US20090189494A1 - No Drip Slab Counter top and Related Method - Google Patents

No Drip Slab Counter top and Related Method Download PDF

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Publication number
US20090189494A1
US20090189494A1 US12/019,871 US1987108A US2009189494A1 US 20090189494 A1 US20090189494 A1 US 20090189494A1 US 1987108 A US1987108 A US 1987108A US 2009189494 A1 US2009189494 A1 US 2009189494A1
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Prior art keywords
edge
slab
drip
countertop
profiled
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Abandoned
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US12/019,871
Inventor
Morris Bendah
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Morris Bendah
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Priority to US12/019,871 priority Critical patent/US20090189494A1/en
Publication of US20090189494A1 publication Critical patent/US20090189494A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47BTABLES; DESKS; OFFICE FURNITURE; CABINETS; DRAWERS; GENERAL DETAILS OF FURNITURE
    • A47B96/00Details of cabinets, racks or shelf units not covered by a single one of groups A47B43/00 - A47B95/00; General details of furniture
    • A47B96/18Tops specially designed for working on

Abstract

A method for making a profiled no drip edge countertop in a series of attractive shapes where much of the profiled surface is already polished as it utilizes the factory polished surface of the original slab. This method decreases the amount of skilled labor or expensive tooling required for making this countertop and edge. This method hides lamination seams in joints so that the profiled edge appears as one piece as if it were milled out of a single slab of material.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to a no drip profiled edge countertop made from natural stone slabs, engineered stone slabs and composite plastic slabs.
  • BACKGROUND AND PRIOR ART
  • Countertops, particularly those used in domestic kitchens, are prepared from a variety of surfaces such as ceramic tile, plastic laminates, plastic composite solid surface and, more particularly, stone and engineered stone surfaces. Laminated plastic is commercially available from a variety of sources and in a variety of colors, patterns and textures. The countertop is prepared by obtaining sheets of laminated plastic which are cut to pattern and thereafter bonded to a suitable surface such as plywood or, more commonly, a pressed particle board. The countertop also generally includes a coved backsplash along the rear edge of the countertop and, customarily, a raised no-drip edge along the front edge of the countertop. Ceramic tiles can be purchased with a no drip edge profile tile to accomplish the same type of edge.
  • The no-drip edge includes a slight upraised ridge along the edge of the countertop and terminates in a downwardly depending lip extending below the bottom surface of the countertop. The raised ridge is called a no drip edge because it prevents fluid spills from flowing off the edge of the countertop.
  • Laminated plastic no drip edge countertops are generally prefabricated in a remote shop location and thereafter shipped to a point of installation in the domestic kitchen. Because these countertops have a special edge, they have to be made on special vacuum form equipment that does not allow for specially shaped islands and counters without many time consuming seams
  • Ceramic tile no drip edges are done by using a special no drip edge tile at the front profiled edge. Although this performs the function of a no drip edge, tiles include many grout joints which are often disliked by consumers because they are difficult to clean.
  • Because slab countertops can be made starting out with typical 2 cm thick slab material that is polished on one side, forming a thicker 4 cm profiled edge usually involves laminating a strip of the same material underneath and then grinding and polishing the desired contour. Using routers and other methods can give you a variety of popular edges such as Full Bullnose, Demi Bullnose, Ogee, Dupont, Flat Polished, Eased edge, Pencil Edge, Beveled edge, to name a few (see FIG. 1). However, all of these edges allow liquid spilled on the counter to flow over the edge and onto cabinets and the floor.
  • Consumers have always had the option of a no drip edge in ceramic tile countertops (using a special no drip edge tile) and in plastic laminate countertops (where the no drip edge is built up in the underlying particle board and then this is covered by the plastic laminate). A No Drip edge is also available in plastic composite countertops but is very labor intensive since it requires laminating another thin layer of the material on top and then routing it first in a separate run, before routing the normal front edge. The seams are not always invisible for this edge depending on the workmanship so it can be very unsightly. If this same procedure were done in natural or engineered stone it would be very labor intensive and very visible, which would make it unmarketable. Although a No Drip edge is preferred by some consumers, it is often required in commercial projects such as dormitories or hospitals where it's performance reduces maintenance and/or increases safety.
  • This invention is a countertop and method of constructing a no drip profiled edge where much of the profiled surface is already polished because it utilizes the factory polished surface of the original slab. This feature alone decreases the amount of skilled labor or expensive tooling required for making this edge. Additionally, the invented edge hides lamination seams in joints so that the profiled edge appears as one piece; like it was milled out of a single slab of material. This is an improvement to all the profiled edges mentioned above since their laminations are more or less visible depending on the workmanship and pattern in the material.
  • One of the benefits of this invention is that because the edge does not depend on a great deal of workmanship to hide the lamination, it can be more mechanized and automated, reducing labor significantly. This would allow countries with expensive labor rates to compete with countries with very low labor rates. Another benefit of this invention is that a whole new series of edge profiles with newly marketable appearances can be fabricated using this new method (see FIG. 4). Still another benefit of this invention is that since the profiled edge is separate from the slab it can be applied in the field, if necessary, without time consuming field fabrication, which is usually required now in some cases.
  • In view of the foregoing, it would be a significant advancement in the art to provide a no drip profiled edge where much of the profiled surface is already polished because it utilizes the factory polished surface of the original slab. This feature alone decreases the amount of skilled labor or expensive tooling required for making this edge.
  • It is, therefore, an object of this invention to provide improvements in the method of manufacturing a no drip edge for natural stone materials.
  • Another object of this invention is to provide improvements in the method for manufacturing a no drip edge for engineered stone materials.
  • Another object of this invention is to provide improvements in manufacturing a no drip edge for solid surface plastic composite materials.
