US20080235850A1 - Glove Having High Coefficient of Friction Regions - Google Patents

Glove Having High Coefficient of Friction Regions Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20080235850A1
US20080235850A1 US12/058,643 US5864308A US2008235850A1 US 20080235850 A1 US20080235850 A1 US 20080235850A1 US 5864308 A US5864308 A US 5864308A US 2008235850 A1 US2008235850 A1 US 2008235850A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
material
mesh
hand covering
cof
process
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US12/058,643
Inventor
John Cabauy
Peter Cabauy
Original Assignee
John Cabauy
Peter Cabauy
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US69078205P priority Critical
Priority to US11/424,363 priority patent/US20070028356A1/en
Priority to US90867407P priority
Application filed by John Cabauy, Peter Cabauy filed Critical John Cabauy
Priority to US12/058,643 priority patent/US20080235850A1/en
Publication of US20080235850A1 publication Critical patent/US20080235850A1/en
Priority claimed from US13/536,964 external-priority patent/US20120324623A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D19/00Gloves
    • A41D19/015Protective gloves
    • A41D19/01547Protective gloves with grip improving means
    • A41D19/01558Protective gloves with grip improving means using a layer of grip improving material

Abstract

A hand covering. The hand covering comprises a gripping region comprising a mesh material having a first permeability and a first coefficient of friction, the first coefficient of friction rendering the hand covering suitable for use in a desired application. Regions of the hand covering other than the gripping region comprise a material having a second coefficient of friction lower than the first coefficient of friction and a second permeability lower than the first permeability.

