US20080282458A1 - Set wave system for wave generation - Google Patents

Set wave system for wave generation Download PDF

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Publication number
US20080282458A1
US20080282458A1 US12/074,848 US7484808A US2008282458A1 US 20080282458 A1 US20080282458 A1 US 20080282458A1 US 7484808 A US7484808 A US 7484808A US 2008282458 A1 US2008282458 A1 US 2008282458A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
chamber
wave
air
system
pool
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Abandoned
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US12/074,848
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Brandon Carnahan
Cheyne Carnahan
Richard Carnahan
Richard Mladick
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Waves Manufacturing
WAVEYARD DEVELOPMENT LLC
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WAVEYARD DEVELOPMENT LLC
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Priority to US89392307P priority Critical
Application filed by WAVEYARD DEVELOPMENT LLC filed Critical WAVEYARD DEVELOPMENT LLC
Priority to US12/074,848 priority patent/US20080282458A1/en
Assigned to WAVEYARD DEVELOPMENT, LLC reassignment WAVEYARD DEVELOPMENT, LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: CARNAHAN, BRANDON, CARNAHAN, CHEYNE, CARNAHAN, RICHARD, MLADICK, RICHARD
Publication of US20080282458A1 publication Critical patent/US20080282458A1/en
Assigned to WAVES MANUFACTURING reassignment WAVES MANUFACTURING ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: CARNAHAN, CHEYNE R
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04DNON-POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT PUMPS
    • F04D35/00Pumps producing waves in liquids, i.e. wave-producers

Abstract

Embodiments of the invention provide a set wave system and method for use with a pool containing water up to a water level. The set wave system can include a chamber positioned lower than the water level. The chamber can include an outlet for ejecting water from the chamber into the pool. The set wave system can include an air injector positioned in the chamber upstream of the outlet. The air injector can introduce air into the chamber causing water to move out of the outlet and into the pool to form a wave.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. § 119 to U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/893,923 filed on Mar. 9, 2007, the entire disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Wave pools and water rides often use conventional wave generators to produce waves. The design of the pool is very important for producing waves. If the design of the pool is flawed, the pool will not produce waves. Even in nature with the correct beach, perfect waves are rare, because the waves depend upon environmental conditions, such as tides, wind, and off-shore storms.
  • One conventional wave generator is the pneumatic surf wave. The pneumatic surf wave stores water in caissons and uses the water to produce the desired wave. The pneumatic surf wave uses gravity to discharge the water from the caissons. The pneumatic surf wave uses a fan to expel the air in the chamber, causing a vacuum to draw the air upward. When the air is at its maximum capacity, the air is released into the chamber to create the wave. The caissons of the pneumatic surf wave are generally positioned upright.
  • Another conventional wave generator is the surf wave generator. The surf wave generator uses compressed air to release water from caissons to form a wave. The surf wave generator uses rows of caissons positioned along a side of the pool. More specifically, the caissons of the surf wave generator are generally positioned vertically along a back side of the pool.
  • Yet another conventional wave generator is the pneumatic wave generator. The pneumatic wave generator uses water-filled caissons to produce the desired wave. The pneumatic wave generator uses compressed air to expel the wave from the caisson. The pneumatic wave generator includes many caissons in a single pool. The pneumatic wave generator includes caissons that are generally positioned vertically on a back side of the pool.
  • SUMMARY
  • Some embodiments of the invention provide a set wave system for use with a pool containing water up to a water level. The set wave system can include a chamber positioned lower than the water level. The chamber can include an outlet for ejecting water from the chamber into the pool. The set wave system can include an air injector positioned in the chamber upstream of the outlet. The air injector can introduce air into the chamber causing water to move out of the outlet and into the pool to form a wave.
  • Other aspects of the invention will become apparent by consideration of the detailed description and accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a side view of a set wave system for wave generation according to one embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 2 is top view of the set wave system of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a wave chamber for use with the set wave system according to some embodiments of the invention.
  • FIG. 4 is a side view of a vent for use with the set wave system according to some embodiments of the invention.
  • FIG. 5 is a perspective view of a blade assembly for use with the set wave system according to some embodiments of the invention.
  • FIG. 6 is a side view of the vent of FIG. 4 and the blade assembly of FIG. 5, along with a wave chamber for use in the set wave system according to some embodiments of the invention.
  • FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a wing for use with the set wave system.
  • FIG. 8 is a top view of the wing of FIG. 7.
  • FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a double wing for use with the set wave system according to some embodiments of the invention.
  • FIG. 10 is a top view of a set wave system with a wing according to another embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 11 is a perspective view of a set wave system according to another embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 12 is a top view of the set wave system of FIG. 11.
