US20080041286A1 - Patterning technique for textiles - Google Patents

Patterning technique for textiles Download PDF

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Publication number
US20080041286A1
US20080041286A1 US11/810,581 US81058107A US2008041286A1 US 20080041286 A1 US20080041286 A1 US 20080041286A1 US 81058107 A US81058107 A US 81058107A US 2008041286 A1 US2008041286 A1 US 2008041286A1
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Prior art keywords
motif
element
diffused
elements
plurality
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Abandoned
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US11/810,581
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Suzanne Tick
Terry Mowers
Todd Van der Kruik
Roby Isaac
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Tandus Flooring Inc
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Collins and Aikman Floor Coverings Corp
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Application filed by Collins and Aikman Floor Coverings Corp filed Critical Collins and Aikman Floor Coverings Corp
Priority to US11/810,581 priority patent/US20080041286A1/en
Assigned to COLLINS & AIKMAN FLOORCOVERINGS, INC. reassignment COLLINS & AIKMAN FLOORCOVERINGS, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: ISAAC, ROBY, MOWERS, TERRY, TICK, SUZANNE, VAN DER KRUIK, TODD
Publication of US20080041286A1 publication Critical patent/US20080041286A1/en
Assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. reassignment BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. SECURITY AGREEMENT Assignors: COLLINS & AIKMAN FLOORCOVERINGS, INC.
Assigned to BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., AS AGENT reassignment BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., AS AGENT SECURITY AGREEMENT Assignors: TANDUS FLOORING, INC., FORMERLY KNOWN AS COLLINS & AIKMAN FLOORING, INC.
Assigned to TANDUS FLOORING, INC. reassignment TANDUS FLOORING, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: COLLINS & AIKMAN FLOORCOVERINGS, INC.
Assigned to TANDUS FLOORING, INC. (FORMERLY COLLINS & AIKMAN FLOORCOVERINGS, INC.) reassignment TANDUS FLOORING, INC. (FORMERLY COLLINS & AIKMAN FLOORCOVERINGS, INC.) RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT AND COLLATERAL AGENT
Assigned to TANDUS FLOORING, INC. (FORMERLY COLLINS & AIKMAN FLOORCOVERINGS, INC.) reassignment TANDUS FLOORING, INC. (FORMERLY COLLINS & AIKMAN FLOORCOVERINGS, INC.) RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A, AS ADMINISTRATIVE AGENT
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05CEMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05C17/00Embroidered or tufted products; Base fabrics specially adapted for embroidered work; Inserts for producing surface irregularities in embroidered products
    • D05C17/02Tufted products
    • D05C17/026Tufted products characterised by the tufted pile surface
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47GHOUSEHOLD OR TABLE EQUIPMENT
    • A47G27/00Floor fabrics; Fastenings therefor
    • A47G27/02Carpets; Stair runners; Bedside rugs; Foot mats
    • A47G27/0243Features of decorative rugs or carpets
    • A47G27/0275Surface patterning of carpet modules, e.g. of carpet tiles
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06NWALL, FLOOR OR LIKE COVERING MATERIALS, e.g. LINOLEUM, OILCLOTH, ARTIFICIAL LEATHER, ROOFING FELT, CONSISTING OF A FIBROUS WEB COATED WITH A LAYER OF MACROMOLECULAR MATERIAL; FLEXIBLE SHEET MATERIAL NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06N7/00Flexible sheet materials not otherwise provided for, e.g. textile threads, filaments, yarns or tow, glued on macromolecular material, e.g. fibrous top layer with resin backing, plastic naps or dots on fabrics
    • D06N7/0063Floor covering on textile basis comprising a fibrous top layer being coated at the back with at least one polymer layer, e.g. carpets, rugs, synthetic turf
    • D06N7/0065Floor covering on textile basis comprising a fibrous top layer being coated at the back with at least one polymer layer, e.g. carpets, rugs, synthetic turf characterised by the pile

Abstract

A textile pattern includes at least one motif element having an irregular peripheral edge, at least one interior discontinuity, or any combination thereof that facilitates alignment of a textile along seams and conceals patterns of wear.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION
  • The benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/811,685, filed Jun. 7, 2006, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety, is hereby claimed.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The present invention relates generally to textiles and, in particular, relates to patterning techniques for textiles and patterns formed therefrom.
  • BACKGROUND
  • It is well known in the textile industry, in particular, the carpet industry, that it is desirable to minimize the appearance of seams between edges of carpet rolls or tiles and to conceal wear patterns or faded portions of the carpet. Thus, there remains a need for both textiles having such capabilities and techniques for forming such textiles.
  • SUMMARY
  • The present invention is directed generally to various textile patterning techniques, textile patterns, and textiles. In one aspect, the patterning technique of the invention may be used to form a textile having a greater tolerance for misalignment of the textile pattern along seams, thereby eliminating the need for the precise alignment required with conventional textiles. In another aspect, the patterning technique may be used to form a textile that tends to obscure areas that are worn or faded, which may extend the useful life of the textile. In still another aspect, the patterning technique may be used to prepare a textile having a first, true pattern that can be segmented and rearranged to form a second, intentionally mismatched, random pattern that is both aesthetically pleasing and tends to conceal wear patterns. The patterning technique may be used to form any type of textile, for example, carpet, carpet tiles, rugs, upholstery fabrics, drapery fabrics, or any other textile, as desired. However, for purposes of simplicity, and not limitation, the invention is discussed generally herein within the context of carpets and carpet tiles.
  • Textile patterns consistent with the invention include a recurring form, shape, or design, generally referred to as a “motif.” One or more motifs may be arranged within a predetermined area to form a textile repeat unit, which then may be used to form a textile having an overall textile pattern, as will be understood by those in the art. Each occurrence of the motif in the repeat unit and textile pattern may be referred to as a “motif element.” However, it is noted that each motif, and therefore, each motif element, may include more than one segment or component.
  • In accordance with the invention, at least one motif element in the repeat unit and, therefore, in the resulting textile pattern, is at least partially “diffused,” that is, altered to obscure the distinction between the motif element and the background and/or to create an impression that a particular motif element is at a different depth than other motif elements. As a result, the diffused motif element may appear to fade or blend into the background, sometimes gradually or progressively, making the precise boundaries of the individual motif elements and the textile repeat unit more difficult to discern. Thus, when two or more pieces of carpet are abutted along respective edges to form a seam, the diffused motif elements may be somewhat misaligned across the seam, yet still create a visually acceptable alignment.
