Connect public, paid and private patent data with Google Patents Public Datasets

Medical travel pack with cooling system

Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20090049845A1
US20090049845A1 US12130696 US13069608A US2009049845A1 US 20090049845 A1 US20090049845 A1 US 20090049845A1 US 12130696 US12130696 US 12130696 US 13069608 A US13069608 A US 13069608A US 2009049845 A1 US2009049845 A1 US 2009049845A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
temperature
device
storage
tec
portable
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12130696
Inventor
David McStravick
Richard Lee Hall
Jared Michael Flatow
Geoffrey Albert Marcek
Ruth Miriam Kuhlman
Lauren Elizabeth Bailey
Original Assignee
Mcstravick David
Richard Lee Hall
Jared Michael Flatow
Geoffrey Albert Marcek
Ruth Miriam Kuhlman
Lauren Elizabeth Bailey
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25BREFRIGERATION MACHINES, PLANTS OR SYSTEMS; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT-PUMP SYSTEMS
    • F25B21/00Machines, plant, or systems, using electric or magnetic effects
    • F25B21/02Machines, plant, or systems, using electric or magnetic effects using Peltier effect; using Nernst-Ettinghausen effect
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M5/00Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests
    • A61M5/002Packages specially adapted therefor, e.g. for syringes or needles, kits for diabetics
    • A61M5/003Kits for diabetics
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25DREFRIGERATORS; COLD ROOMS; ICE-BOXES; COOLING OR FREEZING APPARATUS NOT COVERED BY ANY OTHER SUBCLASS
    • F25D16/00Devices using a combination of a cooling mode associated with refrigerating machinery with a cooling mode not associated with refrigerating machinery
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61JCONTAINERS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR MEDICAL OR PHARMACEUTICAL PURPOSES; DEVICES OR METHODS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR BRINGING PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS INTO PARTICULAR PHYSICAL OR ADMINISTERING FORMS; DEVICES FOR ADMINISTERING FOOD OR MEDICINES ORALLY; BABY COMFORTERS; DEVICES FOR RECEIVING SPITTLE
    • A61J1/00Containers specially adapted for medical or pharmaceutical purposes
    • A61J1/05Containers specially adapted for medical or pharmaceutical purposes for collecting, storing or administering blood, plasma or medical fluids ; Infusion or perfusion containers
    • A61J1/14Details, e.g. provisions for hanging or shape retaining means; Accessories therefor, e.g. inlet or outlet ports, filters or caps
    • A61J1/16Holders for containers
    • A61J1/165Cooled holders, e.g. for medications, insulin, blood, plasma
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M2205/00General characteristics of the apparatus
    • A61M2205/36General characteristics of the apparatus related to heating or cooling
    • A61M2205/3606General characteristics of the apparatus related to heating or cooling cooled
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25DREFRIGERATORS; COLD ROOMS; ICE-BOXES; COOLING OR FREEZING APPARATUS NOT COVERED BY ANY OTHER SUBCLASS
    • F25D2303/00Details of devices using other cold materials; Details of devices using cold-storage bodies
    • F25D2303/08Devices using cold storage material, i.e. ice or other freezable liquid
    • F25D2303/084Position of the cold storage material in relationship to a product to be cooled
    • F25D2303/0845Position of the cold storage material in relationship to a product to be cooled below the product
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25DREFRIGERATORS; COLD ROOMS; ICE-BOXES; COOLING OR FREEZING APPARATUS NOT COVERED BY ANY OTHER SUBCLASS
    • F25D2331/00Details or arrangements of other cooling or freezing apparatus not provided for in other groups of this subclass
    • F25D2331/80Type of cooled receptacles
    • F25D2331/801Bags
    • F25D2331/8014Bags for medical use
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25DREFRIGERATORS; COLD ROOMS; ICE-BOXES; COOLING OR FREEZING APPARATUS NOT COVERED BY ANY OTHER SUBCLASS
    • F25D2700/00Means for sensing or measuring; Sensors therefor
    • F25D2700/12Sensors measuring the inside temperature
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25DREFRIGERATORS; COLD ROOMS; ICE-BOXES; COOLING OR FREEZING APPARATUS NOT COVERED BY ANY OTHER SUBCLASS
    • F25D2700/00Means for sensing or measuring; Sensors therefor
    • F25D2700/16Sensors measuring the temperature of products