Description

    REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit, under 35 U.S.C. 119(e), of the provisional patent application entitled Glove Having High Coefficient of Friction Regions filed on Mar. 28, 2007 and assigned application No. 60/908,674.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates generally to a glove and specifically to a glove having improved breathability and user grip in the palm region of the glove.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • The external palm region of gloves for sports, work and other activities is often made of high coefficient of friction (COF) material to enhance the user's grip. Some examples of such high COF materials include acrylics, latex, leather, nitrile, polyurethane, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), rubber, silicon, synthetic leather and vinyl. Unfortunately, these materials are intrinsically impervious to moisture and air circulation thereby trapping the users' sweat and heat generated by the user's hand within the glove. This problem is compounded by the fact that one of the highest concentrations of sweat glands in the human body is located in the palms of the hands. Gloves constructed from solid cloth-like breathable fabric materials with a high impedance to air flow are known. It is therefore desired to reduce this air flow impedance.
  • Those skilled in the art have attempted to alleviate sweat build up and heat entrapment in the palm region of the glove using a variety of glove materials and designs. In one example, combinations of breathable fabrics (which are known to have a relatively low COF) are strategically placed in areas of the glove not requiring a high gripping-force surface.
  • In other gloves direct ventilation areas are created through pinhole or microscopic perforations on the backside of the glove, in the area between the fingers and to a lesser extent in the palm and palm-finger areas. Such pinhole perforations may not provide sufficient air flow to remove entrapped sweat and/or may not be located in desired glove areas to effectively reduce accumulated palm and hand moisture.
  • The breathable fabrics used in gloves are typically low COF materials that are knitted, woven or non-woven and are made of natural and synthetic fibers and yarns. These low COF materials are not suitable for the palm region of the glove if a good grip is desired.
  • One example of a highly breathable fabric that can be used for gloves and other articles of clothing (e.g. sneakers and traffic safety vests) is a mesh fabric, also referred to as mesh. Meshes are knitted or woven and made of natural and/or synthetic fibers and yarns. They provide excellent breathability due to their screen like architecture that provides easy passage for air flow due to the visible repeating pattern of apertures throughout the material, Disadvantageously, the mesh fabrics have a low coefficient of friction and therefore provide a relatively poor gripping surface.
  • Currently it is known in the art to use a class of mesh fabrics known as warp knitted mesh made of polyester or nylon for work or sports gloves. Patches of this mesh may be sewn on to the backside of the glove and/or between the fingers. The glove offers optimum ventilation in those areas due to the screen-like porosity of the mesh fabric's apertures. As noted above, other breathable fabrics used in gloves, such as knitted cotton, polyester, rayon, and other combination fabrics are porous but do not provide the same degree of breathability as a mesh fabric, since these fabrics present a significantly higher impedance to air flow due to their smaller apertures. In either case, the low coefficient of friction remains problematic.
  • Those skilled in the art have attempted to use mesh fabrics in the palm region of gloves due to its high breathability, but these attempts have not met with success due to the low COF grip of the mesh fabric. In the few cases where mesh fabrics are used in the palm region (e.g. cyclist gloves, lacrosse gloves and women's weight training gloves), their use has been limited only to small patches of mesh, with the remainder of the palm area comprising a less breathable but high grip (i.e., high COF) material. Thus these glove designs attempt to mitigate the need for high grip and high breathability by placing the mesh in areas of the palm where the need for a strong gripping force is perceived to be less.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The present invention can be more easily understood and the advantages and uses thereof more readily apparent when the following detailed description of the present invention is read in conjunction with the figures wherein:
  • FIGS. 1 and 2 illustrate gloves constructed according to different embodiments of the present invention.
  • FIGS. 3A, 3B and 3C illustrate different mesh materials for use in the gloves of FIGS. 1 and 2.
  • FIGS. 4 and 5 illustrate a section of a glove of the present invention gripping a golf club shaft.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates the air flow and sweat absorption mechanism of certain glove embodiments according to the present invention.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates the air flow and sweat absorption mechanism of an embodiment having an inner liner.
  • FIG. 8 illustrates an embodiment of the present invention using a spacer fabric construction.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a die pattern for use in forming openings in a material for use with the glove of the present invention.
  • FIG. 10 illustrates a mesh pattern formed using the die pattern of FIG. 9.
  • In accordance with common practice, the various described device features are not drawn to scale, but are drawn to emphasize specific features relevant to the invention. Like reference characters denote like elements throughout the figures and text.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • Before describing in detail the exemplary methods and apparatuses related to a glove having desired gripping and breathability properties, it should be observed that the present invention resides primarily in a novel and non-obvious combination of elements and process steps. So as not to obscure the disclosure with details that will be readily apparent to those skilled in the art, certain conventional elements and steps have been presented with lesser detail, while the drawings and the specification describe in greater detail other elements and steps pertinent to understanding the invention.
  • The following embodiments are not intended to define limits as to the structure or method of the invention, but only to provide exemplary constructions. The embodiments are permissive rather than mandatory and illustrative rather than exhaustive.
  • The present invention asserts that perspiration can be adequately removed from the inside (palm/grip) glove (i.e., a hand covering) area consistent with providing a grip suitable for the desired use or application of the glove. Specifically, the invention relates to a glove that facilitates greater air circulation and sweat evaporation in the palm and finger grip areas while maintaining an excellent grip with a high COF mesh in the palm area.
  • A glove of the present invention comprises an external palm area surface formed partially or completely from a knitted or a woven mesh material, fabric, textile or cloth (referred to as a mesh). Those skilled in the art recognize that various processes (including both knitting processes and weaving processes) can be used to form a mesh suitable for use according to the teachings of the present invention. Generally, a knitted material comprises substantially parallel courses of natural or synthetic yarn, fiber, filament, textile or any knittable product joined by interlocking loops, including interlocking knots. Generally, a woven material comprises two sets of natural or synthetic yarn, fiber, filament, textile or any weavable product that are combined or interlaced to form a cloth-like material.
  • According to the presenting invention, hand perspiration and moisture is transferred and vented from the palm through a plurality of holes or apertures in the mesh. According to different embodiments the mesh presents a high coefficient of friction surface or a mesh is treated with a coating to provide a high coefficient of friction surface while maintaining the plurality of holes that provide excellent breathability.
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a glove 20 comprising a gripping surface 22 further comprising a palm region 24, finger regions 26 and a thumb region 28. Generally, these are considered gripping regions of the glove 20 since the gloved hand contacts a griped or grasped object in these regions. The gripping surface 22 comprises a mesh fabric having a relatively high COF to permit the user to maintain a firm grip on the object. A specific COF value is dependent on the material employed, the material of the object that is grasped and the conditions of the interfacing surface (e.g., wet, dirty). In any case, the material should present a sufficiently high COF such that the user maintains a firm grip on the object for completing the desired task. COF values greater than about 0.2 should be capable of providing a sufficiently firm grip for the user.
  • A FIG. 2 embodiment of a glove 40 comprises a gripping surface 42 further comprising the palm region 24 and partial finger and thumb regions 46 and 48, respectively. In one embodiment the gripping surface 42 comprises a mesh material as described herein.
