate 45 b have a crown-like running tooth profile on their outer edge.
  • In other example designs shaft, trapeze or rectangular profiles can also be provided. The angular increments in which the grip element 23 can be adjusted around the axis of adjustment 26, depend oil the profile separation. In the case of a coarse or rough separation, the angular increments are relatively large; in the case of fine separation, a nearly infinite adjustability is given. Finally, there are also designs in which friction elements are arranged in place of the locking plates and counter-locking plates, which, in similar fashion, can be clamped against each other via the screw 49 or any other suitable fastening means. Also the frictional engagement produced guarantees the required fixation of the grip element 23 in a desired operative position.
  • So that the Allen wrench 48 (or other tool) can be introduced diagonally to the axis of adjustment 26 and operated (FIG. 6), the Allen wrench 48 in FIG. 5 a is provide with a ball head 48 a. FIG. 5 b shows a design in which the screw head 49 b is gimbal mounted to a tool holding fixture 49 c, which in turn is pivoted in the interior 28 of the grip element 23. The tool holding fixture 49 c is inclined to the axis of adjustment 26 in such a way that a standard Allen wrench 48 can be used for actuation of the screw 49. The Allen wrench may also be inserted into the grip element 23 at an angle that is inclined to the axis of adjustment 26.
  • FIGS. 8 a-c show the example auxiliary grip 23 with an alternative locking mechanism. In FIG. 8 a, the example locking mechanism is a spring-loaded locking pin 101 that may be released and fixed to/with a locking plate 110. In FIG. 8 b, the example locking mechanism is an alternative spring-loaded locking pin 201 that may be released and fixed to/with the locking plate 110. The spring-loaded locking pin 101, 201 and a locking plate 110 are used in place of the locking/counter-locking plates 45 a, 45 b or friction plates. When the locking pin 101, 201 is pulled against the force of a spring 102, 202 out from the locking plate 110, the grip element 23 is decoupled from the adapter 43 and rotatable about the axis of adjustment 26 with respect to the adapter 43.
  • Turning, in particular, to the example illustrated in FIG. 8 a, the locking pin 101 is held in a locking position via a compression spring 102, which is supported between the grip element 23 and a collar 103 on the locking pin 101. An operating end 104 protrudes to the rear out of the grip element 23, where the operating end 104 can be operated. The grip element 23 is coupled to the adapter 43 via a shaft screw 105 that is rotatable with respect to the adapter 43. On the adapter 43, a perforated locking plate 110 is fastened or constructed. In the locking plate 110, holes 111 are provide at intervals (e.g., regularly spaced intervals) over the periphery (see, e.g., FIG. 8 c). If the locking pin 101 engages in one of the recess or holes 111 in the locking plate 110, the grip element 23 is fixed in a rotating position around the axis of adjustment 26 relative to the adapter 43 and, thus, to the weapon. To release/loosen the locking pin 101, the operating end 104 is pulled out against the spring force down from the hole 111 so that the grip element 23 maybe rotated around the axis of adjustment 26. After the grip element 23 is brought into a desired rotating position, the operating end 104 is released and the locking pin 101 again engages the hole 111 corresponding to the desired rotating position to fix the position of the grip element 23.
