US20090183123A1 - Method and system for providing tactical information during crisis situations - Google Patents

Method and system for providing tactical information during crisis situations Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20090183123A1
US20090183123A1 US12/330,365 US33036508A US2009183123A1 US 20090183123 A1 US20090183123 A1 US 20090183123A1 US 33036508 A US33036508 A US 33036508A US 2009183123 A1 US2009183123 A1 US 2009183123A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
user
window
information
computer
room
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12/330,365
Inventor
Steve Larsen
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Tactical Survey Group Inc
Original Assignee
Tactical Survey Group Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US32653701P priority Critical
Priority to US10/190,230 priority patent/US7134088B2/en
Priority to US11/542,949 priority patent/US20070044033A1/en
Application filed by Tactical Survey Group Inc filed Critical Tactical Survey Group Inc
Priority to US12/330,365 priority patent/US20090183123A1/en
Assigned to TACTICAL SURVEY GROUP, INC. reassignment TACTICAL SURVEY GROUP, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: LARSEN, STEVE
Publication of US20090183123A1 publication Critical patent/US20090183123A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09BEDUCATIONAL OR DEMONSTRATION APPLIANCES; APPLIANCES FOR TEACHING, OR COMMUNICATING WITH, THE BLIND, DEAF OR MUTE; MODELS; PLANETARIA; GLOBES; MAPS; DIAGRAMS
    • G09B9/00Simulators for teaching or training purposes
    • G09B9/003Simulators for teaching or training purposes for military purposes and tactics

Abstract

A computer-based method and system for storing and retrieving tactical information pertaining to a site during crisis situations. The method and system provides a graphical user interface comprising a computer screen display and a selection device wherein a user may select from a plurality of options to receive desired tactical information pertaining to a particular site in a plurality of different data formats (e.g, text, graphic images, video, etc.).

