US20090162506A1 - Methods of preparing food and a multi-compartment container and lid assembly for practicing the methods - Google Patents

Methods of preparing food and a multi-compartment container and lid assembly for practicing the methods Download PDF

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US20090162506A1
US20090162506A1 US11/974,339 US97433907A US2009162506A1 US 20090162506 A1 US20090162506 A1 US 20090162506A1 US 97433907 A US97433907 A US 97433907A US 2009162506 A1 US2009162506 A1 US 2009162506A1
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sub
tray
trays
master tray
lid
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Abandoned
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US11/974,339
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Majorie Weir
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Majorie Weir
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Priority to US43474302P priority Critical
Priority to US10/741,285 priority patent/US7326428B2/en
Application filed by Majorie Weir filed Critical Majorie Weir
Priority to US11/974,339 priority patent/US20090162506A1/en
Publication of US20090162506A1 publication Critical patent/US20090162506A1/en
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47JKITCHEN EQUIPMENT; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; APPARATUS FOR MAKING BEVERAGES
    • A47J47/00Miscellaneous kitchen containers, stands, or the like; Cutting-boards, e.g. for bread
    • A47J47/02Closed containers for foodstuffs
    • A47J47/08Closed containers for foodstuffs for non-granulated foodstuffs
    • A47J47/10Closed containers for foodstuffs for non-granulated foodstuffs with arrangements for keeping fresh

Abstract

Methods of preparing food and a divided container system used in the preparation. The container system has a master tray having an interior portion and a peripheral top edge, at least one insertable sub-tray positionable within the interior portion of the master tray, in which each sub-tray includes a peripheral top edge and an interior portion, and a lid for sealing both the master tray and the at least one insertable sub-tray. There are means securing a sub-tray in place within in the master tray.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • This application claims the benefit of pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/741,285 filed Dec. 18, 2003.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates generally to a container for holding at least one item, and more particularly, to a compartmentalized container particularly adapted for storing multiple items separated from each other within a single container for storage and transportation thereof, such as fresh sandwich and salad ingredients.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Restaurants, typically of the take-out variety, such as those involved mostly with sandwich and salad preparations, have developed methods of storing ingredients required to prepare sandwiches and salads to an individual order. Special tray arrangements contain the precut ingredients, typically in large quantities, readily available for use. Similarly, many supermarkets have point-of-sale storage and display arrangements for volume sales of such precut ingredients. A storage system for sandwich and salad ingredients in the home would be highly desirable. The home situation differs from that in a restaurant or supermarket. For example, in a restaurant or supermarket, volume sales may require frequent replenishment of ingredients, and food and health laws may deter storage of ingredients from one day to the next. In the home, such ingredients are need only at certain times, and the consumer may want to retain ingredients for longer periods.
  • The home environment is one area in which it is desirable to provide suitable sandwich and salad ingredient storage. For instance, collecting individual sandwich and salad ingredients from various parts of the refrigerator requires leaving the refrigerator door open for an extended time while searching for the multiple items. It would thus be desirable to provide a single storage unit for containing the needed ingredients so that such a storage unit containing multiple items can be withdrawn from the refrigerator at a single time. A home storage system for a plurality of items, such as sandwich or salad ingredients, may desirably be compartmentalized to hold smaller quantities, maintain freshness and meet the storage requirements of different ingredients. In particular, it would be desirable to have a flexible system that can accommodate multiple containers of various sizes. A compartmentalized storage system should be easily stored in a home refrigerator, be space-efficient, and have other desirable features as described below.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In accordance with the present invention, a storage and display compartmentalized tray system is provided to allow for effective separation of ingredients included within a single tray, such as would be particularly advantageous for strong flavored ingredients (e.g., onions, peppers, olives, etc.) and for ingredients having different storage requirements (e.g., juicy tomatoes vs. moisture-sensitive lettuce). Such a tray system is desirably designed and manufactured to retain ingredient freshness and eye-appeal for extended time periods. In addition, the tray system of the present invention advantageously provides for convenient and safe transport of the ingredients without refrigeration, such as for meals away from home or for outdoor activities. The storage system includes optional features to aid in maintaining the contents of the container at an acceptable low temperature for an extended period.