Abstract

The present invention provides a device for keeping medical materials, such as medicine, cool. The device allows for easy transportation provided infrequent access to electricity. The device incorporates a thermoelectric cooler (TEC) inside an insulated container. The TEC is in contact with a freezable material which is frozen when the TEC is electrically powered. Upon disconnect from electrical power, the freezable material provides passive cooling inside the container while the medical material is transported. This portable device helps patients to travel with their medicines confidently and safely.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/940,895, filed May 30, 2007, hereby incorporated herein by reference.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates generally to a portable insulated temperature controlled container adapted for storing medical materials. Further, the present invention relates to storage or transport of items under conditions of temperature control relative to typical ambient temperatures. More particularly, the present invention relates to insulated containers using thermoelectric modules.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0003]
    Many medications which are prescribed to be taken on a daily or regular basis must be kept in a controlled-temperature environment. If the temperature of these medications is not carefully controlled, these medications lose their stability and potency, and may in fact present health hazards. Such medications include insulin, antibiotics reconstructed in sterile water, allergy and other serums, vaccines, suppositories, snake anti-venom, and many others. It is especially an issue for people with chronic illnesses, requiring long-term treatment, who travel frequently. Hence, the need for refrigerating medicines is a serious problem in third world countries/remote parts of the world and in the United States for people suffering from chronic illnesses that must travel for some period of time.
  • [0004]
    In the United States alone, approximately twenty million people have been diagnosed with diabetes and three hundred-ninety thousand with multiple sclerosis. Particular problems arise when a multiple sclerosis or diabetes patient travels. An adequate supply of required medication for the necessary time needs to be transported under suitable conditions and stored at the destination. In such situations the use of a simple box of ice for transport may not provide adequate temperature control. Usually, the patient calls ahead to his or her lodgings in hopes of finding a refrigerator. If he or she is unable to plan ahead, the probability of not finding a refrigerator is high and he or she might have to resort to a shared refrigerator. A shared refrigerator poses problems related to lack of privacy, cleanliness and safety.
  • [0005]
    Because of the desire to have medicines both readily available and maintained at a certain temperature, insulated containers have been available for transporting insulin and other similar medications during travel. However, most such devices are passive insulated containers filled with blocks of ice or frozen gel packs which rely on a freezer compartment of a refrigerator for refreezing. Thus there remains a need for a self-contained, compact and portable freezer/storage system for transporting items that require temperature control
  • SUMMARY
  • [0006]
    In view of the foregoing and other considerations, the present invention relates to a portable medical storage device that can be used as a portable medicine storage device that can maintain medicines and other items at proper temperatures. The present invention also relates to a portable medicine storage device that allows people suffering from chronic or serious diseases to travel with adequate supply of their medication stored and kept at proper temperature. Further, the microcontroller may be powered by a battery, but can use alternating current (AC) commonly available in hotels and motels to provide the required power to the thermal electric cooler system.
  • [0007]
    Accordingly, described herein is a portable medical storage device, comprising an insulated container; a freezable gel disposed within the container; and a thermoelectric cooler in thermal communication with the freezable gel.
  • [0008]
    Additionally, described herein is a portable medical storage device comprising an insulated container with an insulated lid; a freezable gel disposed within the container; a storage unit in contact with the freezable gel; a cooling assembly in thermal communication with the freezable gel, said cooling assembly comprising a cold plate, a thermal conduction member, a thermal electric cooler, a heat sink, and a fan; a temperature sensor for sensing the temperature within the container; and a microcontroller in electrical communication with the thermoelectric cooler and the temperature sensor.
  • [0009]
    Also, provided is a method for controlling the temperature of a medical material comprising providing portable medical storage device described supra to maintain the temperature of said medical material at a predetermined temperature.
  • [0010]
    The foregoing has outlined some of the features and technical advantages of the present invention in order that the detailed description of the invention that follows may be better understood. Additional features and advantages of the invention will be described hereinafter which form the subject of the claims of the invention.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0011]
    The foregoing and other features and aspects of the present invention will be best understood with reference to the following detailed description of a specific embodiment of the invention, when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:
  • [0012]
    FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a portable medical storage device;
  • [0013]
    FIG. 2 shows a portable medical storage device;
  • [0014]
    FIG. 3 shows an insulated lid of a medical storage device used in passive mode;
  • [0015]
    FIG. 4 shows an insulation and an inner concentric container containing a freezable gel of a portable medical storage device;
  • [0016]
    FIG. 5 shows a cooling assembly;
  • [0017]
    FIG. 6 shows an active cooling configuration for a portable medical storage device;
  • [0018]
    FIG. 7 shows a passive cooling configuration for a portable medical storage device;
  • [0019]
    FIG. 8 shows an electronic circuit for a microcontroller connecting a thermoelectric cooler and a temperature sensor to a microcontroller;
  • [0020]
    FIG. 9 shows an algorithm used by a microcontroller to regulate the operation of a thermoelectric cooler;
  • [0021]
    FIG. 10 shows a comparative non-dimensional temperature log plot to determine m-value for Insulpak;
  • [0022]
    FIG. 11 shows a comparative plot of temperature curve of water in Insulpak for various ambient temperatures;
  • [0023]
    FIG. 12 shows a non-dimensional temperature log plot to determine m-value for Thermos®;
  • [0024]
    FIG. 13 shows a plot of temperature curve of water in Thermos® at various ambient temperatures;
  • [0025]
    FIG. 14 shows a plot of the temperature retention time of frozen gel within Thermos®;
  • [0026]
    FIG. 15 shows a comparative plot of the temperature retention time of frozen gel within Insulpak;
  • [0027]
    FIG. 16 shows a plot of the freezing test results for a portable medical storage device;
  • [0028]
    FIG. 17 shows a plot of thawing test experimental setup and the results for a portable medical storage device; and
  • [0029]
    FIG. 18 shows a fan testing experimental setup and results for a portable medical storage device.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0030]
    In the following description, various embodiments of the present invention will be described. For the purposes of explanation, specific configurations and details are set forth in order to provide a thorough understanding of the embodiments. However, it will be apparent to one skilled in the art that the present invention may be practiced without the specific details. Furthermore, well-known features may be omitted or simplified in order not to, obscure the embodiments being described.
  • [0031]
    Refer now to the drawings wherein depicted elements are not necessarily shown to scale and wherein like or similar elements are designated by the same reference numeral through the several views.
  • [0032]
    Referring to FIGS. 1 through 4, an exemplary portable medical storage device or TravelFridge 10 comprises a container 20, whose configuration and construction are represented in FIG. 1. The container 20, is a double-walled vessel consisting of an inner wall 21 a and an outer wall 21 b, a space between walls 21 a and 21 b being insulated and/or exhausted of air. The container 20 further comprises a concentric inner shell 30 filled with a freezable gel 40. Other phase change materials (PCMs) where the phase change point of the PCM about equals the temperature desired for the medicine, are also contemplated. Between the inner shell 30 containing the freezable gel 40 and the inner wall 21 a of the container 20, is a hydrophobic insulation 50. An example of a hydrophobic insulation is the rigid foam insulation called Foamular®. Disposed within the freezable gel 40 in the container 20 is a storage part 22 which may be configured to hold items such as small glass bottles, syringes, and vials supplying individual doses of drugs, vaccines or the like. Storage part 22 may be configured to hold the items in such a way so as to protect them against shock.
  • [0033]
    At the top of the container 20 there is disposed a cooling assembly 23. A thermal conduction member 61 extends as part of a cooling assembly 23 and is disposed into the freezable gel 40 contained in the container 20. Above these components is a circular lid 100 insulated with a hydrophobic insulation 50, for example Foamular®. This lid 100 is removed when the TravelFridge 10 is in the active cooling configuration so that heat from the cooling process can be rejected to the air rather than being trapped in the container 20. The lid 100 will only be on the TravelFridge 10 in the passive cooling configuration. To reduce heat loss, insulation is desirable. The lid may have a vacuum-walled insulator. Insulating materials like Foamular® may be used as an insulator for its low heat transfer coefficient and hydrophobic capabilities. Foamular® minimizes heat loss through the lid and also serves as a secondary insulator within the container, while not degrading if water is present from condensation
  • [0034]
    Referring to FIG. 5, the cooling assembly 23 comprises of a cold plate 60, a thermal conduction member 61, thermoelectric cooler (TEC) 62, heat sink 63, an insulation 50 between the TEC 62 and the heat sink 63 and the fan 64 (not shown). The TEC 62 is used to freeze the gel 40. A freezing temperature of the gel between 2 and 8° C. was targeted. Other variations where the freezing point of the gel about equals the temperature desired for the medicine, are also contemplated. The TEC 62 has a thermal conduction member 61 extending from it. The thermal conduction member 61 is disposed within the freezable gel 40, when the TravelFridge 10 is in operation, to conduct heat to the TEC 62.
  • [0035]
