US20090149273A1 - Modular golf putter - Google Patents

Modular golf putter Download PDF

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Publication number
US20090149273A1
US20090149273A1 US12315927 US31592708A US2009149273A1 US 20090149273 A1 US20090149273 A1 US 20090149273A1 US 12315927 US12315927 US 12315927 US 31592708 A US31592708 A US 31592708A US 2009149273 A1 US2009149273 A1 US 2009149273A1
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back
large hollow
front
cup
center piece
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Abandoned
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US12315927
Inventor
Christopher C. Dowdey
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Dowdey Christopher C
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B53/0487Heads for putters
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B53/06Heads adjustable
    • A63B53/065Heads adjustable for putters
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B60/00Details or accessories of golf clubs, bats, rackets or the like
    • A63B60/02Ballast means for adjusting the centre of mass
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B2053/0433Heads with special sole configurations
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B2053/0441Heads with visual indicators for aligning the golf club
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B53/00Golf clubs
    • A63B53/04Heads
    • A63B2053/0491Heads with added weights, e.g. changeable, replaceable

Abstract

A modular golf putter head having a hollow body is provided. The modular putter head comprises a permeable thin center piece disposed between two substantially identical large hollow cups. The large hollow cups selectively secure to either side of the thin center piece to enable use for right-handed or left-handed golfers. The modular putter head is configured to receive one or more removable weights, wherein the removable weights can be distributed in accordance to a user's preference to provide a customized center of gravity.