  • In one aspect, a textile pattern comprises a plurality of motif elements circumscribed by a background, where a first plurality of motif elements are tufted at least partially at a first tufting height, a second plurality of motif elements are tufted at least partially at a second tufting height, and at least one motif element of the first plurality of motif elements has an irregular peripheral edge, at least one interior discontinuity, or any combination thereof. At least one motif element of the second plurality of motif elements also may have an irregular peripheral edge, at least one interior discontinuity, or any combination thereof.
  • In one variation, the motif elements are tufted using a tufting yarn having an actual hue, at least one motif element of the first plurality of motif elements appears to have the actual hue, and at least one motif element of the second plurality of motif elements appears to have a perceived hue that is different from the actual hue.
  • In another variation, the first plurality of motif elements have a first perceived intensity, the second plurality of motif elements have a second perceived intensity, and the first perceived intensity is greater than the second perceived intensity.
  • In another aspect, a textile pattern comprises a first plurality of motif elements tufted at least partially from a first yarn at a first tufting height, at least one motif element of the first plurality of the motif element having an irregular peripheral edge, at least one interior discontinuity, or any combination thereof, a second plurality of motif elements tufted at least partially from the first yarn at a second tufting height less than the first tufting height, and a background tufted from a second yarn at the first tufting height, the second tufting height, or any combination thereof. In one variation, the first yarn has a first hue, the second yarn has a second hue, and the second plurality of elements appear to have a third hue comprising a perceived hue intermediate the first hue and the second hue.
  • In yet another aspect, a textile pattern comprises a diffused motif element circumscribed by a background, where the diffused motif element is derived from an initial motif element having an initial motif area, the diffused motif element has a reduced area relative to the initial motif area, and the reduced area of the diffused motif element comprises a reduced peripheral area, a reduced interior area, or any combination thereof. The initial motif element may comprises a form, shape, or figure that is readily identifiable, and the diffused motif element may evoke an impression of the initial motif element. In one variation, the reduced area of the diffused motif element creates an impression that the diffused motif element is discontinuous. In another variation, the reduced area of the diffused motif element creates an impression that the diffused motif element is fading into or out of the background.
  • In still another aspect, a method of forming a textile pattern comprises selecting a motif, preparing a motif element based on the motif, the motif element including a peripheral area and an interior area, and removing at least a portion of the peripheral area of the motif element, at least a portion of the interior area of the motif element, or any combination thereof to form a diffused motif element. The method may further comprise preparing a textile repeat unit including the diffused motif element, and a background circumscribing the diffused motif element. In one variation, the diffused motif element is a first diffused motif element, the repeat unit includes a second diffused motif element, and the method further comprises tufting the first diffused motif element at a first tufting height and the second diffused motif element at a second tufting height.
  • In a further aspect, a method of forming a textile pattern comprises providing a textile having a first textile pattern including a plurality of repeated motif elements, where at least some of the motif elements have an irregular periphery, at least one interior discontinuity, or any combination thereof, preparing a plurality of tiles from the textile, orienting each of the plurality of tiles in a like pile direction, and positioning the oriented tiles in an edge to edge relationship with respect to one another to form a second textile pattern that differs from the first textile pattern. The second textile pattern includes a plurality of incomplete diffused motif elements, but nonetheless is visually appealing.
  • Various other aspects, features, and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description and accompanying figures.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES
  • The file of this patent contains at least one drawing executed in color. Copies of this patent with color drawing(s) will be provided by the Patent and Trademark Office upon request and payment of the necessary fee.
  • The description refers to the accompanying drawings and figures, some of which are schematic, in which like reference characters refer to like parts throughout the several views, and in which:
  • FIG. 1A schematically depicts an exemplary motif that may be used in accordance with various aspects of the invention;
  • FIG. 1B schematically depicts an exemplary repeat unit that may be used to form a textile according to various aspects of the invention, including a plurality of motif elements derived from the motif of FIG. 1A;
  • FIGS. 1C and 1D schematically depict one of the motif elements of FIG. 1B, having a diffused peripheral edge, according to various aspects of the invention;
  • FIG. 1E schematically depicts an exemplary repeat unit that may be used to form a textile in accordance with various aspects of the invention, including the diffused motif element of FIGS. 1C and 1D;
  • FIGS. 1F and 1G schematically depict one of the motif elements of FIG. 1B, having a diffused interior area according to various aspects of the invention;
  • FIG. 1H schematically depicts an exemplary repeat unit that may be used to form a textile in accordance with various aspects of the invention, including the diffused motif element of FIGS. 1F and 1G;
  • FIGS. 1J and 1K schematically depict one of the motif elements of FIG. 1B, having a diffused periphery and a diffused interior, according to various aspects of the invention;
  • FIG. 1M schematically depicts an exemplary repeat unit that may be used to form a textile in accordance with various aspects of the invention, including the diffused motif element of FIGS. 1J and 1K;
  • FIG. 2A depicts an exemplary carpet installation including a carpet formed according to various aspects of the invention;
  • FIG. 2B depicts an exemplary tufting pattern for a first needle bar of a tufting machine, used to form the carpet of FIG. 2A, in accordance with various aspects of the invention;
  • FIG. 2C depicts an exemplary tufting pattern for a second needle bar of a tufting machine, used to form the carpet of FIG. 2A, in accordance with various aspects of the invention;
  • FIG. 2D is a partial, enlarged view of the installation of FIG. 2A;
  • FIG. 2E depicts an exemplary horizontal ashlar carpet tile installation using a carpet formed from the tufting patterns of FIGS. 2B and 2C;
  • FIG. 3A depicts another exemplary carpet installation including a carpet formed according to various aspects of the invention;
  • FIG. 3B depicts an exemplary tufting pattern for a first needle bar of a tufting machine, used to form the carpet of FIG. 3A, in accordance with various aspects of the invention;
  • FIG. 3C depicts an exemplary tufting pattern for a second needle bar of a tufting machine, used to form the carpet of FIG. 3A, in accordance with various aspects of the invention;
  • FIG. 3D depicts an exemplary monolithic carpet tile installation using a carpet formed from the tufting patterns of FIGS. 3B and 3C;
  • FIG. 3E depicts an exemplary horizontal ashlar carpet tile installation using a carpet formed from the tufting patterns of FIGS. 3B and 3C;