    The thermal conduction member transfers cold into the phase change material. A portion of the thermal conduction member extended into the phase change material. The portion may be a fin or a specialized heat transfer member known as a “heat pipe” (a sealed metal tube which has an inner lining of wick-like material and a small amount of fluid in a partial vacuum) in which heat is absorbed at one end by evaporation of the vapor and released at the other end by condensation of the vapor. In selecting the size and shape of the fin or heat pipe, it is desired that there be a tradeoff between phase change material displaced volume and contact surface area between the phase change material and the fin. It is desired that the phase change material freeze, or otherwise change phase, uniformly. According to some embodiments, the fin has a cylindrical shape. The thermal conduction member may be one piece. That is, its portions are integrally formed. For example, a cold plate portion is integrally formed with a conduction fin portion.
  • [0036]
    TEC's use the Peltier effect to cool and may be adjusted depending on amount of input current. To power the TEC 62 any common wall outlet may be used. Since TEC's cool by creating a temperature difference, one side will cool but the other will heat up. In conjunction with the TEC 62, a heat sink 63 and fan 64 are used to expel heat to the outside environment along with a cooling plate 60 on the opposite side to conduct the cold into the container. Thus, TravelFridge is cooled by the cold plate 64 touching the cold side of the TEC 62 and conducting heat away from the freezer gel 40 that is directly surrounding the thermal conduction member 61.
  • [0037]
    An exemplary TEC is manufactured by TETech, specifically product number HP-199-1.4-1.15P, has a maximum temperature gradient of 69° C., measures 40 mm×40 mm×3.6 mm, and is epoxy sealed. A 4.5 Ampere (A) and 16.5 Volt (V) power source can be used to power this TEC in the TravelFridge. Further, an exemplary fan 64 is made by Dynatron and measures 60 mm×60 mm×25 mm, uses 12 V and 0.6 A, and has 38 cubic feet per minute heat pumping capabilities. Additionally, an exemplary heat sink 63 is made by Cool Innovations, specifically product number 2-52514R, measures 2.5″×2.5″×1.4″, and has a thermal resistance of 0.24° C./Watt.
  • [0038]
    TEC 62 is also surrounded by hydrophobic insulation 50. The hydrophobic insulation 50 is in place to minimize condensation around the TEC 62. The bottom of the heat sink 63 touches the hot side of the TEC 62 and with the help of the fan 64; excess heat is expelled to the environment.
  • [0039]
    A total active cooling configuration system is depicted in FIG. 6. In this configuration a power source 170 regulates the power to the TEC 62 and the fan 64. A combined operation of active (connected to a typical AC outlet) cooling and passive (disconnected from an AC outlet) cooling was selected as more efficient and practical, in which a gel acts in the present device as a thermal battery. FIG. 7 shows the passive cooling configuration where the lid is on the TravelFridge. All components remain inside, but there is no external power being used. Alternatively, the TravelFridge may also be considered to actively cool in operation, with an electric battery used when the unit is unplugged.
  • [0040]
    The TravelFridge may have associated therewith a data storage and a display member, e.g. a LCD display, by which information pertaining to the TravelFridge may be stored or displayed as required. By way of example and not limitation such data may include: date, time, a record of the temperature inside the TravelFridge, the state of charge of the batteries in the container, and any other pertinent information essential to the functioning of the device. A microcontroller 180 associated with the TravelFridge may be used to take user input, refresh the temperature display, and control power to the other electrical components. FIG. 8 depicts an exemplary electronic circuit of the microcontroller 180 having a suitable software. The microcontroller 180 is connected to a built in LCD 70. Additionally, the microcontroller 180 has a chip that is able to produce a pulse-width modulated output. In active cooling mode, the microcontroller 180 controls current to the TEC 62 based on the current temperature in the container 20 and the desired temperature of the medicine, and alternately displays the current temperature of the medicine inside the container 20. In active mode, an AC/DC power adapter 190 powers the fan 64 and TEC 62.
  • [0041]
    The microcontroller 180 is powered by an on-board pack of rechargeable batteries 300 of any appropriate type, for example a 3.6 V Lithium battery, fitted within the lid 100. Such a battery pack may be recharged in situ if the container 20 is connected to an AC supply or a low voltage power supply where one is available, or can be replaced by a fresh battery pack if required. The battery pack provides sufficient electrical power storage capacity to enable the functions of the TravelFridge to operate satisfactorily for 24 to 48 hours away from an external power supply. A digital input/output (I/O) cooler pin 200 on the micro-controller 180 controls the operation of the TEC 62 by driving the gate voltage of a power Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor (MOSFET) 300. One or more temperature sensors 400 may be provided to the user to set a required temperature depending on what is being stored or carried in the TravelFridge. An example for such a temperature sensor is an NTC Thermistor. The thermistor may have an analog input proportion to the temperature. There is a single digital output. The cooler pin 200 is thus on or off. The cooler pin 200 is connected to a high power MOSFET.
  • [0042]
    The positive lead of the TEC 62 is hooked up to the +19V coming out of an AC/DC power adapter 80. The MOSFET's 300 drain is hooked up to the negative lead of the TEC 62, and its source is grounded. Thus, the MOSFET 300 acts as an on/off switch, where the TEC is powered on at a little below 19V when the gate of the MOSFET 300 is pulled high, and the TEC 62 has no current flow through it when the gate of the MOSFET is pulled low.
  • [0043]
    Fan power control will be simpler than TEC power control because the fan 64 will always run when the unit is plugged in. A 12V voltage regulator is hooked up with its input being the 19V source from the wall adapter, and its output going to the positive lead of the fan.
  • [0044]
    FIG. 9 depicts the algorithm used in the operation of the microcontroller 180. In a typical operation, temperature sensor 400 provides an analog signal indicating temperature, which is read into the microcontroller's analog to digital converter (ADC) for digital readout. In step 600, the microcontroller initializes every time it is it turned on and then enters into a control loop 1000 with three main stages. In the first stage 700 the liquid crystal display (LCD) is updated with the contents of a global buffer that is updated by the different parts of the program. In the second stage 800 the voltage is read on the thermistor and converted into a temperature, updating the LCD buffer accordingly. Finally, in the last stage 900 the microcontroller 180 decides whether the TEC 62 is selected to be on or off depending on the current temperature of the gel.
  • [0045]
    There are two set points which limit oscillations in the TEC on/off cycling in stage 900 in the control loop 1000. If the TEC is already on, the user may check to see if the temperature is below the low set point temperature, in which case the TEC is turned off. If the TEC is off, the user may need to see if the temperature is above the high set point temperature, in which case the TEC is turned back on. This prevents the TEC from turning on and off rapidly when the temperature in the TravelFridge reaches the desired temperature.
  • [0046]
    It will be understood that a variation of on/off control that is contemplated is as follows. Pulse width modulation may used. Pulse width modulation may have the advantage of using less power. When a simple off/on control is used, there may be a 100% duty cycle. The TEC may be on for the entire cooling period, e.g. overnight, e.g. 8 hours. Associated with on/off control, there may be oscillations in the medicine temperature. In contrast, when a pulse modulation control is used, there may be a less than 100% duty cycle. Some percentage of time, the TEC is on. When a pulse modulation control is used, the current is controlled, e.g. in magnitude, in addition to on or off. Associated with pulse width modulation control, there the medicine temperature may be maintained substantially constant.
  • [0047]
    It will be understood that voltages shown in diagrams in the present disclosure, may include voltages that are adapted for the configuration of the circuit. Other suitable voltages and configurations are contemplated.
  • [0048]
    It will be understood that one version of the invention not only maintains a proper temperature in hot environments, but can provide heating if the ambient temperature gets too low.
  • [0049]
    And advantages is the ability to maintain medicines placed inside the TravelFridge to be at a low initial temperature for an extended time regardless of the external environment. Additionally, the efficient integration of TECs and an active control system into the TravelFridge is an advantage.
  • [0050]
    An exemplary operation of the device may include removing the lid of the device and plugging in to an AC outlet overnight for the active cooling mode of operation. The current will be transformed to low voltage DC current to recharge the device. The current will be used to charge the batteries and maintain the medicine at the desired temperature or used to refreeze the ice pack during the night. In the morning the device is unplugged from the AC outlet, the lid replaced for passive cooling mode of operation. The operation may include repeating the next night.
  • [0051]
    It will be understood that there is no fixed limit on the size of the device. However, there is a trade off with respect to cooling capacity. If the device is larger, the device tends to be plugged in for longer to achieve cooling.
  • [0052]
    The following examples, as well as the other examples described herein, are presented to further illustrate the invention and, are not to be construed as unduly limiting the scope of this invention.
  • EXAMPLE 1 Development of Dimensional Constraints for the TravelFridge
  • [0053]
    A design challenge for the TravelFridge was to create an optimally insulated container. The effects of convection, conduction, and radiation were minimized so that the final product is sufficiently close to a perfect insulator. The main parameters in this design are surface area, insulation, conductivity, volume of liquid to be cooled, and manufacturing cost.
  • [0054]
    The diabetes and MS medicine dimensions and required temperatures for the maintenance of these medicines were used as reference dimensional constraints for developing an exemplary TravelFridge. Table I summarizes these dimensional constraints.
  • [0000]
    TABLE 1
    Physical constraints of medicines
    Typical Time
    Volume Height Width 1 Vial Lasts Temperature
    (mL) (cm) (cm) (days) (Celsius)
    Diabetes 10 5.5 2.25 30 2-8
    Vials
    MS 0.5 varies Varies 30 2-8
    Cartridges
  • [0055]
    The upper dimensional constraints thus come from the diabetes medicines. It was decided that the container can have the capability to carry up to four vials, meaning that at the minimum the interior chamber must be greater than 5 cm in diameter and 5.5 cm in height. Additionally, the interior chamber must stay at temperatures between 2-8° C. for a minimum of 24 hours without active cooling. The medicines must also be safe from breaking during the regular jostle of travel and the interior temperature must be displayed to confirm that the medicines are properly cooled.
