US20090019793A1 - Weep hole screen - Google Patents

Weep hole screen Download PDF

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US20090019793A1
US20090019793A1 US12284412 US28441208A US2009019793A1 US 20090019793 A1 US20090019793 A1 US 20090019793A1 US 12284412 US12284412 US 12284412 US 28441208 A US28441208 A US 28441208A US 2009019793 A1 US2009019793 A1 US 2009019793A1
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screen
weep hole
bricks
pair
spaced apart
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Abandoned
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US12284412
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Edmund Burke Huber, JR.
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Huber Jr Edmund Burke
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/62Insulation or other protection; Elements or use of specified material therefor
    • E04B1/70Drying or keeping dry, e.g. by air vents
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B1/00Constructions in general; Structures which are not restricted either to walls, e.g. partitions, or floors or ceilings or roofs
    • E04B1/62Insulation or other protection; Elements or use of specified material therefor
    • E04B1/70Drying or keeping dry, e.g. by air vents
    • E04B1/7038Evacuating water from cavity walls, e.g. by using weep holes
    • E04B1/7053Grills for weep holes

Abstract

A weep hole screen and method for installing the same in the exterior wall of a masonry building in order to prevent small animals such as insects and rodents from entering the building through the weep hole. A weep hole screen in accordance with the present invention preferably comprises a rectangular mesh screen with an angle bracket attached to each end. The weep hole screen is sized such that the angle brackets sandwich the bricks that form the weep hole, preferably on the interior faces of the bricks. The interfaces between the weep hole screen and the bricks are preferably sealed with mortar or-another suitable sealant. The weep hole screen may be installed easily during original construction of the wall without the need for any mechanical fasteners.

Description

  • This is a continuation-in-part application claiming priority from and incorporating herein by reference U.S. application Ser. No. 10/249,716, filed on May 2, 2003.
  • BACKGROUND OF INVENTION
  • 1. Field of the Invention
  • This invention relates to an improved weep hole screen and method of installing the same for covering weep holes in masonry buildings.
  • 2. Description of the Related Art
  • In masonry buildings, the exterior walls are usually provided with a number of weep holes to allow adequate ventilation of the space between the exterior walls and the interior walls. Weep holes are typically formed during exterior wall construction by simply not placing mortar in the gap between two adjacent bricks. Although weep holes are useful for providing ventilation, they also present a problem of intrusion of insects and rodents into the walls.
  • In view of that problem, a number of types of weep hole screens have been developed over the years. However, each of the prior weep hole screens has significant drawbacks. Most of the existing weep hole screens are designed for installation after the construction of the walls and therefore involve some attempt to fasten the weep hole screens on the exterior of the walls. Examples of such weep hole screens include U.S. Pat. No. 6,360,493 to Torres 111, U.S. Pat. No. 6, 176,048 to Berger, U.S. Pat. No. 6,044,594 to Desselle, and U.S. Pat. No. 5,203,795 to Balamut et al., each of which is incorporated herein by reference. Such designs that involve the use of mechanical fasteners are problematic because of the difficulties of using mechanical fasteners in masonry. Specifically, mechanical fasteners do not readily penetrate and hold in masonry but tend to grind to powder or chip away the masonry. Additionally, some of the existing designs involve movable parts, which unnecessarily increases the level of complexity for manufacture and installation and increases the cost. Because of those drawbacks, it would be a significant advancement in the art to provide a weep hole screen that requires no mechanical fasteners, has no moving parts, is simple and inexpensive to manufacture and install.
  • SUMMARY OF INVENTION
  • The present invention is directed to an improved weep hole screen and method for installing the same in the exterior wall of a masonry building in order to prevent small animals such as insects and rodents from entering the building through the weep hole. A weep hole screen in accordance with the present invention preferably comprises a rectangular mesh screen with an angle bracket attached to each end. The weep hole screen is sized such that the angle brackets sandwich the bricks that form the weep hole on the interior faces of the bricks. The interfaces between the weep hole screen and the bricks are preferably sealed with mortar or another suitable sealant. The weep hole screen may be installed easily during original construction of the wall. Such a weep hole screen is advantageous because it is simple and inexpensive to manufacture and install. By installing the present weep hole screen during original construction, the weep hole screen is cemented firmly in place without the need for mechanical fasteners.