  • FIG. 4A depicts still another exemplary carpet installation including a carpet formed according to various aspects of the invention;
  • FIG. 4B depicts an exemplary horizontal ashlar carpet tile installation using the carpet of FIG. 4A;
  • FIG. 4C depicts an exemplary tufting pattern for a first needle bar of a tufting machine, used to form the carpet of FIG. 4A, in accordance with various aspects of the invention;
  • FIG. 4D depicts an exemplary tufting pattern for a second needle bar of a tufting machine, used to form the carpet of FIG. 4A, in accordance with various aspects of the invention;
  • FIG. 5A depicts an exemplary tufting pattern for a first needle bar of a tufting machine, according to various aspects of the invention;
  • FIG. 5B depicts an exemplary tufting pattern for a second needle bar of a tufting machine, according to various aspects of the invention;
  • FIG. 5C depicts an exemplary carpet installation including a carpet formed from the tufting patterns of FIGS. 5A and 5B;
  • FIG. 5D depicts an exemplary monolithic carpet tile installation using a carpet formed from the tufting patterns of FIGS. 5A and 5B;
  • FIG. 6A depicts another exemplary tufting pattern for a first needle bar of a tufting machine, according to various aspects of the invention;
  • FIG. 6B depicts another exemplary tufting pattern for a second needle bar of a tufting machine, according to various aspects of the invention;
  • FIG. 6C depicts an exemplary carpet installation including a carpet formed from the tufting patterns of FIGS. 6A and 6B;
  • FIG. 6D depicts an exemplary horizontal ashlar carpet tile installation using a carpet formed from the tufting patterns of FIGS. 6A and 6B;
  • FIG. 7A depicts still another exemplary tufting pattern for a first needle bar of a tufting machine, according to various aspects of invention; and
  • FIG. 7B depicts still another exemplary tufting pattern for a second needle bar of a tufting machine, according to various aspects of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Various aspects of the invention may be illustrated by referring to the figures, which depict numerous examples of motif elements, repeat units, tufting patterns, and textiles. For purposes of simplicity, like numerals may be used to describe like features. It will be understood that where a plurality of similar features are depicted, not all of such features necessarily are labeled on each figure. Although several different exemplary aspects, implementations, and embodiments of the various inventions are provided, numerous interrelationships between, combinations thereof, and modifications of the various inventions, aspects, implementations, and embodiments of the inventions are contemplated.
  • FIG. 1A schematically illustrates an exemplary motif 100 that may be used in accordance with various aspects of the invention. In this example, the motif 100 is a substantially solid square. However, numerous other motifs or shapes may be used.
  • The motif 100 may be embodied in one or more motif elements 102, which can be arranged in any manner within a predetermined area to form a repeat unit 104, as illustrated in FIG. 1B. In this example, the repeat unit 104 includes a two by two arrangement of substantially square shaped motif elements 102 (shown by lighter stippling). The spaces between and around the motif elements 102 generally comprise a background 106 (shown by heavier stippling), such that the background 106 substantially circumscribes the motif elements 102.
  • The repeat unit 104 may be used to form a carpet having an overall textile pattern (not shown) with the arrangement of motif elements 102 and background 106 repeated the desired number of times across the length and width of the carpet, as is understood by those in the art. Typically, the motif elements 102 are tufted using a motif yarn having a first hue, and the background 106 is tufted from a background yarn having a second hue. The first yarn hue and the second yarn hue are sufficiently different that the motif elements 102 and the background 106 are perceived by a viewer as being discrete components of the textile pattern.
  • More particularly, and in accordance with one acceptable method, the carpet may be formed using a dual needle bar tufting machine. The motif elements 102 may be tufted using a first yarn (motif yarn) on a single bar, for example, a front needle bar, and the background 106 may be tufted using a second yarn (background yarn) on a single bar, for example, a back needle bar. While both the motif elements 102 and the background 106 are patterned to be tufted on each bar, the pile height of each loop may be controlled so that only the desired yarn is visible in a particular location. Generally, the loops tufted at the highest pile height will be visible and loops tufted at the lowest pile height will not be visible. Loops tufted at intermediate pile heights may or may not be visible, or may be partially visible, depending on the relative pile heights of the loops tufted on the opposite needle bar. Thus, by altering the tufting heights of the loops, each yarn independently can be completely concealed, completely revealed, partially concealed, or partially revealed.
  • In accordance with the invention, at least a portion of at least one motif element 102 within the repeat unit may be “diffused” to obscure the distinctness of the motif element and/or to make the motif element appear more prominently or less prominently within the overall textile pattern. Such a motif element may be referred to sometimes herein as a “diffused motif element.”
  • Various techniques may be used to form a diffused motif element according to the invention. Each technique generally seeks to alter a typical viewer's expectations of uniformity, continuity, symmetry, and/or depth within the textile pattern, thereby creating an overall sense of non-uniformity in the textile pattern and minimizing the perceptibility of the repeat unit. As a result, there is a greater tolerance in aligning the textile pattern across seams formed between adjacent carpet pieces. This more “forgiving” pattern alignment simplifies installation and reduces waste. Furthermore, the overall life of the carpet may be extended because some worn or faded areas may resemble one or more diffused motif elements and thus may appear to be part of the overall textile pattern.
  • In one aspect, the motif element may be diffused by “roughening” the peripheral edge of at least a portion of the motif element to form an irregular boundary between the motif element and the background. This irregularity may tend to blur the distinctness of the motif element against the background and may create the impression that the motif element is fading or blending into the background. This type of diffusion may be referred to as “peripheral diffusion.”
  • One example of peripheral diffusion is illustrated in FIGS. 1C-1E using the motif element 102 of FIG. 1B. Various portions of the peripheral area 108 of motif element 102 are “removed” to form the diffused motif element 110, as shown in FIG. 1C. As will be discussed in greater detail below, the removed portions 112 of the original motif element 102 may become part of the background 106 of the repeat unit 104, as indicated schematically in FIGS. 1D and 1E. Thus, peripheral diffusion of the original motif element 102 causes the visible area of the original motif element 102 to decrease, and the visible area of the background 106 to increase.
  • As shown in FIGS. 1C-1E, the peripheral edge 114 of the diffused motif element 110 is irregular and seemingly discontinuous relative to the peripheral edge 116 of the original motif element 102, shown with dashed lines in FIGS. 1C and 1D. As a result, the boundary between the diffused motif element 110 and the background 106 may become somewhat blurred, causing the diffused motif element 110 to appear to blend or disappear into the background 106, as shown schematically in FIG. 1E.