Description

    REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • The present application claims priority to commonly-owned U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 61/005,644, entitled “Modular Golf Putter,” filed on Dec. 7, 2007.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates generally to golf clubs, and more specifically, to a modular golf putter.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • It is widely accepted among golfers that putting is the most critical aspect of the game. This is manifested by the fact that putting can often consume nearly half of a golfer's strokes in a single round of golf. Thus, the ability to putt accurately is clearly an invaluable asset to a golfer. Accuracy generally depends on numerous factors ranging from variable traits such as a golfer's body size and level of skill, to external elements such as the putting surface and the actual putter employed.
  • Given that a golfer's level of skill adjusts with time and practice, it is common for golfers to seek various putters that conform to their respective skill level. For instance, it is generally recognized that heavier putter heads are better suited for amateur golfers, while lighter putter heads are better suited for more experienced players. Additionally, depending on a golfer's level of self-confidence, putting can frequently impose considerable psychological effects onto golfers. For example, it is not unusual for a golfer to become significantly frustrated due to merely one poor outing with a particular putter. In such cases, the frustration can evolve to the extent that the golfer no longer puts well in subsequent attempts with that putter. As a result, the golfer's frustration may effectively compel him/her to believe that their poor play is directly attributable to the putter, thereby driving the golfer to hastily seek a new, and perhaps entirely different, putter.
  • In light of the foregoing factors, manufacturers have developed a wide array of putters in an attempt to accommodate each individual's perceived needs. Therefore, current putters may vary with respect to size, weight, loft angle, shaft length, appearance, etc. Moreover, due to the fact that a golfer's use of a certain putter is susceptible to change, many manufacturers have developed adjustable putters in order to satisfy a golfer's need at a particular time. For instance, U.S. Patent Application Publication No. 2006/0172816 to Johnson discloses a modular putter head comprising a front face and a back face that are removably secured to a central body. The putter head can be adapted to left-handed and right-handed clubs by altering the face plate. The face plate can be configured to various shapes, and can be affixed to the putter head with any loft angle. Additionally, the body includes one or more recesses for receiving two or more removable weight inserts.
  • While the foregoing reference discloses a modular putter head having a variety of features, the inventor of the present application has conceived a more practical and improved modular golf putter which addresses at least some, if not all of the aforementioned issues regarding existing putters.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention provides an improvement over conventional golf clubs by presenting a novel golf club that is configurable to accommodate a multitude of individual needs. The golf club comprises a modular golf putter head characterized by three primary components. In particular, the modular golf club head includes a center piece disposed between a large hollow front cup and a large hollow back cup.
  • The center piece includes means such as a hosel for attaching a shaft, wherein the shaft may be shaped to be positioned in accordance with a golfer's preference (e.g., over the center of the putter head, or over the front cup). Preferably, the center piece is defined by a thin wall including a front side and an opposite back side. The large hollow front and back cups are selectively securable to the front and back sides, respectively. As such, the secured arrangement provides a large hollow front cup and a large hollow back cup extending axially outward with respect to the thin center piece.
  • In a preferred embodiment, the modular golf club head is a modular golf club putter head comprising a generally elliptical and hollow body, wherein the large hollow cups are substantially symmetric. The large hollow front cup includes a large striking surface for contacting a golf ball. Notably, the large hollow front and back cups are interchangeable to provide use for both, right-handed and left-handed, golfers.
  • Preferably, the large striking surface is complimented with centered alignment lines extending along a top surface of the putter head. As a result, the combination of the two features facilitates overall accuracy by enabling a golfer to visualize a clear path to the hole.
  • In addition to the large striking surface, the large hollow front cup may comprise varying loft angles for providing optimal strokes. More specifically, the modular putter head is preferably configured to ensure that the striking surface essentially contacts the ball at the putter head's “sweet spot.” The net effect of the foregoing configuration allows for the ball to be struck with sufficient topspin to produce a straight line trajectory to the hole.
  • The present invention preferably provides a peripherally-weighted modular putter head, wherein one or more weights can be removably secured within the putter head. Advantageously, the removable weights may be distributed according to any configuration a golfer desires. In this manner, individual golfers may customize the weight of the putter head to provide a particularized center of gravity.
  • In one aspect of the present invention, the thin center piece may comprise a curved bottom surface for providing minimal contact with the green. That is, the bottom surface has a maximum peak to help reduce potential impediments to the putter head during the course of a swing. Nevertheless, the modularity of the putter head alternatively allows for the incorporation of a thin center piece comprising a flat bottom surface, thereby reducing rocking of the putter head when a golfer lines up to putt.
  • One object of the present invention is to provide a modular putter head that reduces the need for purchasing additional putters. Such a modular putter head not only serves a variety of practical advantages, but serves significant financial advantages as well.
  • The above features and other features and advantages of the present invention are readily apparent from the following detailed description of the best modes for carrying out the invention when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a modular golf putter head in accordance with present invention;
  • FIG. 2 is a front view of the modular golf putter head;
  • FIG. 3 is a top view of the modular golf putter head;
  • FIG. 4 is a front view of a center piece of the modular golf putter head depicted in FIGS. 1-3;
  • FIG. 5 is a rear view of a large hollow front cup of the modular golf putter head taken along the lines 5-5 of FIG. 3 looking in the direction of the arrows;
  • FIG. 6 is a front view of a large hollow back cup of the modular golf putter head taken along the lines 6-6 of FIG. 3 looking in the direction of the arrows;
