US20080110853A1 - Container With Multiple Surface Depressions for Enhancing Insulative Properties - Google Patents

Container With Multiple Surface Depressions for Enhancing Insulative Properties Download PDF

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Publication number
US20080110853A1
US20080110853A1 US11559752 US55975206A US2008110853A1 US 20080110853 A1 US20080110853 A1 US 20080110853A1 US 11559752 US11559752 US 11559752 US 55975206 A US55975206 A US 55975206A US 2008110853 A1 US2008110853 A1 US 2008110853A1
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Prior art keywords
depressions
container
surface
plurality
depression
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
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US11559752
Inventor
Ray Alan Toms
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MillerCoors LLC
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Coors Brewing Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D1/00Containers having bodies formed in one piece, e.g. by casting metallic material, by moulding plastics, by blowing vitreous material, by throwing ceramic material, by moulding pulped fibrous material, by deep-drawing operations performed on sheet material
    • B65D1/40Details of walls
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D23/00Details of bottles or jars not otherwise provided for
    • B65D23/08Coverings or external coatings
    • B65D23/0842Sheets or tubes applied around the bottle with or without subsequent folding operations
    • B65D23/085Sheets or tubes applied around the bottle with or without subsequent folding operations and glued or otherwise sealed to the bottle

Abstract

A container is provided with multiple surface depressions for enhancing the insulative properties of the container. The surface depressions are tightly grouped, and a label placed over the surface depressions results in a greater surface area of the label that is suspended over the depressions as compared to a surface area of the label that is in contact with the exterior surface of the container. The air gaps or chambers defining the space between the applied label and the surfaces of the depressions provides an insulating air barrier to better maintain the beverage in the container at a desired temperature. The surface depressions may also be used alone without a label to provide insulative benefits. The surface depressions may be spaced and sized such that, under normal grasping conditions, the consumer's hand does not penetrate the entire depth of the depressions, and an air barrier is still maintained between the consumer's hand and the exterior surface of the container.