  • EXAMPLE 2 Temperature Decay Test
  • [0056]
    The only potential competition to TravelFridge is a device called Insulpak. Insulpak is 12″×9″×3.5″ made with foam insulation and is cooled with a removable, freezable ice-pack. This product is priced at $48.95, which is less than the projected price of TravelFridge, but does not contain all of the features TravelFridge does. The main problems are that an external refrigeration device is still needed to freeze the ice-pack and the insulation is poor. With TravelFridge, the external refrigeration would not be necessary because it uniquely offers active cooling through the use of a TEC along with improved insulation. All other features of Insulpak including temperature readout, insulation, and portability are either met or improved upon by TravelFridge.
  • [0057]
    For choosing a container to develop an exemplary TravelFridge, temperature decay tests were performed. Temperature decay tests were compared for a foam insulated container, like Insulpak and a vacuum insulated container like, Thermos®.
  • [0058]
    Briefly, a beaker filled with 200 mL of water at 38° F. was placed inside Insulpak. This assembly was placed inside a drying oven set to 104 F with an RTD (resistance temperature device) measuring the water and oven temperature. From this data, a log plot to determine the m-value for this test was created, which is depicted in FIG. 10. This m-value was then used to extrapolate temperature curves at other ambient temperatures. FIG. 11 shows the plot with the results from these calculations graphed as a curve of water temperature versus time.
  • [0059]
    The results were not satisfactory for the specification of keeping medicines within the desired temperature range (36-46° F.) for extended periods of time. For this reason, a vacuum insulated container, i.e., a Thermos®© food container, was tested. This container had the desired dimensional constraints with the same approximate interior size and design as storage area specified for the diabetes and MS medications. A similar test to the Insulpak test was run where 200 mL of water at 35° F. was poured directly inside the Thermos®© and placed inside a drying oven at 104° F. The oven temperature and water temperature were once again measured and similar data was collected as shown in FIGS. 12 and 13. By comparing the m-values found along with the temperature decay, it can be seen that the Thermos® shell will have much better temperature performance characteristics than Insulpak. Therefore, an insulation design similar to this was used in TravelFridge.
  • [0060]
    To improve the cooling capabilities further, an icepack (manufactured by Cold Ice®) may be used to store a passive cooling capacity. Table 2 compares the heat capacity and heat of fusion of Cold Ice®) and water (data from the manufacturer of Cold Ice®).
  • [0000]
    TABLE 2
    Heat Capacity and Heat of Fusion
    Difference at
    Equilibrium Point
    Material Total kcal kcal/oz after 3 Hours (° F.)
    Cold Ice ® −155.185 −3.233 71.6
    Water −151.4 −3.154 77
  • [0061]
    This shows that Cold Ice® has a higher heat of fusion than water meaning that Cold Ice® absorbs more energy before it melts. By using the heat of fusion value of Cold Ice® and the m-values from the Thermos® and Insulpak tests, FIGS. 14 and 15 compare the calculated temperature retention time with respect to Cold Ice® mass at ambient temperatures of 66° F., 86° F., 106 F. From these two graphs, it can be seen that the temperature retention time of the Thermos® is significantly longer than that of Insulpak. These calculations indicate with a mass of 1 lbm of Cold Ice® in the Thermos® at an ambient temperature of 86 F, it will take much longer for the temperatures to reach 46° F. (the temperature where the medicine may become unusable) as compared to the Insulpak. According to this data, travelers may be able to expose TravelFridge for extended periods of time at outdoor temperatures with their medicines remaining at the required temperatures. This also justified making a container that may keep medicines cool for up to 24 hours with passive cooling alone.
  • EXAMPLE 3 TEC
  • [0062]
    TEC's are tested by tracking the temperature at various voltages as a certain amount of Cold Ice®© (starting with 0.5 lb) is tracked from starting out at room temperature to being frozen. Calculations are done to determine the amount of heat that the TEC will expel in order to get a temperature difference down to 35° F. The results of these calculations were used to determine the theoretical heat sink geometry and fan speed necessary to dissipate the excess heat generated by the TEC.
  • [0063]
    Upon selection of the appropriate geometries and fan speeds, testing with the TEC, heatsink, fan, thermal grease and gel was done to determine the amount of time it takes to cool the gel at different voltages. Based on this data the input voltage to the TEC and recommended time to freeze is determined.
  • EXAMPLE 4 Development of the TravelFridge
  • [0064]
    A Nissan Thermos® was used for the vacuum insulated container. The lid was modified. First a heat sink was cut to fit inside the Thermos® so that it can be used as a cold plate. A spacer was attached to the cold plate and a TEC to the spacer. A second heat sink with a fan was attached to the other side of the TEC so that the TEC is effectively sandwiched between the heat sink and cold plate. All junctions were made as thermally conductive as possible and therefore were coated with thermal grease.
  • [0065]
    The microcontroller used came mounted on an expansion board designed by Atmel. A temperature sensor was attached near the medicine and the signal fed directly into the ADC of the microcontroller. The microcontroller supplies a control signal to the FET sourcing the TEC. The LCD used for reading out the medicine temperature was integrated on the expansion board.
  • [0066]
    The microcontroller was programmed to run the TEC at high power when the medicine temperature is higher than the desired temperature, and to turn off when the desired medicine temperature is achieved in the active cooling mode. The fan will run at all times that the unit is plugged into an AC outlet.
  • [0067]
    Clasps were provided to hold lids onto the Thermos®, to ensure that the TEC-heatsink-cooling assembly stays together and fits securely on the top of the Thermos®. The Thermos® purchased in order to compare to the Insulpak was used for the final design of the TravelFridge. A commercial shipping gel, called “Cold Ice®” was used. The gel comes in a plastic bag. The bag was cut and the gel poured into a cylinder. In an alternative embodiment, the gel can be left in the bag itself and any suitable air tight container can be used for the gel.
  • [0068]
    A custom designed thermal conduction member was used. The gel was contained in an aluminum container. A medicine vial may contact the aluminum container holding the gel. A portion of the thermal conduction member extended into the gel. The portion was a fin The fin had a cylindrical shape. The thermal conduction member was one piece. That is, a cold plate portion was integrally formed with a conduction fin portion. The present inventors custom machined the thermal conduction member for the TravelFridge. For the size of the fin, accordingly, in an exemplary embodiment, the fin takes up to 10% of the volume. Thus, instead of 1 pound of gel, as without the thermal conduction member, the device contained ¾ pound of gel.
  • EXAMPLE 5 Design Testing and Validation
  • [0069]
    To determine the performance of the TravelFridge, following its construction, three distinct testing phases were performed. These are broken into freezing tests, thawing tests and fan tests. The freezing tests were to determine the performance of the TravelFridge in the “active” mode when power is being supplied to the unit. The thawing tests were consequently designed to test the passive performance of the system after the freezing test was completed. The heatsink and fan combination are a critical part of the thermoelectric assembly, therefore testing of various fans was conducted to decide which one gave the best performance.
  • EXAMPLE 6 Freezing Test Experimental Setup and Results
  • [0070]
    For the freezing tests, the TravelFridge was first hooked up to electrical power. The TEC was powered by a variable power supply set between 4.5-5.5 A. The fan was powered with a 12V power supply. Also, four thermistors were used to measure temperature of the heatsink, cold plate, gel and medicine. Data was taken using an NI-DAQ hooked up to a laptop running a Labview VI. Power was supplied to the TEC and then data was taken for 8 hours. The temperatures were then plotted, as seen in FIG. 16.
  • EXAMPLE 7 Thawing Test Experimental Setup and Results
  • [0071]
    Once the freezing test was completed, a thawing test was started. The power to the TEC and the fan was removed. Also, only data for the gel and medicine temperatures were taken. The lid of the TravelFridge was replaced and fastened, and then data was taken for approximately 30 hours continuously. Typical results are depicted in FIG. 17.
  • EXAMPLE 8 Fan Testing Experimental Setup and Results
  • [0072]
    Fan testing was performed on three different fans, a Dynatron 15 mm fan, a Dynatron 25 mm fan and a Y.S. Tech 25 mm fan. First, the TravelFridge was arranged in the “active” configuration. Different inputs to the TEC were chosen, and the voltage, current and heatsink temperature were recorded at each point. Once the data was collected, a graph of heatsink temperature vs. input wattage was constructed to determine which fan performed the best. Two separate tests were done, one with the fans running at 12V and the other with the fans running at 15V. We do not advise running the fans above 12V however, as we had one burn out during a test which resulted in the TEC burning out. The results for the 15V case are shown in FIG. 18. It is clear from the results that the Dynatron 25 mm fan performed the best. This fan was used for all of the freezing tests to get the best performance possible.
  • [0073]
    Many freeze and thaw tests were conducted to validate the accuracy of data. In most cases, the data correlated well with other tests, indicating that the experimental procedures were valid. The general results of testing were that the gel was frozen thoroughly after 8 hours and the gel stayed in the desired temperature range for around 25 hours.
  • [0074]
    All patents and publications referenced herein are hereby incorporated by reference. It will be understood that certain of the above-described structures, functions, and operations of the above-described embodiments are not necessary to practice the present invention and are included in the description simply for completeness of an exemplary embodiment or embodiments. In addition, it will be understood that specific structures, functions, and operations set forth in the above-described referenced patents and publications can be practiced in conjunction with the present invention, but they are not essential to its practice. It is therefore to be understood that the invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described without actually departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention as defined by the appended claims.

