US20080314965A1 - System and method for authentication of engineering notebook support information - Google Patents

System and method for authentication of engineering notebook support information Download PDF

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Publication number
US20080314965A1
US20080314965A1 US12/214,829 US21482908A US2008314965A1 US 20080314965 A1 US20080314965 A1 US 20080314965A1 US 21482908 A US21482908 A US 21482908A US 2008314965 A1 US2008314965 A1 US 2008314965A1
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Prior art keywords
container
label
authentication
authentication label
engineering
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US12/214,829
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Mark D. Roberts
Larry W. Fullerton
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Roberts Mark D
Fullerton Larry W
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Application filed by Roberts Mark D, Fullerton Larry W filed Critical Roberts Mark D
Priority to US12/214,829 priority patent/US20080314965A1/en
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D27/00Envelopes or like essentially-rectangular containers for postal or other purposes having no structural provision for thickness of contents
    • B65D27/12Closures
    • B65D27/30Closures with special means for indicating unauthorised opening
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D2203/00Decoration means, markings, information elements, contents indicators
    • B65D2203/02Labels
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D2203/00Decoration means, markings, information elements, contents indicators
    • B65D2203/12Audible, olfactory or visual signalling means

Abstract

An improved system and method for authentication of engineering notebook support information is provided. An authentication label having a first part and a second part can employ any of various approaches used to determine that the two parts go together. The first part of the authentication label is used to identify an engineering notebook page and is affixed to a container such as a tamperproof envelope in which engineering notebook support information is stored. The second part of the authentication label is used to identify the container in which the engineering notebook support is stored and is affixed on a page of an engineering notebook.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This U.S. Non-Provisional Patent Application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/936,944, filed Jun. 23, 2007, which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates generally to a system and method for authentication of something of value such as a legal document. More particularly, the present invention relates to a system and method for authentication of engineering notebook support information.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • An engineering notebook is a resource that an engineer (or any other person) may use on a day-to-day basis to record ideas, data, inventions, notes, experimentation records, observations, and other work details. It provides a chronological record of activities of the engineer and of others with whom the engineer works. Because the engineering notebook is intended to provide proof-of-invention and diligence in reducing an invention to practice, an engineer is normally required to follow strict guidelines concerning use of the engineering notebook. The engineering notebook may also be referred to as an inventor's notebook, a lab notebook, and by many other names but is generally used for the basic purpose, which is document an engineer's or other practitioner's daily activities.
  • Typical guidelines for using engineering notebooks require pages to be bound and numbered, entries to be made in chronological order and in ink, forbid erasures, and forbid placing loose pages of paper in the notebooks. Materials such as printed pages, test equipment hardcopy, dated receipts, photographs and CAD drawings are to be affixed to pages in the notebook and dated written entries are to be included for each such item. For photographs, numbers, bubbles and arrows are to be drawn from the page and onto the photograph and the features indicated are to be described in a nearby entry.
  • The use of engineering notebooks and the strict guidelines for doing so are intended to be ‘technology independent’ and to provide an accepted means for authenticating the content of the notebook in a court of law. As technology has advanced and engineers have become increasingly dependent upon computing and other electronic devices, more and more information that can document an invention may be in the form of graphics files, video data, audio data, or other types of electronic data and may be stored in all sorts of media such as CDs, DVDs, and other locations other than the engineering notebook itself. In many if not most cases, it is impractical to ‘affix pages’ of such information into engineering notebooks and doing so can greatly limit the ability of the engineer to describe an invention.
  • It is therefore desirable to have an improved system and method for authentication of engineering notebook support information.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Briefly, the present invention is an improved system and method for authentication of engineering notebook support information. The invention includes a method for authenticating engineering notebook support information having the steps of placing engineering notebook support information inside a container, sealing the container, affixing a first part of an authentication label to the container, where the first part of the authentication label has information that identifies a page in an engineering notebook, affixing a second part of the authentication label to the page in the engineering notebook, where the second part of the authentication label has information that identifies the container, and using the first and second part of the authentication label to authenticate the engineering notebook support information.