Description

    FIELD OF INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to a beverage container, and more particularly to a container with multiple surface depressions formed on the outer surface thereof for enhancing insulative properties of the container in keeping the beverage at a desired temperature.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • There are a great number of glass and plastic containers that have been used to hold a beverage. Many beverages such as soda and beer are preferably consumed cold, and are therefore refrigerated. However, these beverages will not remain at the desired chilled temperature once removed from refrigeration, since a number of factors are responsible for heat transfer to the beverages. Generally, glass bottles and plastic bottles do not provide adequate insulation for maintaining a beverage at a desired temperature.
  • In a common beverage bottle, the mid-portion is cylindrical shaped, and an elongated neck extends above the mid-portion. A consumer typically grabs the container around the mid-portion. The heat of the consumer's hand is directly transferred by conduction through the container to the beverage. Since most labels are simply a very thin sheet of plastic or paper, there is very little insulative advantage that the label provides. Therefore, the temperature of the chilled beverage will rise quite rapidly once a consumer holds the beverage.
  • Some simple solutions have been provided for insulating a container. One solution is to provide an outer sleeve in the form of a polyurethane foam member which surrounds the base and side walls of the container. The use of this type of sleeve is not convenient for the consumer, since the sleeve is not typically sold with the beverage.
  • Therefore, there is a need to provide a container with inherent insulative capabilities that help to maintain the beverage at a desired chilled temperature.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In accordance with the present invention, a container is provided with surface depressions or concavities formed thereon. A label placed over the surface of the container at the location of the depressions results in trapped air serving as an insulative barrier between a consumer's hand and the container surface.
  • In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the size and spacing of the surface depressions are provided so as not to substantially alter the overall shape of the container, yet the depressions provide an air barrier between the exterior surface of the container and the applied label, resulting in greatly improved insulation.
  • In accordance with another preferred embodiment of the present invention, the surface depressions are provided without an overlying label, and the depth and spacing of the depressions is arranged such that when the consumer grasps the container at the location of the depressions, there is still some defined gap or space maintained between the surface of the consumer's hand and the exterior surface of the container.
  • As also discussed below with respect to preferred embodiments of the present invention, the depressions are preferably arranged in rows that extend substantially perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the container. Each of the rows is staggered with respect to one another, and the depressions preferably have the same size and shape. One preferable shape is an elliptical shape. The depressions also preferably have a greatest depth at a central region of the depressions, and the depth of the depressions gradually decrease toward the edges of the depressions. The depressions are also preferably angled such that each remains substantially perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the container. Additionally, there are preferably very small spacings between the depressions such that a great percentage of the mid-portion of the container is covered with the depressions.
  • The size and spacing of the depressions may be adjusted to accommodate the desired amount of insulation provided, and also to accommodate the size and type of label to be applied to the container.
  • Generally, it is desirable to maximize the volume of air that exists between the exterior surface of the bottle and the label. By maximizing the volume of air, better insulation is provided. Maximizing this volume can be achieved by minimizing the surface contact between the label and the bottle. By providing tightly grouped depressions with little space between the depressions, along with a nested configuration of the depressions by an interlocking pattern of elliptical shaped depressions, the area in contact between the label and surface of the bottle is minimized.
  • If no label is used at the location of the depressions, then increasing the size of the depressions may not necessarily improve insulation as depressions of particularly large size may simply allow the consumer's hand to more completely contact the surface of the container. Therefore, with respect to containers not having a label, the depth, size, and spacing of the depressions can be adjusted to minimize contact with the consumer's hand to improve insulation. For example, the depth of the depressions may be increased to improve insulation.
  • Other features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the review of the following drawings, taken in conjunction with the detailed description.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is an elevation view of a container incorporating the multiple surface depressions of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 is a greatly enlarged view of a portion of FIG. 1 illustrating the spacing and arrangement of the surface depressions;
  • FIG. 3 is a fragmentary enlarged perspective view of a container of the present invention incorporating the surface depressions;
  • FIG. 4 is a enlarged vertical cross-section taken along line 4-4 of FIG. 3 illustrating the cross-sectional shape of a few of the surface depressions;
  • FIG. 5 is an enlarged horizontal cross-section taken along line 5-5 of FIG. 3 illustrating the cross-sectional shape of a few of the surface depressions; and
  • FIG. 6 is another enlarged vertical cross-section of a second embodiment of the present invention wherein the label is removed but the surface depressions still provide insulative benefits.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • In accordance with embodiments of the present invention, the container of the present invention is shown having a plurality of surface depressions formed therein. More specifically, referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, the container 10 is shown in the form of a bottle having a mouth 12, neck 14, and mid-section 16. A base 18 forms the bottom portion of the container. The mid-section 16 is defined as the substantially cylindrical portion of the bottle disposed between the base 18 and shoulder 19. The depressions 20 are preferably provided in a geometric pattern. This geometric pattern can be conceptually viewed in different ways, including surface depressions 20 formed in a plurality of horizontally extending rows, the rows being alternately staggered such that the surface depressions of one row are not disposed directly above or below the adjacent row. Alternatively, the surface depressions 20 may be viewed as a plurality of vertically extending columns wherein each adjacent column is staggered with respect to an adjacent column, such that each of the depressions are laterally or horizontally offset with respect to one another.