  • FIG. 13 is a side view of the set wave system of FIGS. 11-12 taken along line 13-13 of FIG. 12.
  • FIG. 14 is a side view of a dual exhaust vent for use with the set wave system according to some embodiments of the invention.
  • FIG. 15 is a side view of a set wave system according to another embodiment of the invention.
  • FIGS. 16A-16C are side perspective views of wave chambers for use with the set wave system according to some embodiments of the invention.
  • FIGS. 17A-17C are side views of output caps and curved walls for use with the set wave system according to some embodiments of the invention.
  • FIGS. 18A-18D are top views of pools including set wave systems being loaded with water at various points within pool walls and outside pool walls according to some embodiments of the invention.
  • FIGS. 19A-19C are side perspective views of wave chambers having various cross-sectional shapes according to some embodiments of the invention.
  • FIGS. 20A-20E are side perspective views of various angles for outputs of the wave chambers according to some embodiments of the invention.
  • FIGS. 21A-21D are perspective views of various output opening shapes extending from generally circular wave chambers according to some embodiments of the invention.
  • FIG. 22 is a side view of a set wave system according to another embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 23 is a top view of a set wave system installed in the ocean near a jetty according to another embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 24 is a top view of a spiral pool configuration for use with a set wave system according to some embodiments of the invention.
  • FIGS. 25A-25D are tables of pool dimensions for use with set wave systems according to embodiments of the invention.
  • FIG. 26 is a side view of a set wave system according to another embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 27 is a side view of a set wave system according to another embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 28 is a top view of a set wave system according to another embodiment of the invention.
  • FIGS. 29A and 29B are top and side views of a set wave system anchored in a V-shaped pool according to another embodiment of the invention.
  • FIGS. 30A-30B are top views of a set wave system according to another embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 31 is a side view of a set wave system according to another embodiment of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Before any embodiments of the invention are explained in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and the arrangement of components set forth in the following description or illustrated in the following drawings. The invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced or of being carried out in various ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology and terminology used herein is for the purpose of description and should not be regarded as limiting. The use of “including,” “comprising,” or “having” and variations thereof herein is meant to encompass the items listed thereafter and equivalents thereof as well as additional items. Unless specified or limited otherwise, the terms “mounted,” “connected,” “supported,” and “coupled” and variations thereof are used broadly and encompass both direct and indirect mountings, connections, supports, and couplings. Further, “connected” and “coupled” are not restricted to physical or mechanical connections or couplings.
  • FIGS. 1-6 illustrate a set wave system 10 according to one embodiment of the invention. The set wave system 10 can be installed in pool 12 having a pool wall 14, a pool floor 16, and a water level 18. The set wave system 10 can include one or more wave chambers 20 each having an outlet 22. The wave chambers 20 and their outlets 22 can be positioned lower than the water level 18. Air can be introduced into the wave chambers 20 to cause water to move from the outlets 22 to the pool 12 to form a wave in the pool 12.
  • The wave chamber 20 can be large enough to facilitate the formation of more than one wave without having to vent the wave chamber 20 in a manner that causes more water to flow into the wave chamber 20. In one embodiment, the wave chamber 20 is large enough to facilitate the formation of two to five or even more waves without having to vent the wave chamber 20 in a manner that causes more water to flow into the wave chamber 20.
  • In some embodiments, at least some of the wave chambers 20 are positioned at least partially or substantially under the pool floor 16. In some embodiments, at least some of the wave chambers 20 are positioned at least partially beside the pool 12 outside the pool wall 14. In some embodiments, each wave chamber 20 can be elongated and tubular in shape with a generally circular cross section.
  • As shown in FIGS. 1 and 3-6, the set wave system 10 can include an air injector 24 configured to inject compressed air into the wave chamber 20. The air injector 24 can receive air from an air delivery line 26. A compressed air control valve 28 can be coupled to the air delivery line 26 to control the flow of compressed air through the air injector 24. The air injector 24 can include a nozzle 30 that causes compressed air to swirl as it exits the air injector 24. The nozzle 30 can be positioned in a vortex air vent 34. In some embodiments, the set wave system 10 can include a blade assembly 32, such as a vortex, that causes air from each air injector 14 to swirl in each wave chamber 20. The nozzle 30 and the blade assembly 32 can be configured to cause air to swirl or rotate in the same direction. The blade assembly 32 can be positioned upstream of a reducer 36 coupled to an upstream end of the wave chamber 20.