  • In one embodiment, the gripping surface 42 comprises a mesh or non-mesh material having a relatively high COF. Generally, the non-mesh material is regarded as non-permeable or at least has a permeability lower than the mesh material. In other embodiments, the high COF material region is reduced in size from the gripping surface 42, with portions of the palm region 24, the finger regions 26 and/or the thumb region 28 comprising relatively low COF material, i.e., having a COF lower than the COF of the relatively high COF mesh. Also in different embodiments different regions of the gripping surface 42, the palm region 24, the finger regions 26 and the thumb region 28 comprise the mesh or non-mesh high COF material or a low COF material For example, in one embodiment one of the finger regions 26 comprises the high COF mesh material and the remaining finger regions 26, the palm region 24 and the thumb region 28 comprise the low COF material. In another embodiment one of the finger regions 26 comprises the high COF mesh material and the remaining finger regions 26, the palm region 24 and the thumb region 28 comprise a high COF non-mesh material. Thus in different embodiments different ones of the palm region 24, the finger regions 26 and the thumb region 28 comprise high COF mesh material, low COF material or high COF, non-mesh material depending on the intended use for the glove.
  • In the various described glove embodiments a composition of the glove backside material is not relevant to the inventive features and can therefore comprise any common glove material, cloth, fabric, etc.
  • Candidate mesh fabric materials for use as the gripping surface are constructed using known processes (e.g. warp knitting, weft knitting, woven etc.) and made of known materials (e.g., polyester, nylon, polyethylene, polypropylene, cotton, acrylic etc.). Suitable mesh fabrics are available from Apex Mills of Inwood, N.Y.; Fablok Mills, Inc. of Murray Hill, N.J. and Gehring Textiles, Inc. of Garden City, N.J.
  • Suitable mesh fabrics comprise a repeating or random pattern of relatively closely spaced holes/apertures for providing the desired features. See FIGS. 3A, 3B and 3C. FIG. 3A illustrates substantially square mesh apertures and FIG. 3B illustrates elliptical mesh apertures. The thread knitting or weaving density is greater in the mesh fabric of FIG. 3A than that of FIG. 3B. In FIG. 3C a mesh fabric with varying aperture shapes and sizes repeats across the mesh fabric intermediate a zigzag knitting pattern. Other shaped apertures are also suitable, including for example, round, oblong, hex, square, diamond, elliptical and rectangular.
  • The gripping surface can comprise a single mesh aperture pattern and aperture size formed from a single thread size and type. Alternatively, different aperture patterns, aperture sizes, thread sizes and types can be used in different portions of the gripping surface. Thread types and sizes can be chosen to provide mesh fabric properties that are easy to integrate into the glove and comfortable for the user to wear. For example, threads may be chosen to be thicker for high durability and padding in work gloves, while thinner threads may be chosen for a more tactile skin feel in sports gloves.
  • Aperture sizes with openings ranging from about 0.1 millimeters to about 15 millimeters are all suitable for use with the present invention. Larger or smaller apertures may also be suitable, depending on the use for the glove. Variously shaped apertures are also suitable, including for example, round, oblong, hex, square, diamond, elliptical and rectangular. One example of an untreated mesh fabric for use with the glove of the present invention comprises a warp knitted mesh made of nylon thread (resulting in a nylon mesh material) with a thickness of about 0.013 inches, weighing about 2.2 ounces per square yard and having roughly 7-8 apertures per inch. In another embodiment, the mesh material comprises up to about at least 100 apertures per inch. In still another embodiment the mesh material comprises less than about 30 apertures per inch.
  • Preferably, one embodiment of the present invention comprises a mesh material formed from a high COF yarn, fiber, filament or thread. In another embodiment a mesh material formed from a material with a relatively low COF is treated with coating processes representative of those used to make synthetic/imitation leather, vinyl and other coated textiles to enhance or increase the mesh material's COF. Some high COF coatings that may be used to increase the mesh material's COF are the following: acrylic, latex, nitrile, polyurethane, rubber, PVC, silicon elastomer, vinyl, compounds used for making synthetic/imitation leather or compounds and combinations of compounds that yield a high COF surface. Such an untreated mesh fabric may be purchased from Apex Mills of Inwood, N.Y. The fabric comprises a warp knitted material of nylon thread with a thickness of about 0.013 inches, weighing about 2.2 ounces per square yard and having roughly 7-8 apertures per inch.
  • Coating thicknesses according to the present inventions vary depending on the intended glove application. For instance, thinner coatings tend to retain the original mesh substrate properties, such as flexibility and tensile strength. Also, relatively thin coatings do not substantially reduce the aperture (opening) size. Thicker coatings can increase padding (cushioning) between the user's hand skin and the object as well as provide more protection from abrasion and the elements when the glove is worn. However, such a relatively thicker coating tends to reduce the aperture size. It is preferable that the aperture size of the coated mesh material be within the approximate range of about 0.1 millimeters to about 15 millimeters.
  • The mesh fabrics with a relatively low COF may be treated with high COF coatings before or after the fabric is knitted or woven. However, it is preferable to apply the coating after the fabric has been knitted or woven into a mesh. Some exemplary processes that may be used to apply high COF coatings to mesh or knitted fabrics are the following as well as others known in the art: curtain coating, foam spraying, gap coating (knife over roll, floating knife, etc.), gravure coating, hot melt coating, immersion dip coating, slot die coating, spraying, etc. In addition, the mesh material may be pre-treated with adhesion promoters and fabric pre-treatment processes, known in the art, that increase the adhesion of the coating to the mesh material. In one embodiment the coating is applied with an adhesion promoter.
  • In another embodiment, coatings may be applied in a single layer or in multiple layers with varying coating materials and thicknesses in each layer so as to enhance the coated mesh material properties. In addition, in some applications it may be desirable to texture or emboss the surface of the coating with sand or a grainy pattern so as to increase the COF of the coating. Some representative properties are the following: coating adhesion strength, coating abrasion resistance, durability, flexibility, texture, tear strength, tensile strength. Additionally, adhesion promoters may be applied between coating layers in order to increase the adhesion strength between applied coatings.
  • In yet another embodiment processes associated with making synthetic leather can used on a mesh substrate, resulting in a synthetic leather material with a relatively high COF.
  • Mesh fabrics may also be coated by laminating a high COF film comprising common coating materials or by combining multiple layers of coatings and multiple laminating film layers to create a high COF surface. The laminating film or films can preserve the mesh fabric's aperture patterns by laminating only the mesh fabric surface while leaving the apertures unobstructed. Such a process suggests that the laminate material exhibit an aperture pattern that is similar to the aperture pattern of the mesh fabric material. Alternatively, the mesh's apertures may be partially obstructed with the laminating film or films while retaining an aperture size within the range of about 0.1 mm to about 15 mm diameter. In yet another process, the laminate or laminates may initially cover the entire mesh fabric including the apertures and in a second step be cleared of the portion of laminate film or films obstructing the apertures. As in the previous case, a portion of the laminating film or films may be left to obstruct a partial area of the mesh's apertures while still leaving an apertures size within the range of about 0.1 mm to about 15 mm in diameter. Some representative processes that may be used to remove the portion of laminating film or films obstructing the apertures are the following: chemical etch with a mask overlying the mesh's pattern, heat melt, heat melt and high pressure air blowing off the excess laminate, etc.
  • In yet another process, synthetic/imitation leathers, vinyls etc. can be coated onto a transfer paper making a laminate (laminate film). The fabric substrate may also be coated with an adhesive or other coating, or it may be dip coated and coagulated within its pores with a polyurethane coat. High pressure is applied to the combination of the laminate and the treated fabric substrate, for example by passing the combination through a pair of rollers with or without the application of heat, causing the laminate and the substrate to fuse according to a chemical and/or melting process. The transfer paper is then removed, producing a synthetic/imitation leather, vinyl, etc. with a coating applied thereto. In one embodiment the transfer paper is patterned to create a grainy or patterned surface on the fabric substrate. The coating material and surface pattern can be selected to enhance the COF of the substrate or create other appealing texture surface properties (i.e. soft to touch, supple etc.). Material formed according to these techniques can be used to increase the COF in one or more areas of the glove according to the teachings of the present invention. In an embodiment where the fabric substrate comprises a woven or knitted material, it may be advantageous to remove the laminate within the mesh openings according to a chemical etching, heating or forced air process.