  • In this and other examples, the extent that the boundary between the diffused motif element and the background appears to blurred or obscured may depend on various factors. Such factors may include, but are not limited to, the percentage of the original motif element removed to form the diffused motif element, the degree of irregularity of the peripheral edge of the diffused motif element, the relative hues of the motif yarn and the background yarn, and the recognizability of the motif. For example, the impression of fading or erosion may be greater when the motif embodied in the original motif element is a common shape or design, for example, a circle, square, triangle, oval, spiral, zigzag, starburst, flower, or any other shape that would be readily identified by a viewer. Such motifs would be expected by a viewer to be “complete” (sometimes referred to as an “expected motif”), and therefore, even subtle peripheral diffusion in a motif element may cause the motif element to be perceived as fading or blending into the background. In contrast, a highly unusual or unrecognizable original motif, such as a complex, irregular design, may not be perceived as readily by the user as lacking a particular boundary that would likely be expected with a more recognizable original motif.
  • In another aspect, the motif may be diffused by creating voids or discontinuities within the interior area of the original motif element 102. This type of diffusion may be referred to as “interior diffusion.”
  • For example, as shown in FIGS. 1F-1H, selected portions 122 of the interior 118 of the original motif element 102 have been removed, such that the resulting diffused motif element 120 has an overall scattered, broken, or non-uniformly discontinuous appearance. The removed areas or voids 122 generally may become part of the background 106 of the repeat unit 104, as illustrated schematically in FIGS. 1G and 1H. Thus, interior diffusion of the original motif element 102 causes the visible area of the original motif element 102 to decrease, and the visible area of the background 106 to increase. As a result, the overall amount and concentration of motif yarn hue within the interior 118 of the diffused motif element 120 in the resulting textile is reduced relative to the overall amount and concentration of motif yarn hue in the original motif element 102. Thus, interior diffusion reduces the perceived intensity of the diffused motif element 120.
  • It will be understood that the perceived intensity of the diffused motif element may depend on various factors including, but not limited to, the recognizability of the motif embodied in the original motif element, as discussed above, the percentage of the original motif element removed and replaced with visible background, the size of each area removed from the interior area of the original motif element, the degree of irregularity of each removed area, and the relative hues of the motif yarn and the background yarn. More particularly, depending on the relative size and positions of the tufted motif yarn and background yarn, the diffused motif element may have a somewhat speckled appearance that, when viewed collectively, appears to be formed from a yarn having a hue between the first yarn hue and the second yarn hue. In this manner, the perceived intensity or depth of the diffused motif element may be adjusted to create the desired visual effect.
  • For example, if the original motif element hue is white and the background is dark blue, the “perceived hue” of the diffused portion of the motif element may be light blue. If the resulting motif element is more prominent than desired, the degree of diffusion may be increased to add additional blue background yarn to “darken” the perceived hue. If the diffused motif element is less prominent than desired, the degree of diffusion may be decreased to increase the presence of white motif yarn to “lighten” the perceived hue. Conversely, if the original motif element hue is dark blue and the background hue is white, the level of diffusion may be adjusted in the opposite manner as described to attain the desired perceived hue of the diffused motif element.
  • FIG. 1J-1M illustrates another diffused motif element 124 derived from the motif element 102 of FIG. 1B. In this example, respective portions 112, 122 of both the peripheral area 108 and the interior area 118 of the original motif element 102 are removed to form a diffused motif element 124 having an overall appearance that is discontinuous, jagged, unsymmetrical, and broken, such that it resembles a cluster of smaller segments or components 126, generally arranged to resemble a square. Any of the smaller segments or components 126 also may have a diffused peripheral edge 128, which further obscures the interface between the diffused motif element and the background. As a result, at least a portion of the diffused motif element 124 may be perceived as fading into the background 106 of the resulting textile. Thus, both peripheral diffusion and interior diffusion challenge a viewer's expectation of substantive continuity, i.e., the expected existence of a “complete” motif element, in the textile pattern.
  • In still another aspect, at least one motif element may be diffused by selectively altering the tufting height of the motif yarn and/or the background yarn. For example, all or a portion of the diffused motif element may be tufted at a height that is less than the highest (foremost) tufting height of the textile. In doing so, the diffused motif element may appear to be less prominent than other motif elements, and may be perceived as being in the middleground of the textile pattern rather than in the foreground. This “depth diffusion” alters the viewer's expectation of spatial continuity, i.e., the expected existence of the motif elements to appear to lie within a common plane, typically the foreground.
  • The various exemplary techniques for creating a diffused motif element from an original motif element may be used alone or in any combination to obscure the distinction between the motif elements and the background, and/or to create an overall impression that at least one motif element lies at least partially in a plane between the foreground and the background. Thus, the total degree of diffusion (or “total diffusion”) of a diffused motif element can be characterized as the combined effect of peripheral diffusion, interior diffusion, and depth diffusion. Stated otherwise, the total degree of diffusion can be approximated as: (1) the percentage of the original motif element that is removed to form the diffused motif element, plus (2) the percentage of the original motif element that is tufted at a height that is less than the maximum tufting height for the motif yarn (but greater than the minimum tufting height, since the lowest tufting height is not visible).
  • Additional features, aspects, and advantages of the invention are discussed in detail in connection with the following examples, which are not intended to be limiting in any manner. While various examples of motifs, original motif elements, diffused motif elements, tufting patterns, pile heights, and corresponding degrees of diffusion are provided, it will be understood that numerous other examples are contemplated.
  • FIG. 2A depicts an exemplary carpet 200 installed in a room. The carpet 200 includes a plurality of diffused motif elements 202 spaced apart in a substantially regular, tiled configuration against a background 204. Each motif element 202 may evoke an impression of a basic geometric shape, for example a square or a circle, having a roughened periphery. Additionally, some of the motif elements 202 appear to be discontinuous or broken into a plurality of smaller segments or components, for example, segments 206, 208. As such, the precise boundary between each motif element 202 and the background 204 is somewhat blurred. Nonetheless, the motif elements 202 can be recognized as derivatives of more common geometric shapes.