  • The container can be an envelope, a vault, a safety deposit box, a crate, a cargo container, a cardboard box, or any other container within which an object can be placed.
  • Tamperproof technology can be used to seal the container, for example, the authentication label can be a tamperproof label.
  • At least one authentication technique can be used such that the first part of the authentication label and the second part of the authentication label can be proven to have been originally one authentication label. An authentication technique may, for example, be a signature, a line, a stamp, a seal, a time stamp, a barcode, a watermark, a holograph, a fingerprint, a spectrographically unique ink, a spectrographically unique paper, a radiologically tagged ink, a radiologically tagged paper, a prime number, a spacing between perforated portions of a tear line.
  • Proof of the date the container was sealed can be placed inside the container before it is sealed. The proof may be a newspaper, an image of a newspaper, an image of a website page, or some other of form of proof used to provide authenticity to the container's contents. A tracking device can be placed inside the container before it is sealed.
  • The invention includes a system for authenticating engineering notebook support information. The system has a container in which engineering notebook support information is placed and then sealed, an authentication label having a first part that is affixed to the container and having information that identifies a page in an engineering notebook, and having a second part that is affixed to the page in the engineering notebook and having information that identifies the container.
  • The system may also have proof of the date the container was sealed that is placed inside the container prior to it being sealed.
  • The container can be an envelope, a vault, a safety deposit box, a crate, a cargo container, a cardboard box, or any other type of container for storing an object.
  • The system can include tamperproof technology that is used to seal the container, for example, the authentication label can be a tamperproof label.
  • The system may have at least one authentication technique used to prove that said first part of said authentication label and said second part of said authentication were originally one authentication label. An authentication technique can be a signature, a line, a stamp, a seal, a time stamp, a barcode, a watermark, a holograph, a fingerprint, a spectrographically unique ink, a spectrographically unique paper, a radiologically tagged ink, a radiologically tagged paper, a prime number, a spacing between perforated portions of a tear line.
  • The invention also includes a system for authenticating an object consisting of a container, where the object is placed inside the container prior to the container being sealed, proof of the date the container was sealed, where the proof is also placed inside the container prior to the container being sealed, and an authentication label having a first part that is affixed to the container and having information that identifies a log entry in a notebook, and having a second part that is affixed to the page in the notebook and having information that identifies the container.
  • The object can be one a legal document, a will, a prenuptial agreement, a real estate-deed, a mortgage, a row easement, a beneficiary assignment, a business contract, a stock, a bond, a copyrightable asset, an artwork, a chip mask, a stamp, a coin, a trading card, a body part, blood, or semen.
  • The object can be engineering notebook support information.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The present invention is described with reference to the accompanying drawings. In the drawings, like reference numbers indicate identical or functionally similar elements. Additionally, the left-most digit(s) of a reference number identifies the drawing in which the reference number first appears.
  • FIG. 1 depicts an exemplary two-part authentication label used to associate an engineering notebook with support information;
  • FIG. 2 depicts an exemplary detachment region of a two-part authentication label having a single bar code straddling a perforated tear line;
  • FIG. 3 depicts an exemplary detachment region of a two-part authentication label having spacings between perforated portions along the tear line;
  • FIG. 4 depicts an exemplary detachment region of a two-part authentication label having exemplary lines and characters straddling a perforated tear line;
  • FIG. 5 depicts an exemplary detachment region of a two-part authentication label having exemplary lines and characters straddling a tear line having spacings between perforated portions;
  • FIG. 6 illustrates an exemplary tamper proof label;
  • FIG. 7 illustrates an exemplary tamper proof envelope;
  • FIG. 8 depicts use of the top portion of an authentication label to overlap a sealed tamper proof envelope; and
  • FIG. 9 depicts use of the bottom portion of an authentication label within an engineering notebook.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention will now be described more fully in detail with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which the preferred embodiments of the invention are shown. This invention should not, however, be construed as limited to the embodiments set forth herein; rather, they are provided so that this disclosure will be thorough and complete and will fully convey the scope of the invention to those skilled in the art. Like numbers refer to like elements throughout.