  • As shown in FIGS. 1 and 3, the set wave system 10 can include a vent assembly 38 in fluid communication with the wave chamber 20. The vent assembly 38 can include a vent pipe 40 coupled to the vortex air vent 34 and to a muffler 42. In some embodiments, the muffler 42 can facilitate both the release of air to the atmosphere and the intake of ambient air. An ambient air control valve 44 can be coupled in communication with the vent pipe 40. The ambient air control valve 44 can control the flow of air to and from the muffler 42. In some embodiments, the vent pipe 40 can have a smaller diameter at the end coupled to the ambient air control valve 44 and a larger diameter at the end coupled to the vortex air vent 34 and the wave chamber 20.
  • As shown in FIG. 1, the pool 12 can include a beach area 46 with one or more drains 48. The drains 48 can be placed below grating (not shown). The beach area 46 can include an incline that slopes into the pool floor 16 and below the water level 18. In other embodiments, the beach area 46 with its draining area can be substantially horizontal and substantially perpendicular to vertical pool walls 14. Below the beach area 46, the set wave system 10 can include water returns 50 that can span across the wave chambers 20 to return water collected under the beach area 46 and/or the pool floor 16. The pool 12 can also include a pool edge drain area 52 proximate to the furthest downstream portion of the pool 12.
  • The set wave system 10 can be used as follows to generate waves in the pool 12. The wave chamber 20 can be at least partially filled with water. The compressed air control valve 28 can be opened to cause compressed air to enter the wave chamber 20 and to push water from the wave chamber 10 into the pool 12 in order to form a first wave. The ambient air control valve 44 can then be opened to add ambient air into the wave chamber 20. In some embodiments, the ambient air control valve 44 can be opened immediately after the compressed air control valve 28 is closed. In some embodiments, the ambient air control valve 44 can be opened within 500 milliseconds after the compressed air valve 27 is closed. In other embodiments, the ambient air control valve 44 and the compressed air control valve 28 can be closed at approximately the same time. The opening of the compressed air control valve 28 and the ambient air control valve 44 can be repeated so as to form a second wave without refilling the wave chamber 20. The wave chamber 20 can eventually be refilled by opening the ambient air control valve 44 and allowing air to vent out the muffler 42 to the atmosphere while water enters the wave chamber 20 through the water returns 50.
  • FIGS. 7-10 illustrate wings 54 for use with the set wave system 10. In some embodiments, the set wave system 10 can include a wing 54 disposed proximate to one or more of the outlets 22 of the wave chambers 20, as shown in FIG. 10. The wing 54 can be configured to enhance the shape of the wave, for example, by increasing the height of the wave. The wing 54 can include wing flaps 56, wing sides 58, and wing anchors 60 each coupled to a main body 62. In some embodiments, the wing flaps 56 are adjustable and can pivot up or down to enhance the shape of the wave, for example, the angle of attack or pitch can be adjustable. In some embodiments, the wing flaps 56 are remotely adjustable. The wing sides 58 can be substantially vertical and can be positioned on each end of the main body 62. The wing anchors 60 can extend from a bottom side of the main body 62 in order to be secured within the pool 12. The height of the wing anchors 60 can be adjustable in order to change the height of each end of the main body 62, either together or independently. In some embodiments, the main body 62 of the wing 54 can be twisted in order to affect different portions of a wave differently. In some embodiments, two or more wings 54 can be stacked upon one another, as shown in FIG. 9. FIG. 10 also illustrates a beach area 46 positioned above the upstream ends of the wave chambers 20. The beach area 46 can include grating to dewater the pool and return the water to the wave chambers 20.
  • FIGS. 11-14 illustrate a set wave system 100 according to another embodiment of the invention. The set wave system 100 can include wave chambers 120, outlets 122, air injectors 124, air delivery lines 126, blade assemblies 132, and dual exhaust vent assemblies 138. As shown in FIG. 14, each dual exhaust vent assembly 138 can include an air inlet check valves 139, an exhaust tube 140, an air inlet tubes 141, a muffler 142, an air control chamber 143, and an air control valve 144. The exhaust tube 140 and the air inlet tube 141 can be coupled to the air control chamber 143, which can be coupled to the wave chamber 120. As shown in FIG. 14, the air flow through the dual exhaust vent assembly 138 is represented by arrows 145. Ambient air can enter through the air inlet check valve 139, flow through the air inlet tube 141, into the air control chamber 143, and into the wave chamber 120. Exhaust air can flow from the wave chamber 120, through the air control chamber 143, through the exhaust tube 140, through the air control valve 144, and can be released to the atmosphere through the muffler 142. The air flow 145 can be controlled by controlling the air inlet check valve 139 and the air control valve 144.
  • A first sequence can be performed with the dual exhaust vent assembly 138. First, the compressed air control valve 128 can be opened to deliver a volume of compressed air into the wave chamber 120 and to cause water to be ejected from the outlet 122. Second, the air inlet check valve 139 can be opened to allow ambient air to be injected into the wave chamber 120 in order to relieve the vacuum created from the ejection of water from the wave chamber 120. Third, the air inlet check valve 139 can be closed. Fourth, the compressed air control valve 128 can be closed. This four-step sequence can be repeated to create each individual wave without refilling or reloading the wave chamber 120 and without venting or releasing air into the atmosphere (i.e., air is only coming into the system not being vented out).