  • Furthermore, the diffused motif elements 202 vary in perceived intensity, depth, and/or prominence within the textile pattern. For example, a first set of diffused motif elements appears to have an ivory or beige hue and appears to be more intense or prominent (e.g., diffused motif element 210) than a second set of diffused motif elements (e.g., diffused motif element 212), which appears to have a light brown or taupe hue and appears to be somewhat faded relative to the first set of diffused motif elements. When viewed overall, the textile pattern is seemingly non-uniform and discontinuous.
  • FIGS. 2B and 2C depict tufting patterns 214, 216 that may be used to form the carpet of FIG. 2A. The tufting patterns may be suitable for use with, for example, a front needle bar and a back needle bar of a dual needle bar tufting machine. FIG. 2B depicts the tufting pattern 214 of motif yarn used to form the front (visible) face 218 of the carpet 200 and FIG. 2C depicts the tufting pattern 216 of background yarn used to form the back face (hidden from view) of the carpet 200. The front needle bar tufting pattern 214 and the back needle bar tufting pattern 216 collectively comprise a single repeat unit of an overall tufting pattern used to form the carpet 200.
  • Each tufting pattern 214, 216 is represented using three colors. Dark blue represents a first tufting height, light blue represents a second tufting height, and white represents a third tufting height. In this example, the first tufting height is greater than the second tufting height, and the second tufting height is greater than the third tufting height. Thus, viewing FIG. 2B, the motif yarn is tufted at the greatest tufting height where indicated in dark blue, a medium tufting height where indicated with light blue, and a lowest tufting height where indicated in white. Similarly, viewing FIG. 2C, the background yarn is tufted at the greatest tufting height where indicated in dark blue, a medium tufting height where indicated with light blue, and a lowest tufting height where indicated in white. However, other representations and correlations of tufting heights may be used.
  • Notably, each diffused motif element 202 includes an irregular peripheral edge 220 and at least one area within the interior area 222 of the diffused motif element 202 that is tufted at the lowest tufting height. However, since the motif yarns and the background yarns tufted at the lowest tufting height generally are concealed by opposed needle bar yarns tufted at the medium or highest tufting height, any discontinuities along the periphery or within interior of the diffused motif element 202 will appear to be part of the background in the resulting carpet. Stated differently, when viewing the visible face 218 of the tufted carpet 200 (FIG. 2A), each diffused motif element 202 may appear to include (1) tufted motif yarns at the second tufting height or the third tufting height and (2) tufted background yarns at either the second tufting height or the third tufting height. By patterning the textile in this manner, a visual impression may be created that the diffused motif element is scattered and/or less intense than would otherwise be expected. Furthermore, each diffused motif element may appear to have an irregular periphery that obscures the interface between the diffused motif element and the background.
  • If desired, the level of diffusion of the repeat unit may be approximated as the sum of: (1) the percentage of the original motif element removed to achieve the desired degree of peripheral diffusion and interior diffusion, and (2) the percentage of visible motif yarns tufted at a height less than the greatest tufting height. Using an original motif element having a substantially square shape, the total diffusion may be approximated as about 57%, which is the sum of: (1) about 39% removal of the original motif element, and (2) about 18% of the motif yarns being tufted at a medium pile height. Additional information regarding the tufting patterns 214, 216 is provided in Table 1, in which all values are approximate. TABLE 1 Dimensions of repeat unit (inches, width × length) 18.125 × 16.05 Percent area “removed” from motif (%), front bar 39 Percent of visible front bar hue in textile (%), 29 per repeat unit* Percent of visible back bar hue in textile (%), 88 per repeat unit* Pile height 1 (in.) 0.156 Pile height 2 (in.) 0.187 Pile height 3 (in.) 0.218 Percent of motif at medium pile height (%), front bar 18 Total diffusion of motif (%), front bar 57
    *The sum of the front bar and back bar is greater than 100% because portions of the repeat unit where both colors are visible are included in the calculation of each value.
  • The visual impression created by the diffused motif elements 202 may be explained further with reference to FIG. 2A. As stated previously, the carpet 200 is tufted from two yarns, each having a different hue (beige and brown). Nonetheless, the carpet 200 generally appears to include at least three different hues. In particular, the substantially beige motif elements (e.g., diffused motif element 210), which correspond to the dark blue areas of the front needle bar pattern of FIG. 2B, appear to be in the foreground of the design and have the greatest intensity. The darker brown areas of the carpet 200, which correspond to the white areas of the front needle bar pattern of FIG. 2B, comprise the background 204 and have the least intensity. The lighter brown or taupe diffused motif elements (e.g., diffused motif element 212), which correspond to the light blue areas of the front needle bar pattern of FIG. 2B, have a medium intensity and appear to lie in a middleground, in a plane more distant than the foreground. Overall, the diffused motif elements 202 appear to be scattered and discontinuous throughout the textile pattern, thereby reducing the distinctness of the motif elements 202 and the background 204 and making the repeat unit of the pattern difficult to discern.
  • There are several practical benefits of altering the viewer's expectations of substantive and spatial continuity in this manner. First, installing the carpet 200 or replacing of a portion of the carpet 200 may be simplified by allowing greater variability in the alignment of adjacent carpet pieces. For example, FIG. 2D illustrates a carpet installation 224 including two pieces of carpet 226, 228, each having a width of, for example, about 6 feet, abutted to form a seam 230. Although the diffused motif elements (e.g., diffused motif elements 232 and 234) in the two carpet pieces 226, 228 are not matched across the seam 230 with precision, the misalignment is barely perceptible. Additionally, since the carpet pieces 226, 228 appear to be somewhat faded or worn in some places, for example, in area 236, any wear patterns or other degradation of the carpet that results from prolonged use may be obscured or concealed.
  • The patterning technique of the invention also may be used to form carpet tiles. For example, as shown in FIG. 2E, a carpet tile installation 238 includes a plurality of substantially square carpet tiles 240 cut or stamped, for example, from a carpet similar to that of FIG. 2A, but having a slightly different color scheme. The tiles 240 are installed in a horizontal ashlar configuration, such that all of the tiles 240 are oriented in a particular direction and staggered, but are otherwise “positionally random,” i.e., not in any particular position or order.
  • Viewing the overall textile pattern, it is evident that the motif elements are not aligned precisely along the various seams. For example, diffused motif element 242 is not aligned properly with the adjacent diffused motif element 244 across seam 246. Further, many of the diffused motif elements adjacent seam 248 are only partial diffused motif elements (e.g., diffused motif element 250), while others appear to “overlap” across the seam to form enlarged diffused motif elements (e.g., diffused motif elements 252, 254, which are also misaligned). Nonetheless, the overall textile pattern remains visually pleasing.