  • The present invention provides an improved system and method for authentication of engineering notebook support information. FIG. 1 depicts an exemplary two-part authentication label 100 used to associate an engineering notebook with support information. The first part 102 of the label 100 is intended to provide information about an engineering notebook for which support information is to be associated including an identifier for the notebook 104 and the page 106 to which the second part 108 of the label 100 is to be affixed. The second part 108 of the label 100 is intended to provide information about the support information for which the engineering notebook is to be associated including an identifier for a storage container 110 (e.g., a tamper proof envelope) to which the first part 102 of the label 100 is to be affixed and a brief description 112 of the support information. Although shown with the first part 102 being over the second part 108, either the first part 102 or the second part 108 could be the top part of the label 100. Generally, any of various orientations for the two parts 102, 108 can be used, for example, a side-by-side orientation.
  • Under one embodiment of the invention, the label initially comprises one label 100 having a detachment region 114. Detachment (or separation) of the label 100 into two parts 102, 108 may be performed using a variety of well known techniques such as using jagged scissors or folding and tearing the label along a line such that the two parts of the label are detached. With this embodiment, forensic science can be later used to prove that the two parts were originally one label 100. Under a second embodiment, when label 100 is manufactured the two label parts 102, 108 are co-located on a backing from which they can be detached (e.g., peeled) separately. Under this embodiment, various methods can be used to verify that the two label parts 102, 108 were co-located. Examples of such methods include drawing lines 116 across the two labels 102, 108 as shown to the right in FIG. 1. Other methods include use of a signature, a stamp, or a seal (e.g., a notary seal) across the two label parts 102, 108. Other similar methods can also be used within the scope of the invention.
  • Moreover, any of the methods (e.g., signatures, lines, stamps, seals, etc.) used with the second embodiment to verify that the two label parts 102, 108 were co-located can also be used with the first embodiment to provide further proof-of-authenticity.
  • As shown, the two parts 102, 108 of the label 100 each have a label number 118, which would typically be sequential and used with a unique customer identifier which can be identified by name, logo, using a barcode, or a number. As such, the two label parts 102, 108 are unique in the same manner as a personnel check having a check number and bank account information. As depicted in FIG. 1, the two label parts 102, 108 each include an optional bar code 120 that may encode various types of information including a company name, address information, the date the label was manufactured, encryption key, or other information. Such barcodes can be matched to prove authenticity and also allow a bar code reader to be used for inventory purposes.
  • An important aspect of the authentication label 100 is that both parts 102, 108 of the label 100 are signed 122 and dated 124 by the engineer assigned the engineering notebook for which the second part 108 of the label is to be affixed (as described below). Additionally, as is common practice involving invention disclosures, two witnesses sign 126 and date 128 both parts 102, 108 of the label 100. In a situation where the support information pertains to an invention, these two witnesses would typically be those that have signed the invention disclosure under a normal ‘Read and Understood’ procedure.
  • Shown to the right of both parts 102, 108 of the label 100 are regions 130 that can be used for a time/date stamp. These regions can also be used by a notary (e.g., locations to use a notary stamp). Below these regions is a location for the initials 132 of the person placing the time stamps. Under one arrangement, this person would be an IP Administrator or other person that would be responsible for storage/filing of the container (e.g., envelope) containing the support information.
  • Various other well known forms of authentication technology can be employed in accordance with the present invention including watermarks, holography, fingerprints, spectrographically unique inks and papers, radiologically tagged inks and papers, etc.