  • A second sequence can be performed with the dual exhaust vent assembly 138 after the first sequence is performed one or more times, depending on how many waves can be created before refilling the wave chamber 120. First, after the compressed air control valve 128 closes during the first sequence, the air control valve 144 can be opened and air can be vented into the atmosphere. Second, water can be allowed refill the wave chamber 1120 through the water return 150. Third, the air control valve 1144 can be closed. The first sequence can then be repeated until the wave chamber 120 must be refilled again using the second sequence.
  • As shown in FIGS. 11-13, in some embodiments, the wave chambers 120 can be refilled or reloaded using a water return 150 near the outlets 122 of the wave chamber 120. However, the water return 150 can also or alternatively be positioned near a beach area (not shown), such as near the vent assemblies 138.
  • FIG. 15 is a side view of a set wave system 200 according to another embodiment of the invention. The set wave system 200 can be installed in a pool with a pool floor 216, a water level 218, a beach area 246, and a water return area 250. The set wave system 200 can include a wave chamber 220 and an outlet 222. The wave chamber 220 can be sloped to decline at an angle similar to the pool floor 216. The outlet 222 of the wave chamber 220 can be curved upward to meet the pool floor 216. A wall 264 can have a curved shape (or another suitable shape) and can be positioned adjacent to the outlet 222 in order to force the water exiting the outlet 222 to substantially conform to the shape of the wall 264. The wall 264 can be used to change the shape of the resulting wave, as represented by the water level 218 shown in FIG. 15.
  • FIGS. 16A-16C illustrate various designs of wave chambers 320 for use with the set wave system. As shown in FIG. 16A, the wave chamber 320 can include an upstream portion 366 having an increased cross-sectional area and a downstream portion 368 having a decreased cross-sectional area with a transition area 370. The downstream portion 368 can lead to the outlet 322 of the wave chamber 320. As shown in FIG. 16B, the wave chamber 320 can include an upstream portion 366 having a cross-sectional area that gradually decreases toward the downstream portion 368. As shown in FIG. 16C, the transition area 370 can be eliminated and the upstream portion 366 can be constructed of a first pipe having a larger substantially constant cross-sectional area connected to the downstream portion 368, which can be constructed of a second pipe having a smaller substantially constant cross-sectional area. In these manners, the water pressure can be increased at the outlet 322 of the wave chamber 320.
  • FIGS. 17A-17C illustrate various configurations of outlets 422 for use with a set wave system 400 according to some embodiments of the invention. As shown in FIG. 17A, the set wave system 400 can be installed below a pool floor 416 with an outlet 422 being formed in the pool floor 416. A cap 472 can be positioned adjacent to the outlet 422. The cap 472 can either be fixed to the pool floor 416 or can be pivotable about a pivot 474. If pivotable, the cap 472 can cover the outlet 422 until water flow opens the cap 472. The cap 472 can include a wall 464 that can be used to change the shape of the resulting wave. The cap 472 can include legs (not shown) that can engage the pool floor 416 when the cap 472 is fully open. The wall 464 can be curved and can force the water to substantially conform to its curved shape. FIG. 17A also illustrates a water reservoir 476 and a release valve 478 that can release additional water into the pool that will flow past the outlet 422 of the set wave system 400. As shown in FIG. 17B, a curved wall 464 can be integrally formed with the pool floor 416. As shown in FIG. 17C, the wave chamber 420 can extend upward beyond the bottom of the pool floor 416 in order to enter the pool. A cap 472 can be coupled to a portion of the outlet 422 of the wave chamber 420. The cap 472 can be curved and can force the water from the outlet 422 to substantially conform to its curved shape.
  • FIGS. 18A-18D illustrate set wave systems 500 being filled or loaded with water at various points within and outside pool walls 514 according to some embodiments of the invention. As shown in FIG. 18A, the pool 512 can include pool walls 514, a pool floor 516, a beach area 546, and drains 548. The pool 512 can have a half “V” shape (e.g., with a half “V” reef) or another suitable shape. The set wave system 500 can include wave chambers 520, outlets 522, and a water return area 550. The set wave system 500 can be positioned substantially outside of the pool walls 514 and can be positioned so that most of each wave chamber 520 is not positioned under the pool floor 516. Water can flow from the outlets 522 toward the beach area 546 where the water can flow into drains 548 and into the water return area 550. In this manner, the set wave system 500 can be loaded with water substantially outside of the pool walls 514. As shown in FIG. 18B, the pool 512 can have a “V” shape (e.g., with a single or double V-shaped reef). Most of each one of the wave chambers 520 of the set wave system 500 can be placed outside the pool walls 514. The outlets 522 of the set wave system 500 can be positioned upstream of the V-shaped reef. The water returns 550 can be positioned adjacent to each lateral edge of the beach area 546. As shown in FIG. 18C, the pool 512 can have a “V” shape and the wave chambers 520 can be positioned to be loaded at various points inside the pool walls 514 and outside the pool walls 514. For example, some water returns 550 can be positioned upstream of a V-shaped reef 551, while other water returns 550 can be positioned downstream of the V-shaped reef 551. Other water returns 550 can be positioned outside the pool walls 514. The positioning of the water returns 550 inside the pool walls 514 can also be used to create certain effects on the waves traveling within the pool walls 514. As shown in FIG. 18D, the pool 512 can have a half “V” shape with pool walls 514 and a pool floor 516. The wave chambers 520 and the water returns 550 can be positioned in the pool floor 516 in order to load the wave chamber 520 with water at various points within the pool walls 514. In other embodiments, the outlets 522 of the wave chambers 520 can be positioned at various points inside the pool walls 514 to boost existing waves either generated upstream by another wave chamber 520 or by another type of wave generation system.
  • FIGS. 19A-19C illustrate several embodiments of cross-sectional shapes of wave chambers 620 and outlets 622. FIG. 19A illustrates a wave chamber 620 having a generally circular or oval cross-sectional shape. FIG. 19B illustrates a wave chamber 620 having a generally square or rectangular cross-sectional shape. FIG. 19C illustrates a wave chamber 620 having a triangular cross-sectional shape. The cross-sectional shapes of the wave chambers 620 can be varied to change the shape of the water flowing out of the outlets 622.
  • FIGS. 20A-20E illustrate various angles for outputs 722 of wave chambers 720 with respect to pool floors 716 according to some embodiments of the invention. FIG. 20A illustrates an outlet 722 that is substantially perpendicular with respect to the pool floor 716. FIG. 20E illustrates an outlet 722 that is substantially parallel with the pool floor 716. FIGS. 20B-20D illustrates outlets 722 positioned at various acute angles between being perpendicular and parallel with the pool floor 716. The angle of the output 722 with respect to the pool floor 716 can be used to direct the water flow in certain manners to generate certain shapes and heights of waves.
  • FIGS. 21A-21D illustrate various shapes for outlets 822 extending from generally circular wave chambers 820 according to some embodiments of the invention. FIG. 21A illustrates a circular wave chamber 820 that transitions to a rectangular outlet 822. FIG. 21B illustrates a circular wave chamber 820 that transitions to a circular outlet 822 having a larger diameter. FIG. 21C illustrates a circular wave chamber 820 that transitions to a square outlet 822. FIG. 21D illustrates a circular wave chamber 820 that transitions to a triangular outlet 822.
  • FIG. 22 illustrates a set wave system 900 according to another embodiment of the invention. The set wave system 900 can include a wave chamber 920, an outlet 922, an air injector 924, an air delivery line 926, a compressed air control valve 928, and a compressed air tank 929. The set wave system 900 can include a vent assembly 938 including a first exhaust pipe 940, a first muffler 942, and an air control valve 944. The vent assembly 938 can include a valve controller 980 coupled to several additional valves 982. The vent assembly 938 can include a valve 982 coupled to a second exhaust pipe 984 positioned downstream of the air injector 924. The second exhaust pipe 984 can be coupled through valves 982 to a second muffler 942. A valve 982 can be coupled between the first exhaust pipe 940 and the second exhaust pipe 984. A valve 982 can also be coupled between the air delivery line 926 and the second exhaust pipe 984. Each of the valves 982 can be controlled by the valve controller 980 in order to alter the amount and timing of air being vented to atmosphere, the amount and timing of ambient air being added, the amount and timing of compressed air being injected, and the amount and timing of water being released from the outlet 922. The outlet 922 can be positioned adjacent to a curved wall 964 leading to an outlet grate 923 in a pool wall 914.
  • FIG. 23 illustrates a set wave system 1000 installed in a portion of the ocean 1086 near a jetty 1088 according to one embodiment of the invention. The jetty 1088 can include a naturally-occurring group of rocks or a pier. The set wave system 1000 can include wave chambers 1020 with outlets 1022 positioned off shore. The set wave system 1000 can include air injectors 1024 on shore near a beach area 1046. The set wave system 1000 can create waves 1090 as a result of the interaction between the jetty 1088 and the water flowing out of the outlets 1022.
  • FIG. 24 illustrates a spiral pool configuration for use with a set wave system according to some embodiments of the invention.
  • FIGS. 25A-25D include tables of pool dimensions and other variables for use with set wave systems according to some embodiments of the invention. A pool designer can use the tables shown in FIGS. 25A-25D to choose the appropriate variables and dimensions for a set wave system, depending on the desired wave length and wave height in relationship to wave chamber diameter. The tables shown in FIGS. 25A-25D include the following variables and dimensions: wave height, wave chamber diameter, wave generator length, wave generator area, wave volume, wave generator width, size of air and vent valves, size of compressed air tank, and total compressed air volume. FIG. 25A provides these variables and dimensions when ten wave chambers are used. FIG. 25B provides these variables and dimensions when 12-13 wave chambers are used. FIG. 25C provides these variables and dimensions when 20 wave chambers are used. FIG. 25D provides these variables and dimensions when 27 wave chambers are used.
  • FIG. 26 illustrates a set wave system 1100 according to another embodiment of the invention. The set wave system 1100 can be installed in a pool 1112 under a pool floor 1116 and through a pool wall 1114 adjacent to a water reservoir 1176 positioned under grating 1190. The set wave system 1100 can include a wave chamber 1120, an air injector 1124, an air delivery line 1126, a compressed air control valve 1128, a vent assembly 1138, and a fill valve 1192. The vent assembly 1138 can include an air inlet check valve 1139, an exhaust pipe 1140, an air inlet pipe 1141, an air control chamber 1143, and an air control valve 1144. In one embodiment, the following pipe diameters can be used: D1 of 18 inches, D2 of six inches, and D3 of 8 inches.
  • A first sequence can be performed with the valves to generate a wave in the pool 1112. First, the compressed air control valve 1128 can be opened to deliver a volume of compressed air into the wave chamber 1120 and to cause water to be ejected from the outlet 1122. Second, the air inlet check valve 1139 can be opened to allow ambient air to be injected into the wave chamber 1120 in order to relieve the vacuum created from the ejection of water from the wave chamber 1120. Third, the air inlet check valve 1139 can be closed. Fourth, the compressed air control valve 1128 can be closed. This four-step sequence can be repeated to create each individual wave without refilling or reloading the wave chamber 1120 and without venting or releasing air into the atmosphere (i.e., air is only coming into the system not being vented out).
  • A second sequence can be performed with the valves after the first sequence is performed one or more times, depending on how many waves can be created before refilling the wave chamber 1120. First, after the compressed air control valve 1128 closes during the first sequence, the air control valve 1144 can be opened and air can be vented into the atmosphere. Second, the fill valve 1192 can be opened, allowing the wave chamber 1120 to refill with water. Third, the fill valve 1192 can be closed. Fourth, the air control valve 1144 can be closed. The first sequence can then be repeated until the wave chamber 1120 must be refilled again using the second sequence.
  • In some embodiments, the wave chambers 1120 can be lower (with respect to a horizontal water level) at the end with the outlets 1122 and can be higher (with respect to the horizontal water level) at the end including the venting assemblies 1138. In other words, the wave chambers 1120 can be positioned in a generally downward angle from their upstream ends to their downstream ends.
  • The wave speed and size can be controlled by the amount of air pressure be used in the wave chamber 1120, such as a pressure from about 40 PSI to about 120 PSI. The wave speed and size can also be controlled by using variable pulses to open the compressed air control valve 1128. The lower the pressure being used in the wave chamber 1120, the longer the time can be between pulses to open the compressed air control valve 1128. The higher the pressure being used in the wave chamber 1120, the shorter the time can be between pulses to open the compressed air control valve 1128.
  • FIG. 27 illustrates a set wave system 1200 according to another embodiment of the invention. The set wave system 1212 can be installed in a pool 1212 including a pool wall 1214, a pool floor 1216, an adjustable wall 1264, a water reservoir 1276, a negative edge 1294, a reef 1296, a piston 1298, and a return pump 1299. The set wave system 1212 can include a wave chamber 1220 with an outlet 1222. The outlet 1222 can be positioned adjacent to the adjustable wall 1264 so that the water flowing out of the outlet 1222 can be directed by the particular configuration of the adjustable wall 1264. The piston 1298 (such as a hydraulic piston) can be used to move the adjustable wall 1264 to a particular position. The negative edge 1294 can be created with a pool wall 1214 that is slightly lower in height that the water level 1218. Water spilling over the negative edge 1294 can fill the water reservoir 1276, and the return pump 1299 can be used to re-load the wave chamber 1220 of the set wave system 1200.