Description

    RELATED APPLICATION
  • The present application is a Continuation of application Ser. No. 11/542,949 filed on Oct. 3, 2006 which is a continuation of application Ser. No. 10/190,230 filed on Jul. 3, 2002 which is a Non-Provisional application of 60/326,537 filed on Sep. 24, 2001, the entirety of which are incorporated by reference herein.
  • FIELD OF INVENTION
  • The invention relates generally to retrieving tactical information during crisis situations. More particularly, the invention relates to a computer-based method and system for storing and retrieving tactical information to respond to crisis situations.
  • DESCRIPTION OF RELATED ART
  • Sadly, in recent times, we have become all too familiar with crisis situations such as the Columbine High School shooting incident which left several people dead and many more injured. During that incident, when emergency personnel such as Police, Fire and SWAT personnel responded to the situation, these trained men and women faced many uncertainties that significantly added to the potentially life-threatening risks that they faced—uncertainties which adversely impacted their effectiveness in quickly and safely resolving the situation with minimal risk to civilians and themselves.
  • For example, during the initial response to the Columbine High School incident when police personnel approached the school premises, they were unaware of the safest, or, more significantly, the most dangerous, route to approach the school buildings and parking lots. For example, they were not aware of which areas were most vulnerable to attack by sniper gun fire while approaching a particular building. They were further unaware of key school personnel to contact, nor did they have access to their contact information. Furthermore, emergency personnel were unaware of building construction and structural information that would have assisted them to strategically plan entry into various building locations. These unknowns, and many others, greatly increased the risk to those individuals responding to the crisis.
  • As a particular example, when emergency rescue personnel finally entered the buildings, fire alarm sprinklers had flooded the interior rooms, an alarm strobe light was flickering, and an audio alarm was loudly sounding. As a result of these intense stimuli, some of the rescue team members who had prolonged exposure to this environment, suffered from vertigo, which adversely affected their perception and balance. Needless to say, this situation detrimentally affected their effectiveness and posed an otherwise unnecessary risk to these individuals. However, because emergency personnel did not know how to shut off the alarm systems, these strategically undesirable conditions persisted, making an already intensely stressful situation even more difficult.
  • In light of the exemplary difficulties and problems described above, there is a need for a method and system that can effectively provide critical tactical information to emergency personnel during crisis situations. Because such situations inherently involve high levels of stress and panic, it is desirable that such methods and systems be extremely “user friendly” and allow personnel to quickly and easily obtain a variety of different types of information that may be pertinent to address a particular situation or tactical plan.
  • SUMMARY OF INVENTION
  • The invention addresses the above and other needs by providing a computer-based method and system for providing critical tactical information to emergency personnel during crisis situations.
  • In one embodiment of the invention, a system includes a computer (e.g., a personal computer) having a display screen for displaying text, graphic images and video pertaining to critical tactical information requested by a user. In another embodiment, the computer further includes a speaker system to provide audio information to the user. The computer may be a conventional computer known to those skilled in the art and includes, at a minimum, a central processing unit (CPU) for executing program instructions and processing stored data and user inputs, and appropriate memories for storing program instructions, data and user inputs (e.g., a hard drive, ROM, RAM, cache, buffers). In one embodiment, some or all of the program instructions and stored data may be stored on a, CD-ROM, wherein the computer includes a CD-ROM drive for reading the CD-ROM and providing instructions and data to the CPU. The computer further includes appropriate input devices (e.g., keyboard, mouse, etc.) for providing user inputs to the computer. Such computers are well-known in the art and need not be further described in detail herein.
  • In another embodiment, a method of the invention includes displaying at least two interactive windows wherein a first window contains indicia, icons or controls (e.g., html links), which enable a user to retrieve or view information in the second window (e.g., images, video, text). In a preferred embodiment, a first window is capable of displaying, among other things, a structural outline of building or campus walls. By using a “mouse,” for example, a user can click on a desired location in the first window to retrieve and view corresponding images or video in the second window.
  • In a further embodiment, images in the second window include 360-degree spherical images generated using known digital imaging technologies such as iPix™ and IBM Hot Media™ digital imaging, for example. However, it is understood that any other known digital imaging systems and techniques may be used in accordance with the invention. By using 360-degree spherical digital imaging technology, a user can virtually view every aspect of a room on the computer display screen, as if he or she were physically present in the room. In this embodiment, a viewer can “pan” up, down, right or left by dragging a mouse cursor in a desired direction. If the user desires to view the interior of another room, he or she can immediately “jump” to that room by clicking on an appropriate location link or icon in the first screen.
  • In another embodiment, as the user moves a cursor of a selection device (e.g., a “mouse” device) over certain objects in the room while navigating in the second screen, embedded text will automatically pop up providing critical information about that object. For example, when a mouse cursor pans over a door, a pop-up message may indicate, for example, where the door leads, the material and thickness of the door, which way it opens, and provide the user the option of proceeding through the door. As another example, if the mouse cursor passes over an electrical switch such as a main electrical power shut-off switch, a pop-up message will alert the user to this fact. Pop-up messages can be embedded in a similar fashion for any number of objects that may be of interest in a particular room, e.g., windows, ventilation ducts, ceilings, flooring, closets, electrical and plumbing details, etc.
  • In another embodiment, a third window is displayed on the computer screen which contains a menu of different types of information which can be displayed in either of the first or second windows, depending on the user's desires. This menu can include items such as geographic or street maps, aerial views, site or campus maps, critical information and telephone numbers, parking lot ingress video, floor diagrams of buildings, etc. In a preferred embodiment, the critical information includes information pertaining to school administrative personnel and their contact information, alarm company information, communications systems information, building construction information, emergency utility shut-off systems, etc.