  • Now turning to the example shown in FIG. 8 b, the example locking mechanism in FIG. 8 b functions similarly to that of FIG. 8 a. The locking pin 201 has an operating end 204 that protrudes from the grip element 23. An end of the locking pin extends into the recess or holes 111 in the locking plate 110, and an opposite end of the locking pin 201 extends in the other direction and beyond the operating end 204 into a blind hole 223, in which the compression spring 202 is arranged. The compression spring presses the locking pin 201 into the corresponding hole 111 in the locking plate 110, as noted above. In the case of the design shown in FIG. 8 b, the locking pin 201 is guided over a greater length (than the locking pin 111 of FIG. 8 a) and does not easily jam if a force is applied to the grip element 23 around the axis of adjustment and the locking pin 201 is in a locked position. FIG. 8 c is a cross-sectional view of the example shown in FIG. 8 b taken along the C-C line of FIG. 8 b. In particular, as noted above, FIG. 8 c illustrates the distribution of the holes 111 in the locking plate 110.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates another example locking mechanism for use with the example grip element 23. The example shown in FIG. 9 includes a locking nose 301 constructed on the grip element 23 that engages in a corresponding recess or hole 111 of the locking plate 110 and fixes the grip element 23 opposite the adapter 43 of the weapon 7. The grip element 23 is coupled to the adapter 43 via a shaft screw 305, where the shaft screw 305 is screwed into the adapter 43 with a thread end 305 a. Though a shaft screw 305 is described, any other suitable fastener may be used in addition or as an alternative to the shaft screw 305 to rotatably couple the grip element 23 and the adapter 43. With a guide shaft 305 b, the shaft screw 305 penetrates a corresponding opening 323 in the grip element 23, the diameter of which corresponds to that of the shaft region 305. A spring 302 is supported with a lower end on a head 305 c of the shaft screw 305. An opposite end of the spring 302 applies a force against an edge of the opening 323 and presses the grip element 23, from the inside, upward against the adapter 43 and the locking plate 110. In turn, the locking nose 301 is pressed into the recess or hole 111. To release/loosen the grip 23, the pulled axially downward in the direction of the axis of adjustment 26 to compress the spring 302 and retract the locking nose 301 from the hole 111. After the locking nose 301 has cleared the hole 111, the grip element 23 can be rotated around the axis 26 to another desired position, and the locking nose 301 may engage another corresponding hole 111 to lock the grip element 23 in a torque-proof manner in the desired position. In another example, the spring 302 may be used in combination with the locking plates 45 a or 45 b or other friction plates described herein as an alternative to the locking nose 301, the locking plate 110 and the holes 111 shown in FIG. 9
  • FIGS. 10 a and 10 b show a further example locking mechanism. Here a spring-loaded locking ball 401 is provide in the grip element 23, the locking ball is pressed by a compression spring 402 into a seat 403 so that a ball segment protrudes upward out of this seat 403 and protrudes into a corresponding recess or locking opening 411 in a locking plate 410. The grip element 23 is rotatably coupled to the adapter 43 via a shaft screw 105, though any other suitable fastener may be used in addition or as an alternative to the shaft screw 105. For adjustment or rotation of the grip element 23 only the spring force exerting the locking effect via the locking ball 401 must be overcome. When the force of the spring 402 is overcome, the locking ball 401 disengages from the locking opening 411 and glides along the locking plate 410 until the locking ball again engages in another corresponding locking opening 411 and noticeably locks therein.
  • FIG. 10 b shows an example stop mechanism that is coupled to the example locking mechanism shown in FIG. 10 a. In this example, a nose 423 is constructed on the grip element 23, that protrudes into a recess 412 in the edge of the locking plate 410. End areas 414 on the locking plate 410 delimit the recess 412 and serve as end stops for the nose 423. Thus, the end areas 414 define the swiveling range of the grip element 23. Simultaneously, these swiveling positions have corresponding locking openings 411, via which the grip element 23 is fixed in the respective swiveling positions via the locking ball 401. Such an arrangement is advantageous when the grip element 23 is only to be adjusted between two rotating positions around the axis of adjustment 26 such s, for example, between a stop position (shoulder stop), in which case the grip element 23 is to be aligned as shown in FIG. 3 and a ready position, in which the grip element 23 is aligned as shown in FIG. 4. The combination of the locking ball mechanism with the stop mechanism allows a reliable adjustment with repeatable accuracy in the simplest operation.
  • FIGS. 11 a and 11 b show a further illustration of another example. In this example, the grip element 23 is rotatably fixed to the adapter 43 via a shaft screw 105, as described above. On the back of the grip element 23, a locking lever pr rocker 501 is provided that is pivoted via a shaft 503 in the grip element 23 and that runs between an operating end 501 a and a locking end 501 b. On the operating end 501, a compression spring 502 engages the locking rocker 501. The compression spring 502 is held in a recess 504 in the grip element 23 by a mandrel 501 c protruding into the interior of the spring 502. The spring 502 applies a force to he operating end 501 a of the locking rocker 501 press the locking end 501 b into a corresponding recess 511 in the edge of the locking plate 510, which is firmly coupled to the adapter 43. To adjust the position of the grip element 23, the operating end 501 a is pressed against the force of the spring 502 into a corresponding recess 506 in the grip element 23. This causes the locking rocker 501 to swivels around a shaft 503 to release the locking end 501 b from the recess 511. The grip element 23 can be adjusted/rotated around the axis of adjustment 26. When the operating end 501 a is released, the locking end 501 b engages another recess 511 (if aligned) or a radial surface 512 of the locking plate 510. If the locking end 501 b engages the radial surface 512, the locking plate glides upon further rotation of the grip element 23 along the locking plate 510 until the locking end 501 b engages in the next locking recess 511 to fix the grip element 23 in the corresponding rotating position.