Claims (27)

1. A portable medical storage device, comprising:
an insulated container;
a freezable gel disposed within the container; and
a thermoelectric cooler in thermal communication with the freezable gel.
2. The portable medicine storage device according to claim 1, further comprising:
a thermal conduction member adapted for providing the thermal communication, the thermal conduction member comprising:
a cold plate portion integrally formed with a conduction fin portion, wherein the cold plate portion is adjacent the thermoelectric cooler and the conduction fin portion extends into the gel.
3. The portable medicine storage device according to claim 2, wherein the conduction fin comprises a rod.
4. The portable medicine storage device according to claim 2, wherein the conduction fin comprises a heat pipe.
5. The portable medicine storage device according to claim 4, wherein the conduction fin comprises a plurality of heat pipes.
6. The portable medicine storage device according to claim 1, wherein the freezable gel comprises a material having a freezing temperature about equal to a minimum storage temperature of the medicine.
7. The portable medicine storage device according to claim 6, wherein the minimum storage temperature is about 2° C.
8. The portable medicine storage device according to claim 1, wherein the device maintains medicine stored in the container at a temperature between about 2° C. and about 8° C. for at least about 24 hr.
9. The portable medicine storage device according to claim 1, further comprising a controller circuit in electrical communication with the thermoelectric cooler.
10. The portable medicine storage device according to claim 9, wherein the controller circuit is configured to transform an input signal dependent on medicine temperature to an output signal regulating the on/off state of the thermoelectric cooler.
11. The portable medicine storage device according to claim 10, further comprising an AC/DC adaptor in electrical communication with the controller circuit.
12. The portable medical storage device according to claim 10, further comprising a source of portable electric power mounted in said device.
13. The portable medical storage device according to claim 12, wherein said portable electric power provides the operating power for the controller circuit to regulate the thermoelectric cooler in the absence of an AC outlet.
14. The portable medical storage device according to claim 13, wherein said portable electric power comprise rechargeable batteries.
15. The portable medicine storage device according to claim 1, wherein the container comprises an inner cylindrical wall.
16. The portable medicine storage device according to claim 15, wherein the wall is at least about 5 cm in diameter.
17. The portable medicine storage device according to claim 1, wherein the container comprises at least one medicine receptacle sized so as to hold a 10 ml medicine vial.
18. The portable medicine storage device according to claim 1, wherein the container comprises at least one medicine receptacle sized so as to hold a 1 ml syringe.
19. The portable medicine storage device according to claim 1, further comprising a fan adjacent the thermoelectric cooler.
20. The portable medicine storage device according to claim 1, wherein the insulated container comprise vacuum insulation.
21. A portable medical storage device, comprising:
an insulated container comprising an insulated lid;
a phase change material disposed within the container;
a storage unit in contact with the phase change material;
a cooling assembly in contact with the freezable gel, said cooling assembly comprising a cold plate, a thermal conduction member, a thermal electric cooler, a heat sink, and a fan;
a temperature sensor adapted for sensing the temperature within the container; and
a microcontroller in electrical communication with the thermoelectric cooler and said temperature sensor.
22. The portable medical storage device according to claim 21, wherein said cold plate is integrally formed with the thermal conduction member and adjacent to the thermoelectric cooler.
23. The portable medical storage device of claim 22, wherein the conduction member extends into the phase change material.
24. The portable medical storage device according to claim 21, wherein said storage unit is configured to hold an item selected from among small glass bottles, syringes, and small vials.
25. The portable medical storage device according to claim 21, wherein said system is adapted for storing liquid phase sterile mediums, for administering to individuals in need thereof, at a temperature slightly above its freezing temperature.
26. The portable medical storage device according to claim 21, wherein said system is adapted for storing personal use medicines required to be kept at a predetermined temperature during travel.
27. A method for controlling the temperature of a medical material, comprising:
providing the portable medical storage device according to claim 21;
maintaining the temperature of said medical material at a predetermined temperature.
US12130696 2007-05-30 2008-05-30 Medical travel pack with cooling system Abandoned US20090049845A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US94089507 true 2007-05-30 2007-05-30
US12130696 US20090049845A1 (en) 2007-05-30 2008-05-30 Medical travel pack with cooling system