  • The container is especially suitable for individual consumer use, although it is also useful for more commercial applications. The container includes a master tray with a selection of sub-trays designed and adapted to nest adjacent to one another within the master tray. Each sub-tray can retain a separate food item, such as a sandwich or salad ingredient, for example. The sub-trays can have various features to maintain separation and freshness according to the requirements of each food item. Optimally, the sub-trays together completely occupy the master tray. Less than complete occupancy of the master tray is possible, according to the needs of specific ingredients or specific occasions. A lid for the compartmentalized container is preferably constructed and designed so that the lid seals both the individual sub-trays and the master tray.
  • In one aspect of this invention, a divided container system is provided, comprising a master tray having an interior portion and a peripheral top edge, at least one insertable sub-tray positionable within the interior portion of the master tray, in which each sub-tray includes a peripheral top edge and an interior portion, and a lid for sealing both the master tray and any insertable sub-trays. In this embodiment, the lid comprises an upper surface, a lower surface, a plurality of sealing surfaces extending from the lower surface of the lid that are arranged to abut with the peripheral top edge of the at least one insertable sub-tray to thereby seal the interior portion of the insertable sub-trays from the interior portion of the master tray, and a peripheral sealing surface for sealable contact with the peripheral top edge of the master tray.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The present invention will be further explained with reference to the appended Figures, in which like structure is referred to by like numerals throughout the several views, and in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a top perspective view of a master tray of the present invention, illustrating one possible array of various sized sub-trays that substantially fill the master tray;
  • FIG. 2 is a front-end view of the exterior of a master tray, showing a latch for retaining the lid and a label;
  • FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional exploded view of a master tray of the type shown in FIG. 1, illustrating the interior portion having two sub-trays, an individual lid for the left-hand sub-tray, and an overall lid suspended in position to lower into sealing arrangement with the master tray and sub-trays;
  • FIG. 4 is an enlarged detail of the view of FIG. 3, showing a cut-away of a hollow interior of the overall lid containing a freezable gel;
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the tray system of FIG. 1 including a lid constructed for sealing engagement with both the master tray and the individual sub-trays;
  • FIG. 6 is a perspective view of a support to elevate a master tray above another surface;
  • FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a compartmentalized storage system of the present invention inside a refrigerator;
  • FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a covered master tray with hinged tabs for locking the lid onto the tray;
  • FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a master tray with an array of sub-trays and a lid with a task-specific surface in position for lowering into sealing engagement with both the master tray and the individual sub-trays;
  • FIG. 10 is a perspective view of a one-piece construction of sub-trays with a suspended lid;
  • FIG. 11 is a perspective view of a several individual sub-trays as they can nest within one another, along with a corresponding lid;
  • FIG. 12 is a top perspective view of another arrangement of sub-trays within a master tray, in accordance with the present invention;
  • FIG. 13 is a bottom perspective view of the arrangement of sub-trays shown in FIG. 12 with the master tray removed, and including a lid positioned relative to the sub-trays in the same manner the lid could be positioned on the master tray of FIG. 12; and
  • FIG. 14 is a perspective view of a tray system including a master tray holding sub-trays and a lid covering the master tray and sub-trays.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • Referring now to the Figures, in which the components are labeled with like numerals throughout the several Figures, and initially to FIGS. 1 and 5, one embodiment of a compartmentalized tray system 10 of the present invention is illustrated. Tray system 10 generally includes a master tray 12, plural separate insertable sub-trays 14, and a lid 16 (see FIG. 5), which may be completely separable from the master tray 12, or may be connected to the master tray 12 via a hinged connection, for example. In particular, the master tray 12 preferably has dimensions that allow it to accommodate individual insertable and removable sub-trays 14 of various sizes. In addition, the sub-trays 14 are preferably sized to be placed adjacent to each other within the master tray 12 to “fill” the interior portion of the master tray 12 (i.e., to maximize the amount of the internal volume of the container that is occupied by sub-trays 14). For example, FIGS. 1 and 5 illustrate a tray system 10 that includes nine sub-trays 14 of various sizes that are selected and arranged to substantially fill the interior portion of the master tray 12. However, it is contemplated that the interior portion of the master tray 12 is only partially occupied by sub-trays 14, as will be discussed in further detail below. Further, FIG. 14 illustrates another embodiment of a tray system 10, with a variety of differently sized sub-trays being held therein and a lid 16 positioned on top of the master tray 12.