  • FIG. 28 illustrates a set wave system 1300 according to another embodiment of the invention. The set wave system 1300 can include wave chambers 1320, outlets 1322, air injectors 1324, an air delivery line 1326, a compressed air tank 1329, vent assemblies 1338, air control chambers 1343, drains 1348, and water returns 1350. The drains 1348 can be positioned adjacent to the outlets 1322 in order to dewater a portion of the wave as soon as the water flows out of the outlets 1322.
  • FIGS. 29A-29B illustrate one embodiment of a set wave system 1400 including an anchoring system 1411 for wave chambers 1420 having outlets 1422. For example, pavers 1413 (e.g., keystone block pavers) can be used to anchor the wave chambers 1420 to the pool floor 1416. Sets of pavers 1413 can be used to span at least a portion of the width of the pool. As shown in FIG. 29B, the pavers 1413 can be positioned around and/or over the wave chambers 1420 and can extend upward to be substantially even with the pool floor 1416.
  • The set wave system can be manufactured and easily assembled at the construction site of a water park. The set wave system components can include flange joints or coupling pressure fittings. After each component is delivered to the construction site, the components can be bolted together without any additional welding or fabrication. The set wave system can also be retrofit into an existing pool and/or can be used in conjunction with another existing wave generation system.
  • FIGS. 30A-30B illustrate a set wave system 1500 according to some embodiments of the invention. The set wave system 1500 can include chambers 1520, outlets 1522, air injectors 1524, air delivery lines 1526, a compressed air tank 1529, a beach area 1546, and drains 1548. As shown in FIG. 30A, more than one air delivery line 1526 and more than one air injector 1524 can be associated with each chamber 1520. For example, three air injectors 1524 can be positioned within each chamber 1520, each successive air injector 1524 being positioned further downstream. As also shown in FIG. 30A, one set of drains 1548 can be positioned adjacent to the outlets 1522, and one set of drains 1548 can also be positioned at the beach area 1546. As shown in FIG. 30B, two air delivery lines 1526 can deliver air from the compressed air tank 1529 to two adjacent chambers 1520. A curved beach area 1546 with drains 1548 can be used to dewater the pool and to reload the chambers 1520.
  • FIG. 31 illustrates a set wave system 1600 installed in a pool including a pool wall 1614, a pool floor 1616, a recessed portion 1617, and an adjustable wall 1664. The set wave system 1600 can include a wave chamber 1620 and an outlet 1622. The wave chamber 1620 can be sloped downward toward the outlet 1622 and the recessed portion 1617 of the pool floor 1616. Water exiting the outlet 1622 can conform to the contours of the recessed portion 1617 and the adjustable wall 1664 in order to be directed about 180 degrees back into the pool to a first water level 1618 or a second water level 1619. The adjustable wall 1664 can be moved inward away from the pool wall 1614 by a piston 1698 in order to change the contour along which the water is directed back into the pool.
  • Various features and advantages of the invention are set forth in the following claims.

Claims (40)

1. A set wave system for use with a pool containing water at a water level, the set wave system comprising:
a chamber positioned lower than the water level, the chamber including an outlet for ejecting water from the chamber into the pool; and
an air injector positioned in the chamber upstream of the outlet, the air injector introducing air into the chamber causing water to move out of the outlet and into the pool to form a wave.
2. The system of claim 1, wherein air injector introduces air into the chamber at least twice to form at least two separate waves without venting in a manner that causes more water to flow into the chamber.
3. The system of claim 1, wherein the chamber is positioned at least partially under a floor of the pool.
4. The system of claim 1, wherein the chamber is positioned at least partially beside a wall of the pool.
5. The system of claim 1, wherein the chamber is at least one of elongated, tubular, and round in cross-section.
6. The system of claim 1, wherein the air injector introduces compressed air into the chamber.
7. The system of claim 6, and further comprising a compressed air control valve that controls a flow of compressed air through the air injector.
8. The system of claim 6, and further comprising a nozzle that causes the compressed air to swirl as it exits the air injector.
9. The system of claim 8, and further comprising a blade assembly that causes the air from the air injector to swirl in the chamber.
10. The system of claim 9, wherein the nozzle and the blade assembly cause the air to swirl in the same direction.
11. The system of claim 1, and further comprising a vent assembly in communication with the chamber.
12. The system of claim 11, wherein the vent assembly includes a muffler that vents air to the atmosphere and an air control valve that controls the flow of air to the muffler.
13. The system of claim 12, and further comprising a vent tube having a smaller diameter end connected to the air control valve and having a larger diameter end connected to the wave chamber.
14. The system of claim 11, wherein the vent assembly includes a muffler, an air control valve, an exhaust tube, an air inlet check valve, an air inlet tube, and an air control chamber to form a dual exhaust vent assembly.
15. The system of claim 1, and further comprising a wing positioned proximate to the outlet of the wave chamber in order to enhance the shape of the wave.