  • FIG. 12 shows a further example alternative auxiliary grip 1′ with a ball and socket joint 55. This example includes a ball 54 coupled to the adapter 43—in turn serving as a connection element. The ball 54 is coupled to the adapter 43 via, for example, a thread 58. However any other suitable mechanical or chemical fastener may be used as well. The grip element 23 includes a guide shell 53 in the interior. The ball 54 may be frictionally fixed on the interior of the guide shell via, for example, a clamping pan 59. The clamping pan 59 is loosened or fixed via a fastening element or screw 57 penetrating the housing, though any other suitable tool may be used as well such as, for example, a spring-loaded bolt, to detachably couple the grip element 23 and the ball 54. A similar example is shown in FIGS. 13 a and 13 b.
  • The grip element 23 that is coupled to the adapter 43 via the ball and socket joint 55 of FIGS. 12, 13 a and 13 b may be rotated not around the axis of adjustment 26, but also in all directions around the ball 54.
  • When the screw 57 is in a loosened state so that the pan 59 is not immovable, or near-immovably coupled to the ball 54, the grip element 23 may be rotated/swiveled in all directions to a desired position set by the user. When the grip element 23 is in a desired position, the screw 57 is tightened to tension the clamping pan 59 against the ball 54 and guide shell 53 to fix the desired operative position. In this example, the head 61 of the screw 57, which is at the bottom of the grip element 23, is constructed as a knurl 61. The knurl 61 lies in a recess 63 in the bottom of the grip element 23. An edge of the knurl 61 slightly overhangs the profile of the grip element 23 so that the screw 57 can be loosened or fixed by engagement/rotation of the peripheral edge of the knurl 61. Additionally, a recess (not shown) may be constructed in the head 61, into which a tool (e.g., a screwdriver, a coin, etc.) may be inserted for turning of the screw 57.
  • As noted above, FIGS. 13 a and 13 b show an example with similarities with the example shown in FIG. 12. The example of FIGS. 13 a and 13 b includes a ball and socket joint that has a clamping pan 59′ that is guided in a linear guide 67 in the grip element 23. The example also includes the fastening element or screw 57, which is arranged in the direction of the axis of adjustment 26 and may be rotated in the grip element 23 via a bearing 69. However, in this example, the screw 69 is fixed in axial direction. When the knurl 61 and, thus, the screw 57 is turned, the clamping pan 59′ moves in linear fashion in the linear guide 67 in accordance with the pitch of a thread 60. Eventually, depending on the direction of rotation of the knurl and the extent of rotation (i.e., extent of linear movement of the clamping pan 59′), the clamping pan 59′ clamps or releases the ball 54.
  • FIG. 14 illustrates another example in which the grip element 23 is rotatable in a plurality of directions with respect to the adapter 43 and, thus, the weapon 7. In this example shown in FIG. 14, the linear guide 67 runs diagonally with respect to the axis of adjustment 26. The thread segment 60 of the fastening element or screw 57 is coupled to the knurl 61 via a universal or a cardan joint 70, Further, the knurl 61 is rotatable but axially fixed in the bearing 69.
  • In alternative examples, any component of any example described herein may be combined with or used as replacements for other components in other examples. For example, the stop mechanism shown in FIGS. 10 a and 10 b may also be used in combination with the examples shown in FIGS. 5-6; 8 a-c; 9; 11 a and b and FIGS. 12-14. Furthermore, these examples are not restricted to the design with the locking ball 401 (FIGS. 8 a-c).