  • FIG. 7 is an exploded perspective view of the modular golf putter head depicted in FIGS. 1-3;
  • FIG. 8 is a front view of a center piece in accordance with another embodiment of the present invention; and
  • FIG. 9 is a front view of a center piece in accordance with yet another embodiment of the present invention.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • Referring to the drawings, wherein like reference numerals refer to like components throughout the several views, FIG. 1 illustrates a modular golf putter head 10 embodying features of the present invention. The modular golf putter head 10 generally comprises a center piece 12 disposed between a pair of large cups 14, 16. Preferably, the center piece 21 is relatively thin and includes a front side 18 and an opposite back side 20, wherein the front and back sides 18, 20 are symmetric in shape. The thin center piece 12 further includes a top surface 22 and a bottom surface 24, the top surface 22 having means, such as, but not limited to, a cavity 22A, for attaching a shaft 26. The cavity 22A is preferably configured to attach any type of shaft 26 known in the art.
  • As illustrated in the drawings, the cavity 22A is positioned off-center with respect to the top surface 22 and extends therethrough (see FIG. 4). Nevertheless, it should be understood that the cavity 22A can be centrally positioned along the top surface 22, and it is not necessary that the cavity 22A extends through the top surface 22. Alternatively, it also is within the scope of the present invention to position the cavity 22A on either of the large cups 14, 16.
  • The pair of large cups 14, 16 comprise a front cup 14 and a back cup 16, each substantially symmetrical in shape. The front and back large cups 14, 16 are selectively securable to the front and back sides 18, 20 of the thin center piece 12, respectively, to provide a putter for a right-handed golfer. Alternatively, however, the front and back large cups 14, 16 can be secured to the back and front sides 18, 20, respectively, to provide a putter for a left-handed golfer. Thus, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the modular golf putter 10 can be configured to provide use for both, right-handed and left-handed golfers, by simply alternating the pair of large cups 18, 20. Regardless of the selected configuration, the modular putter head 10 is designed such that when the large front and back cups 14, 16 are secured to front and back sides 18, 20, the large cups 14, 16 extend axially outward with respect to the thin center piece 12.
  • As best illustrated in FIG. 2 of the drawings, the large front cup 14 comprises a striking surface 28 for contacting a golf ball (not shown). In an exemplary embodiment, the striking surface 28 is configured to provide a three degree loft angle (i.e., angled three degrees from vertical). Yet, it is within the purview of the present invention to provide a striking surface 28 having any suitable loft angle known in the art. Alternatively, it should be noted that the striking surface 28 can also be configured to provide a substantially flat striking surface 28. Moreover, since the large front and back cups 14, 16 are substantially symmetric in shape, the large back cup 16 preferably includes a back surface 30 comprising a loft angle (if applicable) corresponding to that of the striking surface 28.
  • In the preferred embodiment, the loft angle corresponding to the striking surface 28 is configured such that the striking surface 28 essentially contacts the golf ball at its “sweet spot.” The net effect of the foregoing configuration allows for the golf ball to be struck with sufficient topspin to produce a straight line trajectory to a hole. Thus, the striking surface 28 is designed to contact the golf ball at a point of impact to ensure a crisp and accurate shot, such that the ball rolls smoothly (i.e., without hopping) with optimal rotation. On a level playing surface, therefore, the modular putter head 10 can greatly increase a golfer's accuracy by providing topspin to the golf ball.
  • Referring now to FIG. 4 of the drawings, a planar view of the thin center piece 12 is shown. While the thin center piece is depicted as comprising a football or eye-shaped configuration, it is to be understood to those skilled in the art that the thin center piece 12 can be configured to take on any suitable shape. As illustrated in FIG. 4, the thin center piece 12 comprises a plurality of recesses extending therethough. In the preferred embodiment, the thin center piece 12 includes a large central recess 32 for reducing the overall weight of modular putter head 10. Similarly, additional recesses can be provided to further reduce the overall weight of the modular putter head 10. For instance, two arrow-shaped recesses 34A, 34B can be disposed at each lateral distal end 40A, 40B of the thin center piece 12, as depicted in FIG. 4.
  • Moreover, a first set of holes 36A and a second set of holes 36B are provided, wherein each set of holes 36A, 36B is disposed on opposite sides of the large central recess 32. In the preferred embodiment, the two sets of holes 36A, 36B are equidistantly spaced apart from one another, each set 36A, 36B including three holes 37A, 37B, 37C, 37D, 37E, 37F disposed in-between the two arrow-shaped recesses 34A, 34 B and the large central recess 32, respectively. Preferably, the two sets 36A, 36B are disposed such that their respective holes 37A, 37B, 37C, 37D, 37E, 37F extend vertically with respect to the top and bottom surfaces 22, 24. It is also preferable that each set 36A, 36B includes a hole 37B, 37E for receiving a fastener 42A, 42B passing therethrough, wherein the fastener receiving holes 37B, 37E are symmetrically aligned along a central horizontal axis extending across the thin center piece 12 (see FIG. 7). The remaining holes 37A, 37C corresponding to the first set 36A are configured to selectively receive a first key 44A extending therethrough. Similarly, the remaining holes 37D, 37F corresponding to the second set 37B are configured to selectively receive a second key 44B extending therethrough.
  • Referring now to FIG. 5, an internal view of the large front cup 14 is shown. As illustrated in the drawings, the large front cup 14 preferably comprises an eye-shaped configuration. Nevertheless, it is to be understood that the large front cup 14 can be configured to take on any suitable shape. The large front cup 14 comprises a plurality of recesses to provide a generally hollow core therein. Notably, the recesses do not extend through the striking surface 28. Rather, the recesses terminate at or before an opposite surface 28A of the striking surface 28.
  • Analogous to the thin center piece 12, the large front cup 14 preferably includes a large central recess 32A, two arrow-shaped recesses 34C, 34D, and two sets of holes 36C, 36D. The two sets of holes 36C, 36D comprise at least two holes 39A, 39B, 39C, 39D each, wherein each set 36C, 36D includes a hole 39A, 39D for receiving the fastener 42A, 42B. The remaining holes 39B, 39C corresponding to the first and second sets 36C, 36D are configured to selectively secure the first key 44A and second key 44B, respectively. Accordingly, it is preferred that when the large front piece 14 is secured to the thin center piece 12, the large central recess 32A, the two arrow-shaped recesses 34C, 34D, and the two sets of holes 36C, 36D are generally, axially aligned with the large central recess 32, the two arrow-shaped recesses 34A, 34D, and the two sets of holes 36A, 36B (see FIG. 7).