  • As explained above, in one embodiment, the computer may execute program instruction and process data stored in a CD-ROM for one or more sites (e.g., Grandview Elementary School). However, it is contemplated that program instructions and data may be stored and retrieved in other desired formats. For example, it is contemplated that program instructions executed by the computer may be stored in the hard drive of the computer, and data to be retrieved and processed by the computer may be stored in a central database that may be accessed by the computer via conventional computer network communications links. Such links would include those utilized in local area networks (LANs), wide area networks (WANs), the global computer network (Internet or world wide web), including wireless communication techniques and protocols known in the art.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 illustrates an exemplary computer screen display for providing critical information, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates an exemplary computer screen display after a user has selected a “top floor” icon from a menu window of the display screen of FIG. 1, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates an exemplary computer screen display after a user has selected a link icon corresponding to a “multi-purpose” room from the “top floor” layout diagram of FIG. 2, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates an exemplary computer screen display after a user has selected a door inside the multi-purpose room shown in FIG. 3, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates an exemplary computer screen display after a user has selected a link icon corresponding to “room 101” from the “top floor” layout diagram of FIG. 2, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates an exemplary computer screen display showing a hallway just outside of room 101 of FIG. 5 after a user has exited room 101, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates an exemplary detailed layout diagram of the Administrative Offices in the third window of the display screen after a user has selected an “Admin Offices” icon in the layout diagram of FIG. 6, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 8 illustrates an exemplary computer screen display after a user has selected a link icon corresponding to an area in the “Admin Offices” layout diagram of FIG. 7, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates an exemplary computer screen display after a user has selected an “aerial view” icon from the menu window, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 10 illustrates an exemplary computer screen display after a user has selected an “aerial animation” icon from the menu window, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 11 illustrates an exemplary window display after a user has selected a “Parking Lot Ingress Video” icon from the menu window, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 12 illustrates an exemplary streaming video display after a user has selected an ingress video option from the window display of FIG. 11, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 13 illustrates an exemplary “middle floor” layout diagram, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 14 illustrates an exemplary “bottom floor” layout diagram, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 15 illustrates an exemplary display window containing three scenes after a user has selected a “Primary Parking Lot and Exterior” icon from the menu window, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 15A illustrates an exemplary spherical image of an “Asphalt Playground” that is displayed after a user selects a link located in the lower right corner of the middle scene of FIG. 15, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 16 illustrates an exemplary computer screen display after a user has selected a “Critical Information & Telephone #'s” icon from the menu window, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 17 illustrates an exemplary computer screen display after a user has selected an “Administrative Personnel” icon shown in FIG. 16, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 18 illustrates an exemplary display window after a user has selected an “Alarm Company Information” icon shown in FIG. 16, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 19 illustrates an exemplary display window after a user has selected a “Communications Information” icon shown in FIG. 16, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 20 illustrates an exemplary display window after a user has selected a “Building Construction” icon shown in FIG. 16, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 21 illustrates an exemplary display window after a user has selected an “Emergency Utility Shut-Offs” icon shown in FIG. 16, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 22 illustrates an exemplary computer screen display after a user has selected an “Electrical Room” icon shown in FIG. 21, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIGS. 23A-F illustrate exemplary display windows that may be presented after a user has selected a “Total Main Electrical Shutoff Location” icon in the right most display window of FIG. 22, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIGS. 24A and B illustrate exemplary display windows that may be presented after a user has selected a “Total Main Gas Shutoff Location” icon in the right most display window of FIG. 22, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • The invention is described in detail below with reference to the figures wherein like elements are referred to with like numerals throughout. Although the description below is provided in the context of critical tactical information for a school campus, it is readily apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art that the principles and techniques of the present invention may be applied in a variety of other types of venues, buildings, campuses or scenarios (collectively referred to herein as “sites”).
  • Emergency personnel frequently respond to the scene of incidents and threats with a minimal amount of information regarding the site. In order to overcome this lack of “intelligence,” the invention provides a computer-based method and system for quickly and easily accessing and viewing various types of tactical information that may be desired by emergency personnel.
  • In one preferred embodiment, a computer system includes a CD-ROM drive that accesses program instructions and/or data from a CD ROM to provide desired critical information in various formats (e.g., text, graphics, video) on a computer screen display. As emergency personnel receive an emergency dispatch, a CD ROM for a particular site they are approaching may be loaded into the CD-ROM drive of the computer. In a preferred embodiment, the computer may be an in-vehicle computer system of an emergency personnel carrier (e.g., police squad car or van) which allows emergency personnel to access critical information pertaining to the particular site during transit to the site. The computer system further includes a hard drive, read-only memory (ROM) and/or random access memory (RAM) for storing program instructions executed by the CPU of the computer system. The computer system provides a graphic user interface on the computer monitor that allows users to specify desired information as described in further detail below.
  • In one preferred embodiment, the desired information is stored in a computer-readable storage medium (e.g., CD ROM, hard drive, ROM, Flash memory, RAM, floppy disk, etc.) and retrieved by the CPU in accordance with user requests and displayed to the user. In a further embodiment, the computer system includes a transceiver and antenna, and other processors, hardware and software known in the art, for retrieving critical information desired by the user via wireless communication protocols and techniques known in the art. As would be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art, the actual hardware and software required for carrying out the functions described herein may be implemented in various ways in accordance with desired performance criteria. Those of ordinary skill in the art can readily design such hardware architectures and create/write such software programs, without undue experimentation, in accordance with the preferred embodiments of the invention described herein.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates an exemplary computer screen display that may be presented to a user for facilitating the retrieval of tactical information, in accordance with one embodiment of the invention. As shown in FIG. 1, a left portion or first window of the display screen contains a menu 111 of various types of information that may be retrieved by the user. A middle portion or second window contains geographic and street maps 113 illustrating the location of the target destination (in this example, Grandview Elementary School). A right portion or third window contains a site map 115 which illustrates ground layout and site details for Grandview Elementary School. This initial display screen assists emergency personnel to quickly arrive at the destination and provides an overall general layout of the grounds before they arrive.
  • If the user desires further details about a particular building or floor within a building, the invention can provide this information in a quick and easy manner. By using a mouse cursor or other pointer, or a keyboard, the user can select a “top floor” icon, for example, from the menu 111 and get a layout diagram of the building structure for the top floor. FIG. 2 illustrates a computer display screen that may appear upon selecting “top floor” icon or link from the menu window 111. As shown in FIG. 2, the third window now displays a top floor layout diagram 117 of the desired building. Within the “top floor” layout diagram 117 are embedded icons or links that may be selected to obtain further information about a particular room or area associated with that link. In FIG. 2, these links are shown as small circular icons distributed about the diagram at various locations corresponding to rooms and locations on the top floor of the building. In one embodiment, the links may also be room numbers (e.g., room nos. 101-107) or other descriptors associated with each room. If the user wants to obtain information about a particular room, he or she can select or click on a corresponding link or icon.