  • In addition, the upper locking plate 45 a, the locking plate 110, 410, 510 and the ball 54 or the ball and socket joint 55 may also be mounted directly on the weapon 7 without any connection element (thus without the adapter 43) such as, for example, by means of a weld, screw or otherwise suitable connection.
  • As noted above, the examples described herein provide an improved auxiliary grip that enables a safe and comfortable operation of a firearm.
  • The examples described herein include the auxiliary grip 1′, which can be brought into different operative positions and is designed ergonomically. Through the adjustability to different operative positions via a rotating and/or swiveling movement around an axis of adjustment 26′ running diagonally to the axis of the bore 8 of the hand firearm 7, the auxiliary grip 1′ can be brought into a position that approaches/meets the natural hand position of the hand gripping the auxiliary grip 1′ (usually the marksman's hand that is toward the front). The auxiliary grip 19 can, thus, be rotated individually around the axis of adjustment 26, 26′ between the operative positions, so that the grip profile can be brought to the desired position. This allows an operation that is lower in fatigue particularly with the ergonomic grip profiles.
  • As described herein, the examples auxiliary grip 1′ provides for enhanced gripping/grasping of the weapon 7 in an ergonomically favorable and fatigue-proof manner in a variety of positions such as, for example, when holding the weapon 1 with hip contact, in ready a position, and/or with the weapon 7 pulled firmly into the shoulder for sustained fire. The example auxiliary grip 1′ gives the hand a steady/stable grip/hold and prevents burns from the barrel 8, which may become hot after several rounds of firing (e.g., with semiautomatic weapons).
  • The example auxiliary grip 1′ may be adjusted to an individually selectable operative position in which the grip profile fits into the gripping hand without a strained position of the wrist. It is suitable for various hand firearms and can be mounted directly to the barrel 8 or also to the hand guard or a profile rail 3 of the weapon 7.
  • As noted above, in some examples the grip element 2 is rotatable about the axis of adjustment 26 that is substantially perpendicular to the axis of the bore 8. In other examples, the grip element 23 is also rotatable/swivelable about the longitudinal axis of the grip 26′. The longitudinal axis of adjustment of the grip 26′ may be inclined (e.g., slightly inclined) to the front or to the rear to the axis of the bore 8.
  • The natural hand position of a user does not run parallel, but rather diagonally, to the axis of the bore 8 of a weapon 7. Hence the hand position with an individually adjustable front grip that can be rotated around the axis of grip 1′ is significantly more relaxed and natural. This is significantly more pleasant for a user, in particular when patrolling for hours with a weapon pointed down, but also when in long contact/impact with a weapon when positioned in readiness for battle. Cramps and muscle irritations are prevented by the use of the example auxiliary grip 1′ described herein.
  • As noted herein, some examples include the adjustment device 25 that includes fixing means via which the auxiliary grip 23 can be detachably fixed in a resting position or in any of a plurality of operative positions. The fixing means prevent an unintended adjustment of the auxiliary grip 23 and provide a firm and stable hold. The example adjustment device 25 may include a locking hole 48, fastener 49 and interlocking, positive coupling teeth or clamping elements 45 a, 45 b that can be fixed to each other in frictional manner.
  • Two profiled, in particular toothed locking plates 45 a, 45 b can serve as the fixing means, where the locking plates 45 a, 45 b are releasably and rotatably fixed to each other via the tensioning device (e.g., the fastener 49). The toothed locking plates 49 a, 49 b facilitate an almost infinitely variable adjustment of the example auxiliary grip 23. Other example fixing means 45 a, 45 b, 49, 101, 201, 301, 401, 423, 501, 110, 410, 510, 55 and 57 are described throughout this patent.
  • The tensioning device 49 can quite simply be a screw (as described above). However, in other examples, the tensioning device may also be constructed as a spring arrangement whose spring action fixes the locking plates to each other. Some example spring arrangements are described above with respect to FIGS. 8 a, 8 b, 8 c, 9, 10 a, 10 b, 11 a and 11 b. By means of releasing of the lock 101, 201, 301, 401501 against the spring pressure a rapid, simple adjustment of the example auxiliary grip 23 is possible.