  • Coatings applied to the mesh fabric may be supplemented with additives for coating textiles as is known in the art. Some representative supplements are the following: colorants, odor/scents, fillers, flame retardants, heat stabilizers, lubricants, accelerators, antidegradants, cross-linking agents etc. These coatings may be further treated to create microporousity features, enabling moisture transfer through the coating as well as increased surface area providing more contact area and higher friction with other surfaces that the coated surfaces contacts.
  • A prevalent method of obtaining a microporous coating is by coagulating the mesh fabric's internal matrix by a polymer solution in a nonsolvent. In one embodiment a solution of polyurethane in dimethylformamide (DMF) is applied onto the fabric's matrix by dipping and/or coating, followed by dipping in a large excess of water. The polyurethane coagulates in the nonsolvent due to precipitation and coalescence. After drying, the microporous coating on the mesh fabric may be treated with other layers of coating materials and finishes that preserve the microporousity and the increased surface area, using methods known in the art. In yet another embodiment, a microporous laminate may be constructed on a transfer paper or substrate and then transferred onto the mesh fabric's surface using methods previously described. Additionally, surface area and friction may be increased for the coated mesh fabric by embossing, engraving or using other methods known in the art that can create tiny grainy pattern or other textured-like patterns to increase the surface area coming into contact with the surface to be gripped.
  • The exemplary mesh fabric identified above having a thickness of about 0.013 inches, weighing about 2.2 ounces per square yard and having roughly 5-10 apertures per inch is suitable for coating according to these methods. Preferably the coating is less than about 0.3 mm thick to increase the COF and enhance the user's grip when the coated material is used to form the palm region of a glove or other hand covering.
  • According to one embodiment, aperture opening sizes (i.e., prior to application of the high-COF coating) of a low COF material that does not provide sufficient COF in the glove grip area for the intended use of the glove can be in the range of about 1.5 to about 1.8 millimeter. After coating according to the teachings of the present invention the mesh opening size is reduced, but it has been determined that remaining opening dimensions can provide acceptable breathability and adequate grip when the coated mesh material is employed in the palm region of the glove.
  • According to the present invention the mesh material can be treated on one side or both sides, depending on the intended use for the glove. For example, a high COF material can be applied to both surfaces of the mesh fabric and thus when used to form a glove palm region, the COF between the hand and the glove (an internal surface of the glove) and the COF between the glove and the grasped object (an external surface of the glove) are both increased. In an embodiment having only one surface coated with a COF material, the coated surface is preferably located on the outside or external surface of the glove to increase the friction to the grasped object.
  • In another preferred embodiment of a thinly coated mesh material for use in the palm or grip region of a glove, the uncoated nylon mesh material referenced above is pretreated with an adhesion promoter process and then treated with a silicon elastomer, e.g., LSR 3631 available from Dow Corning of Midland, Mich.
  • The silicon coating is applied thinly to the nylon mesh using a gravure coating process known in the art. Using this method the coating may be carefully controlled to apply the coating to one or both sides and to form the thin coating layer that raises the COF of the mesh material without substantially closing the apertures that provide breathability for a glove constructed from this material. For example, in one case the applied coating is about 11 microns thick. In another embodiment this coating is applied to only one side of the mesh material.
  • Any of the coated or uncoated, treated, etc. mesh (or non-mesh) fabrics described herein can be used to for the grip portion of a sports or work glove as shown in FIGS. 1 and 2. In the case of sports gloves, a coated nylon mesh glove can provide sufficient breathability to the user's hands allowing extended wear without degradation of the user's grip due to sweat accumulation. A thin mesh (e.g. less than about 0.8 millimeters) provides the user with a skin feel for grasped objects such as a baseball bat, golf club, football or racquet, etc. while also protecting against the formation of calluses and blisters. In an embodiment where the mesh apertures are sufficiently large (e.g. an opening size of more than about one millimeter), the mesh material provides direct skin contact with the grasped object, enhancing the user's feel and control of the object. This feature provides the user with a touch feel sensitivity that is important in sports such as golf.
  • FIGS. 4 and 5 illustrate a user's skin surface 60 protruding through apertures 64 of a mesh material 65 as the user grips a golf club shaft 66. Note that in this case the user's grip is enhanced by having a combination of skin and mesh friction surfaces linking the hand to the shaft 66.
  • Coating one surface of the mesh fabric with a material having a high COF and using the coated surface as the outside-facing surface for the material of a glove grip area, retains the intrinsic absorption and texture properties of the mesh on the inside-facing surface of the glove. FIG. 6 is a close-up illustration of a palm side of a thinly-coated mesh glove showing three processes that reduce sweat buildup on the user's hand, i.e. air ventilation, evaporation of sweat, and absorption or wicking away of sweat onto an internal layer of the mesh. Using a mesh material with a high COF coating on only one surface promotes the wicking action and thus offers better sweat dissipation than a mesh material having a COF coating on both surfaces. The degree of air ventilation and sweat evaporation is responsive to the mesh aperture size. Further, convective heat flow from the hand through the apertures reduces the hand temperature.
  • Glove variations within the scope of the present invention are achieved using different mesh types, that is, matching glove use with the mesh type. Generally, a mesh type is distinguished by thread size and thread diameter, dimensions and pattern of the mesh openings, the mesh manufacturing process, the mesh materials and compositions and coatings applied to the mesh material. For example, in sports glove where a skin feel is desired (e.g. football, racquet ball, golf etc.) a relatively large mesh opening size is preferred to provide the user with direct skin contact through the mesh apertures.
  • In a work environment where hand protection against blisters caused by repetitious actions (e.g. swinging a hammer) is important, a mesh fabric with a relatively thick coating is desired. An exemplary glove comprises a thickly coated mesh material, such as a knitted polyester mesh coated via a spraying or foaming process with PVC or a silicon elastomer, where the coating may be several millimeters thick. A glove using such a PVC mesh provides a comfortable padding in the palm and finger area of a glove. With a suitable choice of aperture sizes and coating type and thickness the glove can provide a breathable alternative to prior art PVC work gloves. A thick foamed PVC mesh glove or a thick foamed silicon mesh glove provides padding and protects the user from abrasion and the elements while providing breathability and improved grip to the palm area.
  • Another embodiment of the present invention incorporates a breathable internal liner with an outer surface comprising a mesh fabric according to the teachings of the present invention. A breathable inner liner provides a direct passage of air from the palm side of the hand to the apertures of the external mesh. It also provides a wicking action for accumulated sweat from the palm side of the hand that expediently removes the sweat through the external mesh apertures of the palm region (see FIG. 7).
  • Inner liner materials are breathable textile fabrics that may be comprised of one or more of the following representative textiles: polyester, rayon, cotton, spandex, brushed spandex, nylon, wool, silk, breathable suede/leathers, microporous breathable synthetic leathers and other materials commonly known in the art. Typically, inner liners are knitted, woven or non-woven and are made of natural and synthetic fibers and yarns. In addition, an inner liner material may be a mesh made with smaller openings than the external mesh fabric. Inner liner materials may be attached to the external mesh fabric through processes known in the art such as, sewing, knitting or the application of wet adhesives or dry adhesives with hot presses and rollers etc. One technique places a dry adhesive between the inner liner and a coated mesh material. The resulting laminate is processed through a series of heated rollers at about 300-400 degrees F. The combination of the high heat and pressure melts the adhesive to a liquid state. When dry, a strong bond is formed between the inner liner and the coated mesh material. Breathability of the inner liner is preserved as the adhesive does not plug or foul the openings of the inner liner. A web adhesive or dry film adhesive can also be used in lieu of the dry adhesive to retain more breathability, but the bond strength is sacrificed.