  • As also shown, the surface depressions 20 each have a similar size and shape, namely, an elliptical shape wherein a long axis of the ellipse extends horizontally as the container 10 is illustrated in FIG. 1. However, it shall be understood that it may be advantageous to provide surface depressions of different sizes so that the surface depressions 20 do not necessarily align with one another in rows or columns.
  • Referring specifically to FIG. 2, the size and spacing of the surface depressions 20 results in the formation of a plurality of primary gaps 24. More specifically, these gaps 24 may be defined as the space between the facing lateral edges of adjacent depressions in a row, and the space between the facing longitudinal edges of depressions in a column. With the arrangement of the surface depressions as shown, there is a very narrow seam or corridor 25 that separates the adjacent surface depressions 20. Each primary gap 24 can be defined as having a height 26 and a width 28. Preferably, the height 26 of the gap is less than a height 30 of a surface depression. Also, it is preferable that the length 28 of the gap be less than a length 32 of a surface depression. The particular arrangement shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 show that the height 26 of the gap is less than one-half the height 30 of a surface depression, and the length 28 of the gap is approximately one-half the length 32 of a surface depression. With the arrangement of the surface depressions as shown, the mid-section of the container is dominated with the surface depressions, and the otherwise cylindrical-shaped surface area of the mid-section is significantly reduced by the depressions.
  • Referring to FIGS. 4 and 5, the cross-sectional shapes of the surface depressions are illustrated as these cross sections are taken along lines 4-4 and 5-5 of FIG. 3. Referring first to FIG. 4, it is shown that the surface depressions 20 are substantially symmetrical about lines L1, that are drawn normal to the surface of the container and through the depressions. The deepest part of the depressions is found at the centers 40 of the depressions, and the depressions smoothly transition in a decreasing depth toward the side edges 42 of the depressions. The gaps 24 are shown as occupying much less overall surface area than the depressions.
  • Referring to the cross-section of FIG. 5, a line L2 drawn normal to the surface of the container shows that the surface depressions 20 are also symmetrical about this line, the deepest portions of the depressions being at the respective centers 40 and the depressions smoothly decreasing in depth at the edges 42 of the depressions.
  • FIGS. 4 and 5 also illustrate a label 44 secured to the container. When the label 44 is secured to the container, a plurality of chambers or air gaps 46 are formed between the surface depressions and the facing surface 48 of the label 44. As shown in the Figures, the amount of the facing surface 48 in contact with the exterior surface of the container is significantly less than the amount or area of the facing surface 48 that is suspended over the depressions. This large amount of air that is trapped between the label and the surface of the container provides an effective insulative air barrier.
  • In order to modify the amount of insulative protection for the container, the depth, size and spacing of the surface depressions may be adjusted. Generally, reducing the amount of the facing surface 48 in contact with the exterior surface of the container increases the insulative benefit. Additionally, generally increasing the depth of the depressions also increases the insulative effect of the surface depressions.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates another embodiment of the present invention, wherein a label is not used. The fingers of a consumer's hand H are shown in contact with the exterior surface of the container. As shown, the surface depressions 20 are sized such that under normal grasping by the consumer, the consumer's hand does not penetrate the entire depth of the surface depression, thereby still maintaining some chamber or air gap 46. By adjusting the depth of the surface depressions, this air gap may be maintained. Of course, if a consumer tightly grips the container in an unusual manner, it may be possible to completely eliminate the air gap 46. Nonetheless, under normal grasping conditions, even without a label, the configuration of the surface of the container in this embodiment provides insulative benefits. In this embodiment, the label could be applied on the shoulder 19 or the neck 14. Thus, the container could still be properly labeled. Additionally, there may be some aesthetic benefit to leaving the surface depressions exposed for viewing, to include special visual effects that may be achieved by light that is refracted through the container and through the various curved surfaces formed by the surface depressions.
  • Although the preferred embodiment of the present invention illustrates elliptical shaped depressions, it should also be understood that a number of other shapes could be provided for the surface depressions. For example, circular shaped depressions allow a similar arrangement of the depressions wherein a primary gap can be formed that has a size that is less than a height and width of a circular shaped depression. Additionally, different sized but similar shaped depressions may be formed to adjust the area or size of the primary gaps between the depressions.
  • Additionally, it shall be understood that the present invention can be incorporated in containers made of a number of different materials including, without limitation, glass, plastic, and alumimim. The surface depressions may be formed in these different types of materials in known manufacturing processes. For glass and plastic, conventional blow molding techniques can be used to create the desired pattern of surface depressions. For aluminum, known ironing and bending techniques can be used to create the desired pattern of surface depressions. Further, the particular shape of the container illustrated in the preferred embodiment is intended to cover other shaped containers that may traditionally hold a beverage. For example, cylindrical shaped containers such as aluminum cans are also contemplated in the present invention as well as other shaped plastic and glass containers.
  • There are a number of benefits to the surface depressions formed on the container of the present invention. The surface depressions enhance insulative capability for the container, which does not change the basic shape of the container, and allows use of a standard sized bottle. Tightly grouped surface depressions provide an integral insulative benefit for the container, and a separate device is not required for maintaining the temperature of the beverage.
  • While the foregoing invention has been described with respect to various preferred embodiments, it shall be understood that various other changes and modifications to the invention may be made within the spirit and scope of the invention, in accordance with the scope of the claims appended hereto.