  • Thus, and in accordance with another aspect of the invention, a patterning technique may comprise forming an initial, repeating textile pattern including at least one diffused motif element, dividing the repeating textile pattern into a plurality of pattern segments, and reconfiguring the pattern segments to define a new, intentionally and randomly mismatched pattern or design that is visually pleasing. In this aspect, since the tiles do not have to be arranged in any particular position or order, the process of installing the tiles is substantially simplified. Furthermore, the resulting overall design is unique, since the specific arrangement of tiles will likely vary in each installation.
  • Like the repeating textile pattern shown in FIGS. 2A and 2D, the intentionally mismatched textile design shown in FIG. 2E appears to be somewhat antiqued or faded in selected areas, thereby concealing actual fading or wear patterns that may develop over time. In other words, the textile pattern mimics the appearance of fading or wear so that actual fading or wear is much less apparent. Additionally, new replacement tiles may be less conspicuous because the differences between the older, perhaps worn or faded, tiles and the new replacement tiles are minimized visually by the irregularity of the textile pattern.
  • FIG. 3A illustrates another example of a carpet 300 that may be formed according to the invention. The carpet 300 generally includes a textile pattern comprising a plurality of diffused motif elements 302 and a background 304. In this example, the diffused motif elements 302 resemble parallelograms or diamonds varying in size and having somewhat distorted or lengthened ends 306. The motif elements 302 are similarly oriented, such that the lengthened ends 306 of each motif element 302 may be substantially parallel to one another. Some of the motif elements 302 are in a partially overlapping configuration or in a substantially superposed configuration, for example, as with respective motif elements 308 and 310. The diffused motif elements 302 vary in intensity and/or prominence, creating an overall impression of depth, non-uniformity, and discontinuity in the overall textile pattern.
  • FIGS. 3B and 3C illustrate tufting patterns 312, 314 that may be used to form the carpet 300 of FIG. 3A. As discussed with respect to FIGS. 2B and 2C, the tufting patterns 312, 314 may be used respectively on a front bar and a back bar of a dual needle bar tufting machine to form collectively a single repeat unit of the textile pattern. Each color in the tufting patterns 312, 314 may correspond to a particular tufting height, as discussed above.
  • In accordance with the invention, the repeat unit includes one or more diffused motif elements having peripheral and/or internal diffusion. Additionally, some of the diffused motif elements may be tufted at a reduced height, as indicated in light blue. The total diffusion of the repeat unit shown in FIG. 3B may be approximated as about 47%, which is the sum of: (1) about 12% removal of the original motif element having a diamond shape, and (2) about 35% of the motif yarn being tufted at a medium pile height. Additional information regarding the tufting patterns 312, 314 is provided in Table 2, in which all values are approximate. TABLE 2 Dimensions of repeat unit (inches, width × length) 18.125 × 20 Percent area “removed” from motif (%), front bar 16 Percent of visible front bar hue in textile (%), PH 2 = 35 per repeat unit* PH 3 = 17 Percent of visible back bar hue in textile (%), PH 2 = 35 per repeat unit* PH 3 = 49 Pile height 1 (PH 1) (in.) 0.156 Pile height 2 (PH 2) (in.) 0.187 Pile height 3 (PH 3) (in.) 0.218 Percent of motif at pile height 2 (%), front bar 35 Total diffusion of motif (%), front bar 51
    *The sum of the front bar and back bar is greater than 100% because portions of the repeat unit where both colors are visible are included in the calculation of each value.
  • The various effects of the diffusion may be understood with further reference to FIG. 3A. First, although the carpet 300 is formed from only two different yarns, one having a beige hue and one having a darker brown hue, the carpet 300 appears to be tufted from yarns having three different hues. Additionally, some of the motif elements 302 appear to fade in and out of the background 304. Such motif elements 302 may be formed by reducing the height of the tufts, by creating discontinuities that cause the hues of the yarns to appear blended, or any combination thereof.
  • For example, the substantially beige diffused motif elements (e.g., diffused motif element 316), which correspond to the dark blue areas of the front needle bar pattern 312 of FIG. 3B, appear to be in the foreground of the textile pattern and appear to have the greatest intensity. The dark brown areas, which correspond to the white areas of the front needle bar pattern 312 of FIG. 3B, form the background of the textile pattern and have the least intensity. The lighter brown or taupe diffused motif elements (e.g., diffused motif element 318), which correspond to the light blue areas of the front needle bar pattern 312 of FIG. 3B, appear to lie in the middleground and have a medium intensity and a third, intermediate hue. As a result, some areas of the carpet 300 appear to be somewhat faded or worn, which may conceal patterns of actual wear or fading.
  • FIG. 3D illustrates an exemplary installation 320 of carpet tiles 322 cut or stamped, for example, from a carpet similar to that shown in FIG. 3A. In this example, the tiles 322 are installed in a monolithic configuration, such that all of the tiles 322 are oriented in a particular direction with aligned edges, but are otherwise positionally random. FIG. 3E illustrates another exemplary installation 324 of carpet tiles 322 arranged in a horizontal ashlar configuration, such that all of the tiles 322 are oriented in a particular direction and staggered, but are otherwise positionally random.
  • In either configuration, it is evident that not all of the motif elements 302 are aligned with precision across the various seams. Nonetheless, the overall textile pattern remains visually pleasing. For example, in FIG. 3D, motif elements 326 and 328 are misaligned across seam 330. Likewise, in FIG. 3E, motif elements 332 and 334 are misaligned along seam 336. Nonetheless, the misalignment does not diminish the visual aesthetics of either textile pattern. Rather, the textile patterns created in installations 320, 324 have an intentionally and randomly mismatched, somewhat prismatic appearance that significantly differs from the original textile pattern shown in FIG. 3A, without being visually distracting or otherwise aesthetically undesirable.
  • FIG. 4A depicts still another example of an installation 400 of carpet pieces 402, 404 formed according to various aspects of the invention. The carpet pieces 402, 404 may have any suitable dimensions, and in one example, carpet pieces 402, 404 each may have a width of about 6 feet. The carpet pieces are abutted along respective edges to form a seam 406.