  • Additionally, in one embodiment, as the user moves a cursor above areas or rooms outlined by the layout diagram 117, corresponding pop-up text messages may be presented to the user to instantly provide location-specific information about the particular area or room. Methods of providing such pop-up text messages that are mapped to locations of a graphic image are known in the art and may be implemented using known and commercially available programs such as, for example, iPOP Pro Sensomap™ from Image Intelligence, Ltd., located in Herefordshire, United Kingdom.
  • As further illustrated in FIG. 3, below the top floor layout diagram 117 are further links 119 that may be selected to obtain information about other features of the top floor such as utility shut-off information (“Utility Shut-Offs”), Administrative Office Details (“Admin Details”), or details about the exterior of the building (“Exterior”). The links 119 further include links to view a “Middle Floor” or “Bottom Floor” layout diagram for the building. It is appreciated that the additional links 119 are exemplary only. Links to any desired type of information whether they be in the form of text, graphic images, video or any combination of these formats, maybe provided. These additional links 119 allow emergency personnel to quickly and easily identify additional information that is available and to obtain that information at a click of a button (e.g., a mouse button).
  • FIG. 3 illustrates an exemplary display screen when a user has selected a link corresponding to a multi-purpose room in the top floor layout diagram 117. In the middle window, there is displayed a 360 degree spherical digital image 121 of the multi-purpose room. In a preferred embodiment, a user may navigate in this room by dragging a mouse cursor in a desired direction. In this fashion, the user can “look” up, down, right or left (or any combination of these directions) as if he or she were physically present in the room. In a preferred embodiment, known spherical digital imaging and software technology is used to provide the navigational spherical image of the room. Such spherical digital imaging technologies and methods of navigating in the images, so as to change the perspective or directional view shown to the user, are known in the art. Furthermore, as shown in FIG. 3, the user may zoom in, zoom out and automatically pan the room by selecting appropriate control icons 123 located in the lower, right corner of the digital image. Other known digital imaging functionalities (e.g., color enhancement, etc.) may be implemented as well. As also shown, under the spherical image 109 there is a sub-window 125 for displaying further textual information about the particular room or area selected that may be useful to emergency personnel.
  • In a preferred embodiment, as the user's mouse cursor moves over particular objects/structures within the spherical image, pop-up messages (not shown) may appear that provide critical information or instructions. For example, if the mouse cursor pans over a door, a pop-up message may appear containing information such as where the door leads to, material and thickness of the door, whether it opens inwardly or outwardly, where the hinges are located, etc. The pop-up message may further provide instructions such as “double click to proceed through door into next room.”
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a display screen after a user has clicked on a door from inside the multi-purpose room shown in FIG. 3. The middle display window now shows an image 127 of a view that would be seen by someone standing outside of the door, looking into the multi-purpose room. This image 127 is also a 360 degree spherical image and, therefore, the user may look up, down, to the right or to the left while standing at that point, as discussed above with respect to FIG. 3. As further illustrated in FIG. 4, the middle window further includes a sub-window 129, below the spherical image 127, that contains additional information about the area depicted in the image 127. In the example shown, the sub-window 129 contains additional information regarding current location and details about the particular doors shown in the image 127.
  • If the user is now interested in another room, he or she does not have to continue navigating through spherical images, which can become confusing, especially during a crisis situation. Instead, the user can simply return to the “top floor” layout 117 displayed in the third window and click on a desired room to “jump” into that room. FIG. 5 illustrates a display screen after a user has selected a link icon corresponding to room 101 from the layout diagram 117 in the third window. The middle window now contains a spherical digital image 131 of the selected room (e.g., room 101 of the top floor). As described above, a user may navigate in this image and view the entire room as if he or she is virtually present in the room. In a preferred embodiment, pop-up messages (not shown) are also implemented in this image. Thus, if the user pans over the image using a mouse cursor, for example, as the cursor becomes positioned over particular objects or areas within the image, pop-up messages may be programmably implemented to appear as desired by the designer of the method and system of the present invention. Such pop-up messages and methods of implementing the same in a graphic user interface (GUI) environment are well known in the art. As shown in FIG. 5, just below the spherical image 131 is a sub-window 133 which provides further details concerning the room shown in the spherical image 131.
  • If the user desires to exit room 101 through the door shown on the right portion of the image 131, he or she may position a mouse cursor, for example, over the door and click once or twice to indicate a desire to proceed through the door. FIG. 6 illustrates a display screen after such a process has occurred. The user is now presented with a spherical image 135 of the hallway just outside of room 101 as shown in FIG. 6. A sub-window 137 provides further detailed information about the hallway shown in image 135.
  • In one preferred embodiment, the invention further provides the ability to retrieve refined layout diagrams of portions of the top floor, or any other floor for that matter, which may be of particular interest to emergency personnel. For example, if emergency personnel desire further detailed information about the administrative offices, such personnel may obtain the information by selecting an “Admin Offices” icon or link in the layout diagram 117 or selecting “Admin Detail” icon 119 as shown in FIG. 6.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates a refined layout diagram 139 of the administration offices located on the top floor, shown in the right window of the display screen, presented to the user after he or she has selected the “Admin Offices” link in the layout diagram 117 (FIG. 6). In a preferred embodiment, located under this refined layout diagram 139, further detailed information pertaining to that area of the top floor is presented to the user. For example, each room is labeled and identified (e.g., M=mens restroom, W=woman's restroom, N=nurse's office, P=Principal's office, etc.). By selecting/clicking on a link icon for a particular location, a spherical image corresponding to that location can be displayed in the middle window.
  • FIG. 8 illustrates a new spherical image 141 that is displayed to the user after the user has selected a link icon corresponding to the hallway and reception area just outside of the administration offices. The spherical image 141 contains all the attributes and functionality as those described above. Again, a sub-window 143 below the image window 141 provides additional detailed information about the selected area that may be useful to emergency personnel.
  • The invention allows emergency personnel to access various other types of information with ease and speed. For example, by clicking on the link “Aerial View” in the menu 111 presented in the left window of the computer screen display, an aerial view image 145 is displayed in the middle window as shown in FIG. 9. This view may be useful, for example, to emergency personnel arriving at the scene in aircraft such as helicopters or planes. Furthermore, in one embodiment, an animated aerial video may be displayed to the user by clicking on the icon “Aerial Animation” provided by the menu 111 located in the left window of the display.