Claims (20)

  1. 1. A container comprising:
    a neck;
    a base;
    a mid-section interconnecting said neck and said base;
    a plurality of surface depressions formed on an outer surface of said container at said mid-section, said surface depressions being arranged in a plurality of lateral rows or longitudinal columns, said surface depressions being arranged to create a plurality of primary gaps between adjacent surface depressions, one primary gap defined as space between two laterally adjacent surface depressions and two longitudinally adjacent depressions, said gap having a height that is less than a height of said depressions, and said gap having a length that is less than a length of said depressions.
  2. 2. A container, as claimed in claim 1, wherein:
    adjacent rows of said plurality of rows are longitudinally offset with respect to one another.
  3. 3. A container, as claimed in claim 1, wherein:
    adjacent columns of said plurality of columns are laterally offset with respect to one another.
  4. 4. A container, as claimed in claim 1, wherein:
    said plurality of surface depressions are elliptical shaped.
  5. 5. A container, as claimed in claim 1, wherein:
    said plurality of depressions each have a same shape.
  6. 6. A container, as claimed in claim 1, wherein:
    an area of said outer surface of said mid-section comprises a greater percentage of depressions as compared to spaces between said surface depressions.
  7. 7. A container, as claimed in claim 1, wherein:
    a surface area of said mid-section occupied by said surface depressions exceeds a surface area occupied by said primary gaps.
  8. 8. A container, as claimed in claim 1, further including:
    a label placed over said surface depressions, wherein an area of said label in contact with said outer surface of said mid-section is less than an area of said label not in contact with said outer surface.
  9. 9. A container, as claimed in claim 1, wherein:
    each said surface depression of said plurality of surface depressions are symmetrical about a line drawn normal to said outer surface of said container.
  10. 10. A container, as claimed in claim 1, wherein:
    at least one depression of said plurality of surface depressions has a vertical cross-sectional shape including a center defining a deepest part of said depression, and wherein said depression smoothly transitions in decreasing depth toward side edges of said depression.
  11. 11. A container, as claimed in claim 1, wherein:
    at least one depression of said plurality of depressions has a horizontal cross-sectional shape including a center defining a deepest part of said depression, and wherein said depression smoothly transitions in decreasing depth toward side edges of said depression.
  12. 12. A method of insulating a beverage within a container, said method comprising the steps of:
    providing a container having a neck, a base, and a mid-section interconnecting said neck and said base;
    creating a plurality of surface depressions on an outer surface of said container at said mid-section, said surface depressions being arranged in a plurality of lateral rows or longitudinal columns, said surface depressions being arranged to create a plurality of primary gaps between adjacent surface depressions, one primary gap defined as space between two laterally adjacent surface depressions and two longitudinally adjacent depressions, said gap having a height that is less than a height of said depressions, and said gap having a length that is less than a length of said depressions.
  13. 13. A method, as claimed in claim 12, further including:
    applying a label over said mid-section of said container, when gaps between said surface depressions and said label form an air barrier to insulate said beverage.
  14. 14. A container comprising:
    a neck;
    a base;
    a mid-section interconnecting said neck and said base;
    a plurality of surface depressions formed on an outer surface of said container at said midsection, said surface depressions being arranged to create a plurality of primary gaps between adjacent surface depressions, at least one primary gap of said plurality of primary gaps defined as space between two laterally adjacent surface depressions and two longitudinally adjacent surface depressions, a surface area of said midsection occupied by said surface depressions exceeding a surface area occupied by said plurality of primary gaps.
  15. 15. A container, as claimed in claim 14, wherein:
    said plurality of surface depressions are elliptical shaped.
  16. 16. A container, as claimed in claim 14, wherein:
    said plurality of depressions each have a same shape.
  17. 17. A container, as claimed in claim 14, further including:
    a label placed over said surface depressions, wherein an area of said label in contact with said outer surface of said mid-section is less than an area of said label not in contact with said outer surface.
  18. 18. A container, as claimed in claim 14, wherein:
    each said surface depression of said plurality of surface depressions are symmetrical about a line drawn normal to said outer surface of said container.
  19. 19. a container, as claimed in claim 14, wherein:
    at least one depression of said plurality of surface depressions has a vertical cross-sectional shape including a center defining a deepest part of said depression, and wherein said depression smoothly transitions in decreasing depth toward side edges of said depression.
  20. 20. A container, as claimed in claim 14, wherein:
    at least one depression of said plurality of depressions has a horizontal cross-sectional shape including a center defining a deepest part of said depression, and wherein said depression smoothly transitions in decreasing depth toward side edges of said depression.
US11559752 2006-11-14 2006-11-14 Container With Multiple Surface Depressions for Enhancing Insulative Properties Abandoned US20080110853A1 (en)

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US11559752 US20080110853A1 (en) 2006-11-14 2006-11-14 Container With Multiple Surface Depressions for Enhancing Insulative Properties
US29446249 USD736091S1 (en) 2006-11-14 2013-02-21 Beverage container

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Cited By (8)

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US20140217054A1 (en) * 2013-02-07 2014-08-07 Owens-Brockway Glass Container Inc. Bottle with Insulative Body
US20140366483A1 (en) * 2013-06-13 2014-12-18 Strategic Solutions International, Llc Insulating Container
USD736091S1 (en) * 2006-11-14 2015-08-11 Millercoors, Llc Beverage container
US20150353221A1 (en) * 2014-06-06 2015-12-10 The Procter & Gamble Company Faceted container
USD749216S1 (en) * 2013-02-20 2016-02-09 E. Hahnenkratt Gmbh Medical mirror
USD811884S1 (en) 2016-07-15 2018-03-06 Owens-Brockway Glass Container Inc. Container
USD813040S1 (en) 2016-07-15 2018-03-20 Owens-Brockway Glass Container Inc. Container
USD815914S1 (en) * 2015-05-01 2018-04-24 Family Hospitality, Llc Environmentally-considerate children's drinking cup

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