  • Each piece of carpet 402, 404 includes a textile pattern comprising a plurality of diffused motif elements 408 arranged against a background 410. Each of the diffused motif elements 408 may evoke an impression of a flower having a circular center portion 412 and a plurality of petals 414 extending radially from the center portion 412. A plurality of dots 416 extend between and/or overlap with the petals 414 of adjacent motif elements 408. The motif elements 408 are arranged in a substantially uniform, spaced, staggered configuration, generally appearing to phase in and out of the background 410. Thus, although the diffused motif elements 408 of the two pieces 402, 404 are not matched with precision, the seam 406 is obscured by the diffusion of the motif elements 408 throughout the textile pattern.
  • Likewise, FIG. 4B depicts an exemplary installation 418 of substantially square carpet tiles 420 cut or stamped, for example, from a carpet web similar to that shown in FIG. 4A. In this example, the tiles 420 are installed in a horizontal ashlar configuration, such that all of the tiles 420 are oriented in a particular direction and staggered, but are otherwise positionally random. Although the overall textile design viewed across the various tiles 420 differs from the initial repeating textile pattern shown in FIG. 4A, the intentionally mismatched pattern is visually pleasing.
  • FIGS. 4C and 4D depict exemplary respective front bar and back bar tufting patterns 422, 424 that may be used to form the carpet 400 of FIG. 4A in the manner discussed above. At least one motif element is diffused in accordance with the invention. More particularly, each motif element 408 has an irregular peripheral edge 426 and at least one interior discontinuity 428 that cause the motif element 408 to have a somewhat dispersed or faded appearance. Furthermore, motif element 430 gradually transitions from a greater intensity to a lesser intensity as viewed in a direction X due to the progressive prominence of discontinuities in the motif element 430.
  • An approximation of the total diffusion of the repeat unit of FIG. 4C may yield a value of about 42%, which is the sum of: (1) about 24% removal of the original flower and dots motif element, and (2) about 18% of the motif yarns being tufted at a medium pile height. Additional information regarding the tufting patterns 422, 424 is provided in Table 3, in which all values are approximate. TABLE 3 Dimensions of repeat unit (inches, width × length) 18.125 × 37.8 Percent area “removed” from motif (%), front bar 24 Percent of visible front bar hue in textile (%), 27 per repeat unit* Percent of visible back bar hue in textile (%), 91 per repeat unit* Pile height 1 (in.) 0.156 Pile height 2 (in.) 0.187 Pile height 3 (in.) 0.218 Percent of motif at medium pile height (%), front bar 18 Total diffusion of motif (%), front bar 42
    *The sum of the front bar and back bar is greater than 100% because portions of the repeat unit where both colors are visible are included in the calculation of each value.
  • FIGS. 5A and 5B depict another set of tufting patterns 500, 502 that may be used to form a carpet 504 (FIG. 5C) according to the invention. The repeat unit formed from the tufting patterns 500, 502 includes at least one diffused motif element 506 that resembles a triangle that appears to blend with or fade into the background 508 of the textile pattern.
  • An approximation of the total diffusion of the repeat unit may yield a value of about 35%, which is the sum of: (1) about 12% removal of the triangular original motif element, and (2) about 23% of the motif yarns being tufted at several midrange pile heights. It is noted that in this tufting pattern, numerous pile heights were used. Thus, only a small percentage of the motif yarns are at the maximum height.
  • If desired, the textile pattern shown in FIG. 5C may be transformed into a new, intentionally mismatched, yet visually pleasing textile design, as depicted in the exemplary installation 510 of carpet tiles 512. In this example, the carpet tiles 512 have a monolithic installation. However, in this and other examples, a horizontal or vertical ashlar installation may be used. Additional information regarding the tufting patterns 500, 502 is provided in Table 4, in which all values are approximate. TABLE 4 Dimensions of repeat unit (inches, width × length) 18.125 × 26.7 Percent area “removed” from motif (%), front bar 12 Percent of visible front bar hue in textile (%), 24 per repeat unit* Percent of visible back bar hue in textile (%), 93 per repeat unit* Percent of visible back bar hue mixed with front bar 22 hue in textile (%), per repeat unit Pile height 1 (in.) 0.100 Pile height 2 (in.) 0.125 Pile height 3 (in.) 0.150 Pile height 4 (in.) 0.235 Pile height 5 (in.) 0.255 Pile height 6 (in.) 0.275 Pile height 7 (in.) 0.310 Percent of motif at pile heights 2-6 (%), front bar 23 Total diffusion of motif (%), front bar 35
    *The sum of the front bar and back bar is greater than 100% because portions of the repeat unit where both colors are visible are included in the calculation of each value.
  • FIGS. 6A and 6B depict another set of tufting patterns 600, 602 that may be used to form a carpet 604 (FIG. 6C) according to the invention. The carpet 604 formed from the tufting patterns 600, 602 includes at least one diffused motif element 606 that resembles a circle that appears to fade at least partially into the background 608 of the textile pattern.
  • An approximation of the total diffusion of the repeat unit of FIG. 6A may yield a value of about 75%, which is the sum of: (1) about 44% removal of the circular original motif element, and (2) about 31% of the motif yarns being tufted at a medium pile height. Additional information regarding the tufting patterns 600, 602 is provided in Table 5, in which all values are approximate. TABLE 5 Dimensions of repeat unit (inches, width × length) 18.125 × 34.6 Percent area “removed” from motif (%), front bar 44 Percent of visible front bar hue in textile (%), PH 1: 31 per repeat unit PH 2: 13 Percent of visible back bar hue in textile (%), 55 per repeat unit Pile height 1 (PH 1) (in.) 0.125 Pile height 2 (PH 2) (in.) 0.213 Pile height 3 (PH 3) (in.) 0.250 Percent of motif at PH 2 (%), front bar 31 Total diffusion of motif (%), front bar 75
  • As illustrated by the exemplary installation 610 of carpet tiles 612 in FIG. 6D, the textile pattern shown in FIG. 6C may be transformed into a new, intentionally mismatched, yet visually pleasing textile design. In this example, the carpet tiles 612 have a horizontal ashlar configuration. However, other configurations are contemplated.