  • In still further examples, as described herein, the example auxiliary grip element 23 may be adjusted and fixed in any desired operative position or a resting position by fixable selectively fixable/releasable ball and socket joint 55. Thus, the example auxiliary grip element 23 may be swiveled and rotated in a plurality of directions, which facilitates a very flexible adaptation of the auxiliary grip element 23 to the requirements of the particular marksman/user. The auxiliary grip element 23 may also be folded up against the weapon 7 (i.e., into the resting position noted above).
  • In another example, as described above, the example auxiliary grip element 23 may be coupled to the weapon, e.g., a handgun, via the adjustment device 25 (e.g., without an intervening component like the adapter 43).
  • The example auxiliary grip 1 may be mounted via various fastening devices directly or indirectly to the weapon such as, for example, via profile rails, in particular Picatinny rails. The connection element or adapter 43 for coupling the example auxiliary grip 23 to the weapon 7 or to the profile rail 3 mounted to the weapon 7 may be included. The connection element 43 may include an engagement profile (e.g., FIG. &, components 36, 37) by which the connection element 43 is slipped onto the profile rail 3. Such a guide 36, 37 makes possible a stable, flexible fastening and secures the respectively desired position of the auxiliary grip 1.
  • When fastened to a (Picatinny) profile rail 3, the rail 3 can translate considerable forces from the auxiliary grip 1 to the weapon 7. Also, the location of the auxiliary grip 1 along the longitudinal direction of the weapon 7 can be changed, so that the example auxiliary grip 1 is adaptable to the body mass, inclinations and habits of the marksman. As a result, different marksmen can use the same weapon and optimally adapt the weapon quickly and individually to their requirements.
  • Further, as described above, the example auxiliary grip 1 can be brought into engagement and fixed via an additional formation on the profile rail 3 with a counter-formation arranged there. The formation can, for example, be designed as a projecting part, an attachment, a positioning pin, a set bolt or the like. The formation may be mounted in a recess 41 or existing clearance in the profile rail 3 and may engage, for example a borehole and/or a transverse slot in the Picatinny rail 3 to lock the auxiliary grip 1 in place.
  • Also, as described above, the auxiliary grip element 23 may include the one or more removable and interchangeable grip panel elements 31, 33 and 35 that can be used for ergonomic forming and customization. The base body or the grip base 27 of the auxiliary grip 1 can, for example be constructed as a square-like profile and be equipped on its four sides with interchangeable grip panel elements 31, 33 and 35. These grip panel elements 31, 33 and 35 can, for example, be slipped on horizontally or vertically and additionally be locked or screwed on via dovetail interfaces.
  • The grip panel elements 31, 33 and 35 can be designed as the grip back strap 31, grip front 33 and/or grip flank elements 35. Thus, the auxiliary grip 1 and the grip element 23 can be adapted easily, comfortably and precisely to the hand size and hand form of the marksman. With an assortment of different grip panel elements 31, 33 and 35 and, thus, grip elements 23, the ergonomically optimum operative range of the weapon can be enlarged. A grip with such grip panel elements 31, 33, 35 and, thus, grip elements 23, in particular for automatic pistols, is described in German Patent Application DE 10 2005 016020 A1, which is co-owned with this application and hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • Alternatively, only two grip flank elements 35 may be mounted. In this example, the half stock interface where the two grip flank elements 35 meet may be located, for example, either vertically at the grip front and rear or may run vertically to the right and left on the grip surfaces. The grip panels 35 may be slipped on, locked into place, screwed etc. horizontally from the front and/or rear.
  • Alternatively the ergonomic design of the grip element 23 can also be achieved by means of a single panel. In such an example, when viewed in cross-section from above, a u-shaped, one-piece grip panel is slipped onto a grip frame from the rear and locked into place, screwed or any other suitable fastener. One example of a one-piece grip panel for small arms is the Heckler & Koch P9S pistol.
  • Further the interior of the auxiliary grip 1 can be designed solid or hollow. Preferably it is designed as a hollow space 28. The hollow space 28 can, for example, be sealed by a slip-on base plate or a base plate that can be installed via a lock-in position. For example, an appropriate receptacle can be pushed into the hollow space 28, the receptacle also locks into place in the grip or locks in some other way. The hollow space 28 or receptacle can, for example, serve the purpose of the holding of tools, batteries, reserve ammunition, medicaments or other hardware.