  • Referring now to FIG. 6, a front view of the large hollow back cup 16 is shown. As illustrated in the drawings, the large back cup 16 is substantially identical to the large front cup 14. The large back cup 16 preferably includes a large central recess 32B, two arrow-shaped recesses 34E, 34F, and two sets of holes 36E, 36F. The two sets of holes 36E, 36F comprise at least two holes 41A, 41B, 41C, 41D each, wherein each set 36E, 36E includes a hole 41B, 41C for receiving the fastener 42A,42B. Unlike the large front cup 14, however, the fastener receiving holes 41B, 41C corresponding to the large back cup 16 extend therethrough. In this manner, the fastener receiving holes 41B, 41C extend through the back surface 30 to provide means for inserting the fasteners 42A, 42B, as clearly depicted in FIG. 7 of the drawings.
  • Furthermore, the remaining holes 41A, 41D corresponding to the first and second sets 36E, 36F of the large back cup 16 are configured to selectively secure the second key 44B and the first key 44A, respectively. Analogous to the large front cup 14, it is preferred that when the large back cup 16 is secured to the thin center piece 12, the large central recess 32B, the two arrow-shaped recesses 34E, 34F, and the two sets of holes 36E, 36F are generally, axially aligned with the large central recess 32, the two arrow-shaped recesses 34A, 34D, and the two sets of holes 36A, 36B.
  • Accordingly, when the thin center piece 12 is secured to the large front and back cups 14, 16, the holes corresponding to the first and second sets 36A, 36B, 36C, 36D, 36E, 36F of each component 12, 14, 16, are coaxially aligned with one another (see FIG. 7). It should be understood that the large front and back cups 14, 16 can be secured to the thin center piece 12 by various means known in the art. In the preferred embodiment, for instance, the fasteners 42A, 42B comprise screws 42A, 42B, wherein the screws 42A, 42B are threadable through the fastener receiving holes 37B, 37E, 39A, 39D, and screw into the fastener receiving holes 41B, 41C, as depicted in FIG. 7. Nevertheless, any suitable fastener known in the art can be used.
  • Additionally, the modular putter head 10 is configured to receive one or more removable weights W for enabling golfers to customize the overall weight of the modular putter head 10. More particularly, the recesses corresponding to the thin center piece 12 and large and front back cups 14, 16, provide users with the ability to dispose the removable weights W within the modular putter head 10. In the preferred embodiment, the removable weights W can be disposed nearly anywhere within the modular putter head 10 that a golfer desires. As a result, users can adjust the center of mass of the modular putter head 10 according to their unique preferences. For instance, in FIGS. 5-6, the removable weights W are disposed within the large central recesses 32A, 32B of the large front and back cups 14, 16, respectively.
  • The removable weights W can comprise one or more types of weights known in the art, e.g., tire weights, stick-on weights, etc. It should be understood to those skilled in the art that the removable weights W need not be identical. That is, two or more different types of removable weights W can be incorporated within the modular putter head 10 at any given time. Thus, the removable weights W can vary with respect to numerous aspects, including, but not limited to, material, shape, size, and weight.
  • Moreover, the modular putter head 10 preferably comprises means for aligning the golf ball with the hole. Such alignment means can include one ore more sight lines. As best depicted in FIG. 3, the large front and back cups 14, 16 each comprise a sight line 46A, 46B extending along upper surfaces 48, 50 of the two cups 14, 16. As illustrated in the drawings, the sight lines 46A, 46B preferably extend perpendicularly with respect to the striking and back surfaces 28, 30, respectively. The sight lines 46A, 46B can comprise thin straight lines disposed along the upper surfaces 48, 50, respectively, wherein the thin lines can be etched, raised, painted, taped, or similarly defined thereon. If desired, the sight lines 46A, 46B can be enhanced with color for increased alignment. In one aspect, the sight lines 46A, 46B can be sandwiched by symmetric graphic lines (not shown), wherein the graphic lines preferably comprise a different color than the sight lines 46A, 46B. The graphic lines extend laterally outward with respect to the sight lines 46A, 46B, such that the collective width of the graphic lines and sight lines 46A, 46B of each cup 14, 16, correspond to the width of the golf ball.
  • In a preferred embodiment, the bottom surface 24 of the thin center piece 12 is curved, as best shown in FIG. 4, to reduce turf snagging. Nevertheless, as best depicted in FIG. 8 of the drawings, the thin center piece 12 can alternatively comprise a generally flat bottom surface 24A. The flat bottom surface 24A is preferably configured to reduce rocking of the modular putter head 10 when a golfer lines up to putt.
  • Furthermore, while the thin center piece 12 preferably comprises a plurality of recesses 32, 34A, 34B extending therethrough, it is also within the purview of the present invention to provide a substantially solid thin center piece 12, as depicted in FIG. 9. The solid thin center piece 12 is essentially equivalent to the thin center piece discussed above, except that the solid thin center piece 12 does not comprise the large central recess 32 or the two arrow-shaped recesses 34A, 34B. Accordingly, the solid thin center piece 12 provides an alternative means to centrally locate additional weight within the modular putter head 10.
  • The present invention further provides the modular putter head 10 including the shaft 26 attached thereto. In the preferred embodiment, the shaft 26 comprises a generally sinuous neck 26A designed to avoid wiggle. As depicted in FIG. 3, the shaft 26 secures to the top surface 22 of the thin center piece 12 so that the shaft 26 substantially extends over the large front cup 14. In this manner, a longitudinal axis of the shaft 26 is aligned parallel to the striking surface 28. Alternatively, the shaft 26 can be secured to the modular putter head 10 such that the longitudinal axis of the shaft 26 is substantially aligned with the top surface 22. Nevertheless, it is to be understood that the shaft 26 can be secured to the modular putter head 10 in a variety of arrangements.
  • Finally, it should be understood by those skilled in the art that the modular putter head 10 and its respective elements can be constructed from a multitude of materials, including, but not limited to, plastics, metals, and various alloys.
  • While the best modes for carrying out the invention have been described in detail, those familiar with the art to which this invention relates will recognize various alternative designs and embodiments for practicing the invention within the scope of the appended claims.