  • FIG. 10 illustrates that the middle window, in response, displays a moving video image 147 recorded while flying above and around the Grandview Elementary campus. In a preferred embodiment, the video 147 is a sequence of high-resolution still images that supports zoom-in and zoom-out functionality, created using commercial off-the-shelf software. In a preferred embodiment, by clicking and dragging a mouse cursor in a desired direction in the video image 147, various aerial perspectives may be instantly viewed by the user. As would be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art, the quality (e.g., frame speed and resolution) of the moving video presentation will be largely dependent on the processing capabilities and speed, and memory capacity of the computer system. Therefore, it is desirable to have a computer system that includes a fast processor and large memory capacity. In a preferred embodiment, the computer system includes at least an Intel Celeron™ 500 MHz CPU, 256 Kbytes of Cache, 256 Kbytes of RAM and a 5 GByte hard drive. In a preferred embodiment, the system includes an Intel Pentium III™ 500 MHz CPU, 256 Kbytes of Cache, 256 Kbytes of RAM and a 20 GByte hard drive.
  • In another embodiment, the menu 111 further provides a “site map” link that allows a user to retrieve and view a site map of the desired site in either the second or third window. An exemplary site map is shown in the right window of FIG. 1. Such a site map would include details concerning the relative locations and layout of buildings, parking lots, fields, and other areas on the site. Thus, emergency personnel can obtain an overview of the layout and topography of the site at a click of a button. In one preferred embodiment, a site map is provided as a default window in an initial computer screen display that is presented to the user by the method and system of the present invention.
  • Other types of critical tactical information may include information pertaining to the different routes/roads that may be taken to enter a particular site. By clicking on the link “Parking Lot Ingress Video” from the menu 111, a user may obtain various videos showing the landscape and overall topology of different routes of access to the site. FIG. 11 illustrates an exemplary video image 149 that may be displayed in a right window section, for example, of the computer screen display. As shown in FIG. 11, this window illustrates and labels four possible routes for entering the campus. A user may then select one of these routes by clicking on the appropriate link label. For example, if the user selects the link “Main Parking Lot Ingress From South,” in a preferred embodiment, the middle window will display a streaming MPEG video 151 of camera footage taken while entering the campus by that route, as shown in FIG. 12. Note, however, an illustration of the actual moving video is omitted in FIG. 12.
  • By selecting appropriate menu items from the menu 111 in the left window of the computer screen display, information pertaining to other floors of a building may be obtained. FIGS. 13 and 14 illustrate layout diagrams 153 and 155 for the middle and bottom floors, respectively. These can be navigated and used to view spherical images of desired rooms or areas as described above with respect to the top floor diagram. Obviously, if a building has many floors, additional menu items specifying floor numbers may be provided in the window.
  • FIG. 15 illustrates an exemplary display window containing three exemplary scenes 157, 159 and 161, after a user has selected the “Primary Parking Lot and Exterior” icon from the menu 111. As shown in FIG. 15, each of the three scenes show a unique perspective of the campus that may be useful in different ways to emergency personnel. As before, link icons are strategically placed in each of these scenes or images to enable the user to retrieve spherical images corresponding to a particular location or area in a respective image. These links can be seen as small dots in each of the scenes. FIG. 15A illustrates a spherical image 163 that is displayed in the middle window of the display after a user clicks on a link located in the lower right corner of image 157, for example, of FIG. 15.
  • In a preferred embodiment, by selecting the icon “Critical Information & Telephone #'s” in the menu 111, the user can access a large variety of information that may be needed in a crisis situation. FIG. 16 illustrates an exemplary computer screen display that is presented to the user after he or she has selected the “Critical Information & Telephone #'s” icon. The display provides a critical information index 165 in the middle window that allows the user to further refine his or her criteria to more specific types of information. In the example shown in FIG. 16, the user has further selected “General Information” from the index 165 to view general information 167 for Grandview Elementary presented in a right window of the display. By selecting other items from the index 165, the user may obtain other desired information.
  • FIG. 17 illustrates an exemplary list 169 that is displayed in a right window of a computer screen display when an “Administrative Personnel” link is selected from the index 165. FIGS. 18 and 19 illustrate exemplary lists 171 and 173 that are displayed when “Alarm Company Information” and “Communications Information” is selected from the index 165, respectively. FIGS. 20 and 21 illustrate exemplary lists 175 and 177 that are displayed when “Building Construction” and “Emergency Utility Shut-Offs” items are selected from the index 165, respectively.
  • As shown in FIG. 21, the window that displays “Emergency Utility Shut-Off information further includes links to access additional information. For example, under the first listing of information for “Total Main Electrical Shutoff Location,” there is a link, indicated by underlined text, to the “Electrical room next to cafeteria kitchen.” By clicking on this link, the user is provided a spherical image 179, in the middle window, of this electrical room, as shown in FIG. 22. FIG. 22 also illustrates an image 181 of a main circuit breaker that is located in the electrical room that is also provided to the user. By scrolling down the image in the middle window, additional critical information may be viewed. FIGS. 23A-F illustrate further images of secondary shutoffs 183, T-1 frame relay circuitry 185, a battery backup system 187, an alarm panel cabinet interior 189, an interior generator shed 191, a booster pump control panel 193, a fire pump transfer switch 195, and a heater 197 that may be of interest to emergency personnel.
  • Referring again to FIG. 21, if the user desires further information regarding the gas shutoff location, he or she may select the link under “Total Main Gas Shutoff Location=Behind cafeteria kitchen” in the window shown in FIG. 21. Upon doing so, the user will be presented with a window as illustrated in FIG. 24A. A top scene 199 of that window is a spherical image of the area outside of kitchen where the gas shut-off valve is located. As explained above, the user may navigate within this scene and view images of the surrounding area as if he or she is virtually present at that location. Under the spherical image 199, there are images 201 and 23 that provide further critical information as shown in FIG. 24B.
  • Appendix A attached hereto provides an overview of an exemplary process of conducting a tactical survey of a site in accordance with the preferred embodiments of the invention described above.
  • The invention provides a method and system for quickly and easily providing critical tactical information to emergency personnel during crisis situations. As described above, a large amount and variety of information may be efficiently delivered to emergency personnel to address a multitude of tactical concerns and issues. Such a comprehensive and user friendly system has heretofore been unknown to assist emergency personnel in crisis situations. One of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate that the above descriptions of the preferred embodiments are exemplary only and that the invention may be practiced with modifications or variations of the techniques disclosed above. Those of ordinary skill in the art will know, or be able to ascertain using no more than routine experimentation, many equivalents to the specific embodiments of the invention described herein. Such modifications, variations and equivalents are contemplated to be within the spirit and scope of the present invention as set forth in the claims below.