  • The mesh glove may consist of multiple inner liner layers (i.e., between the outer layer and a surface of the hand covered by the glove) depending on the function of the glove. For instance, a work glove where padding is necessary may consist of several inner liners allowing breathability through palm side apertures of the external mesh. Inner liners used in such a glove may be made of different materials/fabrics with varying breathability and padding characteristics. In another embodiment a padding layer (comprising, for example, rubber, a silicon gel or another padding material, for comfort, for example) is disposed between the two inner liner layers. These pads can be modified to allow for breathability as desired. In yet another embodiment the inner liners may be treated with a high COF coating/laminate to increase contact friction between the user's hand and the glove. This technique may prevent slippage and bunching up of the glove's fabric while handling objects.
  • In lieu of an internal liner or liner layers, in another embodiment a spacer fabric may be used. Spacer fabrics are extremely breathable and lightweight. As shown in FIG. 8, a spacer fabric consists of three layers: a top face layer 70, a connecting layer 72 and a bottom face layer 74, with air flow indicated by arrowheads 80.
  • The top face and bottom face layers are typically constructed of highly breathable fabrics such as mesh fabrics as taught by the present invention. The connecting layer is knitted or woven in two or three dimensions using monofilaments or other types of yarns or threads. The connecting layer generally provides 1 to 10 millimeters of compression resistant cushioning and is extremely breathable due to its relatively hollow knitting architecture. When the top face layer 70 and/or the bottom face layer 74 comprise a breathable material as taught by the present invention, an entirely breathable spacer fabric is formed.
  • A mesh glove according to the present invention can be constructed with a spacer fabric where the top face layer is external on the palm side of the glove and comprises a mesh fabric with a high COF yarn, fiber or thread, or a mesh that is treated with a high COF coating or laminate. The intermediate layer or connecting layer is constructed using methods known in the art as described above, and the bottom face layer may be made of a solid face breathable material or preferably a mesh fabric. The bottom face layer constructed of a solid face breathable material or mesh fabric (i.e., in contact with the user's skin) may be made of high COF yarn, fiber or thread and it may be treated or untreated with a high COF coating or laminate depending on the user's need for internal grip to the glove. In addition, the spacer fabric may have an additional inner liner or multiple inner liner arrangements as described in the teachings of this invention. In an embodiment where the top and bottom faces comprise mesh fabrics it is not necessary that both surfaces comprise the same mesh fabric material. The mesh fabrics can differ in knitting styles, materials etc.
  • In yet another embodiment, a glove can be formed entirely of mesh material and only the gripping region coated with a high COF material. Such an embodiment provides maximum breathability for the entire hand and appropriate gripping forces for the palm area or the palm area and the finger/thumb areas.
  • The various embodiments of a glove of the present invention provide improved breathability and grip via a high COF mesh fabric. The mesh fabric may be knitted of high COF yarn, fiber or thread or the mesh may be treated with a high COF coating, laminates or layers of coatings. The coating may be applied before or after the knitting process, although it is preferably applied after the mesh has been knitted. The high COF coating or layers of coatings may be applied to one or both mesh surfaces depending on the glove user's needs. For instance, the internal side of the mesh may be left uncoated due to the mesh fabric's relatively soft and comfortable texture against the user's skin. In addition to comfort, the internal side of the mesh fabric may be able to better absorb or wick away sweat into the mesh fiber matrix if the internal side of the mesh is left uncoated. Alternatively, an internally coated mesh can provide an enhanced internal grip to the user. This is often needed in high hand movement applications, such as sports, where the looseness of a glove to the hand can degrade performance. Finally, the external high COF coated mesh allows the glove user to grip surfaces while maintaining breathability and moisture control in the palm of the hands.
  • A mesh treated with a high COF coating or layers of coatings that is applied non-uniformly on the mesh fabric (e.g. beading, varying thicknesses, etc.) increases the contact surface area between the hand and the grasped object and thus increases the COF between the two contact surfaces. Furthermore, a high COF coated mesh's surface may be embossed, engraved or patterned, using methods known in the art, to create a surface that is grainy or patterned to increase the surface area and COF between the two contact surfaces. A non-uniform coating, embossed, engraved or patterned on the internal surface increases the COF between the hand and the glove.
  • In yet another embodiment a simulated mesh may be constructed from solid (i.e., whole or having no apertures) materials or fabrics that do not have apertures such as the previously described mesh fabrics and materials. Some examples of materials or fabrics that may be used to mechanically construct a simulated mesh are the following: non-woven fabrics, leather, synthetic/imitation leather, Poron® (cellular urethane), silicon rubber, rubber pads, abrasive pads and common knitted and woven fabrics with micropores etc. These materials or fabrics either have an intrinsic high COF or may be coated with a high COF coating before or after the mechanical construction. Coating/laminating techniques that may be employed are those according to the teaching of this invention and those known the in the art of coating textiles.
  • Mechanical construction of a simulated mesh may be performed by equipment that can create a set of apertures on a material or fabric. Representative equipment that can create a set of apertures in a repeating manner are the following: chemical etching with an aperture patterned mask, CO2 laser hole drills, and a punch press. Alternatively, the material may be extruded or hot pressed into a mesh. Apertures may be constructed in any variety of shapes, sizes and patterns that knitted or woven mesh fabrics can provide along with aperture shapes, sizes and patterns that can only be made via mechanical construction. This is due to the fact that mechanical constructions are not inhibited by geometries dictated by knitting, weaving or thread types. As in the case of knitted or woven mesh fabrics, the aperture sizes with openings ranging from about 0.1 millimeters to about 15 millimeters are all suitable for use with the present invention. Larger or smaller apertures may also be suitable, depending on the use for the glove. Variously shaped apertures are also suitable, including for example, round, oblong, hex, square, diamond, elliptical and rectangular. One example of a simulated mesh constructed from rubber, plastic and polyurethane based materials is an extruded mesh.
  • In one example of the present embodiment, Cabretta leather tanned from Hair Sheep may be purchased from The Hide House in Napa, Calif. The Cabretta leather is supple with a high COF and about 1 to 1.5 ounces per square foot corresponding to a thickness of about 0.5 to 0.8 millimeters. The Cabretta leather is mechanically altered by a punch press leaving about 41% of the leather as open area. The punch press die may be set to a staggered patterned dye with holes in a 60 degree isometric pattern as shown in FIG. 9. The diameter of the holes punched in the leather is 1/16 inch resulting in approximately 132 holes per square inch. FIG. 10 shows the mechanically constructed Cabretta Leather mesh pattern.
  • Tensile and tear strength of mechanically constructed, simulated mesh may be enhanced through coating layers before and/or after the fabric or material has been altered. In this case, coatings may serve a dual purpose of providing a high COF surface while increasing the durability of the simulated mesh with respect to wear and tear. As noted earlier, coatings that may be applied can come as multiple layers of laminate films and/or coating layers as well as other coating procedures known in the art. Additionally, non-woven materials, woven and knitted fabrics and materials may be mechanically constructed into a simulated mesh, and later converted into synthetic/imitation leather or other coated textile fabric while preserving the apertures in the simulated mesh's pattern.
  • While the present invention has been described with reference to preferred embodiments, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that various changes may be made and equivalent elements may be substituted for the elements thereof without departing from the scope of the invention. The scope of the present invention further includes any combination of elements from the various embodiments set forth herein. In addition, modifications may be made to adapt a particular situation to the teachings of the present invention without departing from its essential scope. Therefore, it is intended that the invention not be limited to the particular embodiments disclosed, but that the invention will include all embodiments falling within the scope of the appended claims.