  • Additionally, the present weep hole screen is located on the interior face of the brick wall, so it is not readily visible from the exterior and is out of the way and not likely to get knocked off by activities occurring on the exterior of the building, such as lawn care and building maintenance.
  • Disclosed is a method of installing the present weep hole screen about a weep hole formed between first and second bricks in a masonry wall during construction of the wall, each of said bricks having an upper surface, a lower surface, a front surface, a rear surface, and side surfaces, the method comprising the following steps:
  • (a) applying a first amount of mortar on a mounting surface;
  • (b) positioning the first and second bricks in spaced relation on a first amount of mortar;
  • (c) providing a weep hole screen having first and second angle brackets spaced apart from one another and a mesh screen attached to each of first and second angle brackets;
  • (d) positioning the weep hole screen such that the first and second bricks are at least partially sandwiched between first and second angle brackets and the mesh screen abuts the front or rear surface of each of the first and second bricks;
  • (e) sealing the weep hole screen to each of the first and second bricks; and
  • (f) installing a third brick on top of the first and second bricks using a second amount of mortar.
  • Disclosed is a method of installing Applicant's novel weep hole screen wherein said step(e) above comprises using a third amount of mortar to seal the mesh screen to first and second bricks.
  • Additionally, disclosed is a method of installing Applicant's novel weep hole screen wherein a first angle bracket comprises first and second flanges, first and second flanges being substantially perpendicular to one another, a second angle bracket comprises third and fourth flanges, third and fourth flanges being substantially perpendicular to one another, the mesh screen being attached to second and fourth flanges, and wherein step (d) above comprises positioning the first flange adjacent the upper surface of each of the first and second bricks; positioning the second flange adjacent the rear surface of each of the first and second bricks; positioning the third flange adjacent the lower surface of each of the first and second bricks; and positioning the fourth flange adjacent the rear surface of each of the first and second bricks.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a weep hole screen in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 is a front elevation view of a portion of a brick wall having a weep hole with a weep hole screen installed in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIG. 3 is a rear perspective view of a portion of a brick wall having a weep hole with a weep hole screen installed in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an alternative weep hole screen in accordance with the present invention.
  • FIG. 5A is a perspective view of an alternative preferred embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 5B is perspective view of another alternative preferred embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 5C is a perspective view of another alternative preferred embodiment of the present modification.
  • FIG. 5D is a partial cross sectional view alternative preferred embodiment of the present invention set forth in FIG. 5C.
  • FIG. 5E illustrates a perspective view of a louvered screen embodiment for use with Applicant's present invention.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates the installation of Applicant's various embodiments on the front of a brick wall.
  • FIGS. 7A and 7B illustrate top elevational views of an alternate preferred embodiment of Applicant's weep hole screen; FIG. 7B illustrating the top elevational view of the embodiment set forth in FIG. 8C below.
  • FIGS. 8A, 8B, and 8C illustrate three alternate preferred embodiments of an integral face/leg weep hole screen device particularly suited for installation to preexisting weep holes that have no screens or devices engaged therewith.
  • FIG. 9A and 9B illustrate the brick wall, preexisting, and the steps for installing the embodiment of FIGS. 8A, B and C therein, having a weep hole therein.
  • FIG. 10 illustrates a top elevational view of a manner in which the integral face/leg weep hole screen fits into a weep hole.
  • FIGS. 11 and 12 illustrate an embodiment of applicant's integral face/leg weep hole screen device having tapered legs.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Referring to FIG. I a weep hole screen 10 in accordance with the present invention comprises a mesh screen 16 which is attached to angle brackets 12 and 14 at either end. The attachment of screen 16 to angle brackets 12 and 14 may be by any suitable means, such as by welding, adhesives, or mechanical fasteners. Screen 16 preferably has holes that are-small enough to prevent insects and rodents from passing through it yet large enough to allow air and moisture to pass through. Angle brackets 12 and 14 and screen 16 may be made of any suitable material, such as metal, plastic, or nylon.