Claims (1)

1. In a computer system having a graphical user interface including a computer screen display and a selection device, a method of providing tactical information pertaining to a site, the method comprising:
providing a first window on said computer screen display, said first window displaying a menu of user-selectable categories of tactical information;
receiving a user selection of one of said categories of information;
retrieving tactical information corresponding to said selected category, wherein said tactical information is retrieved from a computer readable medium; and
providing a second window on said computer screen display, said second window displaying said retrieved tactical information corresponding to said selected category.
US12/330,365 2001-09-24 2008-12-08 Method and system for providing tactical information during crisis situations Abandoned US20090183123A1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US32653701P true 2001-09-24 2001-09-24
US10/190,230 US7134088B2 (en) 2001-09-24 2002-07-03 Method and system for providing tactical information during crisis situations
US11/542,949 US20070044033A1 (en) 2001-09-24 2006-10-03 Method and system for providing tactical information during crisis situations
US12/330,365 US20090183123A1 (en) 2001-09-24 2008-12-08 Method and system for providing tactical information during crisis situations

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/330,365 US20090183123A1 (en) 2001-09-24 2008-12-08 Method and system for providing tactical information during crisis situations

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/542,949 Continuation US20070044033A1 (en) 2001-09-24 2006-10-03 Method and system for providing tactical information during crisis situations

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20090183123A1 true US20090183123A1 (en) 2009-07-16

Family

ID=26885890

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/190,230 Active 2024-06-07 US7134088B2 (en) 2001-09-24 2002-07-03 Method and system for providing tactical information during crisis situations
US11/542,949 Abandoned US20070044033A1 (en) 2001-09-24 2006-10-03 Method and system for providing tactical information during crisis situations
US12/330,365 Abandoned US20090183123A1 (en) 2001-09-24 2008-12-08 Method and system for providing tactical information during crisis situations

Family Applications Before (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/190,230 Active 2024-06-07 US7134088B2 (en) 2001-09-24 2002-07-03 Method and system for providing tactical information during crisis situations
US11/542,949 Abandoned US20070044033A1 (en) 2001-09-24 2006-10-03 Method and system for providing tactical information during crisis situations

Country Status (8)

Country Link
US (3) US7134088B2 (en)
EP (1) EP1433159A4 (en)
JP (2) JP2005504383A (en)
AU (1) AU2008221600A1 (en)
CA (1) CA2461561A1 (en)
EA (1) EA006788B1 (en)
MX (1) MXPA04002712A (en)
WO (1) WO2003028002A1 (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20140065576A1 (en) * 2012-05-07 2014-03-06 Eads Deutschland Gmbh Device for Visualizing Military Operations