  • Although certain example methods, apparatus and articles of manufacture have been described herein, the scope of coverage of this patent is not limited thereto. On the contrary, this patent covers all methods, apparatus and articles of manufacture fairly falling within the scope of the appended claims either literally or under the doctrine of equivalents.

Claims (21)

1. A grip for a firearm having an axis of a bore, the grip comprising:
a grip element with a plurality of first axis operative positions that overhang from the firearm and which is rotatable about a first axis of rotation substantially perpendicular to the axis of the bore to two of the plurality of first axis operative positions.
2. The grip as defined in claim 1, wherein the grip element is ergonomic.
3. The grip as defined in claim 1, wherein the first axis of rotation runs in a longitudinal direction of the grip.
4. The grip as defined in claim 1, further comprising an adjustment device that includes fixing element to detachably fix the grip element one of the plurality of operative positions and/or a resting position.
5. The grip as defined in claim 4, wherein the fixing element includes:
a first locking plate with a toothed profile;
a second locking plate with a tooth profile; and
a tensioning device to releasably couple the first locking plate and the second locking plate.
6. The grip as defined in claim 5, further comprising a spring to bias the locking plates toward one another.
7. The grip as defined in claim 4, wherein the element includes a recess and one of a spring-biased ball, spring-biased pin or spring-biased lever.
8. The grip as defined in claim 4, wherein the element includes a ball and socket joint.
9. The grip as defined in claim 8, further comprising:
a fastening element; and
a pan, wherein actuation of the fastening element causes a linear movement in the pan to tighten or loosen the ball and socket joint.
10. The grip as defined in claim 9, wherein the fastening element includes a universal joint.
11. The grip as defined in claim 4, wherein the adjustment device couples the grip to the firearm.
12. The grip as defined in claim 4, wherein the adjustment device includes a connection element to couple the grip to the firearm.
13. The grip as defined in claim 1, wherein the grip element includes at least one interchangeable grip panel element.
14. The grip as defined in claim 11, wherein the interchangeable grip panel element is one or a grip back strap, a grip front, or a grip flank element.
15. The grip as defined in claim 1, wherein the grip element is also rotatable about a second axis of rotation that is not perpendicular to the axis of the bore to one of a plurality of second axis operative positions.
16. The grip as defined in claim 15, wherein the grip element is releasably lockable in one of the plurality of second axis operative positions.
17. A firearm comprising:
a grip including a grip element with a plurality of first axis operative positions that overhang from the firearm and which is rotatable about a first axis of rotation substantially perpendicular to the axis of the bore to two of the plurality of first axis operative positions.
18. A firearm as defined in claim 17, further comprising an adjustment device that includes fixing element to detachably fix the grip element one of the plurality of first axis operative positions and/or a resting position.
19. A firearm as defined in claim 17, wherein the grip element is also rotatable about a second axis of rotation that is not perpendicular to the axis of the bore to one of the plurality of second axis operative positions.
20. A grip for a firearm having an axis of a bore, the grip comprising:
a grip element with a plurality of operative positions that overhang from the firearm and which is rotatable about an axis of rotation that is not substantially perpendicular to the axis of the bore to one of the plurality of operative positions.
21. A grip element as defined in claim 20, wherein the grip element is releasably lockable in one of the plurality of operative positions.
US12/138,262 2008-02-04 2008-06-12 Auxiliary grips for firearms Abandoned US20090313873A1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
DE102008007341 2008-02-04
DE102008007341A DE102008007341A1 (en) 2008-02-04 2008-02-04 Additional handle for a handgun
US3832008P true 2008-03-20 2008-03-20
US12/138,262 US20090313873A1 (en) 2008-02-04 2008-06-12 Auxiliary grips for firearms

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/138,262 US20090313873A1 (en) 2008-02-04 2008-06-12 Auxiliary grips for firearms

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DE (1) DE102008007341A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2009097873A1 (en)

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DE102008007341A1 (en) 2009-08-06

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