  • As seen in FIG. 2, weep hole screen 10 is sized such that angle brackets 12 and 14 are able to snugly sandwich a pair of adjacent bricks 18 and 19 having a weep hole 23 therebetween. Typically, the distance between the inner faces of the flanges is equal to or a few thousands of an inch greater than the brick thereon, in one embodiment about 2¼ inches to about 2 9/32 inches, and the screen 16 about ⅜ to ½ inch wide. Bricks 18 and mortar 22 are arranged to form a wall atop foundation 20 as is known in the art. Weep hole screen 10 is installed during original construction of the wall. Although weep hole screen 10 may be installed on the exterior of the wall, weep hole screen 10 is preferably installed on the interior of the wall, as best shown in FIG. 3.
  • FIG. 3 is a view from the inside of a portion of a brick wall comprising bricks 24, 25, and 26 on top of foundation 20. For the sake of clarity, no mortar is shown in FIG. 3. A weep hole 23 is formed by the absence of mortar between bricks 24 and 25. Angle brackets 12 and 14 of weep hole screen 10 sandwich bricks 24 and 25 in the vicinity of weep hole 23 such that screen 16 covers weep hole 23. Mortar (not shown) between foundation 21 and bricks 24 and 25 serves to cement weep hole screen 10 firmly in place and to seal the interfaces between angle brackets 12, 14 and bricks 24, 25. Mortar or another suitable sealant (not shown), such as silicone or adhesive, may also be used to seal the edges 16 a and 16 b of screen 16 to the back sides of bricks 24 and 25, respectively. In this manner, weep hole screen 10 allows the interior of the wall to breathe while preventing insects or rodents from entering into the interior of the wall through the weep hole 23. Those skilled in the art will appreciate that weep hole screen 10 provides a significant advantage over currently available weep hole screens in that weep hole screen 10 has no moving parts, and no mechanical fasteners are required for installation. Weep hole screen 10 is simple and inexpensive to manufacture and install and thus provides a much more efficient solution to the problem of insect and rodent entry than presently available weep hole screens which are installed on the exterior after a wall is constructed.
  • Referring to FIG. 4, an alternative weep hole screen 30 is the same as weep hole screen 10 described above except that peel-off preferably double-sided adhesive strips 32, 34 are installed along the front sides—of screen 16 between angle brackets 12, 14. Peel-off adhesive strips 32, 34, which are preferably of the type having a protective layer (not shown) that is peeled off to expose the adhesive prior to installation, enhance the seal between screen 16 and the backs of the bricks that are sandwiched between angle brackets 12, 14 when weep hole screen 30 is installed. As an alternative to peel-off adhesive strips 32, 34, other suitable sealants may be used, such as silicone, putty, or epoxy.
  • Referring again to FIG. 3, weep hole screen 10 is preferably installed on the inner face of the brick wall by placing a first amount of mortar (not shown) on foundation 21, which serves as a mounting surface. Bricks 24 and 25 are placed upon the first amount of mortar in spaced relation to one another so as to form a weep hole 23. Weep hole screen 10 is positioned about bricks 24 and 25 such that brackets 12 and 14 sandwich bricks 24 and 25 about the weep hole 23 and mesh screen 16 abuts the rear surfaces of bricks 24 and 25. Edges 16 a and 16 b of mesh screen 16 are sealed to the rear surfaces of bricks 24 and 25, preferably with mortar. Other suitable sealant, such as silicone, putty, or epoxy, could be used instead of mortar, but mortar is preferred because it is readily available for brick building construction as a matter of course. Brick 26 is then installed with mortar on top of bricks 24 and 25. Angle bracket 12 is thus cemented firmly in place in the mortar between bricks 24, 25, 26, and angle bracket 14 is cemented firmly in place in the mortar between bricks 24, 25 and foundation 21. In addition to holding weep hole screen 10 in place, the mortar also seals the interfaces between weep hole screen 10 and the bricks 24, 25, 26 and foundation 21 and thereby prevents insects and rodents from entering the building through the weep hole 23. Weep hole screen 16 of FIG. 4 is preferably installed in like manner as weep hole screen 10 as described above, except that the protective layer is peeled off of each of the adhesive strips 32 and 34 before weep hole screen 30 is positioned about the bricks 24, 26. Adhesive strips 32 and 34 thereby seal the interfaces between mesh screen 16 and bricks 24, 25.