Families Citing this family (43)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
AU2003256376A1 (en) * 2002-02-27 2003-10-08 Industrial Interfaces Limited "A risk mapping system"
US7634156B2 (en) * 2002-07-27 2009-12-15 Archaio, Llc System and method for rapid emergency information distribution
US8050521B2 (en) * 2002-07-27 2011-11-01 Archaio, Llc System and method for simultaneously viewing, coordinating, manipulating and interpreting three-dimensional and two-dimensional digital images of structures for providing true scale measurements and permitting rapid emergency information distribution
US7672009B2 (en) * 2002-07-27 2010-03-02 Archaio, Llc Systems and methods for providing true scale measurements for digitized drawings
US20040085578A1 (en) * 2002-11-03 2004-05-06 Quek Su Mien Producing personalized photo calendar
US20050015222A1 (en) * 2003-07-14 2005-01-20 Harrington Kevin J. System and method for automated building incident response
US20050165633A1 (en) * 2004-01-28 2005-07-28 Huber Robert C. Method for reducing adverse effects of a disaster or other similar event upon the continuity of a business
US7502036B2 (en) * 2004-03-03 2009-03-10 Virtual Iris Studios, Inc. System for delivering and enabling interactivity with images
US7616834B2 (en) * 2004-03-03 2009-11-10 Virtual Iris Studios, Inc. System for delivering and enabling interactivity with images
US7542050B2 (en) 2004-03-03 2009-06-02 Virtual Iris Studios, Inc. System for delivering and enabling interactivity with images
US9185147B1 (en) * 2004-04-29 2015-11-10 Paul Erich Keel System and methods for remote collaborative intelligence analysis
US20060049933A1 (en) * 2004-09-09 2006-03-09 Kelley Sean P Method and apparatus for tactical planning
US20060118636A1 (en) * 2004-12-07 2006-06-08 Planready, Inc. System and method for coordinating movement of personnel
US20060190812A1 (en) * 2005-02-22 2006-08-24 Geovector Corporation Imaging systems including hyperlink associations
US7596608B2 (en) * 2005-03-18 2009-09-29 Liveprocess Corporation Networked emergency management system
US7954070B2 (en) * 2005-06-01 2011-05-31 Honeywell International Inc. Systems and methods for navigating graphical displays of buildings
US20080143709A1 (en) * 2006-12-14 2008-06-19 Earthmine, Inc. System and method for accessing three dimensional information from a panoramic image
WO2008127626A1 (en) * 2007-04-13 2008-10-23 Hntb Holdings Ltd System asset management
US20090049094A1 (en) * 2007-08-16 2009-02-19 Facility Audit Solutions, Llc System and method for performing site audits on facilities
US20090172131A1 (en) * 2007-12-28 2009-07-02 Sullivan Paul C Emergency Information System
US8549028B1 (en) 2008-01-24 2013-10-01 Case Global, Inc. Incident tracking systems and methods
US20090216438A1 (en) * 2008-02-21 2009-08-27 Microsoft Corporation Facility map framework
WO2009105603A1 (en) * 2008-02-22 2009-08-27 Innerguide Technologies Llc System for providing building and facility information for emergency response and crisis management
US8275394B2 (en) * 2008-03-20 2012-09-25 Nokia Corporation Nokia places floating profile
US20090237396A1 (en) * 2008-03-24 2009-09-24 Harris Corporation, Corporation Of The State Of Delaware System and method for correlating and synchronizing a three-dimensional site model and two-dimensional imagery
US8412231B1 (en) * 2008-04-28 2013-04-02 Open Invention Network, Llc Providing information to a mobile device based on an event at a geographical location
US20090285369A1 (en) * 2008-05-13 2009-11-19 Microsoft Corporation Emergency notification through reserved network communication channels
US7971812B2 (en) * 2008-06-16 2011-07-05 Michilin Prosperity Co., Ltd. Power saving shredder
WO2010127351A1 (en) * 2009-05-01 2010-11-04 Aai Corporation Method, apparatus, system and computer program product for automated collection and correlation for tactical information
US8676493B2 (en) * 2009-11-30 2014-03-18 Honeywell International Inc. Systems and methods for better alarm management
US8494121B1 (en) 2010-03-08 2013-07-23 Edwin C. Barnett System and method for gathering information at a crisis scene
US8406986B2 (en) 2010-04-27 2013-03-26 International Business Machines Corporation Emergency routing within a controllable transit system
US8311510B2 (en) 2010-05-26 2012-11-13 Gregory Cradick System for automatically providing firefighters with the floor plans for a burning building
US8930334B2 (en) * 2010-09-10 2015-01-06 Room 77, Inc. Creating a database that stores information about individual habitable units
US8621394B2 (en) 2011-08-26 2013-12-31 Nokia Corporation Method, apparatus and computer program product for displaying items on multiple floors in multi-level maps
WO2013070977A1 (en) 2011-11-10 2013-05-16 Room 77, Inc. Metasearch infrastructure with incremental updates
US9467662B2 (en) 2013-03-21 2016-10-11 Jeffrey Childers Emergency response system and method
US9257033B2 (en) * 2013-03-21 2016-02-09 Jeffrey Childers Emergency response system and method
US10176611B2 (en) * 2013-10-21 2019-01-08 Cellco Partnership Layer-based image updates
US9767717B1 (en) 2014-07-21 2017-09-19 Michael B Angelica Method and system for managing a critical incident operation
RU2605315C2 (en) * 2014-09-04 2016-12-20 Публичное акционерное общество "Невское проектно-конструкторское бюро" Automated system for information support to deployment, combat employment and transportation of target military equipment when operated from ships (vessels)
US10048077B2 (en) 2014-11-24 2018-08-14 Pornchai Direkwut Method and system of generating an indoor floor plan
US10240936B1 (en) * 2017-09-27 2019-03-26 Motorola Solutions, Inc. Device and method for electronically deploying responders

Citations (49)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4875034A (en) * 1988-02-08 1989-10-17 Brokenshire Daniel A Stereoscopic graphics display system with multiple windows for displaying multiple images
US4962473A (en) * 1988-12-09 1990-10-09 Itt Corporation Emergency action systems including console and security monitoring apparatus
US5295244A (en) * 1990-09-17 1994-03-15 Cabletron Systems, Inc. Network management system using interconnected hierarchies to represent different network dimensions in multiple display views
US5297252A (en) * 1991-05-07 1994-03-22 Don Becker Color graphics terminal for monitoring an alarm system
US5310349A (en) * 1992-04-30 1994-05-10 Jostens Learning Corporation Instructional management system
US5347628A (en) * 1990-01-18 1994-09-13 International Business Machines Corporation Method of graphically accessing electronic data
US5448696A (en) * 1990-11-30 1995-09-05 Hitachi, Ltd. Map information system capable of displaying layout information
US5504853A (en) * 1991-08-24 1996-04-02 International Business Machines Corporation System and method for selecting symbols and displaying their graphics objects in a detail window
US5528735A (en) * 1993-03-23 1996-06-18 Silicon Graphics Inc. Method and apparatus for displaying data within a three-dimensional information landscape
US5734805A (en) * 1994-06-17 1998-03-31 International Business Machines Corporation Apparatus and method for controlling navigation in 3-D space
US5748109A (en) * 1993-12-27 1998-05-05 Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for navigating vehicle to destination using display unit
US5794216A (en) * 1995-07-14 1998-08-11 Brown; Timothy Robert Methods and system for data acquisition in a multimedia real estate database
US5793882A (en) * 1995-03-23 1998-08-11 Portable Data Technologies, Inc. System and method for accounting for personnel at a site and system and method for providing personnel with information about an emergency site
US5821937A (en) * 1996-02-23 1998-10-13 Netsuite Development, L.P. Computer method for updating a network design
US5896133A (en) * 1994-04-29 1999-04-20 General Magic Graphical user interface for navigating between street, hallway, room, and function metaphors
US5940089A (en) * 1995-11-13 1999-08-17 Ati Technologies Method and apparatus for displaying multiple windows on a display monitor
US5971580A (en) * 1996-04-17 1999-10-26 Raytheon Company Tactical awareness monitoring and direct response system
US5977872A (en) * 1997-01-09 1999-11-02 Guertin; Thomas George Building emergency simulator
US5995106A (en) * 1993-05-24 1999-11-30 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Graphical user interface for displaying and navigating in a directed graph structure
US6002853A (en) * 1995-10-26 1999-12-14 Wegener Internet Projects Bv System for generating graphics in response to a database search
US6006161A (en) * 1996-08-02 1999-12-21 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Land vehicle navigation system with multi-screen mode selectivity
US6008808A (en) * 1997-12-31 1999-12-28 Nortel Network Corporation Tools for data manipulation and visualization
US6037936A (en) * 1993-09-10 2000-03-14 Criticom Corp. Computer vision system with a graphic user interface and remote camera control
US6041281A (en) * 1995-10-31 2000-03-21 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Information guidance system based on structure configuration map
US6061688A (en) * 1997-11-04 2000-05-09 Marathon Oil Company Geographical system for accessing data
US6091417A (en) * 1998-03-16 2000-07-18 Earthlink Network, Inc. Graphical user interface
US6097389A (en) * 1997-10-24 2000-08-01 Pictra, Inc. Methods and apparatuses for presenting a collection of digital media in a media container
US6097393A (en) * 1996-09-03 2000-08-01 The Takshele Corporation Computer-executed, three-dimensional graphical resource management process and system
US6121966A (en) * 1992-11-02 2000-09-19 Apple Computer, Inc. Navigable viewing system
US6121969A (en) * 1997-07-29 2000-09-19 The Regents Of The University Of California Visual navigation in perceptual databases
US6141014A (en) * 1995-04-20 2000-10-31 Hitachi, Ltd. Bird's-eye view forming method, map display apparatus and navigation system
US6144920A (en) * 1997-08-29 2000-11-07 Denso Corporation Map displaying apparatus
US6151024A (en) * 1998-03-31 2000-11-21 International Business Machines Corporation Data processor controlled display interface with tree hierarchy of elements view expandable into multiple detailed views
US6167394A (en) * 1998-05-11 2000-12-26 General Electric Company Information management system with remote access and display features
US6169552B1 (en) * 1996-04-16 2001-01-02 Xanavi Informatics Corporation Map display device, navigation device and map display method
US6192266B1 (en) * 1998-03-26 2001-02-20 Boston Scientific Corporation Systems and methods for controlling the use of diagnostic or therapeutic instruments in interior body regions using real and idealized images
US6195122B1 (en) * 1995-01-31 2001-02-27 Robert Vincent Spatial referenced photography
US6201544B1 (en) * 1997-08-11 2001-03-13 Alpine Electronics, Inc. Location floor number display device in navigation apparatus
US6222557B1 (en) * 1998-06-26 2001-04-24 Visual Insights, Inc. Navigation system and method for viewing a 3D data landscape
US6232977B1 (en) * 1996-05-08 2001-05-15 Mgi Software Corporation Rendering perspective views of a scene using a scanline-coherent look-up table
US6247020B1 (en) * 1997-12-17 2001-06-12 Borland Software Corporation Development system with application browser user interface
US6271842B1 (en) * 1997-04-04 2001-08-07 International Business Machines Corporation Navigation via environmental objects in three-dimensional workspace interactive displays
US6321158B1 (en) * 1994-06-24 2001-11-20 Delorme Publishing Company Integrated routing/mapping information
US6563529B1 (en) * 1999-10-08 2003-05-13 Jerry Jongerius Interactive system for displaying detailed view and direction in panoramic images
US6604126B2 (en) * 2001-04-11 2003-08-05 Richard S. Neiman Structural data presentation method
US6748400B2 (en) * 2000-06-22 2004-06-08 David F. Quick Data access system and method
US6873256B2 (en) * 2002-06-21 2005-03-29 Dorothy Lemelson Intelligent building alarm
US6917288B2 (en) * 1999-09-01 2005-07-12 Nettalon Security Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for remotely monitoring a site
US6978418B1 (en) * 1999-04-13 2005-12-20 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Dynamic-adaptive client-side image map