  • The dimensions of the master tray 12 and sub-trays 14 relative to each other are preferably chosen to allow a selection of sub-trays 14 to occupy the interior of the master tray 12 completely (or substantially completely), when desired. For one example, a master tray 12 may have dimensions of 5y in length and 4y in width, where y represents one side of the smallest sub-tray 14 that would typically be used in a particular tray system. Referring again to FIG. 5, the lid 16 shows such an arrangement, with five grid sections in the direction of the length, and four grid sections in the direction of the width. In this example, a master tray 12 could accommodate sub-trays 14 whose individual length and width dimensions are multiples of y. If, for instance y is 7.62 cm (3 inches), the master tray 12 could have a width of 30.48 cm (12 inches) and a length of 38.10 cm (15 inches), providing for sub-trays 14 having length and width dimensions that are multiples of 7.62 cm (3 inches) in order to occupy the total interior area of the master tray 12. The multiplier (i.e., y in the above example) may be the same in both the length and width dimensions to provide the maximum flexibility for arranging sub-trays 14 within a master tray 12, since the sub-trays 14 can be oriented in either direction. Alternatively, the multiplier in the length dimension may be different than the multiplier in the width dimension, which may require additional user manipulation and positioning to optimally arrange sub-trays 14 within a master tray 12, since the sub-trays 14 may fit together better when oriented in one particular way relative to the master tray 12.
  • As can be seen best in FIG. 3, the sub-trays 14 may be made to be at least slightly smaller in at least one dimension than the dimensions that would be needed to completely fill a master tray 12 with adjacent sub-trays. In this way, a small clearance space 13 can be provided between adjacent sub-trays 14 and/or between sub-trays 14 and the side of the master tray 12 so that individual sub-trays 14 may be inserted into and removed from the master tray 12 more easily than if no such clearance space is provided between adjacent sub-trays 14. However, no clearance space or gap 13 necessarily needs to be provided between adjacent tray walls.
  • One example of a master tray 12 can be about 5.08 cm (2 inches) to about 10.16 cm (4 inches) deep, with sub-trays 14 of a slightly smaller depth to allow for easier insertion and removal, depending on the construction materials. It is understood that it may be preferable in some situations for the depth of the sub-trays 14 to match or closely match the depth of the master tray 12 in order to maximize the volume of materials that can be held within each sub-tray 14 and to allow for easier sealing to a lid 16, as will be described below. However, the sub-trays 14 may instead have a depth that is slightly or substantially less than that of the master tray 12, which would require a lid that has a recessed portion to reach the upper surfaces of the sub-trays 14, as will also be described in further detail below.
  • An assortment of differently sized and shaped sub-trays 14 can be made available to fit in various combinations within the master tray 12. Thus, the master tray 12 can be adapted for use with a small number of sub-trays 14 (e.g., two or even one sub-tray positioned therein, where such sub-trays can be relatively large) or a larger number of sub-trays 14 (e.g., twenty sub-trays positioned therein, where such sub-trays are relatively small). While an optimal arrangement of sub-trays 14 would fill the master tray 12 completely, a less than optimal arrangement can be used, and is contemplated as included within the scope of the present invention. One example of such an arrangement is illustrated in FIGS. 12 and 13, where various sub-trays 14 are positioned within a master tray 12 with so that spaces or vacancies 15 remain between some of the sub-trays 14. In an arrangement of this type, the spaces 15 may simply be left empty, or items may be stored in the spaces 15 while other items may be stored within the sub-trays 14. For one example, food products may be held within the sub-trays 14 while napkins and utensils may be stored within a space 15 between sub-trays 14.
  • As is shown best in FIG. 3, the sub-trays 14 may optionally be provided with a recessed area 50 in each of their outside bottom surfaces, and the bottom interior surface 52 of the master tray 12 may be provided with at least one corresponding raised surface or protuberance 54. In this way, the recessed area 50 of a sub-tray 14 can nest or fit onto a raised surface 54 to “lock” or hold the sub-tray 14 in place relative to the other sub-trays 14 and/or the interior portion of the master tray 12. The gap or space shown between the recessed area 50 and protuberance 54 is for illustration purposes, where the actual space between the surfaces may be larger or may be essentially eliminated, as when the surfaces actually touch each other for a frictional fit. Preferably, multiple raised surfaces 54 are provided across the bottom surface 52 of the master tray 12 to accommodate multiple sub-trays 14 for securing such sub-trays in place. It is further preferred that when such multiple raised areas are provided, they are designed in such a way that sub-trays 14 of various sizes can fit onto the raised surfaces 54. This may be accomplished in a variety of ways. For one example, a master tray 12 may be provided with an array of raised surfaces 54 that are spaced from one another in a pattern that can accommodate sub-trays 14 that have one or more recessed areas that can fit over one or more of the raised surfaces 54. Referring again to FIG. 12, for example, a sub-tray 56 may have a recessed area that fits onto a single raised surface, while a sub-tray 58 (which is approximately twice as wide as the sub-tray 56) can have one recessed area that is large enough to fit over two raised surfaces, or may have two recessed areas to slide or fit over two adjacent raised surfaces.