  • The method set forth in the paragraph above applies as well to the installation of any of the embodiments of the weep hole screen set forth herein and also to the installation on a weep hole created by spaced apart adjacent bricks in a course of bricks above a first course of bricks illustrated in FIG. 3. That is to say, while the description set forth above for the installation of the device between adjacent bricks shows the adjacent bricks being the first course (first horizontal level of bricks above the foundation), the method is used for applying the device to the weep hole where the weep hole is located between adjacent bricks and a course above the first course, such as the second course of bricks in FIG. 2. It follows then that the first amount of mortar is not placed on foundation, but is placed on the underlying brick (see FIG. 2).
  • A preferred method of installing any of the devices set forth herein is on weep holes defined by adjacent bricks on the inner wall of the brick wall, during construction of the brick wall. In an alternate preferred method of installation, the devices may be placed both on the rear (inner) and the front (outer) walls during the construction of the brick wall. Thus, there may be dual coverings on a single weep hole, both at the front and at the rear of the weep holes thereby providing double coverage. That is to say, if one of the front or the rear devices failed, there would still be backup protection from the remaining weep hole screen.
  • Furthermore, while a preferred method of installing a device on a brick wall is set forth in the paragraphs above, an alternative preferred method of installing devices, either at the front or at the rear or at both the front and the rear of the brick wall, during the construction of a brick wall would provide for the flanges of the devices to be inserted after all of the bricks and mortar below, to either side of the weep hole, and above the weep hole have been installed with mortar and the mortar is still wet. At such a time any of the devices set forth herein can be gently pressed, with the flanges sandwiching the bricks as seen in FIGS. 2 and 3 into the wet mortar, which when hardened will lock the weep hole screen in place. This placement should be done carefully so as not to affect the alignment of the bricks. The flanges may be gently urged outward or inward prior to installation, as needed if the gap between the inner walls of the spaced apart flanges needs to be adjusted to be snug with the brick.
  • FIGS. 5A-5C illustrate alternative preferred embodiments of Applicant's weep hole screen 10. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 5A, angled brackets 12 and 14 are connected by vertical portions 40 a and 40 b, thus comprising a rectangular frame 40, the frame having the horizontal (flanged) portions of angled brackets 12 and 14 extending therefrom.
  • FIG. 5A illustrates an alternate preferred embodiment of Applicant's weep hole screen 10. In FIG. 5A, a separate screen 16, which may be rigid, but is typically flexible (non-rigid), is provided to cover an opening defined by the inner walls of vertical portions 40 a and 40 b, and the inner (vertical) walls of flanges or angled brackets 12 and 14. The embodiment set forth in FIG. 5B illustrates a rigid screen portion 17 that is integral (of the same piece) with the remaining elements of the weep hole screen. These elements are the vertical portions 40 a and 40 b, and the horizontal portions or the flanges that extend perpendicular to and integral with elements 17, 40 a, 40 b.
  • Likewise, in FIG. 5C, the integral one-piece flange/frame/rigid screen unit is illustrated. However, where FIG. 5B has actual holes punched through the material defining rigid screen portion 17, FIG. 5C and 5D illustrate “half-moon” (semi-circular) shaped louvers pressed out of the workplace. Moreover, in the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 5C and 5D, an integral, rigid one-piece screen 17 with half-moon shaped louvers, it is seen that there is now an “up” and “down” side to the louver side to the screen. That is to say, the screen is preferably installed with the louvers down, so as to shed water or rain.
  • FIG. 5E illustrates the rigid, integral screen portion 17 being defined by louvers across the face thereof, that is, having an extended longitudinal axis when compared to the “half moon” shaped louvers. While all the embodiments illustrate openings, FIGS. 1, 5A and 5B define holes and in FIGS. 5C, 5D and 5E, the openings are louvers.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates the installation of any of the embodiments of Applicant's weep hole screen on the outer surface of a brick wall. This installation may be accompanied by an installation on the same weep hole on the inner surface of the wall. That is to say, any of Applicant's novel weep hole devices may be installed on the inner surface alone, on the outer surface of the wall alone or on both inner and outer surfaces of the same weep hole. Moreover, installation of any of the devices set forth herein could be done during the laying of the side bricks 24 and 25, which define the weep hole and either before or after placement of brick 26 above the weep hole.