16. The system of claim 1, and further comprising a plurality of wave chambers having outlets positioned adjacent to one another.
17. The system of claim 1, and further comprising one of a curved wall and a curved cap positioned adjacent to the outlet in order to cause water flowing out of the outlet to conform to the curvature.
18. The system of claim 1, wherein the wave chamber includes an upstream portion having a diameter larger than a downstream portion.
19. The system of claim 1, wherein the outlet is one of parallel to a pool floor, perpendicular to the pool floor, and at an acute angle with respect to the pool floor.
20. The system of claim 1, wherein the chamber has a cross-sectional shape of one of rectangular, circular, oval, and triangular.
21. The system of claim 1, wherein the outlet has a cross-sectional shape of one of rectangular, circular, oval, and triangular.
22. The system of claim 1, wherein the chamber is higher with respect to the water level at an upstream end than at a downstream end so that the chamber slopes downward toward the outlet.
23. A method of generating waves in a pool, the method comprising:
at least partially filling a chamber with water;
injecting compressed air into the chamber;
pushing water through an outlet in the chamber with the compressed air;
adding ambient air into the chamber as the water exits the outlet; and
forming a wave as the water exits the outlet and enters the pool.
24. The method of claim 23, and further comprising adding ambient air into the chamber immediately after compressed air is no longer being injected into the chamber.
25. The method of claim 23, and further comprising adding ambient air into the chamber within 500 milliseconds after the compressed air is no longer being injected into the chamber.
26. The method of claim 23, and further comprising injecting compressed air into the chamber a second time without refilling the chamber.
27. A method of generating waves in a pool, the method comprising:
at least partially filling a chamber with water;
opening a compressed air control valve to inject compressed air into the chamber;
pushing water through an outlet of the chamber with the compressed air in order to create a wave in the pool;
opening an air inlet check valve to inject ambient air into the chamber to relieve a vacuum in the chamber;
closing the air inlet check valve; and
closing the compressed air control valve.
28. The method of claim 27, and further comprising opening the compressed air control valve a second time before refilling the chamber with water.
29. The method of claim 27, and further comprising opening an air control valve to vent air and opening a fill valve to refill the chamber with water.
30. The method of claim 29, and further comprising closing the fill valve and closing the air control valve.
31. A wing for use with a wave generation system, the wing comprising:
a main body that can be positioned adjacent to an outlet of the wave generation system, the main body being configured to enhance a shape of the wave formed as water exits the outlet.
32. The wing of claim 31, wherein the main body is configured to increase a height of the wave.
33. The wing of claim 31, wherein an orientation of the main body is adjustable.
34. The wing of claim 31, wherein an orientation of the main body is remotely adjustable.
35. The wing of claim 31, wherein a pitch of the main body is adjustable.
36. The wing of claim 31, wherein a height of each end of the main body is adjustable.
37. The wing of claim 31, wherein the main body can be twisted so as to affect different portions of a wave differently.
38. The wing of claim 31, wherein the main body includes at least one adjustable flap.
39. The wing of claim 31, wherein two wing sides are coupled to the main body.
40. The wing of claim 31, wherein two wing anchors are coupled to the main body.
US12/074,848 2007-03-09 2008-03-06 Set wave system for wave generation Abandoned US20080282458A1 (en)

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US20120024978A1 (en) * 2010-07-30 2012-02-02 Rinoud Hanna Water fountain system including a means for propelling floating ornaments
US20120255112A1 (en) * 2011-04-08 2012-10-11 Universal City Studios Llc System and method for generating waves in multiple directions
CN103547322A (en) * 2010-12-21 2014-01-29 斯蒂芬·空·克里提克斯 Surfing device and method
WO2018085924A1 (en) * 2016-11-08 2018-05-17 1090690 B.C. Ltd. Wave producing method and apparatus
US10119285B2 (en) 2017-01-20 2018-11-06 The Wave Pool Company, LLC Systems and methods for generating waves

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US20120024978A1 (en) * 2010-07-30 2012-02-02 Rinoud Hanna Water fountain system including a means for propelling floating ornaments
CN103547322A (en) * 2010-12-21 2014-01-29 斯蒂芬·空·克里提克斯 Surfing device and method
US20120255112A1 (en) * 2011-04-08 2012-10-11 Universal City Studios Llc System and method for generating waves in multiple directions
US9534408B2 (en) * 2011-04-08 2017-01-03 Universal City Studios Llc System and method for generating waves in multiple directions
WO2018085924A1 (en) * 2016-11-08 2018-05-17 1090690 B.C. Ltd. Wave producing method and apparatus
US10119285B2 (en) 2017-01-20 2018-11-06 The Wave Pool Company, LLC Systems and methods for generating waves

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