Claims (31)

1. A hand covering comprising;
a gripping region comprising a mesh material having a first permeability and a first coefficient of friction, the first coefficient of friction rendering the hand covering suitable for use in a desired application; and
regions of the hand covering other than the gripping region comprising a material having a second coefficient of friction lower than the first coefficient of friction and a second permeability lower than the first permeability.
2. The hand covering of claim 1 further comprising a liner layer in the gripping region and lining an internal surface of the mesh material, the liner layer comprising a breathable layer or a padding layer.
3. The hand covering of claim 2 wherein a material of the liner layer comprises polyester, rayon, cotton, spandex, brushed spandex, nylon, wool, silk, breathable suede, breathable leather and microporous breathable synthetic leather.
4. The hand covering of claim 2 wherein the liner layer defines openings therein smaller than openings of the mesh material.
5. The hand covering of claim 1 further comprising a spacer fabric in the gripping region.
6. The hand covering of claim 1 wherein the mesh material of the gripping region comprises a spacer fabric further comprising an external surface of a mesh layer with the first COF, a connecting intermediate layer and an internal surface of a breathable material.
7. The hand covering of claim 1 wherein the gripping region comprises one or more of a palm region, one or more finger regions and a thumb region.
8. The hand covering of claim 7 wherein the mesh material of the gripping region comprises different aperture patterns, aperture sizes, thread sizes or thread types in different areas of the gripping region.
9. The hand covering of claim 1 wherein the first coefficient of friction is at least about 0.2.
10. The hand covering of claim 1 wherein the mesh material comprises one or more of a warp knitted material, a weft knitted material, a woven material, polyester, nylon, polyethylene, polypropylene, cotton or acrylic.
11. The hand covering of claim 1 wherein the mesh material defines a repeating or a random pattern of openings.
12. The hand covering of claim 1 wherein the mesh material comprises a yarn, fiber, filament or thread having the first coefficient of friction.
13. The hand covering of claim 1 wherein the mesh material comprises an inner material layer and an outer material layer, the outer material layer exhibiting a textured surface to increase the coefficient of friction.
14. A process for manufacturing a hand covering, comprising:
processing a mesh material to increase a coefficient of friction on a first surface of the mesh material;
forming a gripping region of the hand covering with the processed mesh material, wherein the first surface comprises an external surface of the gripping region of the hand covering; and
forming regions of the hand covering other than the gripping region with a material having a COF less than the COF of the processed mesh material.
15. The process of claim 14 wherein the step of processing comprises applying a single material layer or multiple material layers to the mesh material to increase the COF of the mesh material.
16. The process of claim 15 wherein the single material layer or the multiple material layers exhibit a mesh pattern, and wherein the step of applying the single material layer or the multiple material layers further comprises aligning the mesh pattern of the mesh material and the mesh pattern of the single material layer or the multiple material layers to avoid substantially obstructing openings in the mesh material.
17. The process of claim 14 wherein the step of processing comprises texturing the external surface.
18. The process of claim 14 wherein the mesh material defines openings therein, and wherein the step of processing comprises applying a high COF material to the first surface of the mesh material that at least partially obstructs the openings, and further comprises removing at least a portion of the high COF material obstructing the openings.
19. The process of claim 14 wherein the step of processing comprises coating a transfer paper with a material layer having a high COF, laminating the material layer having the high COF to the mesh material and removing the transfer paper.
20. The process of claim 14 wherein the step of processing further comprises processing the mesh material on a first side to create an external surface for the hand covering or processing the mesh material on the first side and an opposing second side.
21. The process of claim 14 wherein the step of processing further comprises applying a silicon-based material or a polyvinyl chloride material to the mesh material to increase the COF.
22. The process of claim 14 wherein properties of the mesh material are derived from mesh materials and mesh compositions, a mesh thread size, a mesh thread diameter, dimensions associated with the mesh openings, a pattern of the mesh openings and manufacturing processes employed to manufacture the mesh material.
23. A process for manufacturing a hand covering, comprising:
forming a simulated mesh material;
forming a gripping region of the hand covering from the simulated mesh material; and
forming remaining regions of the hand covering from a material having a lower permeability to air flow than a permeability of the simulated mesh material.
24. The process of claim 23 further comprising processing the simulated mesh to increase the COF on at least one surface of the material, wherein a COF of the simulated mesh is greater than a COF of the material forming the remaining regions of the hand covering.
25. The process of claim 23 wherein the step of forming the simulated mesh material further comprises forming openings in a solid material.
26. The process of claim 25 wherein the solid material comprises one of non-woven fabrics, leather, synthetic leather, cellular urethane, silicon rubber, abrasive materials, knitted fabrics and woven fabrics.
27. The process of claim 25 wherein the step of forming the openings comprises one or more of chemical etching the openings using an aperture pattern mask, drilling the openings in the solid material and employing a punch press to create the openings in the solid material.
28. The process of claim 23 wherein the step of forming the simulated mesh material further comprises extruding a rubber, plastic or polyurethane material.
29. A process for manufacturing a hand covering, comprising:
forming a first material layer comprising a mesh material;
forming a second lining material; and
attaching the first and second material layers
30. The process of claim 29 wherein the step of attaching comprises sewing, knitting or applying wet or dry adhesives to one or both of the first and the second material layers.
31. The process of claim 29 wherein the step of attaching comprises forming one or more bonding layers between the first and the second material layers.
US12/058,643 2005-06-15 2008-03-28 Glove Having High Coefficient of Friction Regions Abandoned US20080235850A1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US69078205P true 2005-06-15 2005-06-15
US11/424,363 US20070028356A1 (en) 2005-06-15 2006-06-15 Mesh Glove
US90867407P true 2007-03-28 2007-03-28
US12/058,643 US20080235850A1 (en) 2005-06-15 2008-03-28 Glove Having High Coefficient of Friction Regions