  • Another object of this invention is to provide a no drip edge in a new variety of attractive edge shapes
  • It is another object of this invention to provide a no drip edge where much of the profiled surface is already polished because it utilizes the factory polished surface of the original slab
  • It is another object of this invention is to provide improvements in manufacturing a no drip edge where the process hides lamination seams in joints so that the profiled edge appears as one piece; like it was milled out of a single slab of material.
  • An even still further object of this invention is to provide improvements in manufacturing a no drip edge where some of the edge can be applied in the field for unexpected situations without time consuming field fabrication.
  • These and other objects and features of the present invention will become more fully apparent from the following description and appended claims taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing.
  • It is understood, of course, that while the forms of the invention herein shown and described include the best mode contemplated for carrying out the present invention, they are not intended to illustrate all possible forms thereof. It will also be understood that the words used are descriptive rather than limiting, and that various changes may be made without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention as claimed below.
  • ADDED-BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Added-FIG. 1 is depiction of existing slab material cross section, existing edges made from slabs cross sections and existing no drip edges made from plastic laminate, composite plastic and ceramic tiles cross sections.
  • Added-FIG. 2 is a depiction of the method and construction of the new typical Angled No Drip Edge Cross Section.
  • Added-FIG. 3 is a depiction of the method and construction of the new typical Straight No Drip Edge Cross Section.
  • Added-FIG. 4 is a depiction of new styles of Angle No Drip Edges cross sections.
  • Added-FIG. 5 is a depiction of new styles of Straight No Drip Edges cross sections.
  • Added-FIG. 6 is a depiction of the top of a raw slab showing how a design can be matched to the edge.
  • Added-FIG. 7 is a depiction of a Faux Table Apparatus and method of construction of a No Drip Edge in cross section.
  • Added-FIG. 8 is a depiction of a no drip edge and clamping jig cross section and top view of slab with clamping jigs in series.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • Raw slabs of Natural Stone, Engineered stone and Plastic Composites come in various sizes from about 48″ by 96″ to 72″ by 125″ depending on the material and the color. These raw slabs are then processed to give them profiled finished edges and cut to size for kitchen countertops or vanity tops. The method used in this invention involves first routing and polishing the edge of the granite slab (FIG. 3, Number 5 and FIG. 4, number 5) and then making accurate cuts at certain angles (FIG. 3, Numbers 1, 2, 3 and 4, and FIG. 4, Numbers 1, 2, and 3). FIG. 3 refers to an Angled No Drip edge and FIG. 4 refers to a Straight No Drip edge. Of course, there are many variations available in between and outside of these angles but these two examples serve as the basis to describe all the new profiled edges shown in FIG. 4 and FIG. 5, all unique and claimed.
  • The profiling and polishing can be done using existing technology of portable stone routers, in-line routing machines, in-line profiling machines and CNC router machines. The cutting should be done with a bridge saw for accuracy. Importantly, you must be able to change the angle of cut on the bridge saw. Assembly of Part “A” and Part “B” on to Slab “C” (See FIG. 2 and FIG. 3) is done with a premium glue for the type of material used. The glue is spread on the surfaces described by FIG. 2, Number 6 and FIG. 3, Number 6 after grooving those surfaces for better adhesion. A simple angle grinder with a diamond cutting blade can be used for grooving as this will not be visible. The Angled No Drip Edge has better adhesion and strength because there is a larger glue surface due to the angle.
  • The Part “A” and Part “B” on to Slab “C” (See FIG. 2 and FIG. 3) can be applied to the same side they were cut from (FIG. 6, Number 2) if the texture and color in the material is much the same from end to end of the slab. If, as in some natural stone slabs, the material color is different or the pattern is different, then it is better to use the Part “A” and Part “B” on to the other long side of Slab “C” (FIG. 6, Number 1).
  • Of course the easiest edges to construct are shown on FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 or the Angle Straight edge on FIG. 4 and similarly the Straight Straight edge on FIG. 5. These edges require only one run of the (vertical) router (FIG. 4, Number 1) and polishing heads. Most other fancy profiles require a second (lateral) router run (FIG. 4, Number 2) to finish the more complex edge. The numbered cuts on FIG. 2 and FIG. 3 are then made in succession. Although the pieces “A” and “B” are very fragile and long, fabricators are accustomed to pieces like this since laminations for the profiles in FIG. 1 are made with 1.5 inch wide pieces. Even though this can be assembled manually and clamped with the Clamping Jig (see FIG. 8), the Faux Table Apparatus (FIG. 7), allows for the clamping and gluing of piece “A” and piece “B” without handling the fragile pieces. The top of the apparatus has rubber (Number 6) so that the slab or cut pieces do not slip. Cuts are then made so that piece Number 5 falls into slot (Number 2). Piece Number 5 is waste and is then removed without disturbing piece “A” or piece “B” (see FIG. 7, Step I). Turning the handled screw (Number 4) moves one side of the apparatus closer to the other and decreases the size of the slot (Number 2) (see FIG. 7, Step II). At the same time the acute angled edges of piece “A” and piece “B” move up until they contact correctly for gluing. Just the force of gravity and the friction of the rubber holds them together for gluing (see FIG. 7, Step III). Any voids from inaccurate cutting will be filled with glue.
  • If the edge piece (Number 7) was constructed accurately enough just a wall and table is all that is needed to finish gluing. The weight of the slab itself will help (see FIG. 7, Step IV) and spacer (Number 10) is needed to get the correct angle of gluing. Grooves done with an angle grinder (Number 8) are helpful for better adhesion.
  • If using the Clamping Jig (FIG. 8, Number 1), then it must be placed as shown with rubber feet (Number 6) for friction wrenched down by turning screw handle Number 2. Leg Number 5 is long for stability. After it is secure, and Piece “A” and Piece “B” are glued and in place, screw handle number 3 and number 4 are used to adjust the placement of Piece “A” and “B” and to apply pressure. The clamping jig is modified for straight clamping by changing the arm (Number 7). The clamps would be placed about every 8 inches along a slab and could even be connected together to make a long accurate clamp.
  • The illustrations and examples provided herein are for explanatory purposes and are not intended to limit the scope of the appended claims, as those skilled in the art will make modifications to the invention for particular uses.