Claims (14)

  1. 1. A modular golf club head securable to a shaft comprising:
    a center piece including a wall having a front side and an opposite back side, and a top surface and an opposite bottom surface, the top surface including a cavity for securing the shaft;
    a large hollow front cup selectively securable to the front side, the large hollow front cup including a striking surface for contacting a golf ball; and
    a large hollow back cup selectively securable to the back side, the large hollow back cup including a back surface;
    wherein the large hollow front and back cups extend axially outward with respect to the center piece.
  2. 2. The modular golf club head of claim 1, wherein the wall of the center piece is relatively thin; and
    wherein the center piece, the large hollow front cup, and the large hollow back cup each include at least one hole coaxially aligned with each other.
  3. 3. The modular golf club head of claim 2, further comprising:
    at least one fastener threadable through each hole of the center piece, the large hollow front cup, and the large hollow back cup;
    wherein the fastener is configured to selectively secure the large hollow front and back cups to the front and back sides, respectively.
  4. 4. The modular golf club head of claim 3, further comprising:
    at least one removable weight, the removable weight securable therein; and
    at least one alignment line disposed along a top surface of the putter head, the alignment line extending in a perpendicular direction with respect to the striking surface.
  5. 5. The modular golf club head of claim 4, wherein the club head is a putter head.
  6. 6. A modular golf putter head securable to a shaft and adaptable to right-handed and left-handed users comprising:
    a thin center piece including a wall having a front side and an opposite back side, and a top surface and an opposite bottom surface, the top surface including a cavity for securing the shaft;
    a large hollow front cup selectively securable to the front side, the large hollow front cup including a striking surface for contacting a golf ball;
    a large hollow back cup selectively securable to the back side, the large hollow back cup including a back surface; and
    at least one removable weight, the removable weight securable therein;
    wherein the large hollow front and back cups extend axially outward with respect to the center piece.
  7. 7. The modular golf putter head of claim 6, wherein the thin center piece, the large hollow front cup, and the large hollow back cup each include at least one hole coaxially aligned with each other;
    wherein at least one fastener is threadable through each hole of the center piece, the large hollow front cup, and the large hollow back cup; and
    wherein the fastener is configured to selectively secure the large hollow front and back cups to the front and back sides, respectively.
  8. 8. The modular golf putter head of claim 7, wherein the large hollow front and back cups each include a top surface having a centered alignment line extending in a substantially perpendicular direction with respect to the striking surface and the back surface, respectively.
  9. 9. The modular golf putter head of claim 8, wherein the striking and back surfaces are flat.
  10. 10. The modular golf putter head of claim 8, wherein the striking and back surfaces are angled to provide a loft when the large hollow front and back cups are secured to the front and back sides, respectively.
  11. 11. The modular golf putter head of claim 10, wherein the lofts of the striking and back surfaces are each three degrees from vertical.
  12. 12. The modular golf putter head of claim 6, wherein the bottom surface of the center piece is convex, the convex bottom surface having an apex configured to provide minimal contact with golf surfaces.
  13. 13. The modular golf putter head of claim 6, wherein the bottom surface of the center piece is substantially flat.
  14. 14. The modular club head of claim 6, wherein the large hollow front and back cups are interchangeable.
US12315927 2007-12-07 2008-12-08 Modular golf putter Abandoned US20090149273A1 (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110294597A1 (en) * 2010-05-31 2011-12-01 ANEEGING GOLF Ltd. Golf club head
US20120077611A1 (en) * 2010-09-27 2012-03-29 David Lorince Weighted Golf Club Training Device
US20130331197A1 (en) * 2012-06-11 2013-12-12 Jimmy Hack Golf, Llc Spherical Impact Putter-Face System