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US12/058,643 US20080235850A1 (en) 2005-06-15 2008-03-28 Glove Having High Coefficient of Friction Regions
US13/536,964 US20120324623A1 (en) 2005-06-15 2012-06-28 Glove having region of both high coefficient of friction and high permeability to ambient air

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/424,363 Continuation-In-Part US20070028356A1 (en) 2005-06-15 2006-06-15 Mesh Glove

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/536,964 Continuation-In-Part US20120324623A1 (en) 2005-06-15 2012-06-28 Glove having region of both high coefficient of friction and high permeability to ambient air

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20080235850A1 true US20080235850A1 (en) 2008-10-02

Family

ID=39791799

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US12/058,643 Abandoned US20080235850A1 (en) 2005-06-15 2008-03-28 Glove Having High Coefficient of Friction Regions

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20080235850A1 (en)

Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080295219A1 (en) * 2005-10-20 2008-12-04 Peter Beicker Andersen Glove for Removing Detachable Material from an Object and a Method for Manufacturing the Glove
US20100050319A1 (en) * 2006-09-04 2010-03-04 Showa Glove Co. Glove
US20100077526A1 (en) * 2008-09-26 2010-04-01 Gathering Storm Llc D/B/A Tmax Gear Sports glove
US20110030121A1 (en) * 2009-08-10 2011-02-10 Smalls Delicia A Slip-resistant medical grip glove
US20110179551A1 (en) * 2010-01-28 2011-07-28 Vanermen Steven R Breathable coated and perforated gloves
US20120117703A1 (en) * 2010-11-17 2012-05-17 Jason Jaramillo Baseball catcher's protective handwear
US20120210483A1 (en) * 2011-02-21 2012-08-23 William Patrick Fricke Protective hand covering
US20130007937A1 (en) * 2011-07-06 2013-01-10 TetraMast LLC Protective glove liner for use in athletics
EP2583573A1 (en) * 2010-06-15 2013-04-24 Towa Corporation Ltd. Work glove
US8443462B1 (en) * 2011-11-08 2013-05-21 Jamelle Brian Eugene Athletic grip enhancing finger gloves
EP2644044A1 (en) * 2010-11-25 2013-10-02 Showa Glove Co. Non-slip glove and method for producing non-slip glove
US20130269084A1 (en) * 2012-11-21 2013-10-17 Charles Ray Shear Management Gloves
US20130305430A1 (en) * 2011-11-10 2013-11-21 Katsuhito TOMONO Glove, and method for producing the same
US20140157486A1 (en) * 2013-07-02 2014-06-12 Bernardo Antonio Del Rio Audibert Glove for capacitive touchscreen interface and methods
US20140208477A1 (en) * 2010-06-07 2014-07-31 Justin M. Mitchell Protective clothing and methods thereof
US20150091215A1 (en) * 2013-09-30 2015-04-02 Daniel Reetz Fabricating lightweight skin systems for large scale robotic characters
US9084444B2 (en) 2010-05-25 2015-07-21 Inteplast Group, Ltd. Disposable gloves and glove material compositions
US9084445B2 (en) 2011-09-15 2015-07-21 Inteplast Group, Ltd. Disposable gloves and glove material compositions
US9131737B2 (en) 2011-09-15 2015-09-15 Inteplast Group, Ltd. Disposable gloves and glove material compositions including a coloring agent
US9198472B2 (en) * 2011-11-18 2015-12-01 Patrick William HILBURN Glove for grouting tile
US20160367882A1 (en) * 2015-06-17 2016-12-22 John C. Ramirez Sport Performance Gloves
US20170080322A1 (en) * 2011-11-14 2017-03-23 John C. Ramirez Sport Gloves
US9622524B2 (en) 2010-01-28 2017-04-18 Performance Fabrics, Inc. Breathable coated and perforated gloves
US20170113117A1 (en) * 2015-10-22 2017-04-27 CaddieSack LLC/DBA Caddy Daddy Golf glove with ultrathin grip coating
WO2017214344A1 (en) 2016-06-07 2017-12-14 Bvw Holding Ag Wenzel-cassie glove

Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3341861A (en) * 1966-12-12 1967-09-19 Beulah M Robbins Open weave anti-slip glove
US6728969B2 (en) * 2000-12-15 2004-05-04 Milliken & Company Insect barrier garment
US6845519B2 (en) * 2001-01-26 2005-01-25 Louis Garneau Sports Inc. High breathability cyclist hand glove
US20070028356A1 (en) * 2005-06-15 2007-02-08 John Cabauy Mesh Glove

Patent Citations (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3341861A (en) * 1966-12-12 1967-09-19 Beulah M Robbins Open weave anti-slip glove
US6728969B2 (en) * 2000-12-15 2004-05-04 Milliken & Company Insect barrier garment
US6845519B2 (en) * 2001-01-26 2005-01-25 Louis Garneau Sports Inc. High breathability cyclist hand glove
US20070028356A1 (en) * 2005-06-15 2007-02-08 John Cabauy Mesh Glove