  • While the recessed areas 50 and corresponding raised surfaces 54 are illustrated as being relatively square or rectangular in shape, it is understood that any mating shapes can be used for these features, such as rectangular, circular, elliptical, triangular, or the like. It is further understood that recessed areas may instead be recessed into the bottom of the master tray and that the bottom surface of the sub-trays may then include corresponding protuberances. Further, the master trays and sub-trays may instead include other types of features for holding the sub-trays in place relative to a master tray in which it is positioned, such as sub-trays with interlocking side walls or other securing features, for example.
  • FIG. 3 is a cross-sectional view of a master tray 12 showing the interior portion of the tray with two sub-trays 14 adjacent to one another. As discussed above, a small gap 13 may optionally be provided between sub-trays 14 for easier removal and insertion of sub-trays 14. As seen in FIGS. 3 and 4, individual lids 18 may optionally be provided for the sub-trays 14, in addition to an overall lid 16 that is large enough to cover the entire master tray 12. In particular, FIGS. 3 and 4 each show a lid 16 suspended in position to lower into sealing arrangement with a master tray 12 and two different arrays of sub-trays 14. More particularly, each of these Figures illustrates an interior lid 18 for a sub-tray 14 of the left side of the corresponding master tray 12. Any of the individual lids 18 and/or the overall lid 16 may have beveled edges 24 that preferably mate with corresponding beveled edges 25 on the top surface of the sides of the master tray 12 and/or corresponding beveled edges on the top surface of the sides of the individual sub-trays 14. In this way, each lid 16, 18 is capable of being partially or entirely positioned within the interior of its respective master tray 12 or sub-tray 14. In other words, each lid 16, 18 may optionally be insertable within either a sub-tray 14 or master tray 12 so that the top surface of the lid is flush with the sides of the corresponding sub-tray or master tray. The master tray 12 and sub-trays 14 may each have individual sealing lids 16, 18 that snap-fit into place, or otherwise fasten onto the top of the master tray 12 or the tops of the individual sub-trays 14, respectively, as seen in FIGS. 3 through 5, 8 and 9. Individual sealing lids 18 for each sub-tray 14, as in FIGS. 3 and 4, keep the ingredients fresh and safe from excessive dehydration during storage and before use, such as in the refrigerator.
  • Preferably, as seen for example in FIG. 5, the lid 16 of the master tray 12 is provided with a pattern or grid of sealing surfaces 28 sized to the openings of the array of sub-trays 14 nested within the master tray 12. In such an embodiment, the outer perimeter of the lid 16 seals the outer perimeter of the master tray 12 while the sealing surfaces 28 simultaneously contact and seal the outer perimeter of each of the individual sub-trays 14 positioned within the master tray 12. FIG. 5 shows a lid 16 with an array of sealing surfaces 28 to interfit with the rims of both the master tray 12 and the sub-trays 14. The sealing surfaces 28 are preferably arranged to have the capability of sealing any sub-tray 14 that may be contained within the corresponding master tray. In this particular example, sealing surfaces 28 of the lid 16 arranged to that they may interfit with or seal up to a maximum of twenty sub-trays 14. However, these sealing surfaces 28 are also arranged for sealing sub-trays that are sized to be multiples of each grid square 29, where the larger sub-trays will contact only some of the sealing surfaces 28 of adjacent plural grid squares 29. For example, in the embodiment shown in FIG. 5, the sealing surfaces 28 within the lid 16 will contact the rims of the nine sub-trays 14, so there will be some sealing surfaces 28 that will not be in contact with a surface of a sub-tray 14.
  • The master tray 12 and sub-trays 14 may be made of synthetic resin, with a smooth interior and rounded corners to facilitate easy cleaning, and a sanded or pebbled exterior to facilitate secure, non-slip gripping. In addition, the interior of the lid 16 of the master tray 12 or the opening of each contained sub-tray 14 may be formed with a soft synthetic resin or other material that allows corresponding areas of the lid 16 of the master tray 12 and sub-tray 14 openings fit and seal together smoothly. The sub-trays 14 may be made of thin synthetic resin material for disposal after use, if desired, or may alternatively be made of a more durable material for sub-tray reuse, if desired. The material from which the planar surface of the lid 16 is made may be relatively transparent to allow viewing of the contents of the sub-trays 14, or may instead be relatively opaque, as desired. In one preferred embodiment, the sealing surfaces 28 are made of a relatively soft durometer material (e.g., 30 to 40), and may further be a closed cell material that is preferably relatively stain resistant. In addition, all materials of the tray system 10 are preferably approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (or similar authorities) as “food safe” or “food grade” materials.
  • The seal between the sealing surfaces 28 and the top peripheral edges of the sub-trays 14 may be established mainly through pressure between these surfaces, which causes at least slight deformation of the sealing surface material so that it conforms to the top surface of the sub-trays 14. Alternatively, the sealing surfaces 28 may be provided more in the form of a “channel” that can be deformed at least slightly to accept the top edge of corresponding sub-trays 14 to thereby seal the two surfaces to each other. In another alternative, the top peripheral edges of the sub-trays 14 may be provided with a relatively soft, deformable material to seal against a lid, where such a lid could also include corresponding sealing surfaces, or may be a relatively flat surface against which the soft edges of the sub-trays can press for sealing. In yet another alternative, the lid may have recessed areas into which the sub-tray edges can be pressed to seal the interior portion of the sub-trays from the interior of the master tray in which it is inserted.
  • Predetermined gaps 31 along the length of the sealing surfaces 28 may optionally be provided to allow airflow needed to maintain the quality of certain ingredients. Minute air perforations around the surfaces of either the sub-trays 14 or the master tray 12 may also optionally be provided to allow for additional airflow. Oxygen-absorbents within the master tray 12 may also be provided to retard spoilage of oxygen-sensitive ingredients.
  • FIG. 11 shows a nesting of identical sub-trays 14, which may be disposable, with a suspended lid 18. As shown in FIG. 2, the leading edge of the master tray 12 may have molded indents 36 to facilitate grasping.
  • A particular master tray 12 can be sized to fit into a portable cooler, or into a smaller refrigerator, such as the type commonly found in a family room, hotel room, dormitory or the like, as seen in FIG. 7. Optionally, as seen in FIG. 7, the compartmentalized tray system 10 can hang from a refrigerator shelf in order to keep the area beneath the tray system 10 free for storing other refrigerator items. In this way, other items would preferably not need to be moved before the user can remove the tray system 10 from the refrigerator. The dimensions for the master tray 12 should allow easy insertion and withdrawal of the master tray 12 relative to the dimensions and door opening mechanism of a standard sized refrigerator. The illustrative dimensions for a master tray discussed above of 30.48 cm (12 inches) by 38.10 cm (15 inches) are suitable for most standard sized home refrigerators. The width of the tray is preferably somewhat smaller than a standard refrigerator, thus allowing easy insertion and withdrawal of the tray system 10 so that the refrigerator door does not provide an obstacle. A refrigerator may have a specifically manufactured shelf for the master tray 12, making the entire compartmentalized tray system 10 space-efficient within the refrigerator and easy to remove and use.
  • As is shown in FIG. 6, an optional support 38, which could be adjustable, may be provided to elevate the master tray 12 above a refrigerator shelf, or any other type of support member can instead be used that can position the tray system 10 within a refrigerator or other storage area in a desirable location. In this example, bottles or other containers can easily fit beneath the support 38, thereby providing for better utilization of vertical refrigerator space. Further, as is seen in FIGS. 2 and 3, the exterior bottom corners 26 of the master tray 12 may have gliders 34, for example, for easy insertion and removal of master tray 12 from a refrigerator shelf. Other types of gliders, rollers, or other features that facilitate easier insertion and removal of the master tray from a shelf or other storage area may be used in place of such gliders or in addition to such gliders, as desired.
  • Alternatively, an attachment system may optionally be used to suspend and fasten the master tray 12 relative to a shelf, such as a refrigerator shelf. Such an attachment system can be an integral part of the exterior surface of a lid 16 of a master tray 12 or may be an attachable and detachable feature. The attachment system should accommodate various potential locations of the master tray 12, such as for various refrigerator shelf designs. For instance, some refrigerator shelves may be thin synthetic resin or glass planar sheets, other shelves may have a narrow depending front skirt, and other shelves may be a grid of parallel rods with connecting rods generally at right angles to the parallel rods.
  • In one example, an attachment system can include a pair of opposing members, such as top and bottom arms, and a plurality of such attachments may be about the perimeter of the lid of a master tray. Each top arm can generally narrow from a proximal to distal end to allow easy insertion of the master tray 12 between bottles or containers on the shelf from which the master tray 12 suspends. Each bottom arm can fasten to the lid 16 of the master tray 12 and may have a connection, which may be ratchetable or otherwise moveable, to its respective top arm to allow changing the space between the arms after the master tray 12 has been suspended from the refrigerator shelf. Alternatively, the attachment may have a ratcheting mechanism to adjust the space between the two arms, or each arm can be manipulated independently of the other. In another embodiment, the distal end of the bottom arm facing the shelf may have resilient suction cups to assure stability and positioning of the master tray 12. When removed from the refrigerator, the bottom and top arms may collapse onto each other as opposing rails or legs to support the inverted lid 16.
  • The tray system 10 may optionally be designed so that as the master tray 12 slides forward from its refrigerator shelf space, the lid 16 tilts and lifts. In such an embodiment, the lid 16 may remain in place in the refrigerator until removed for cleaning or for use of the covered master tray 12 outside of the refrigerator.
  • Either surface of the lid of the master tray 12 can have a feature suitable for specific tasks, such as a magnetic surface for holding ferrous items; a smooth resealable or other mat for crafts; a cushioned fabric surface for preventing items placed thereon from sliding off the surface and/or into which sharp items such as pins and needles may be inserted; a structured connector to accept mating features, e.g., snaps, hook/pile fasteners and other equivalents; or a cutting board surface 20, as shown in FIG. 8, for example. When the master tray 12 is opened, the lid 16 may sit on the attachment (described above for refrigerator storage), collapsed as parallel rails supporting the cutting board 20. The cutting board 20 surface may contain food-compatible iontophoretic materials or bactericides to control bacterial growth. Any task-specific surfaces can be integral with or removable from the lid 16 of the master tray 12 (e.g., by snap-attachment).
  • The walls of master tray 12, or any of the sub-trays 14, or tray lid 16 can be hollow to accommodate refreezable material such as water or gel packs 22, as seen in FIGS. 4 and 9, to maintain freshness of the packaged ingredients, when the storage system 10 is used to transport and serve contents without refrigeration, as a lunch or picnic salad/sandwich bar. When the lid 16 has a cutting board 20 surface, the refreezable gel packs 22 may be inserted into the lid 16 from a side opening. The refreezable gel packs 22 can be inserted while the cutting board 20 is removed from the master tray 12 and the removable cutting board 20 can seal the hollow lid 16. The refreezable gel pack 22 may be permanently sealed within the lid 16, so that the lid 16 can be frozen to transport perishable items without refrigeration. Alternatively, the gel pack 22 may instead be a material that can retain heat for keeping the contents of the master tray relatively warm. Similar features apply to the master tray 12 and/or any of the sub-trays 14 in analogous manner as for tray lid 16.
  • The sub-trays 14 can be of thin synthetic resin film, available in quantity, nested by size for storage, distribution and disposal, as seen in FIG. 11. The synthetic resin film sub-trays 14 may have ethylene-absorbent or antibacterial material to retard food spoilage and bacterial growth. The sub-trays 14, as in FIGS. 10 and 11, can have a covering sheath 40 (in place of the lid 18) attached to the sub-tray 14 main body. The covering sheath 40 may have a linear bead along the remainder of its periphery to engage a mating depression near the mating inner sides of the free rim of the sub-tray 14. Each sub-tray 14 may alternatively have a wedge-fit lid 18, as in FIGS. 3, 4 and 9, that does not protrude outside the sub-tray 14 rim and is essentially flush with the sub-tray 14 rim. A wedge-fit lid 18 allows snug fitting of the sub-trays 14 within the master tray 12, optimizing utilization of the master tray 12 and avoiding debris accumulation between the sub-trays 14.
  • Although the compartmentalized storage system 10 of this invention is particularly suitable for home usage, a segmented tray 42, optionally disposable, as seen in FIG. 10, can also be used in conjunction with restaurant or supermarket salad/sandwich bars. Such a segmented tray 42 can typically be molded from a single sheet of material, if desired. For example, a synthetic resin sheet may be deformed to provide independent sections as an array of segmented trays 42, seen in FIG. 10. A linear depression may be along the top rim of each segmented tray 42. For sub-trays 14 adjacent to the master tray 12 outer rim, this linear depression may be along the outer rim of the segmented tray 42. A lid 16 or covering sheath 40 for the segmented tray 42 may have a linear bead of the same dimensions as the top rims of the sub-trays 14. When pressed onto the segmented tray 42, the lid 16 or covering sheath 40 can mate with the top rim depressions to seal each individual sub-tray 14 and the entire segmented tray 42 array. In this prepackaged form, the sandwich/salad ingredients may be easily transported from the supermarket to the sandwich/salad master tray 12 in the consumer's refrigerator, eliminating possible cross contamination of ingredients in adjacent sub-trays 14. In some embodiments, such a disposable, segmented tray 42 would be a tray within a tray, replacing the individual sub-trays 14. In other embodiments, such a segmented tray 42 could be an independent sandwich/salad bar ingredients container. As mentioned above, this disposable, segmented tray 42 can be made to include food preservatives, such as antibacterial agents and ethylene absorbent agents. As a structural and functional equivalent for individual sub-trays 14, disposable sub-trays 14 or segmented trays 42 may each have covering sheath 40 as a replacement for the lid 18 for each individual sub-tray 14.
  • In accordance with the present invention, the arrangement of sealing surfaces 28 on a lid 16 are shown in the Figures as a rectangular or square grid pattern, but the arrangement of sealing surfaces may include other shapes, such as circular, triangular and the like, with the understanding that better nesting of the sub-trays with each other across the length and width of the master tray will better utilize the interior space of the master tray for holding items within the sub-trays being held therein.
  • Other features may be provided to the compartmentalized storage system 10 to meet the needs of specific users or specific situations. For example, as seen in FIG. 8, the lid 16 may be lockable to the master tray 12. Hinged tabs 30 on the sides of the master tray 12 can pivot upward to lock the lid 16 in position. Alternatively, the master tray 12 can be locked with a combination lock or a strap device with a lock to retain the lid 16. For special diets, federal nutritional fact guidelines or other meal planning, weights or exchange quantities can be imprinted on or molded into the master tray 12, sub-trays 14 or the lids 16, 18. To keep track of the number of servings or quantities used or to aid proper nutrition, a counter, such as an abacus type counter, can be provided and attached to a portion of the tray system 10. The counter may be on a handle, a surface of the master tray 12, the sub-trays 14, the lids 16, 18 or a molded tab, for example. Such molded tabs can be of the type that appear on beverage cup lids, which can be depressed when a portion is used, and then later returned to its original shape. A dedicated space can optionally be provided on the tray system 10 for food preparation utensils, such as a grater, tongs, knife, or the like, or for a refillable pack of antibacterial wipes, for example.
  • As shown in FIG. 2, a slot 32 in a surface of the master tray 12 or sub-tray 14 may hold an insert, such as a metal insert to retain magnet reminders, a pad of self-adhesive notes, or a rewritable surface. The slot 32 may also retain a patient label, as in a compartmentalized pill box, for home bound or assisted living patients, to track when container refills are necessary, or to retain a freshness expiration date.
  • Although one use for the compartmentalized tray system 10 of this invention is for storage and transport of various food ingredients, a variety of other uses are equally intended to be within the scope of this invention. For one example, the tray system 10 may be used for storage and transport of live bait and/or similar fishing needs that should be stored separately but are desirably transported together. For another example, medicines and other health and beauty aids may be stored advantageously in this storage system 10. This storage system 10 may also stock collections of miniature electrical components, such as surface mount resistors (“SMRs”) and surface mount capacitors (“SMCs”), readily available for use.
  • The present invention has now been described with reference to several embodiments thereof. The entire disclosure of any patent or patent application identified herein is hereby incorporated by reference. The foregoing detailed description and examples have been given for clarity of understanding only. No unnecessary limitations are to be understood therefrom. It will be apparent to those skilled in the art that many changes can be made in the embodiments described without departing from the scope of the invention. For example, the dimensions of the individual sub-trays, segmented trays, master trays and various lids and the overall dimensions of the storage system may be varied. Thus, the scope of the present invention should not be limited to the structures described herein, but only by the structures described by the language of the claims and the equivalents of those structures.