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12130696 US20090049845A1 (en) 2007-05-30 2008-05-30 Medical travel pack with cooling system

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20090049845A1 true true US20090049845A1 (en) 2009-02-26

Family

ID=40380885

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12130696 Abandoned US20090049845A1 (en) 2007-05-30 2008-05-30 Medical travel pack with cooling system

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20090049845A1 (en)

Cited By (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110000224A1 (en) * 2008-03-19 2011-01-06 Uttam Ghoshal Metal-core thermoelectric cooling and power generation device
US20110016886A1 (en) * 2008-03-05 2011-01-27 Uttam Ghoshal Method and apparatus for switched thermoelectric cooling of fluids
US20110208348A1 (en) * 2010-02-24 2011-08-25 Monosol Rx, Llc Device and system for determining, preparing and administering therapeutically effective doses
WO2012004433A1 (en) * 2010-07-07 2012-01-12 Sociedad Anónima Damm Beverage cooling device
US20120017633A1 (en) * 2010-07-23 2012-01-26 Hong Wei-Li Cooling device
US20120097686A1 (en) * 2007-12-11 2012-04-26 Tokitae Llc Temperature-Stabilized medicinal storage systems
US20120312031A1 (en) * 2011-06-08 2012-12-13 Richard Elliot Olsen Cooler for Temperature Sensitive Items
US8904808B2 (en) 2009-07-17 2014-12-09 Sheetak, Inc. Heat pipes and thermoelectric cooling devices
US20150013347A1 (en) * 2013-06-26 2015-01-15 Brewjacket, Inc. Modular thermoelectric submerged high volume liquid temperature controlling system
EP2832340A1 (en) * 2013-08-02 2015-02-04 Astrium GmbH Insulating container device
WO2015048003A1 (en) * 2013-09-25 2015-04-02 Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Corporation Cryopreservation container
WO2015055836A1 (en) * 2013-10-17 2015-04-23 Deltatrak Inc. A portable temperature controlled container
WO2015081058A1 (en) 2013-11-27 2015-06-04 Tokitae Llc Refrigeration devices including temperature-controlled container systems
WO2015081057A1 (en) 2013-11-27 2015-06-04 Tokitae Llc Temperature-controlled container systems for use within a refrigeration device
WO2015084700A1 (en) * 2013-12-05 2015-06-11 Tokitae Llc Storage apparatuses and related methods for storing temperature-sensitive items
WO2015084701A1 (en) * 2013-12-06 2015-06-11 Tokitae Llc Temperature-stabilized storage systems with integral regulated cooling
US20150241092A1 (en) * 2014-02-25 2015-08-27 Qualcomm Incorporated Active heat flow control with thermoelectric layers
US9140476B2 (en) 2007-12-11 2015-09-22 Tokitae Llc Temperature-controlled storage systems
US9139351B2 (en) 2007-12-11 2015-09-22 Tokitae Llc Temperature-stabilized storage systems with flexible connectors
US9174791B2 (en) 2007-12-11 2015-11-03 Tokitae Llc Temperature-stabilized storage systems
US9205969B2 (en) 2007-12-11 2015-12-08 Tokitae Llc Temperature-stabilized storage systems
WO2016011207A1 (en) * 2014-07-15 2016-01-21 Ron Nagar Devices, systems and methods for controlling conditions and delivery of substances
CN105307951A (en) * 2013-05-31 2016-02-03 脱其泰有限责任公司 Temperature-stabilized storage systems with regulated cooling
US9447995B2 (en) 2010-02-08 2016-09-20 Tokitac LLC Temperature-stabilized storage systems with integral regulated cooling
US20170071784A1 (en) * 2015-09-16 2017-03-16 William I. Brobeck High efficiency apparatus for selectively heating and/or cooling therapeutic gel packs by conduction
WO2017136345A3 (en) * 2016-02-02 2017-12-07 Tokitae Llc Thermal transfer devices, temperature stabilized containers including the same, and related methods