Family Cites Families (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
CA2057961C (en) * 1991-05-06 2000-06-13 Robert Paff Graphical workstation for integrated security system
US20020059246A1 (en) * 1999-07-13 2002-05-16 Steve Rowe Method of distributing information to emergency personnel
US6307573B1 (en) * 1999-07-22 2001-10-23 Barbara L. Barros Graphic-information flow method and system for visually analyzing patterns and relationships
US7035864B1 (en) * 2000-05-18 2006-04-25 Endeca Technologies, Inc. Hierarchical data-driven navigation system and method for information retrieval
EP1344123A4 (en) * 2000-12-18 2007-04-25 Wireless Valley Comm Inc Textual and graphical demarcation of location, and interpretation of measurements
WO2003001468A2 (en) * 2001-06-21 2003-01-03 Crisis Technologies, Inc. Method and system for emergency planning and management of a facility

Patent Citations (50)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4875034A (en) * 1988-02-08 1989-10-17 Brokenshire Daniel A Stereoscopic graphics display system with multiple windows for displaying multiple images
US4962473A (en) * 1988-12-09 1990-10-09 Itt Corporation Emergency action systems including console and security monitoring apparatus
US5347628A (en) * 1990-01-18 1994-09-13 International Business Machines Corporation Method of graphically accessing electronic data
US5295244A (en) * 1990-09-17 1994-03-15 Cabletron Systems, Inc. Network management system using interconnected hierarchies to represent different network dimensions in multiple display views
US5448696A (en) * 1990-11-30 1995-09-05 Hitachi, Ltd. Map information system capable of displaying layout information
US5297252A (en) * 1991-05-07 1994-03-22 Don Becker Color graphics terminal for monitoring an alarm system
US5504853A (en) * 1991-08-24 1996-04-02 International Business Machines Corporation System and method for selecting symbols and displaying their graphics objects in a detail window
US5310349A (en) * 1992-04-30 1994-05-10 Jostens Learning Corporation Instructional management system
US6121966A (en) * 1992-11-02 2000-09-19 Apple Computer, Inc. Navigable viewing system
US5528735A (en) * 1993-03-23 1996-06-18 Silicon Graphics Inc. Method and apparatus for displaying data within a three-dimensional information landscape
US5671381A (en) * 1993-03-23 1997-09-23 Silicon Graphics, Inc. Method and apparatus for displaying data within a three-dimensional information landscape
US5995106A (en) * 1993-05-24 1999-11-30 Sun Microsystems, Inc. Graphical user interface for displaying and navigating in a directed graph structure
US6037936A (en) * 1993-09-10 2000-03-14 Criticom Corp. Computer vision system with a graphic user interface and remote camera control
US5748109A (en) * 1993-12-27 1998-05-05 Nissan Motor Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for navigating vehicle to destination using display unit
US5896133A (en) * 1994-04-29 1999-04-20 General Magic Graphical user interface for navigating between street, hallway, room, and function metaphors
US5734805A (en) * 1994-06-17 1998-03-31 International Business Machines Corporation Apparatus and method for controlling navigation in 3-D space
US6321158B1 (en) * 1994-06-24 2001-11-20 Delorme Publishing Company Integrated routing/mapping information
US6195122B1 (en) * 1995-01-31 2001-02-27 Robert Vincent Spatial referenced photography
US5793882A (en) * 1995-03-23 1998-08-11 Portable Data Technologies, Inc. System and method for accounting for personnel at a site and system and method for providing personnel with information about an emergency site
US6141014A (en) * 1995-04-20 2000-10-31 Hitachi, Ltd. Bird's-eye view forming method, map display apparatus and navigation system
US5794216A (en) * 1995-07-14 1998-08-11 Brown; Timothy Robert Methods and system for data acquisition in a multimedia real estate database
US6002853A (en) * 1995-10-26 1999-12-14 Wegener Internet Projects Bv System for generating graphics in response to a database search
US6041281A (en) * 1995-10-31 2000-03-21 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Information guidance system based on structure configuration map
US5940089A (en) * 1995-11-13 1999-08-17 Ati Technologies Method and apparatus for displaying multiple windows on a display monitor
US5821937A (en) * 1996-02-23 1998-10-13 Netsuite Development, L.P. Computer method for updating a network design
US6169552B1 (en) * 1996-04-16 2001-01-02 Xanavi Informatics Corporation Map display device, navigation device and map display method
US5971580A (en) * 1996-04-17 1999-10-26 Raytheon Company Tactical awareness monitoring and direct response system
US6232977B1 (en) * 1996-05-08 2001-05-15 Mgi Software Corporation Rendering perspective views of a scene using a scanline-coherent look-up table
US6006161A (en) * 1996-08-02 1999-12-21 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Land vehicle navigation system with multi-screen mode selectivity
US6097393A (en) * 1996-09-03 2000-08-01 The Takshele Corporation Computer-executed, three-dimensional graphical resource management process and system
US5977872A (en) * 1997-01-09 1999-11-02 Guertin; Thomas George Building emergency simulator
US6271842B1 (en) * 1997-04-04 2001-08-07 International Business Machines Corporation Navigation via environmental objects in three-dimensional workspace interactive displays
US6121969A (en) * 1997-07-29 2000-09-19 The Regents Of The University Of California Visual navigation in perceptual databases
US6201544B1 (en) * 1997-08-11 2001-03-13 Alpine Electronics, Inc. Location floor number display device in navigation apparatus
US6144920A (en) * 1997-08-29 2000-11-07 Denso Corporation Map displaying apparatus
US6097389A (en) * 1997-10-24 2000-08-01 Pictra, Inc. Methods and apparatuses for presenting a collection of digital media in a media container
US6061688A (en) * 1997-11-04 2000-05-09 Marathon Oil Company Geographical system for accessing data
US6247020B1 (en) * 1997-12-17 2001-06-12 Borland Software Corporation Development system with application browser user interface
US6008808A (en) * 1997-12-31 1999-12-28 Nortel Network Corporation Tools for data manipulation and visualization
US6091417A (en) * 1998-03-16 2000-07-18 Earthlink Network, Inc. Graphical user interface
US6192266B1 (en) * 1998-03-26 2001-02-20 Boston Scientific Corporation Systems and methods for controlling the use of diagnostic or therapeutic instruments in interior body regions using real and idealized images
US6151024A (en) * 1998-03-31 2000-11-21 International Business Machines Corporation Data processor controlled display interface with tree hierarchy of elements view expandable into multiple detailed views
US6167394A (en) * 1998-05-11 2000-12-26 General Electric Company Information management system with remote access and display features
US6222557B1 (en) * 1998-06-26 2001-04-24 Visual Insights, Inc. Navigation system and method for viewing a 3D data landscape
US6978418B1 (en) * 1999-04-13 2005-12-20 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. Dynamic-adaptive client-side image map
US6917288B2 (en) * 1999-09-01 2005-07-12 Nettalon Security Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for remotely monitoring a site
US6563529B1 (en) * 1999-10-08 2003-05-13 Jerry Jongerius Interactive system for displaying detailed view and direction in panoramic images
US6748400B2 (en) * 2000-06-22 2004-06-08 David F. Quick Data access system and method
US6604126B2 (en) * 2001-04-11 2003-08-05 Richard S. Neiman Structural data presentation method
US6873256B2 (en) * 2002-06-21 2005-03-29 Dorothy Lemelson Intelligent building alarm

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20140065576A1 (en) * 2012-05-07 2014-03-06 Eads Deutschland Gmbh Device for Visualizing Military Operations
US9530330B2 (en) * 2012-05-07 2016-12-27 Airbus Defence and Space GmbH Device for visualizing military operations

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
JP2005504383A (en) 2005-02-10
EA200400472A1 (en) 2004-12-30
EP1433159A1 (en) 2004-06-30
MXPA04002712A (en) 2005-11-04
EA006788B1 (en) 2006-04-28
JP2007249977A (en) 2007-09-27
CA2461561A1 (en) 2003-04-03
EP1433159A4 (en) 2006-10-18
US7134088B2 (en) 2006-11-07
US20070044033A1 (en) 2007-02-22
US20030058283A1 (en) 2003-03-27
WO2003028002A1 (en) 2003-04-03
AU2008221600A1 (en) 2008-10-16

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6493633B2 (en) Systems and methods for distributing real-time site specific weather information
US5675721A (en) Computer network data distribution and selective retrieval system
US8532609B2 (en) Apparatus and method for broadcasting messages to selected group(s) of users
US6947976B1 (en) System and method for providing location-based and time-based information to a user of a handheld device
US8769013B1 (en) Notifications using a situational network
US8484576B2 (en) System and method for customizing multiple windows of information on a display
CN101964823B (en) Interactive weather advisory system
AU785213B2 (en) Method and apparatus for intuitively administering networked computer systems
US6661353B1 (en) Method for displaying interactive flight map information
JP3831706B2 (en) Wireless communication system and method for providing geospatial related event data
KR100719765B1 (en) System and method for highly accurate real time tracking and location in three dimensions
US6018699A (en) Systems and methods for distributing real-time site specific weather information
US5958012A (en) Network management system using virtual reality techniques to display and simulate navigation to network components
US7248159B2 (en) User-centric event reporting
US8621032B2 (en) Method and apparatus for intuitively administering networked computer systems
US20020154174A1 (en) Method and system for providing a service in a photorealistic, 3-D environment
US8947421B2 (en) Method and server computer for generating map images for creating virtual spaces representing the real world
US20050219048A1 (en) Method and apparatus for remotely monitoring a site
US7724130B2 (en) Systems and methods for distributing emergency messages
US20110131597A1 (en) Data-Driven 3D Traffic Views with the View Based on User-Selected Start and End Geographical Locations
Kyng et al. Challenges in designing interactive systems for emergency response
EP1433132B1 (en) Interactive electronically presented map
Monares et al. Mobile computing in urban emergency situations: Improving the support to firefighters in the field
US20100100319A1 (en) Mobile Navigation System with Graphic Crime-Risk Display
JP5367380B2 (en) User-defined private map

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: TACTICAL SURVEY GROUP, INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:LARSEN, STEVE;REEL/FRAME:022463/0728

Effective date: 20020813