  • FIG. 2 depicts an exemplary detachment region 114 of a two-part authentication label 100 having a single bar code 120 straddling a perforated tear line 202. With this approach, when the label 100 is separated into two parts 102, 108, the single bar code 120 would become two bar codes 120 that can be matched to authenticate the two parts 102, 108 of the label 100 were originally one. If the two label parts 102, 108 were initially separate but co-located as described above, the barcode 120 could be printed across the two label parts 102, 108 (and the area between them), which would still allow for the two bar codes to be matched forensically.
  • FIG. 3 depicts an exemplary detachment region 114 of a two-part authentication label 100 having spacings 302 between perforated portions 304 along a tear line 202. With this approach, the regions between the perforated portions of the tear line would tear more randomly and therefore making the detachment patterns more unique. Under one arrangement, the pattern of the perforated portions 304 and the spacings 302 between can be used to encode information such as that described above for the bar code.
  • FIG. 4 depicts an exemplary detachment region 114 of a two-part authentication label 100 having exemplary lines 402 and characters 404 straddling a perforated tear line 202 that can be used to match the two label parts 102, 108. The alignment of the lines 402 and/or characters 404 used under this arrangement can be perpendicular to or non-perpendicular to the tear line 202.
  • FIG. 5 depicts an exemplary detachment region 114 of a two-part authentication label 100 having exemplary lines 402 and characters 404 straddling a tear line 202 as described in relation to FIG. 4 and also having spacings 302 between perforated portions 304 as described in relation to FIG. 3.
  • One approach for authenticating the two parts 102, 108 of the two-part label 100 is to include half of a long prime number sequence on one part 102 of the two-part label 100 and to include the second half of the same long prime number sequence on the other part 108 of the two-part label 100. For example, one or more truly random seed generators, such as a Geiger counter, can be used to produce a seed to a prime number generator. A long prime number sequence such as, for example, a 200 digit prime number sequence, could be generated and half the sequence printed on one part 102 of the two-part label 100 and the other half of the sequence printed on the other part 108 of the two-part label 100. With this approach, each two-part label 100 can be entirely unique from any other and it would be impossible to counterfeit the prime number sequences. Under one arrangement, the two halves of the prime number sequence would be printed on the back of the label in a manner such that when the label is removed, portions of it would be easily destroyed except for the portion having the prime number sequence. Under another arrangement, the number would be on the front of the two parts of the two-part label but covered such that it could not be read, for example, with material used with scratch off cards. The scratch off approach could also be used with any identifiers that could be matched.
  • FIG. 6 depicts an exemplary tamper proof label 600 representing technology that can be used in accordance with the present invention. As shown, tamper proof label 600 leaves the wording “VOID” on the surface to which the label was attached whenever someone attempts to remove the label. Although not necessarily required, the use of such technology provides additional proof that the label has not been tampered with and that it wasn't removed and placed onto a different container. Alternative techniques such as those described above including lines, signatures, seals, and stamps that would be placed across the label and the container (e.g., envelope) also can be used to prove that the label and the container are associated.
  • FIG. 7 depicts an exemplary tamper proof envelope 700. Having a tamper proof container such as a tamper proof envelope 700 or any other such container sealed with tamper proof tape or otherwise having tamper proof seals is a key aspect of the invention. By combining the authentication label 100 with the tamper proof container 700, which contains the engineering notebook support information, essentially a ‘time capsule’ is created that can be stored/filed and, when necessary, opened in court to prove authenticity of the support information. The types of support information placed in the time capsule may include printed documents; electronic media (e.g., a CD or DVD) containing a computer program, simulation results, audio, video, digital or pictures; or any type of information that can be encapsulated. For non hardcopy materials, care should be taken to ensure the ability to ‘replay’ the information many years later (e.g., twenty years later). The container may itself be large, such as a sealed vault, safety deposit box, crate, metal cargo container, or a cardboard box. Essentially, as long as appropriate seals can be provided to ensure that the contents of the container have not been tampered with, the authentication label 100 can be used to associate the content to an engineering notebook. Thus, by using the label 100 and the sealed container 700, the engineer can capture, in time, all sorts of information pertaining to an invention beyond what may be easily written into or affixed into the engineering notebook, and that information can be authenticated in court via the authentication label 100 to be directly associated with a dated entry in the engineering notebook.