  • FIGS. 7A, 7B, 8A, 8B, and 8C illustrate yet additional preferred embodiments of Applicant's weep hole screen designated element 10 a. These feature a rigid face portion 42 having openings therethrough and integral side legs 44 and 46. The width WI of face 42, which includes a perforated face portion (FIGS. 8B or 8C) or louvered (FIG. 8A, 11A or 11B) defining all or part of the face, has a width of W1, which typically approximates the weep hole width, typically about ⅜ inch. Typically the width of the face may be in the range of ¼ to ½ inch.
  • Integral and resiliently or flexibly engaged with the face are the legs 44, 46 which may be provided with crimps 48, 50, so as to facilitate bending of legs during installation. Typically angle A between face 42 and legs 44, 46 is greater than 90° but less than 180°, typically about 135°.
  • FIG. 8A illustrates that at least a portion of face 42 is made up of a perforated or louvered section that may be integral with and made from the same workpiece as legs 44, 46. This may be done by stamping flat stock metal or other suitable material having the proper length, width and height dimensions with a stamp to define the face portion 42 and then bending after crimps 48, 50 (optional) are pressed into the workpiece, legs 44, 46 and the legs bent to the proper angle greater than 900,
  • In FIG. 8B, a separate perforated section such as a flexible screen 16 may be added to a workpiece with a rectangular blank formed therein, which screen would be attached by any suitable adhesive to the rear surface of the weep hole screen.
  • FIG. 8C illustrates that the entire single integral face/legs workpiece may be punched with openings throughout, including legs 44, 46, to provide circulation through the weep hole, crimps may be added and legs defined at the proper angle.
  • FIGS. 9A and 9B illustrate the installation of the integral face/leg embodiment 10 a illustrated in FIGS. 7A, 7B, 8A, 8B, and 8C and 11. Typically this occurs after a wall is built and the mortar is dried. Indeed, these embodiments are quite suitable for retrofitting open weep holes on walls that have been built and existing for years.
  • The device is placed adjacent to the weep hole and aligned so that the legs are adjacent the brick weep hole side walls. The top and bottom of the weep hole screen is aligned with the top and bottom of the weep hole.
  • The installation process may be achieved by flexing legs 44, 46 gently inward until they pass the inner faces of side walls of adjacent bricks 24, 25 and then urging screen 10 a into the wall until face 42 is about flush with or slightly past (inward of) the front surface 24 a and 25 a of the bricks. The angle that the legs are bent inward during installation will typically be at or less than 90 degrees. For example, weep hole screen 10 a would be inserted so that it is flush with the walls of the brick when the mortar surface is also flush with the brick wall. However, mortar is sometimes smoothed back or recessed from the surface of the brick, in which case, screen 10 a would be pushed back past the adjacent brick front wall so that it was adjacent the surface of the mortar course above and below the weep hole.
  • The height of the alternate preferred embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 7-8C and 11 is typically a height H3, that is, about equal to the height H1 (thickness of a brick or about 2¼″-2½″), but may be as great as H2, about 3¾″ a typical height between the top surface of a brick or foundation below the weep hole and the bottom surface of a brick above the weep hole as seen in FIG. 9. This range may be 2¼ to 3¼ inches.
  • FIGS. 11 and 12 show an alternate preferred embodiment of Applicant's novel weep hole screen 10, which has louvered openings, installed cantered downward to help repel water, such as rain or water from a sprinkler, but which maintains an appropriate gap that will allow effective circulation of air yet prevent access into the weep hole by bugs and the like. The full length louvers may be made with integral legs (for example, FIG. 11).
  • Note in FIGS. 11 and 12 an alternate preferred embodiment of the integral face/legs of the weep hole screen set forth in FIGS. 7A, 7B and 8A-C is illustrated. However, the pair of legs adjacent the weep hole screen face in FIGS. 11 and 12 is seen to be tapered. In FIG. 8A, height H3 is typically the height of the entire piece, including the face 42 as well as both legs. However, in the embodiment illustrated in FIGS. 11 and 12, it is seen that the height H3 of the legs is only the height where the legs join the face and going outward therefrom toward the outer edge of the leg, the height of the leg H4 tapers so that height H4 is less than height H3.