Claims (18)

1. A method of providing a portion of a meal from plural food ingredients, comprising the steps of,
providing a master tray having sides forming a rim,
providing a plurality of separate sub-trays fitting within the master tray and having sides forming rims, the sides of the sub-trays having dimensions,
providing a lid that seals the master tray and the sub-trays, the lid having means that seal to the rim of the master tray and means that seal to rims of the sub-trays, the means sealing to the rims of the sub-trays being arranged in a rectangular grid having sides, the sides of the grid having dimensions,
the dimensions of the sides of the sub-trays being multiples of the dimensions of the sides of the grid of the means sealing to the sub-trays,
the master tray and at least some of the sub-trays having means securing the at least some sub-trays in place in the master tray,
providing food ingredients,
placing the food ingredients in the sub-trays,
placing the sub-trays within the master tray,
placing the lid on the master tray and the sub-trays within the master tray thereby sealing the master tray and the sub-trays,
placing the master tray within a refrigerator,
removing the master tray from the refrigerator,
removing the lid from the master tray and sub-trays,
selecting ingredients from the sub-trays and
providing a meal portion from at least some of the ingredients.
2. The method of claim 1 wherein,
at least one sub-tray having an individual lid for sealing the at least one sub-tray.
3. The method of claim 1 wherein,
at least one of the plurality of sub-trays has a different shape from at least one other of the plurality of sub-trays.
4. A divided container system comprising:
a master tray having an interior portion and a peripheral top edge;
at least one sub-tray positionable within the interior portion of the master tray, in which each sub-tray includes a peripheral top edge and an interior portion; and
a lid having means for sealing both the master tray and the at least one sub-tray, the lid comprising
an upper surface;
a lower surface;
a plurality of sealing surfaces extending from the lower surface of the lid, in which the sealing surfaces are arranged to abut with the peripheral top edge of the at least one sub-tray to thereby seal the interior portion of the at least one sub-tray from the interior portion of the master tray; and
a peripheral sealing surface for sealably contacting with the peripheral top edge of the master tray;
in which at least one sub-tray is held in place relative to at least one other sub-tray or the interior portion of the master tray.
5. The container system of claim 4, in which the sealing surfaces are arranged in a grid-like pattern.
6. The container system of claim 5, in which the grid-like pattern of the sealing surfaces corresponds with the top peripheral edges of at least one sub-tray.
7. The container system of claim 4, in which the sealing surfaces comprise a compliant material for conforming to the top peripheral edge of the at least one sub-tray.
8. The container system of claim 4, in which the at least one sub tray comprises a plurality of sub-trays, in which the sealing surfaces of the lid are arranged to abut with and seal the peripheral edge of each of the plurality of sub trays.
9. The container system of claim 8, in which each of the plurality of sub-trays is identical to each of the other sub-trays.
10. The container system of claim 8, in which at least one of the plurality of sub-trays has a different shape from at least one other of the plurality of sub-trays.
11. The container system of claim 4, in which at least one of the upper and lower surfaces of the lid comprises a surface selected from the group comprising a magnetic surface, a resealable surface, a cushioned surface, a fabric surface and a structured connector surface.
12. The container system of claim 4, in which at least one of the sub trays further comprises a sub-tray lid.
13. The container system of claim 4, in which at least one of the sub-trays is detachably connected to the interior portion of the master tray.
14. The container system of claim 4, in which at least one of the sub-trays is insertable into the interior portion of the master tray.
15. The container system of claim 4, in which at least one of the sub-trays is permanently attached to the interior portion of the master tray.
16. The container system of claim 4, in which at least one of the sub-trays has a bottom surface including a recessed area to hold the at least one sub-tray in place.
17. The container system of claim 4, in which at least one sub-tray further comprises an interlocking side wall.
18. The container system of claim 17, in which the sub-trays interlock with each other.
US11/974,339 2002-12-18 2007-10-12 Methods of preparing food and a multi-compartment container and lid assembly for practicing the methods Abandoned US20090162506A1 (en)

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US20160309863A1 (en) * 2013-12-10 2016-10-27 G.T. Line S.R.L. Container, of the type of trunks, suitcases, trolley cases and the like
US10182628B2 (en) * 2013-12-10 2019-01-22 G.T. Line S.R.L. Container, of the type of trunks, suitcases, trolley cases and the like
USD767409S1 (en) * 2015-04-02 2016-09-27 Asclemed USA, Inc. Tray

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
CN1914090A (en) 2007-02-14
CN100572201C (en) 2009-12-23
US7326428B2 (en) 2008-02-05
US20040129707A1 (en) 2004-07-08
WO2005062789A2 (en) 2005-07-14
WO2005062789A3 (en) 2006-02-23

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