  • FIG. 8 depicts use of the top portion 102 of an authentication label 100 to overlap a sealed tamper proof envelope 700 and FIG. 9 depicts use of the bottom portion 108 of an authentication label 100 on an engineering notebook page 902. Typically, the authentication label would be completed by the parties using the label including signatures, dates, stamps, seals, lines, etc. and, in the case of the first embodiment; the label would be separated into two parts. With either embodiment, the first part 102 of the label 100 would be affixed to the container (preferably to provide another seal layer) and the second part 108 of the label 100 would be affixed to the engineering notebook page 902. As shown in FIG. 8, the first part 102 of the label 100 partially overlaps the seal of the sealed envelope 700. In both figures, lines 116 are used to further associate the first and second label parts 102, 108 with the envelope 700 and with the engineering notebook page 902, respectively. Again, any of the various methods described above can be used. As shown in FIG. 9, the engineer records the storing of the support information, includes the completed label part 108, and gets two or more witnesses to sign the engineering notebook page 902. Optionally, the same individuals that signed the label 100 also sign and date the engineering notebook page 902.
  • The ‘time capsule’ containers (e.g., envelopes) containing the support information can be stored (filed) in a secure area in the same manner as with other legal documents. Ideally, the containers would be stored in a location that is protected from damage. Various offsite facilities are available for such storage purposes.
  • As necessary, a bar code reader can be used to scan the labels as required to support an inventory procedure.
  • A database of label owners can be maintained by the maker/seller of the authentication labels that would include the owner ID and other information (perhaps encrypted) that is encoded on the label. This information can be provided via affidavit to provide ownership/authenticity of the label.
  • Prior to sealing the container, the users of the label (perhaps the IP Administrator) can place proof inside the container further authenticating the date/time the container was sealed. For example, a newspaper can be used or an image of a front page of a newspaper can be printed and placed into the container (envelope) prior to sealing. They can also place a device for tracking the container inside the container.
  • Under one arrangement, a business could provide a service whereby a person could log on to a website and receive a ‘proof of sealing day image’ to be placed in a container whereby the request and a copy of the image would be recorded for later use in court. The proof of sealing day image could be a composite image of front pages of newspapers around the world that might even pay to have their paper's image used since it would be significant form of advertisement. Such a service could likely be completely or nearly completely automated and could be free to users where the website could generate income via advertisements. Specifically, such a business could operate under a business model much like Google whereby an Internet site provides a free service (free proof of sealing day images) that provides millions of people reason to use the Internet site. As such, space on the site would be very valuable to advertisers. The business may also maintain a copy of the image it provides and provide a receipt to the customer both of which could be matched at a later time to provide additional proof of authenticity.
  • The present invention, although enabled above specifically for engineering notebook support information, could be used to authenticate the content of time capsules that could contain any form of legal document such as wills, prenuptial agreements, real estate-deeds, mortgages, row easements, beneficiary assignments, business contracts, stocks, bonds, etc., copyrightable assets such as artwork, chip masks, stamps, coins, trading (baseball) cards, etc., and even body parts, blood, semen, etc. Under this arrangement, an entry logbook, a journal, or some other form of notebook might be used instead of an engineering notebook. The authenticity of practically any article of value that needs to be associated with a moment in time (e.g., a record setting sports item such as a baseball) can be ensured with the present invention. Moreover, the present invention can be used against those that produce fake goods such as watches, designer purses, precision parts, etc. whereby an authentic producer of goods would use the time capsule approach described herein. Optionally, a producer or a buyer of goods could use the Internet as a means for comparison of label components.
  • The method of the invention can be used to support various forms of businesses based upon the various aspects of the invention including storage containers, seals, storage facilities, etc.