  • Turning now to dimensions of the screen or gaps in the louver, it may be seen that the gap (across lower end half moon) or the diameter or longest axis of a round hole or polygonal opening should not exceed about ⅛ inch and not be less than about 1/32 inch. The upper limit would prevent entry of bugs and the like and promote air circulation and the lower limit would allow same, but too small a dimension would inhibit air circulation, to allow access by bugs. The thickness of the material used for the weep hole device, such as the frame and flange is typically about 1/32 inch.
  • Any of the embodiments of Applicant's present invention may be made from any suitable material. Metal, including stainless steel or aluminum, would help prevent rusting. Galvanized, painted, or powder coating of steel would also inhibit rusting. Moreover, any of the devices may be colored with paint or other suitable coating, including powder coating, and may be of a color including a medium gray to simulate mortar. Plastic may also be used.
  • Although the foregoing specific details describe a preferred embodiment of this invention, persons reasonably skilled in the art will recognize that various changes may be made in the details of this invention without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims. Therefore, it should be understood that this invention is not to be limited to the specific details shown and described herein.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A brick wall comprising:
    a multiplicity of bricks including at least a pair of bricks of a first course, the pair of bricks adjacent to one another and defining a weep hole therebetween, each of the bricks having a top wall, a bottom wall, a front wall, a rear wall, and a pair of side walls, the weep hole adjacent the pair of side walls of the adjacent bricks of the pair of bricks; and
    a weep hole screen having an upper and a lower angled brackets spaced apart by a screen portion defining at least in part a multiplicity of openings, the angled bracket having flanged portions dimensioned to engage a portion of the top and bottom walls of adjacent bricks to lay in generally flush relationship thereto, the weep hole screen further dimensioned such that at least a portion of the screen portion lays between the rear walls of the pair of bricks adjacent the weep hole.
  2. 2. The brick wall of claim 1, wherein the screen portion is rigid and integral with the angled brackets, and wherein the angled brackets are connected by a pair of spaced apart vertical member portions dimensioned to at least partially lay flush and adjacent to the rear walls of the pair of adjacent bricks.
  3. 3. The brick wall of claim 2, wherein the screen portion includes a multiplicity of holes.
  4. 4. The brick wall of claim 2, wherein the screen portion includes a multiplicity of louvered openings.
  5. 5. The brick wall of claim 4, wherein the louvers are semi-circular in shape.
  6. 6. The brick wall of claim 5, wherein the louvers are elongated in shape.
  7. 7. The brick wall of claim 1, wherein the weep hole screen includes a pair of vertical member portions spaced apart and a flexible screen member and defining an inner opening in which the flexible screen member is mounted.
  8. 8. The brick wall of claim 1, wherein the weep hole screen is frameless.
  9. 9. The brick wall of claim 1, wherein the inner faces of the flanges are spaced apart approximately 2¼ inches, and the screen portion is about ⅜ to ½ inch wide.
  10. 10. The brick wall of claim 9, wherein at least the angled brackets of the weep hole screen is made from a material with a thickness of about 1/32 inch.
  11. 11. The brick wall of claim 1, wherein the screen portion is rigid and integral with the angled brackets, and wherein the angled brackets are connected by a pair of spaced apart vertical member portions dimensioned to at least partially lay flush and adjacent to the rear walls of the pair of adjacent bricks, and wherein the inner faces of the flanges are spaced apart approximately 2¼ inches, and the screen portion is about ⅜ to ½ inch wide.
  12. 12. The brick wall of claim 1, wherein the weep hole screen includes a pair of vertical member portions spaced apart and defining an inner opening in which the screen is mounted, and wherein the inner faces of the flanges are spaced apart approximately 2¼ inches, and the screen portion if about ⅜ to ½ inch wide.
  13. 13. The brick wall of claim 1, wherein the screen portion includes a multiplicity of louvered openings, and wherein the flanges are spaced apart approximately 2¼ inches, and the screen portion is about ⅜ to ½ inch wide.
  14. 14. The brick wall of claim 1, wherein the screen portion includes a multiplicity of holes, and wherein the flanges are spaced apart approximately 2¼ inches, and the screen portion is about ⅜ to ½ inch wide.