Claims (11)

1. A no drip slab countertop and method made from natural stone slabs, engineered stone slabs and composite plastic slabs comprised of;
A polished or finished factory surface cut in three sections and re-assembled exposing a factory finished edge on most outside surfaces.
2. A no drip slab countertop and method as defined in claim 1 wherein the slab is cut in three sections.
3. A no drip slab countertop and method as defined in claim 1 wherein the slab edge is cut at 120 degree angles.
4. A no drip slab countertop and method as defined in claim 1 wherein the edge is cut from natural stone.
5. A no drip slab countertop and method as defined in claim 1 wherein the edge is cut from engineered stone slabs
6. A no drip slab countertop and method as defined in claim 1 wherein the edge is cut from resin based slabs.
7. A no drip slab countertop and method as defined in claim 1 wherein the lamination seams in joints are hidden so that the profiled edge appears as one piece.
8. A no drip slab countertop and method as defined in claim 1 wherein the smaller two sections form a no drip edge section that can be applied in the field to the third slab section.
9. A no drip slab countertop and method as defined in claim 1 wherein the shape of the finished profiled edge can vary as illustrated on FIG. 4 and FIG. 5.
10. A no drip slab countertop and method as defined in claim 1 wherein the finished rectangular countertop slab may be any necessary dimension and may have one edge profiled, two edges profiled, three edges profiled or four edges profiled.
11. A no drip slab countertop and method as defined in claim 1 wherein there is a curved edge made from segments of straight edge and then hand finished to produce a smooth curve.
US12/019,871 2008-01-25 2008-01-25 No Drip Slab Counter top and Related Method Abandoned US20090189494A1 (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090263610A1 (en) * 2008-04-17 2009-10-22 Maria Yee, Inc. Glue-laminated bamboo furniture
US20110011467A1 (en) * 2009-07-17 2011-01-20 David Fillhart Liquid divergent device
USD759795S1 (en) * 2014-01-31 2016-06-21 Kohler Co. Countertop

Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5826396A (en) * 1996-10-18 1998-10-27 Michaels; Walter Double-sided, single pass grooving of countertops and other building structures
US6258190B1 (en) * 1999-06-03 2001-07-10 Pete A. Sciarrino Natural stone tile edging

Patent Citations (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5826396A (en) * 1996-10-18 1998-10-27 Michaels; Walter Double-sided, single pass grooving of countertops and other building structures
US6258190B1 (en) * 1999-06-03 2001-07-10 Pete A. Sciarrino Natural stone tile edging

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20090263610A1 (en) * 2008-04-17 2009-10-22 Maria Yee, Inc. Glue-laminated bamboo furniture
US7960004B2 (en) * 2008-04-17 2011-06-14 Maria Yee, Inc. Glue-laminated bamboo furniture
US20110011467A1 (en) * 2009-07-17 2011-01-20 David Fillhart Liquid divergent device
USD759795S1 (en) * 2014-01-31 2016-06-21 Kohler Co. Countertop
USD759794S1 (en) * 2014-01-31 2016-06-21 Kohler Co. Countertop

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