  • While particular embodiments of the invention have been described, it will be understood, however, that the invention is not limited thereto, since modifications may be made by those skilled in the art, particularly in light of the foregoing teachings.

Claims (20)

1. A method for authenticating engineering notebook support information, comprising the steps of:
placing said engineering notebook support information inside a container;
sealing said container;
affixing a first part of an authentication label to said container, said first part of said authentication label having information that identifies a page in an engineering notebook; and
affixing a second part of said authentication label to said page in said engineering notebook, said second part of said authentication label having information that identifies said container, said first part of said authentication label and said second part of said authentication label providing authentication of said engineering notebook support information.
2. The method of claim 1, wherein said container is one of an envelope, a vault, a safety deposit box, a crate, a cargo container, or a cardboard box.
3. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
using tamperproof technology is used to seal said container.
4. The method of claim 1, wherein said authentication label is a tamperproof label.
5. The method of claim 4, wherein said authentication label is used to seal said container.
6. The method of claim 1, wherein at least one authentication technique is used such that the first part of said authentication label and said second part of said authentication label can be proven to have been originally one authentication label.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein said at least one authentication technique comprises at least one of a signature, a line, a stamp, a seal, a time stamp, a barcode, a watermark, a holograph, a fingerprint, a spectrographically unique ink, a spectrographically unique paper, a radiologically tagged ink, a radiologically tagged paper, a prime number, a spacing between perforated portions of a tear line.
8. The method of claim 1, further comprising the step of:
placing proof inside the container of the date the container was sealed.
9. The method of claim 8, wherein said proof comprises one of a newspaper, an image of a newspaper, or an image of a website page.
10. A system for authenticating engineering notebook support information, comprising:
a container, said engineering notebook support information being placed inside said container prior to said container being sealed; and
an authentication label, said authentication label having a first part being affixed to said container, said first part having information that identifies a page in an engineering notebook, said authentication label having a second part being affixed to said page in said engineering notebook, said second part of said authentication label having information that identifies said container.
11. The system of claim 10, further comprising:
proof of the date the container was sealed, said proof being placed inside said container prior to it being sealed.
12. The system of 1 1, wherein said proof comprises one of a newspaper, an image of a newspaper, or a website page.
13. The system of claim 10, wherein said container comprises one of an envelope, a vault, a safety deposit box, a crate, a cargo container, or a cardboard box.
14. The system of claim 10, further comprising:
tamperproof technology, said tamperproof technology being used to seal said container.
15. The system of claim 10, further comprising:
a tracking device, said tracking device being placed inside said container prior to it being sealed.
16. The system of claim 10, wherein at least one authentication technique is used to prove that said first part of said authentication label and said second part of said authentication were originally one authentication label.
17. The system of claim 10, wherein said at least one authentication technique comprises at least one of a signature, a line, a stamp, a seal, a time stamp, a barcode, a watermark, a holograph, a fingerprint, a spectrographically unique ink, a spectrographically unique paper, a radiologically tagged ink, a radiologically tagged paper, a prime number, a spacing between perforated portions of a tear line.
18. A system for authenticating an object, comprising:
a container, said object being placed inside said container prior to said container being sealed;
proof of the date the container was sealed, said proof also being placed inside said container prior to said container being sealed; and
an authentication label, said authentication label having a first part being affixed to said container, said first part having information that identifies a log entry in a notebook, said authentication label having a second part being affixed to said page in said notebook, said second part of said authentication label having information that identifies said container.
19. The system of claim 18, wherein said object comprises one of a legal document, a will, a prenuptial agreement, a real estate-deed, a mortgage, a row easement, a beneficiary assignment, a business contract, a stock, a bond, a copyrightable asset, an artwork, a chip mask, a stamp, a coin, a trading card, a body part, blood, or semen.
20. The system of claim 18, wherein said object comprises engineering notebook support information.
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