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US2820638A (en) * 1954-03-01 1958-01-21 Vaughn E Morrison Golf club
US5569098A (en) * 1994-12-15 1996-10-29 New Vision Golf Corp. Golf putter having tapered shaft and large grip
US5683307A (en) * 1994-07-11 1997-11-04 Rife; Guerin D. Putter type golf club head with balanced weight configuration and complementary ball striking face
US6203443B1 (en) * 1998-10-02 2001-03-20 Jrd Golf, Llc Golf putter
US6264571B1 (en) * 1999-05-05 2001-07-24 Carl Lekavich Dynamically balanced modular putter with a sliding hosel
US6485375B1 (en) * 1999-05-26 2002-11-26 Robert C. McKinley High CG, modular putter
US7004852B2 (en) * 2002-01-10 2006-02-28 Dogleg Right Corporation Customizable center-of-gravity golf club head
US20060172816A1 (en) * 2005-02-03 2006-08-03 Johnson Lanny L Modular putter

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* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2820638A (en) * 1954-03-01 1958-01-21 Vaughn E Morrison Golf club
US5683307A (en) * 1994-07-11 1997-11-04 Rife; Guerin D. Putter type golf club head with balanced weight configuration and complementary ball striking face
US5569098A (en) * 1994-12-15 1996-10-29 New Vision Golf Corp. Golf putter having tapered shaft and large grip
US6203443B1 (en) * 1998-10-02 2001-03-20 Jrd Golf, Llc Golf putter
US6264571B1 (en) * 1999-05-05 2001-07-24 Carl Lekavich Dynamically balanced modular putter with a sliding hosel
US6485375B1 (en) * 1999-05-26 2002-11-26 Robert C. McKinley High CG, modular putter
US7004852B2 (en) * 2002-01-10 2006-02-28 Dogleg Right Corporation Customizable center-of-gravity golf club head
US20060172816A1 (en) * 2005-02-03 2006-08-03 Johnson Lanny L Modular putter

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110294597A1 (en) * 2010-05-31 2011-12-01 ANEEGING GOLF Ltd. Golf club head
US20120077611A1 (en) * 2010-09-27 2012-03-29 David Lorince Weighted Golf Club Training Device
US20130331197A1 (en) * 2012-06-11 2013-12-12 Jimmy Hack Golf, Llc Spherical Impact Putter-Face System

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