Citations (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4245479A (en) * 1978-01-19 1981-01-20 Texaco Inc. Temperature stabilization method
US5253260A (en) * 1991-12-20 1993-10-12 Hughes Aircraft Company Apparatus and method for passive heat pipe cooling of solid state laser heads
US5505046A (en) * 1994-01-12 1996-04-09 Marlow Industrie, Inc. Control system for thermoelectric refrigerator
US5522216A (en) * 1994-01-12 1996-06-04 Marlow Industries, Inc. Thermoelectric refrigerator
US5865032A (en) * 1996-07-02 1999-02-02 Emerging Technology Systems, L.L.C. Thermoelectric medicine cooling bag
US6213007B1 (en) * 1997-06-09 2001-04-10 Arnold J. Lande Home yogurt/cheese making machine
US6308518B1 (en) * 1999-09-28 2001-10-30 Rick C. Hunter Thermal barrier enclosure system
US6397618B1 (en) * 2001-05-30 2002-06-04 International Business Machines Corporation Cooling system with auxiliary thermal buffer unit for cooling an electronics module
US20020162339A1 (en) * 2001-05-04 2002-11-07 Harrison Howard R. High performance thermoelectric systems
US6588548B1 (en) * 1999-11-23 2003-07-08 Load King Manufacturing, Co. Pharmacy workstation and method of operation
US20030213814A1 (en) * 2001-11-26 2003-11-20 Johne Phelps Wine or champagne preservation and dispensing apparatus
US6666032B1 (en) * 1999-07-01 2003-12-23 Kryotrans Limited Thermally insulated container
US6823678B1 (en) * 2003-12-22 2004-11-30 Ferrotec (Usa) Corporation Air conditioner system for flexible material-based devices
US20050159055A1 (en) * 2004-01-16 2005-07-21 Kazuo Nakase Life saving device provided with body temperature adjuster
US7278270B2 (en) * 2004-07-01 2007-10-09 The Coleman Company, Inc. Insulated container with thermoelectric unit
US20080135564A1 (en) * 2006-12-12 2008-06-12 Benjamin Romero Container for shipping products, which controls temperature of products

Patent Citations (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4245479A (en) * 1978-01-19 1981-01-20 Texaco Inc. Temperature stabilization method
US5253260A (en) * 1991-12-20 1993-10-12 Hughes Aircraft Company Apparatus and method for passive heat pipe cooling of solid state laser heads
US5522216A (en) * 1994-01-12 1996-06-04 Marlow Industries, Inc. Thermoelectric refrigerator
US5505046A (en) * 1994-01-12 1996-04-09 Marlow Industrie, Inc. Control system for thermoelectric refrigerator
US5865032A (en) * 1996-07-02 1999-02-02 Emerging Technology Systems, L.L.C. Thermoelectric medicine cooling bag
US6213007B1 (en) * 1997-06-09 2001-04-10 Arnold J. Lande Home yogurt/cheese making machine
US6666032B1 (en) * 1999-07-01 2003-12-23 Kryotrans Limited Thermally insulated container
US6308518B1 (en) * 1999-09-28 2001-10-30 Rick C. Hunter Thermal barrier enclosure system
US6588548B1 (en) * 1999-11-23 2003-07-08 Load King Manufacturing, Co. Pharmacy workstation and method of operation
US20020162339A1 (en) * 2001-05-04 2002-11-07 Harrison Howard R. High performance thermoelectric systems
US6397618B1 (en) * 2001-05-30 2002-06-04 International Business Machines Corporation Cooling system with auxiliary thermal buffer unit for cooling an electronics module
US20030213814A1 (en) * 2001-11-26 2003-11-20 Johne Phelps Wine or champagne preservation and dispensing apparatus
US6823678B1 (en) * 2003-12-22 2004-11-30 Ferrotec (Usa) Corporation Air conditioner system for flexible material-based devices
US20050159055A1 (en) * 2004-01-16 2005-07-21 Kazuo Nakase Life saving device provided with body temperature adjuster
US7278270B2 (en) * 2004-07-01 2007-10-09 The Coleman Company, Inc. Insulated container with thermoelectric unit
US20080135564A1 (en) * 2006-12-12 2008-06-12 Benjamin Romero Container for shipping products, which controls temperature of products

Cited By (40)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9205969B2 (en) 2007-12-11 2015-12-08 Tokitae Llc Temperature-stabilized storage systems
US9140476B2 (en) 2007-12-11 2015-09-22 Tokitae Llc Temperature-controlled storage systems
US9139351B2 (en) 2007-12-11 2015-09-22 Tokitae Llc Temperature-stabilized storage systems with flexible connectors
US9174791B2 (en) 2007-12-11 2015-11-03 Tokitae Llc Temperature-stabilized storage systems
US20120097686A1 (en) * 2007-12-11 2012-04-26 Tokitae Llc Temperature-Stabilized medicinal storage systems
US9138295B2 (en) * 2007-12-11 2015-09-22 Tokitae Llc Temperature-stabilized medicinal storage systems
US9435571B2 (en) * 2008-03-05 2016-09-06 Sheetak Inc. Method and apparatus for switched thermoelectric cooling of fluids
US20110016886A1 (en) * 2008-03-05 2011-01-27 Uttam Ghoshal Method and apparatus for switched thermoelectric cooling of fluids
US20110000224A1 (en) * 2008-03-19 2011-01-06 Uttam Ghoshal Metal-core thermoelectric cooling and power generation device
US8904808B2 (en) 2009-07-17 2014-12-09 Sheetak, Inc. Heat pipes and thermoelectric cooling devices
US9447995B2 (en) 2010-02-08 2016-09-20 Tokitac LLC Temperature-stabilized storage systems with integral regulated cooling
CN102762183A (en) * 2010-02-24 2012-10-31 莫诺索尔克斯有限公司 Device and system for determining, preparing and administering therapeutically effective doses
WO2011106341A1 (en) * 2010-02-24 2011-09-01 Monosol Rx, Llc Device and system for determining, preparing and administering therapeutically effective doses
US20110208348A1 (en) * 2010-02-24 2011-08-25 Monosol Rx, Llc Device and system for determining, preparing and administering therapeutically effective doses
US9095495B2 (en) 2010-02-24 2015-08-04 Monosol Rx, Llc Device and system for determining, preparing and administering therapeutically effective doses
WO2012004433A1 (en) * 2010-07-07 2012-01-12 Sociedad Anónima Damm Beverage cooling device
ES2372458A1 (en) * 2010-07-07 2012-01-20 Sociedad Anónima Damm Beverage cooling device.
US20120017633A1 (en) * 2010-07-23 2012-01-26 Hong Wei-Li Cooling device
US8887512B2 (en) * 2011-06-08 2014-11-18 Richard Elliot Olsen Cooler for temperature sensitive items
US20120312031A1 (en) * 2011-06-08 2012-12-13 Richard Elliot Olsen Cooler for Temperature Sensitive Items
US9372016B2 (en) 2013-05-31 2016-06-21 Tokitae Llc Temperature-stabilized storage systems with regulated cooling
CN105307951A (en) * 2013-05-31 2016-02-03 脱其泰有限责任公司 Temperature-stabilized storage systems with regulated cooling
US9423163B2 (en) * 2013-06-26 2016-08-23 Brewjacket Incorporated Modular thermoelectric submerged high volume liquid temperature controlling system
US20150013347A1 (en) * 2013-06-26 2015-01-15 Brewjacket, Inc. Modular thermoelectric submerged high volume liquid temperature controlling system
EP2832340A1 (en) * 2013-08-02 2015-02-04 Astrium GmbH Insulating container device
WO2015048003A1 (en) * 2013-09-25 2015-04-02 Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Corporation Cryopreservation container
CN105555246A (en) * 2013-09-25 2016-05-04 美国圣戈班性能塑料公司 Cryopreservation container
US9357763B2 (en) 2013-09-25 2016-06-07 Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics Corporation Cryopreservation container
WO2015055836A1 (en) * 2013-10-17 2015-04-23 Deltatrak Inc. A portable temperature controlled container
WO2015081057A1 (en) 2013-11-27 2015-06-04 Tokitae Llc Temperature-controlled container systems for use within a refrigeration device
WO2015081058A1 (en) 2013-11-27 2015-06-04 Tokitae Llc Refrigeration devices including temperature-controlled container systems
EP3074704A4 (en) * 2013-11-27 2017-07-19 Tokitae Llc Temperature-controlled container systems for use within a refrigeration device
EP3074703A4 (en) * 2013-11-27 2017-07-19 Tokitae Llc Refrigeration devices including temperature-controlled container systems
US9435578B2 (en) 2013-12-05 2016-09-06 Tokitae Llc Storage apparatuses and related methods for storing temperature-sensitive items
WO2015084700A1 (en) * 2013-12-05 2015-06-11 Tokitae Llc Storage apparatuses and related methods for storing temperature-sensitive items
WO2015084701A1 (en) * 2013-12-06 2015-06-11 Tokitae Llc Temperature-stabilized storage systems with integral regulated cooling
US20150241092A1 (en) * 2014-02-25 2015-08-27 Qualcomm Incorporated Active heat flow control with thermoelectric layers
WO2016011207A1 (en) * 2014-07-15 2016-01-21 Ron Nagar Devices, systems and methods for controlling conditions and delivery of substances
US20170071784A1 (en) * 2015-09-16 2017-03-16 William I. Brobeck High efficiency apparatus for selectively heating and/or cooling therapeutic gel packs by conduction
WO2017136345A3 (en) * 2016-02-02 2017-12-07 Tokitae Llc Thermal transfer devices, temperature stabilized containers including the same, and related methods

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3262283A (en) Refrigerating jacket
US3178896A (en) Beer keg cooler
US5250032A (en) Heater for in vivo blood infusion
US6674052B1 (en) Thermal cup
US4961320A (en) Conveying and storage device for thermosensitive products
US6260360B1 (en) Container
US4145895A (en) Apparatus for storing goods at stable temperatures in a heat-insulated container
US5097829A (en) Temperature controlled cooling system
US4250720A (en) Disposable non-cyclic sorption temperature-changers
US6316750B1 (en) Apparatus for warming medical pads
Min et al. Experimental evaluation of prototype thermoelectric domestic-refrigerators
US6021642A (en) Cosmetic storage and refrigeration unit
US20040231355A1 (en) Thermal insert for container having a passive controlled temperature interior
US20110016886A1 (en) Method and apparatus for switched thermoelectric cooling of fluids
US20060110657A1 (en) Battery assembly for use in an uninterruptible power supply system and method
US20050016198A1 (en) Cryogenic storage system
US5181394A (en) Freeze protective shipping units
US5207674A (en) Electronic cryogenic surgical probe apparatus and method
US20050210884A1 (en) Portable cooled merchandizing unit
US4799358A (en) Apparatus for cooling and deep freezing samples of biological material enclosed in vessels
US20080251063A1 (en) Rechargeable self-heating food container
US5505046A (en) Control system for thermoelectric refrigerator
US7959657B1 (en) Portable thermal therapeutic apparatus and method
US5713208A (en) Thermoelectric cooling apparatus
US6401461B1 (en) Combination ice-maker and cooler