  • FIGS. 7A and 7B depict still other exemplary respective front bar and back bar tufting patterns 700 and 702 that collectively form a repeat unit including at least one diffused motif element in accordance with the invention. An approximation of the total diffusion of the motif of FIG. 7A may yield a value of about 42%, which is the sum of: (1) about 11% removal of the original motif element, and (2) about 31% of the motif yarns being tufted at a medium pile height. Additional information regarding the tufting patterns 700, 702 is provided in Table 6, in which all values are approximate. TABLE 6 Dimensions of repeat unit (inches, width × length) 18.125 × 40.7 Percent area “removed” from motif (%), front bar 11 Percent of visible front bar hue in textile (%), 51 per repeat unit* Percent of visible back bar hue in textile (%), 90 per repeat unit* Pile height 1 (in.) 0.156 Pile height 2 (in.) 0.187 Pile height 3 (in.) 0.218 Percent of motif at medium pile height (%), front bar 31 Total diffusion of motif (%), front bar 42
    *The sum of the front bar and back bar is greater than 100% because portions of the repeat unit where both colors are visible are included in the calculation of each value.
  • Although certain embodiments of this invention have been described with a certain degree of particularity, those skilled in the art could make numerous alterations to the disclosed embodiments without departing from the spirit or scope of this invention. For example, although particular combinations of hues are provided herein, other hue combinations may be used as desired, provided that the hues provide a visually pleasing combination when used in the selected pattern. Also, it is noted that although a two yarn system is discussed in the examples, any type and number or of yarns may be used with the present invention, including space dyed or multi-hue yarns.
  • Further, it will be recognized by those skilled in the art, that various elements discussed with reference to the various embodiments may be interchanged to create entirely new embodiments coming within the scope of the present invention. It is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative only and not limiting. Changes in detail or structure may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined in the appended claims. The detailed description set forth herein is not intended nor is to be construed to limit the present invention or otherwise to exclude any such other embodiments, adaptations, variations, modifications, and equivalent arrangements of the present invention.
  • Additionally, it will be readily understood by those persons skilled in the art that, in view of the above detailed description of the invention, the present invention is susceptible of broad utility and application. Many adaptations of the present invention other than those herein described, as well as many variations, modifications, and equivalent arrangements will be apparent from or reasonably suggested by the present invention and the above detailed description thereof, without departing from the substance or scope of the present invention.
  • While the present invention is described herein in detail in relation to specific aspects and/or embodiments, it is to be understood that this detailed description is only illustrative and exemplary of the present invention and is made merely for purposes of providing a full and enabling disclosure of the present invention and the best mode known to the inventors of practicing the inventors. The detailed description set forth herein is not intended nor is to be construed to limit the present invention or otherwise to exclude any such other embodiments, adaptations, variations, modifications, and equivalent arrangements of the present invention.

Claims (18)

1. A textile pattern comprising:
a plurality of motif elements circumscribed by a background, wherein
a first plurality of motif elements are tufted at least partially at a first tufting height,
a second plurality of motif elements are tufted at least partially at a second tufting height, and
at least one motif element of the first plurality of motif elements has an irregular peripheral edge, at least one interior discontinuity, or any combination thereof.
2. The textile pattern of claim 1, wherein at least one motif element of the second plurality of motif elements has an irregular peripheral edge, at least one interior discontinuity, or any combination thereof.
3. The textile pattern of claim 1, wherein
each of the first plurality of motif elements has an irregular peripheral edge and at least one interior discontinuity, and
each of the second plurality of motif elements has an irregular peripheral edge and at least one interior discontinuity.
4. The textile pattern of claim 1, wherein
the motif elements are tufted using a tufting yarn having an actual hue,
at least one motif element of the first plurality of motif elements appears to have the actual hue, and
at least one motif element of the second plurality of motif elements appears to have a perceived hue that is different from the actual hue.
5. The textile pattern of claim 1, wherein
the first plurality of motif elements have a first perceived intensity,
the second plurality of motif elements have a second perceived intensity, and
the first perceived intensity is greater than the second perceived intensity.
6. A textile pattern comprising:
a first plurality of motif elements tufted at least partially from a first yarn at a first tufting height, at least one motif element of the first plurality of the motif element having an irregular peripheral edge, at least one interior discontinuity, or any combination thereof;
a second plurality of motif elements tufted at least partially from the first yarn at a second tufting height less than the first tufting height; and
a background tufted from a second yarn at the first tufting height, the second tufting height, or any combination thereof.
7. The textile pattern of claim 6, wherein at least one motif element of the second plurality of motif elements has an irregular peripheral edge, at least one interior discontinuity, or any combination thereof.
8. The textile pattern of claim 6, wherein the first yarn has a first hue, the second yarn has a second hue, and the second plurality of elements appear to have a third hue comprising a perceived hue intermediate the first hue and the second hue.
9. A textile pattern comprising:
a diffused motif element circumscribed by a background, wherein
the diffused motif element is derived from an initial motif element having an initial motif area,
the diffused motif element has a reduced area relative to the initial motif area, and
the reduced area of the diffused motif element comprises a reduced peripheral area, a reduced interior area, or any combination thereof.
10. The textile pattern of claim 9, wherein the initial motif element comprises a form, shape, or figure that is readily identifiable.
11. The textile pattern of claim 9, wherein the diffused motif element evokes an impression of the initial motif element.
12. The textile pattern of claim 9, wherein the reduced area of the diffused motif element creates an impression that the diffused motif element is discontinuous.
13. The textile pattern of claim 9, wherein the reduced area of the diffused motif element creates an impression that the diffused motif element is fading into or out of the background.
14. A method of forming a textile pattern comprising:
selecting a motif;
preparing a motif element based on the motif, the motif element including a peripheral area and an interior area; and
removing at least a portion of the peripheral area of the motif element, at least a portion of the interior area of the motif element, or any combination thereof to form a diffused motif element.
15. The method of claim 14, further comprising preparing a textile repeat unit including
the diffused motif element, and
a background circumscribing the diffused motif element.
16. The method of claim 15, wherein
the diffused motif element is a first diffused motif element,
the repeat unit includes a second diffused motif element, and
the method further comprises tufting the first diffused motif element at a first tufting height and the second diffused motif element at a second tufting height.
17. A method of forming a textile pattern, comprising:
providing a textile having a first textile pattern including a plurality of repeated motif elements, wherein at least some of the motif elements have an irregular periphery, at least one interior discontinuity, or any combination thereof;
preparing a plurality of tiles from the textile;
orienting each of the plurality of tiles in a like pile direction; and
positioning the oriented tiles in an edge to edge relationship with respect to one another to form a second textile pattern that differs from the first textile pattern.
18. A textile pattern comprising:
a plurality of motif elements circumscribed by a background, wherein at least one motif element of the plurality of motif elements includes an irregular peripheral edge, at least one interior discontinuity, or any combination thereof.
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