  15. 15. The brick wall of claim 1, wherein the screen portion is rigid and integral wit the angled brackets, and wherein the angled brackets are connected by a pair of spaced apart vertical member portions dimensioned to at least partially lay flush and adjacent to the rear walls of the pair of adjacent bricks, and wherein the flanges are spaced apart approximately 2¼ inches, and the screen portion is about ⅜ to ½ inch wide, and wherein the weep hole screen is made of galvanized, painted or powder coated steel.
  16. 16. The brick wall of claim 1, wherein the weep hole screen includes a pair of vertical member portions spaced apart and defining an inner opening in which the screen is mounted, and wherein the flanges are spaced apart approximately 2¼ inches, and the screen portion is about ⅜ to ½ inch wide, and wherein the weep hole screen is made of galvanized, painted or powder coated steel.
  17. 17. The brick wall of claim 1, wherein the screen portion includes a multiplicity of louvered openings, and wherein the flanges are spaced apart approximately 2¼ inches, and the screen portion is about ⅜ to ½ inch wide, and wherein the weep hole screen is made of galvanized, painted or powder coated steel.
  18. 18. The brick wall of claim 1, wherein the screen portion includes a multiplicity of holes, and wherein the flanges are spaced apart approximately 2¼ inches, and the screen portion is about ⅜ to ½ inch wide, and wherein the weep hole screen is made of galvanized, painted or powder coated steel.
  19. 19. A brick wall comprising:
    a multiplicity of bricks including at least a pair of bricks of a first course, the pair of bricks adjacent to one another and defining a weep hole therebetween, each of the bricks having a top wall, a bottom wall, a front wall, a view wall, and a pair of side walls, the weep hole adjacent the pair of side walls of the adjacent bricks; and
    a weep hole screen having an upper and a lower angled brackets spaced apart by a screen portion defining at least in part a multiplicity of openings, the angled bracket having flanged portions to engage a portion of the top and bottom walls of adjacent bricks to lay in flush relationship thereto, the weep hole screen further dimensioned such that at least a portion of the screen portion lays between the rear walls of the bricks adjacent the weep hole, wherein the size of the openings are between 1/32 inch and ⅛ inch.
  20. 20. The brick wall of claim 19, wherein the openings are louvered or holes.
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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080276556A1 (en) * 2006-02-15 2008-11-13 John Noel Flint Insert for a Weep Hole Opening in a Masonry Wall
US20080305734A1 (en) * 2007-06-05 2008-12-11 Kenneth Hoskins Weep hole cover
US20110041439A1 (en) * 2006-06-06 2011-02-24 David Michael Reid Apparatus, assembly and method of forming a decorative feature on a structure
WO2010149120A3 (en) * 2009-06-25 2011-04-14 Mateiciuc A.S. Termination set of heat-insulating system and method of its application
US20150218800A1 (en) * 2010-10-01 2015-08-06 Christopher John Riggs Retrofit cavity wall barrier and methods therefor

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US3429084A (en) * 1967-07-10 1969-02-25 Ben Brewer Insect-proof weep hole
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US6601356B2 (en) * 1998-09-03 2003-08-05 Snyder National Corporation Connector frame for ventilation opening
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US20080276556A1 (en) * 2006-02-15 2008-11-13 John Noel Flint Insert for a Weep Hole Opening in a Masonry Wall
US8171677B2 (en) * 2006-02-15 2012-05-08 John Noel Flint Insert for a weep hole opening in a masonry wall
US20110041439A1 (en) * 2006-06-06 2011-02-24 David Michael Reid Apparatus, assembly and method of forming a decorative feature on a structure
US8322099B2 (en) * 2006-06-06 2012-12-04 David Michael Reid Apparatus, assembly and method of forming a decorative feature on a structure
US20080305734A1 (en) * 2007-06-05 2008-12-11 Kenneth Hoskins Weep hole cover
US8087981B2 (en) * 2007-06-05 2012-01-03 Kenneth Hoskins Weep hole cover
WO2010149120A3 (en) * 2009-06-25 2011-04-14 Mateiciuc A.S. Termination set of heat-insulating system and method of its application
US20150218800A1 (en) * 2010-10-01 2015-08-06 Christopher John Riggs Retrofit cavity wall barrier and methods therefor
US9309665B2 (en) * 2010-10-01 2016-04-12 Christopher John Riggs Retrofit cavity wall barrier and methods therefor

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