Cited By (37)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080295219A1 (en) * 2005-10-20 2008-12-04 Peter Beicker Andersen Glove for Removing Detachable Material from an Object and a Method for Manufacturing the Glove
US20100050319A1 (en) * 2006-09-04 2010-03-04 Showa Glove Co. Glove
US8256029B2 (en) * 2006-09-04 2012-09-04 Showa Glove Co. Glove
US20100077526A1 (en) * 2008-09-26 2010-04-01 Gathering Storm Llc D/B/A Tmax Gear Sports glove
US20110030121A1 (en) * 2009-08-10 2011-02-10 Smalls Delicia A Slip-resistant medical grip glove
US20110179551A1 (en) * 2010-01-28 2011-07-28 Vanermen Steven R Breathable coated and perforated gloves
US9622524B2 (en) 2010-01-28 2017-04-18 Performance Fabrics, Inc. Breathable coated and perforated gloves
US9084444B2 (en) 2010-05-25 2015-07-21 Inteplast Group, Ltd. Disposable gloves and glove material compositions
US20140208477A1 (en) * 2010-06-07 2014-07-31 Justin M. Mitchell Protective clothing and methods thereof
EP2583573A4 (en) * 2010-06-15 2013-11-20 Towa Corp Ltd Work glove
EP2583573A1 (en) * 2010-06-15 2013-04-24 Towa Corporation Ltd. Work glove
US8863317B2 (en) 2010-06-15 2014-10-21 Towa Corporation Ltd. Work glove
US20120117703A1 (en) * 2010-11-17 2012-05-17 Jason Jaramillo Baseball catcher's protective handwear
US20150165302A1 (en) * 2010-11-17 2015-06-18 Jason Jaramillo Baseball catcher's protective handwear
EP2644044A1 (en) * 2010-11-25 2013-10-02 Showa Glove Co. Non-slip glove and method for producing non-slip glove
EP2644044A4 (en) * 2010-11-25 2014-09-17 Showa Glove Co Non-slip glove and method for producing non-slip glove
US8925113B2 (en) * 2011-02-21 2015-01-06 The Crew Stop Llc Protective hand covering
US20120210483A1 (en) * 2011-02-21 2012-08-23 William Patrick Fricke Protective hand covering
US20130007937A1 (en) * 2011-07-06 2013-01-10 TetraMast LLC Protective glove liner for use in athletics
US9101170B2 (en) * 2011-07-06 2015-08-11 TetraMast LLC Protective glove liner for use in athletics
US9131737B2 (en) 2011-09-15 2015-09-15 Inteplast Group, Ltd. Disposable gloves and glove material compositions including a coloring agent
US9084445B2 (en) 2011-09-15 2015-07-21 Inteplast Group, Ltd. Disposable gloves and glove material compositions
US9635892B2 (en) 2011-09-15 2017-05-02 Inteplast Group Corporation Disposable gloves and glove material compositions
US8443462B1 (en) * 2011-11-08 2013-05-21 Jamelle Brian Eugene Athletic grip enhancing finger gloves
US8938814B2 (en) * 2011-11-10 2015-01-27 Showa Glove Co. Glove, and method for producing the same
US20130305430A1 (en) * 2011-11-10 2013-11-21 Katsuhito TOMONO Glove, and method for producing the same
US10065101B2 (en) * 2011-11-14 2018-09-04 John C. Ramirez Sport gloves
US20170080322A1 (en) * 2011-11-14 2017-03-23 John C. Ramirez Sport Gloves
US9198472B2 (en) * 2011-11-18 2015-12-01 Patrick William HILBURN Glove for grouting tile
US20130269084A1 (en) * 2012-11-21 2013-10-17 Charles Ray Shear Management Gloves
US20140157486A1 (en) * 2013-07-02 2014-06-12 Bernardo Antonio Del Rio Audibert Glove for capacitive touchscreen interface and methods
US10137616B2 (en) * 2013-09-30 2018-11-27 Disney Enterprises, Inc. Fabricating lightweight skin systems for large scale robotic characters
US20150091215A1 (en) * 2013-09-30 2015-04-02 Daniel Reetz Fabricating lightweight skin systems for large scale robotic characters
US9962594B2 (en) * 2015-06-17 2018-05-08 John C. Ramirez Sport performance gloves
US20160367882A1 (en) * 2015-06-17 2016-12-22 John C. Ramirez Sport Performance Gloves
US20170113117A1 (en) * 2015-10-22 2017-04-27 CaddieSack LLC/DBA Caddy Daddy Golf glove with ultrathin grip coating
WO2017214344A1 (en) 2016-06-07 2017-12-14 Bvw Holding Ag Wenzel-cassie glove

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3597765A (en) Sport glove
DE69822345T2 (en) With glossy silicone printed glove with constant grip properties under different moisture conditions
US20080189824A1 (en) Engineered Fabric Articles
US6018819A (en) Garment with moisture vapor transmissive wind barrier panels
US20190289939A1 (en) Cold weather vented garment
CA2512836C (en) Garment having improved contact areas
US5655226A (en) Article of waterproof, breathable apparel and the method of making same
JP2013032615A (en) Windproof waterproof breathable seamed articles
US8137606B2 (en) Lightweight thin flexible polymer coated glove and a method therefor
US8256030B2 (en) Windproof waterproof breathable seamed articles
EP2348901B1 (en) Articles of apparel providing enhanced body position feedback
US20190069638A1 (en) Shoe upper
US6511927B1 (en) Breathable waterproof laminate and method for making same
US7000257B2 (en) Glove with stitchless seams
CN101166434B (en) Gloves
CN101990493B (en) Liquid water resistant and water vapor permeable garments comprising hydrophobic treated nonwoven made from nanofibers
US3649967A (en) Non-slip golf glove
KR101495541B1 (en) Liquid water resistant and water vapor permeable garments comprising hydrophobic treated nonwoven made from nanofibers
US5682613A (en) Waterproof breathable gloves
EP0134484B1 (en) Slip resistant surfaces
CA2697770C (en) Lightweight robust thin flexible polymer coated glove
US4589940A (en) Method of making foamed slip resistant surfaces
US20100275342A1 (en) Knitted gloves having a single layer with a plurality of yarns
US5168576A (en) Body protective device
RU2544138C2 (en) Work glove

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION