US20080032824A1 - Methods and means for lifting jumper - Google Patents

Methods and means for lifting jumper Download PDF

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Publication number
US20080032824A1
US20080032824A1 US11899529 US89952907A US2008032824A1 US 20080032824 A1 US20080032824 A1 US 20080032824A1 US 11899529 US11899529 US 11899529 US 89952907 A US89952907 A US 89952907A US 2008032824 A1 US2008032824 A1 US 2008032824A1
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Prior art keywords
leg
jumper
sleeve
gripping
means
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
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US11899529
Inventor
Kendyl Roman
Joel Roman
Dean White
John Livacich
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Roman Kendyl A
Original Assignee
Roman Kendyl A
Roman Joel P
White Dean S
John Livacich
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B71/00Games or sports accessories not covered in groups A63B1/00 - A63B69/00
    • A63B71/08Body-protectors for players or sportsmen, i.e. body-protecting accessories affording protection of body parts against blows or collisions
    • A63B71/12Body-protectors for players or sportsmen, i.e. body-protecting accessories affording protection of body parts against blows or collisions for the body, e.g. shoulders, or the legs
    • A63B71/1225Body-protectors for players or sportsmen, i.e. body-protecting accessories affording protection of body parts against blows or collisions for the body, e.g. shoulders, or the legs for the legs, e.g. thighs, knees, ankles, feet
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41DOUTERWEAR; PROTECTIVE GARMENTS; ACCESSORIES
    • A41D1/00Garments
    • A41D1/06Trousers
    • A41D1/08Trousers specially adapted for sporting purposes
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B71/00Games or sports accessories not covered in groups A63B1/00 - A63B69/00
    • A63B71/08Body-protectors for players or sportsmen, i.e. body-protecting accessories affording protection of body parts against blows or collisions
    • A63B71/12Body-protectors for players or sportsmen, i.e. body-protecting accessories affording protection of body parts against blows or collisions for the body, e.g. shoulders, or the legs
    • A63B71/1225Body-protectors for players or sportsmen, i.e. body-protecting accessories affording protection of body parts against blows or collisions for the body, e.g. shoulders, or the legs for the legs, e.g. thighs, knees, ankles, feet
    • A63B2071/1241Body-protectors for players or sportsmen, i.e. body-protecting accessories affording protection of body parts against blows or collisions for the body, e.g. shoulders, or the legs for the legs, e.g. thighs, knees, ankles, feet for the thigh
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2209/00Characteristics of used materials
    • A63B2209/10Characteristics of used materials with adhesive type surfaces, i.e. hook and loop-type fastener
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2225/00Other characteristics of sports equipment
    • A63B2225/09Adjustable dimensions
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2243/00Specific ball sports not provided for in A63B2102/00 - A63B2102/38
    • A63B2243/0066Rugby; American football
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2244/00Sports without balls
    • A63B2244/18Skating
    • A63B2244/183Artistic or figure skating
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B2244/00Sports without balls
    • A63B2244/22Dancing

Abstract

A leg device with means for gripping, or handles, is used to aid in lifting a jumping player, especially for lineouts in Rugby Union. The simple, reusable, easy to use leg device provides a level of effectiveness, comfort, convenience, and safety not provided by conventional methods. In a leg sleeve embodiment, means for gripping include a thickened band or grip attached to a sleeve material. The means for gripping may be formed by attaching a semi-rigid material. The means for gripping may be formed by attaching extra layers in sections, in rolls, in folds. The means for gripping may be shaped to match the hand of a lifter. To use, leg sleeves are applied to the legs of a jumper. Other embodiments of leg devices include leg glove or mitt and various leg straps. An improved leg glove further comprises a non-elastic base strap. An improved leg sleeve comprises a base strap and a cross strap attached to a sleeve of stretch material. When the jumper jumps, one or more lifters grip the leg device. The lifters lift the jumper higher, support the jumper in the jump while the jumper attempts to intercept a ball, and safely lower the jumper. Non-elastic leg straps many including padding or warrior fringe.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation-in-part of, and claims priority based on, U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/800,356, filed May 4, 2007, which is a continuation-in-part of, and claims priority based on, U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/499,023, filed Aug. 3, 2006.
  • BACKGROUND FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • This invention relates to a leg device, especially a leg device, such as a leg sleeve or leg strap, with a means for gripping used when lifting a person who is jumping or being lifted, for example a jumper in a Rugby lineout.
  • BACKGROUND-DESCRIPTION OF PRIOR ART
  • There is a need to jump high in order to intercept a ball in many sports, such as Rugby, volleyball, or baseball.
  • For example, in Rugby Union, when a ball goes out of bounds it is returned to play using a set formation known as a lineout. In a lineout, players from both teams line up near where the ball went out of bounds. Each team forms its own line. A space of about one yard is formed between the lines of players, referred to as the tunnel. The ball is then thrown back into the playing field. The ball must be thrown straight into the middle of the tunnel. Players compete for the ball. A player has a greater likelihood of winning the ball if he is higher in the air than others. Therefore, players jump and/or are lifted up by teammates to be in a favorable position to win possession of the ball.
  • Other activities such as ice skating and dancing also involve lifts.
  • Various methods have been employed to accomplish these types of lifts and jumps.
  • Originally, players jumped unassisted by teammates, but the rules of Rugby Union have changed to allow teammates to support a player while in the air. At first, lifters would grab the waist of the jumper. It is currently illegal to grab on to or bind to the player while the player is on the ground. As time passed, it became common to support a jumping player by grabbing the player by the bottom of the shorts and lifting him/her by the shorts long enough to play the ball. More recently, it has been made legal to grab the jumping player by the thighs above the knee. Many jumping players wrap a combination of materials and tapes around the thigh to offer those lifting a better grip.
  • The use of such techniques has several disadvantages such as:
      • Being ineffective, as a good grip is often still difficult to maintain
      • Being unsafe, as jumping players that are dropped because of poor grip can fall up to 10 feet and land in an awkward position
      • Damage to or tearing of clothing, especially if the proper shorts are not worn
      • Extreme discomfort to the jumper
      • Taking time to apply during the critical stages of pre-match preparation
      • Requiring help to apply, as taping one's own leg is often difficult to do satisfactorily
      • Needing to be taped before every game
      • Requiring special skill of the lifter in the case where only one lifter is used
  • It is also desirable to have a means for lifting that does not cause additional bunching and riding up of the short rugby shorts and that looks better than an awkward contraption of tapes on both thighs.
  • More recently, elastic sleeves with a gripping surface have also been placed around legs or knees. These also have several disadvantages such as:
      • Being constricting during the activity between lifts
      • Being too elastic and sliding up during lifts
      • Being hot, causing excessive sweating and odor
      • Having material break down
      • Being relatively heavy
      • Expensive materials requiring expensive equipment to manufacture
  • There is a need for a means to improve lifting in all levels of play, as ineffective lifts can be costly, dangerous, and contribute significantly to losing a game.
  • What is needed is an improved lightweight, low cost, easy to manufacture, quick, simple, easy to use, reusable device that provides an effective means of obtaining a sure grip that offers comfort and safety to the players involved.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Accordingly, it is an objective of the present invention to provide an improved lightweight, low cost, easy to manufacture, quick, easy to use, simple, reusable, effective means of lifting a jumper that provides safety and comfort to those involved.
  • OBJECTS AND ADVANTAGES
  • Accordingly, beside the objects and advantages described above, some additional objects and advantages of the present invention are:
    • 1. To provide a comfortable method of lifting a player who is jumping.
    • 2. To provide a more effective method of obtaining a sure grip on the thighs of a jumping player.
    • 3. To provide an increase of safety for a jumping player being lifted by the thighs.
    • 4. To provide means and methods of lifting that are easy to use.
    • 5. To provide means and methods of lifting that are reusable.
    • 6. To provide means and methods of lifting that offer higher performance.
    • 7. To provide means and methods of lifting that can be quickly applied and removed.
    • 8. To provide means and methods of lifting that are adjustable to varying conditions.
    • 9. To empower a less skilled lifter to lift a jumper by himself.
    • 10. To provide means and methods of lifting that are minimal in cost and waste.
    • 11. To provide means and methods of lifting that do not worsen a user's appearance.
    • 12. To provide means and methods of lifting that do not interfere with the wearing of compression shorts.
    • 13. To provide means and methods of lifting that improve a user's appearance.
    • 14. To provide means of lifting that do not stretch and slide up the jumper's leg during the lift.
    DRAWING FIGURES
  • In the drawings, closely related figures have the same number but different alphabetic suffixes.
  • FIG. 1A and FIG. 1B show prior art techniques for lifting a jumper.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a leg sleeve with means for gripping.
  • FIG. 3A through FIG. 3D illustrate various embodiments of the means for gripping.
  • FIG. 4 shows the use of a leg device, such as a leg sleeve or leg strap.
  • FIGS. 5A through 5E illustrate various embodiments of the leg sleeve construction.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates shorts with integrated gripping means FIG. 7A through FIG. 7D illustrate leg glove or leg mitt embodiments.
  • FIG. 8A through FIG. 8H illustrate leg straps with sleeve embodiment.
  • FIG. 9A through FIG. 9E illustrate adjustable leg straps with handles.
  • FIG. 9F through FIG. 9I illustrate leg straps with optional padding or fringe.
  • FIG. 10A illustrates shorts with integrated straps.
  • FIG. 10B illustrates shorts with integrated grips.
  • REFERENCE NUMERALS IN DRAWINGS
  • 110 first jumper
    112 shorts
    120 first lifter
    121 left hand of first lifter
    122 right hand of first lifter
    130 second lifter
    131 left hand of second lifter
    132 right hand of second lifter
    140 ball
    150 second jumper
    154 thigh
    160 third lifter
    161 left hand of third lifter
    162 right hand of third lifter
    170 fourth lifter
    171 right hand of fourth lifter
    172 left hand of forth lifter
    180 third jumper
    190 underwrap
    192 (a-b) tape
    194 bulge
    200 (a-d) leg sleeve
    210 means for gripping
    220 attachment
    230 sleeve material
    310 semi-rigid material
    320 covering layer
    330 (a-b) extra layer
    350 roll
    510 knee cutout
    520 hamstring cutout
    550 (a-b) shaped grip
    560 (a-b) memory foam
    570 (a-b) impression
    580 (a-b) back grip
    590 (a-b) front grip
    600 shorts with integrated sleeves
    700 leg glove or mitt
    710 pocket attachment
    715 base attachment
    720 V attachment
    730 fold
    740 base layer
    750 pocket
    800 straps with sleeve
    810 base strap
    820 cross strap
    822 cross handle
    825 attached portion
    830 reinforcement strap
    840 front strap
    850 back strap
    860 padding
    880 base handle
    890 elastic band
    895 stretch fabric
    900 leg strap
    901 (a-b) enhanced leg strap
    902 shorts with integrated straps
    910 closed strap
    912 expansion section
    920 (a-b) bite loop
    922 loop attachment
    930 (a-b) handle stop
    932 (a-b) stop leg
    934 stop attachment
    940 attachment loops
    942 loops attachment
    950 (a-b) attachment hooks
    960 elastic section
    970 padding strip
    971 (a-c) belt loop
    972 warrior fringe
    973 permanent attachment
    980 (a-b) handle
    990 lower thigh
    992 knee
    994 calf

    Special Definitions
  • sleeve—a substantially tubular part designed to fit over another object, such as a leg.
  • non-elastic strap—a substantially linearly non-elastic, flat strip or ribbon of flexible material used for securing or holding together, e.g. polypropylene or cotton webbing
  • elastic band—a substantially linearly elastic, flat strip of flexible material used for tightening, which has a predetermined limit to the amount of stretch before it becomes inelastic and provides tensile strength in its linear direction e.g. elastic waist band material
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention comprises a leg device comprising a handle or other means for gripping. When a person jumps, one or more other people can assist the jumper by gripping the means for gripping. Such a lifter is able to lift the jumper higher, support the jumper while in the air, and safely lower the jumper to the ground. When the jumper is not jumping, the jumper is able to run or otherwise move without hindrance or discomfort. Some embodiments comprise leg sleeves. Other embodiments comprise non-elastic straps comprising handles.
  • FIG. 1A
  • FIG. 1A illustrates two conventional means of lifting. As shown on the right, a first jumper 110 is lifted by a first lifter 120 and a second lifter 130. As shown on the left, a second jumper 150 is lifted by a third lifter 160 and a fourth lifter 170.
  • A first conventional means for lifting (gripping the shorts) is shown on right. The first jumper 110 is lifted by his shorts 112. The first lifter 120 lifts using both his left hand 121 and his right hand 122 on the bottom front of the shorts 112. The second lifter 130 is gripping the shorts with his left hand 131 and his right hand 132 (not shown) to lift. These grips allow the first lifter 120 and second lifter 130 to lift first jumper 110 to a height where he can intercept the ball 140.
  • A second conventional means for lift (gripping the thigh) is shown on the left. The fourth lifter 170 is using a similar technique of lifting as the second lifter 130 and uses both his right hand 171 and his left hand 172. Third lifter 160 is lifting second jumper 150 by his thigh 154. Note that the second jumper 150 is unstable, is falling, and was unable to intercept the ball because of the bad lift.
  • Lifting by the shorts has many disadvantages including, for example, discomfort for the jumper, less than optimal lift performance, and difficult to obtain grip. It is also difficult to obtain a secure grip on a bare thigh (e.g. third lifter 160).
  • FIG. 1B
  • FIG. 1B illustrates a third jumper 180 with material wrapped around his thighs 154, just above each knee 992. The one-time-use material consists of an underwrap 190 covered by an upper strip of tape 192 a and a lower strip of tape 192 b. The underwrap 190 may consist of fabric athletic tape, foam tape, or cloth. Typically the tape is black, plastic, electrical tape. This arrangement creates a bulge 194. The bulge 194 may include additional layers of the underwrap 190 material.
  • The one-time-use thigh wrap also has many disadvantages including, for example, difficulty in applying consistently, requiring application by coach, trainer, or other player during the critical pre-game preparation time, discomfort, waste of materials, and debris often left behind.
  • FIG. 2
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a leg sleeve 200 comprising a means for gripping 210 attached to a sleeve material 230 with an attachment 220. The sleeve material 230 is preferably a thin, flexible, elastic, durable material such as neoprene or stretch fabric. The attachment 220 is made by sewing with thread (as shown) or by gluing with an adhesive (not shown).
  • One advantage of using a flexible, elastic material is that the position of the leg sleeve may be adjusted to meet the needs of a specific condition, such as a particular play. Further, the leg sleeve can be quickly removed from one player and transferred to another player to accommodate substitutions.
  • FIG. 3A
  • FIG. 3A shows a cross-sectional view of one embodiment of the means for gripping 210. In this embodiment, the means for gripping 210 is created by covering a semi-rigid material 310 with a covering layer 320. The covering layer 320 is attached to the base sleeve material 230 by an attachment 220. In this embodiment, the semi-rigid material 310 comprises a higher density material than the sleeve material 230, and may be rubber, soft flexible plastic, or high-density foam.
  • FIG. 3B
  • FIG. 3B shows another embodiment of the means for gripping 210. In this embodiment, one or more extra layers 330 are attached to the base sleeve material 230 by one or more attachments 220. As shown, two extra layers 330 a and 330 b are attached by sewing with thread.
  • When the base sleeve material 230 is neoprene, the extra layers 330 can be made of the same material to simplify manufacturing. When the base sleeve material 230 is a stretch fabric, the extra layers 330 could be neoprene or similar material.
  • Although shown at the top, a leg sleeve 200 could have multiple thickened areas at the top, middle, and bottom of the sleeve material 230.
  • FIG. 3C
  • FIG. 3C shows another embodiment of the means for gripping 210. In this embodiment, a section of sleeve material 230 is rolled to form a roll 350. The roll 350 is secured by an attachment 220, shown sewn together with thread.
  • Although shown rolled at the top, the roll 350 also could be formed somewhere in the middle of the sleeve material 230 by pinching the material in the middle and rolling the resulting fold. The roll 350 could be then be held by the attachment 220.
  • Further, a leg sleeve 200 could have multiple rolls 350 at the top, middle, and bottom of the sleeve material 230.
  • FIG. 3D—Extra Layers Using S-Shaped Fold
  • FIG. 3D shows yet another embodiment where each means for gripping 210 the sleeve material 230 is folded forming an S-shaped fold. The S-shaped fold is held with an attachment 220, such as being sewn with thread. The S-shape fold in effect creates two extra layers 330 from the same material as the sleeve material 230 (similar to FIG. 3B, but without having to cut the sleeve material 230) and produces a rounded edge (similar to the roll 350 shown FIG. 3C). Further, the location of the attachment 220 near to the top fold, as shown, creates a novel pocket 750. Placing parts of the hand inside the pocket 750, formed in this manner, results in a superior, more secure grip than can be achieved by abutting a flat ridge such as shown in FIG. 3B. The pocket 750 is also easier to grasp, for example, when the jumper is already in the air.
  • FIG. 4
  • FIG. 4 shows leg devices, shown as leg sleeves 200 a, 200 b, 200 c, and 200 d, respectively, being used to assist in jumping and lifting for the lineout. Each leg sleeve 200 comprises at least one means for gripping 210.
  • Prior to entering the game, each potential jumper (e.g. first jumper 110 and second jumper 150) applies one or more leg sleeves 200 of the present invention to one or more legs. When an opportunity to intercept the ball occurs, each jumper jumps. One or more players from the jumper's team are then able to grip the leg sleeves 200. For example, as shown in FIG. 4, the first jumper 110 jumps during a lineout. The first lifter 120 places his hands (121 and 122) on the back of each leg sleeve 200 a and 200 b, respectively. The second lifter 130 places his hands (131 and 132) on the front of each leg sleeve 200 a and 200 b, respectively. Together, the first lifter 120 and the second lifter 130 are able to: a) lift the first jumper 110 higher, b) sustain the first jumper 110 at the height of the jump until the first jumper 110 is able to intercept the ball 140, and c) lower the first jumper 110 safely to the ground. Likewise, the third lifter 160 and the fourth lifter 170 are able to secure lift, sustain, and lower the second jumper 150 (shown wearing leg sleeves 200 c and 200 d, respectively), who is able to have a more competitive and safe attempt at the ball 140.
  • Because the respective lifters can obtain a safe and secure grip on the leg sleeves 200 of their respective jumper, both jumpers are able to: a) achieve a higher performance jump, b) be held stable during the jump, c) have a more consistent, more competitive attempt for the ball 140. The lifters are able to get a more consistent grip on the jumper. The jumper is able to jump with and be supported with less discomfort and more safety and confidence.
  • Compare the height and stability of the jumpers in FIG. 1A to FIG. 4 to see the increase in performance that may result from use of the present invention.
  • The increased safety and performance of various embodiments of the present invention may allow for changes in the Laws (rules) of Rugby to allow lifters to support jumpers using the various embodiments.
  • Further, while the leg sleeves 200 of the present invention are shown as applied to Rugby, the leg sleeves, or other leg devices of the present invention, could be used in other sports that also require jumping, such as Volleyball (e.g. while spiking a set ball, etc.) or Baseball (while jumping at the fence to stop a home run, etc.).
  • FIG. 5A
  • FIG. 5A shows another embodiment of the leg sleeve 200 comprising a means for gripping 210 attached to the sleeve material 230 by the attachment 220. This embodiment further comprises an optional knee cutout 510 or an optional hamstring cutout 520 for greater comfort and flexibility. This embodiment may be worn in a position over the knee and provide additional knee support.
  • FIG. 5B
  • FIG. 5B shows additional embodiments of leg sleeves 200 a and 200 b. The means for gripping are shaped grips 550 a and 550 b. Leg sleeve 200 a comprises the shaped grip 550 a attached to the sleeve material 230 a. Leg sleeve 200 b comprises the shaped grip 550 b attached to the sleeve material 230 b. The shape of each shaped grip 550 is designed to more closely fit the shape of the hand while gripping the thighs. For example, the shaped grip 550 may be designed to match the edge of extended thumb and extended index finger of each hand.
  • For example, in Rugby, because it is not legal to bind with the jumper before the jump is started, the lifters must assess a location to grip while the jumper is in the air. Thus, using the present invention, it is easier to place the open hands against the leg sleeves 200 until the palms of the hands rest against the shaped grips 550. In this way the lifter can quickly assess the location of at least one of the means for gripping 210 and immediately apply lifting pressure against the means for gripping 210.
  • FIG. 5C
  • FIG. 5C shows additional embodiments of leg sleeves 200 a and 200 b. In this embodiment the means for gripping 210 comprise memory foam 560 a and 560 b attached to the sleeve materials 230 a and 230 b, respectively. The memory foam 560 conforms to the lifter's hands during contact, leaving impressions 570 a and 570 b. Regardless of where the lifter's hands make contact with the memory foam 560, the impressions 570 provide a immediate sure grip and the lifter can immediately apply a lifting pressure against the leg sleeves 200.
  • Because of the immediate, sure grip provided by the memory foam 560, the lifter does not have to spend time assessing the location of the means for gripping 210. In Rugby, because it is not legal to bind with the jumper before the jump is started, with this embodiment, the lifter may place the open hands against the leg sleeves 200 making an immediate impression. In this way the lifter can immediately apply lifting pressure against the means for gripping 210.
  • FIG. 5D
  • FIG. 5D shows an additional embodiment of leg sleeve 200. Attached to the sleeve material 230 is a back grip 580 and front grip 590.
  • This embodiment provides a means for a single, relatively unskilled lifter to assist a jumper. For example, the single lifter can stand behind the jumper in a lineout. When the jumper jumps, the lifter is able to place his hands on the back of each leg sleeve 200 below the back grip 580. The jumper temporarily sits on the uplifted hands of the lifter. The back grip 580 prevents the lifters hands from sliding up the legs of the jumper. Having a single lifter allows for more offensive players to be distributed across the field and, under the rules of Rugby, reduces the number of defenders who can be close to the lineout.
  • This embodiment can also be used with two lifters, where a lifter's hand is placed on the back of the leg sleeve 200 against the back grip 580 and another hand is placed on the front of the leg sleeve 200 against the front grip 590 to provide a safe, secure, high performance lift.
  • FIG. 5E
  • FIG. 5E shows an additional embodiment of leg sleeve 200. Attached to the sleeve material 230 is front grip 590. In this embodiment, the sleeve material 230 is preferably a stretch fabric. A small amount of tape can be used to hold the leg sleeve in place above the knee.
  • FIG. 6
  • FIG. 6 illustrates a pair of shorts with integrated sleeves 600. This embodiment comprises a pair of shorts 600 having a right leg sleeve material 230 a and a left leg sleeve material 230 b integrated into the shorts 600. In this embodiment the means for gripping 210 is shown as shaped grips 550 a and 550 b, respectively, but could comprise any means of gripping 210. The shorts may be made of thin neoprene or other flexible, elastic material.
  • FIG. 7A through FIG. 7C
  • FIG. 7A through FIG. 7C illustrate a leg glove 700 (or leg mitt) embodiment.
  • As shown in FIG. 7A, and the cross section shown in FIG. 7B, the leg glove 700 is simply made from a single piece of flexible material such as fabric or neoprene. The fold 730 creates a base layer 740 and a partially overlapping pocket 750. The pocket 750 is secured with a pocket attachment 710 (shown sewn) and base attachment 715. Preferably, the overlapping area above the pocket attachment 710 is attached with a V attachment 720. This provides the V-shape which, as discussed above in reference to the shaped grip 550 shown in FIG. 5B, is designed to match the location of the extended thumb and extended index finger of the hand (e.g. 122 as shown in FIG. 7C).
  • The layout shown in FIG. 7C allows the reverse side to have a mirror image, second pocket 750 (not visible). This would allow one lifter to securely grasp one leg with both hands (e.g. 161 and 162), as poorly attempted by third lifter 160 in FIG. 1A, with greater success. Alternatively, the back lifter (e.g. fourth lifter 170) could put one hand (e.g. left hand of fourth lifter 172) in the second pocket, on the back, while the front lifter (e.g. third lifter 160) puts one hand (e.g. right hand of third lifter 162) in the front pocket 750.
  • FIG. 7D shows an embodiment of a leg glove 700 with a base strap 810. Base strap 810 is made of non-elastic material of a fixed circumference, preventing excess sliding and movement of the leg glove or mitt during lifting and open play. The base strap 810 is further described in reference to FIG. 8A through 8F.
  • The leg glove 700 (or leg mitt) embodiments provide improved, more secure grip. The hand (shown as 122) is easily slipped inside the pocket 750 during the lift and is easily removed as the jumper comes down. The downward facing pocket opening is less likely to engage the hands or fingers of other players at other times, for example, while being tackled during open play.
  • FIG. 8A through FIG. 8H
  • FIG. 8A through FIG. 8F illustrate embodiments of leg straps with sleeve 800.
  • As shown in FIG. 8A, and the cross section shown in FIG. 8B, the leg straps with sleeve 800 comprises a base layer 740 of flexible material such as fabric or neoprene to which a base strap 810 and a cross strap 820 are permanently attached. Optionally, a reinforcement strap 830 is also permanently attached.
  • Each of the straps is made of a non-elastic, flat strip or ribbon of flexible material. The base strap 810 is of a fixed circumference such that the leg device can be passed over the calf 994 and knee 992 but stopped securely when it reaches the larger circumference of the lower thigh 990 (see, for example, FIG. 9E). For high school and adult males, the base straps would be about fifteen to eighteen inches. The base strap 810 encircles the leg of the jumper.
  • The cross strap 820 is shown at a diagonal with an attached portion 825 and an open portion. As shown in the cross section of the front wall in FIG. 8B, the open portion of the cross strap 820 is secured so that it is removed from the base layer 740 allowing the hand (e.g. 122) to pass under the cross strap 820 if desired. The lifter could also grasp the open portion of the cross strap 820 like a handle. The cross strap 820 is substantially greater in circumference than the base strap 810. This allows the cross strap 820 to pass over the even larger circumference higher up on the thigh 154. It also allows for the same leg device to be used by people with different thigh sizes. Further, it allows the open portion to remain open even when the base strap 810 is tight against the lower thigh 990.
  • During the lift, the cross strap 820 could have over one hundred pounds of force applied to it. To prevent the base layer 740 material from tearing, and to more evenly distribute the force to the base strap 810 (and then the jumper's leg), the reinforcement strap 830 is attached between the base strap 810 and a cross strap 820 forming a triangle. This provides the V-shape which, as discussed above is designed to match the shape and location of the hand (e.g. 122 as shown in FIG. 8C).
  • The layout shown in FIG. 8C allows the reverse side to have a mirror image, second open portion of the cross strap 820 (not visible). This would allow one lifter to securely grasp one leg with both hands (e.g. 161 and 162), as poorly attempted by third lifter 160 in FIG. 1A, with greater success. Alternatively, the back lifter (e.g. fourth lifter 170) could use the second open portion of the cross strap 820 (not visible) with one hand (e.g. left hand of fourth lifter 172), on the back, while the front lifter (e.g. third lifter 160) puts one hand (e.g. right hand of third lifter 162) under the front open portion of the cross strap 820 (visible).
  • The straps with sleeve 800 embodiment provides an improved, more secure grip. The hand (shown as 122) is easily graphs the open portion of the cross strap 820 during the lift and is easily released as the jumper comes down.
  • The novel, non-elastic base strap 810 overcomes a disadvantage found with conventional leg sleeves that, because they are elastic, continue to stretch during the lift and slide up the leg. Further, the use of smaller circumference sleeves only partially addresses this problem and adds to the discomfort and constriction of leg sleeve between lifts.
  • Further, by attaching the straps to the base layer 740, it is more difficult for the opponents to use the strap system disadvantageously.
  • FIG. 8D shows another embodiment of a strap with sleeve 800. The features and benefits of the base strap 810 are similar to the embodiment shown in FIG. 8A through FIG. 8C. This embodiment has two straps with open portions: a front strap 840 and a back strap 850. The two straps (840 and 850) can be used as described above regarding the cross strap 820, but would be positioned on the front and back of the thigh 154. While this embodiment aids with conformance of current international Rugby Union laws (rules) (namely, lifting above the knees in the front and at the shorts in the rear), the horizontal straps could be used disadvantageously by opponent when making a tackle.
  • FIG. 8E shows another embodiment of a base strap 810 with optional padding 860. The features and benefits of the base strap 810 are similar to the embodiments shown in FIG. 8A through FIG. 8C. Instead of open portions on straps that are secured at both ends (e.g. 820, 840, and 850), a base handle 880 is formed by permanently attaching a strap to the base strap 810 at one end. The base handle 880 has the advantage of being easy to grasp during the lift, but difficult to grasp during open play. Use of the handles is described in reference to FIG. 9E. The padding 860 is optional but provides a cushion for the leg and if made with an elastic material could help hold the base strap 810 in place.
  • FIG. 8F shows yet another embodiment of a base strap 810 with optional padding 860, having two base handles (880 a and 880 b).
  • FIG. 8G shows another embodiment similar to that shown in FIG. 8C with a portion of elastic band 890 at the top edge between the attached portion 825 of cross strap 820 which is also attached at the top edge. Collectively, the attached portion 825 of the cross strap 820 and the portion of elastic band 890 form a reinforced top edge of this sleeve embodiment. This reinforced top edge makes it easier for the jumper to put on and to adjust its placement. The base material for this leg sleeve is made out of a stretch fabric 895, such as stretch swimsuit material (e.g. Lycra brand).
  • FIG. 8H is an embodiment similar to that shown in FIG. 8G. In this embodiment, an elastic band 890 is attached to the top edge around the entire circumference. Each cross handle 822 is attached to the elastic band 890 at the top and to the base strap 810 at the bottom. Each cross handle 822 is made of a separate piece of material, unlike the cross strap of FIG. 8C and FIG. 8G which is preferably made from a single continuous strap. The cross handles 822 could be made of non-elastic strap or of elastic band.
  • FIG. 9A through FIG. 9E
  • FIG. 9A through FIG. 9E illustrate adjustable leg straps 900 with handles 980.
  • FIG. 9A shows a basic embodiment of a leg strap 900 comprising a bite loop 920 at one end of the strap and a free end (on the other end) which passes through the bite loop 920 forming a closed strap 910 (similar to base strap 810 discussed above) and a handle 980. The bite loop 920 is secured by folding the strap back on itself and making a loop attachment 922 (shown sewn with an X in a box). The closed strap 910 encircles the leg of the jumper.
  • The leg strap 900 is adjustable to fit a wide variety of leg sizes. This results in several advantages over other leg devices. The manufacture needs to make only one size. The distribution channels need to stock only one size. The user can easily order the right size and the same leg device can be shared by multiple players.
  • The novel structure allows the leg strap 900 to rapidly and easily attached over the thigh 154, without having to bend over to slide it over the foot, shoe, and calf. For example, the leg strap 900 could be carried in the jumper's pocket between jumps and quickly put only just before a jump. Alternatively, the leg strap could be thrown in from the sideline, exchanged by players on a substitution.
  • FIG. 9B shows a currently preferred embodiment of a leg strap 900 comprising an enhanced leg strap 901. It has all the features and benefits of the basic leg strap 900. Additionally, enhanced leg strap 901 comprises various optional elements.
  • The free end of the handle 980 has a handle stop 930. As shown in detail in FIG. 9C, the handle stop 930 comprises two stop legs 932(a-b). Good results have been obtained by forming the stop legs 932 by folding preferably about 1.5 to 2 inches of strap back over itself twice. The first fold forming the first stop leg 932 a and the second fold forming the second stop leg 932 b. The stop attachment 934 is made by sewing the overlaps together at the center, forming a flexible T-shape.
  • Referring back to FIG. 9A, alternatively, a handle stop 930 could be formed by tying a knot (such as an overhand knot) in the free end of handle 980.
  • Also as shown in FIG. 9D, the handle 980 can be temporarily stowed when not needed for a lift. This may be accomplished by the use of hook and loop fastener. As shown in FIG. 9B a section of softer attachment loops 940 is permanently attached to the handle 980, while a corresponding section of more abrasive attachment hooks 950 is permanently attached to the front of the attachment hooks 950.
  • As shown in FIG. 9C, the attachment loops 940 are optionally attached to the first stop leg 932 a with loops attachments 942 (a-c), shown sewn. This allows the handle stop 930 to be flattened when stowed.
  • Referring back to FIG. 9A, alternatively, the handle 980 could be stowed by tucking it under the closed strap 910, looping through the bite loop 920, or by tying a knot (such as an overhand knot) in handle 980.
  • The ability to stow the handle 980 (and to flatten the handle stop 930) provides the advantage that between jumps the jumper can loosen the leg strap 901 and stow the handle 980 in a position (for example, on the front of the leg) where it would be difficult for the opposition to use, for example, to gain an advantage on a tackle.
  • FIG. 9B also shows a novel means of adding some expansion to the non-elastic leg strap 901. An elastic section 960 comprising an elastic section of material is attached to an expansion section 912 of the closed strap 910. When the leg strap 910 is being used to lift the weight of the jumper, the handle pulls the closed strap 910 (including the expansion section 912) taut around the leg of the jumper. This maximum constriction is applied only while the leg is in a substantially fixed position and only for the period of the lift. Following the lift, the leg strap 901 can be loosened allowing the elastic section 960 to relax and the expansion section 912 to open. In this more comfortable configuration the handle 980 is stowed (FIG. 9D) using the hook and loop fasteners (940 and 950) at a comfortable tightness that keeps the leg strap 901 positioned as desired (for example, above the knee 992 on the lower thigh 990, FIG. 9E). As the jumper participates in open play by running and jumping, the elastic section 960 allows the expansion section 912 to move in and out with the minor changes in the circumference of the leg muscles.
  • Referring back to FIG. 9A, alternatively, the handle 980 could be loosened to allow for leg expansion but held loosely above the knee by a small piece of athletic tape or with a fabric sleeve with a elastic section 960 (similar to the padding in FIG. 8E).
  • FIG. 9E shows the general operation of leg straps (810, 900, 901, 902, etc.) with handles (880 or 890). In particular, the operation of the leg straps 901(a-b) during a lift will be described. One leg strap 901 is attached above the knee 992 on the lower thigh 990. The handles 980(a-b) are moved out of their stowed position and the leg straps 901 (a-b) are pulled taut prior to the jump. During the lift, the lifter (or lifters) pulls up on the handles 980 (for example, handle 980 a with the left hand of first lifter 121 and handle 980 b with the right hand of first lifter 122). The handle stops 930 re-open to the T-shape and help maintain the grasp on the handles 980.
  • The handles (880 or 980) are easily grasped before or during each jump or lift, and are easily released after the lift. Between lifts the handles 980 may be stowed. Whether stowed or not, the handles 980 are less likely to be used by opponents than straps with permanent open portions.
  • FIG. 9F through FIG. 9I
  • FIG. 9F through FIG. 9I illustrate leg straps with optional padding 970 or fringe 972.
  • If a jumper desires additional cushion, comfort can increased by added a padding strip 970. As shown in FIG. 9F the padding strip 970, can be removably attached, for example, by forming belt loops 971 (a-c) by cutting slits in the padding strip 970. FIG. 9H shows how the padding 970 or fringe 972 could be attached to the leg strap (900 or 901).
  • Alternatively, a strip of material with novel warrior fringe 972 (FIG. 9G) could be attached in a similar way. Warrior fringe 972 could be thin fabric or padding (such as neoprene). In particular, many of the top Rugby playing nations have tribal cultures which traditionally wore fringe above the knees when their warriors when to battle. The warrior spirit is celebrated with the haka tradition of many top Rugby teams. The spirit of competition is enhanced by use of this novel warrior fringe 972 in combination with the novel leg straps (900 or 901).
  • FIG. 9I shows a leg strap (900 or 901) with warrior fringe 972 over the knee 992. The warrior fringe 972, in additional to its emotional impact, has a more practical function, namely, it is used to conceal and to protected the handle (880 or 980) unwanted grasp by an opponent.
  • Alternatively, in an alternate embodiment (not shown), the warrior fringe 972 comprises a plurality of fringe elements each independently attached (for example with hook and loop fasteners) to the strap (810 or 910). Each fringe element could appear as a decoy handle. An opponent attempting to tackle by pulling the handle 980, more often than not would be disappointed with a handful of fringe elements, instead of a tackle.
  • FIG. 10A
  • FIG. 10A illustrates shorts with integrated straps 902. Two leg straps (shown as enhanced leg strap 901 (a-b) are attached to the respective legs of shorts (see FIG. 6). The leg straps 901 could be removably attached with belt loops 971 (similar to FIG. 9H) or permanently attached with permanent attachments 973 (shown sewn).
  • The embodiment provides the advantage that the leg straps (900 or 901) are always in the proper location on the leg and they can be fully loosened between lifts. The attached shorts are worn, for example, under normal Rugby shorts, the loosened handle will not generally be reachable by a would-be tackler, but would be readily available to a lifter from the jumper's team. The optional handle stops 930 (shown) advantageously stop the straps 901 from unplanned detachment from the bite loops 920 (a-b) or belt loops 971.
  • FIG. 10B
  • FIG. 10B illustrates shorts with front grips 590 a and 590 b and back grips 580 a and 580 b sewn in. For players wearing compression shorts, this embodiment has all the advantages of the embodiment shown in FIG. 5D while being much more comfortable than wearing a combination of compressions shorts and a leg sleeve. The use of grips as part of a pair of shorts also guarantees that the grips will stay in place during play.
  • Other Uses
  • While the descriptions of the various embodiments have been made in reference to Rugby Union, the present invention could also be used for other sports which involve, or in the future may involve, lifting, such as Volleyball, International Rules Football, Australian Rules Football, baseball, ice skating, dance, or other sports.
  • ADVANTAGES
  • Comfortable
  • The leg devices of the present invention offer comfort to the jumping player. The leg sleeve, leg glove, and leg straps do not apply pressure to the sensitive crotch areas of the body, as conventional methods of lifting do. The wearer also does not risk pulling out the hairs of the leg during removal, as in certain conventional methods.
  • Effective
  • The leg devices of the present invention are effective. A lifter has much better odds for obtaining and maintaining a sure grip with the present invention than with conventional methods. Thus, the jumper is more consistently able to obtain an optimum jump.
  • Safe
  • Because of the effectiveness of the present invention in allowing lifters to have a sure grip, the present invention offers greater safety and lessens risk of injury to both jumping and lifting players. Some embodiments also provide increased safety for other players, such as opponents.
  • Simple
  • The present invention is simple to make and use. The present invention requires little time to put on.
  • Easy to Use
  • The present invention is easy to use. To install, the potential jumper simply applies, or pulls over, one leg device over each leg. The lifters easily can find a grip while lifting the jumper.
  • Unlike conventional methods of lifting, which require a second party such as a trainer or coach to apply and runs the risk of inconsistency, the present invention is easily put on by one person and gives consistent results.
  • Reusable
  • The present invention can be used over and over again. The conventional method of wraps and tapes can only be used once and a new one must be used for every game.
  • Because the conventional wraps and tapes can only be used once, the materials become trash after use. The remains of the wraps and tape are often strewn on the field and leave an unsightly, unprofessional appearance requiring extra effort to clean up.
  • Higher Performance
  • The present invention offers higher performance in jumping than conventional methods. The quality of grip maintained allows stronger and higher lift, for example during a Rugby lineout. Use of the present invention gives teams more options on plays to be run during the lineout. The use of the present invention does not hinder agility or running, as conventional taping sometimes does.
  • Quick
  • The present invention can be quickly applied and removed. Time from warm-up and pre-game training need not be taken to apply the leg devices. The conventional method of taping can take several minutes to apply and removal can also be a slow process. Conventional taping often requires assistance from a coach or other highly skilled person and detracts from the critical pre-game preparation.
  • Adjustable
  • The present invention can easily be adjusted to different heights and positions on the leg. This easy adjustment enables the devices to be set to accommodate different lifters and/or different plays. The present invention can easily be switched from player to player to accommodate substitutions.
  • Empowering
  • The present invention can empower a single player to lift jumper when that player would not be able to otherwise do so. This can offer teams a considerable advantage in the lineout as well as the reception of kicks.
  • Efficient
  • The conventional method of taping is wasteful. Garbage is created after every game, and more taping and wrap materials need to be replaced and bought, adding to expenses. The present invention does not produce additional garbage or cost on repeated uses.
  • Better Appearance
  • Conventional methods of lifting worsen the look of players. The present invention has a smooth, professional look. While conventional taping has limited options, the present invention can easily be manufactured in a variety of colors to match the team color or the individual preference of the wearer. Space on the device material may also be used to bear a team logo, national insignia, or advertising.
  • The warrior fringe improves the user's appearance and helps promote the spirit of the competition.
  • Can be Used with Compression Shorts
  • Some players elect to wear compression shorts while playing their sport. Conventional methods of taping are ineffective when used with compression shorts. The present invention enables players to wear compression shorts and in combination with means for lifting.
  • Cost Effective
  • Because the leg devices can be made relatively inexpensively, are reusable, and eliminate waste the present invention is cost effective. In particular, the leg strap embodiments can be made very inexpensively, providing a larger market and encouraging less waste.
  • CONCLUSION, RAMIFICATION, AND SCOPE
  • Accordingly, the present invention provides an easy to use, simple, safe, comfortable, reusable, and effective means for lifting a jumper.
  • While the above descriptions contain several specifics these should not be construed as limitations on the scope of the invention, but rather as examples of some of the preferred embodiments thereof. Many other variations are possible. For example, different widths of strap could be used. Additionally, the leg devices could be made of different materials or have additional features, or be used in different sports, without departing from the scope and spirit of the novel features of the present invention.
  • Accordingly, the scope of the invention should be determined not by the illustrated embodiments, but by the appended claims and their legal equivalents.

Claims (15)

  1. 1. A leg sleeve to be worn on a leg of a jumper and gripped by one or more lifters, said leg sleeve comprising:
    a) sleeve material, and
    b) a means of gripping, attached to said sleeve material with an attachment,
    wherein the sleeve material comprises a thin, flexible, elastic material of sufficient size and shape to be worn around at least a portion of the leg of the jumper,
    wherein, to apply the leg sleeve, the sleeve material is stretched and passed over the foot of the jumper and when positioned, remains in a predetermined position while the jumper is running or jumping,
    wherein the means of gripping is positioned such that, when the jumper jumps, the one or more lifters is able to grip said means of gripping with at least one hand,
    wherein the means of gripping is of sufficient size and shape that it is easily gripped by the at least one hand of at least one lifter,
    wherein, when the jumper jumps to obtain a higher position, the jumper is lifted and held in the higher position by the one or more lifters,
    wherein, to remove, the sleeve material is stretched and passed over the foot and off the leg, and
    wherein, to reuse, the sleeve material is stretched again,
    whereby the jumper when wearing the leg sleeve is lifted and held in the higher position by at least one lifter.
  2. 2. The leg sleeve of claim 1 wherein the means of gripping comprises a thickened portion.
  3. 3. The leg sleeve of claim 2 wherein the thickened portion comprises,
    i) a length of semi-rigid material which is firmer than the sleeve material, and
    ii) a covering layer which covers the semi-rigid material,
    wherein the semi-rigid material provides a firm area for the hand of at least one lifter to grip.
  4. 4. The leg sleeve of claim 1 wherein sleeve material receives tape to hold the leg sleeve in place at the predetermined position on the leg of the jumper.
  5. 5. A system comprising a plurality of leg sleeves of claim 1 and a pair of shorts,
    wherein the leg sleeves are integrated into the pair of shorts, and
    wherein the shorts hold the leg sleeve in place at the predetermined position on the leg of the jumper.
  6. 6. A leg glove, to be worn on a leg of a jumper and gripped by one or more lifters,
    the leg glove comprising material folded to form two layers, a base layer and a pocket layer, and
    the leg glove further comprising a non-elastic strap at the base of the leg glove having a predetermined circumference, which prevents the leg glove from stretching and sliding up the leg of the jumper beyond a predetermined point,
    wherein the pocket layer has at least one open portion each forming a pocket,
    wherein the pocket is attached at one side of the opening with a pocket attachment and at the other side of the opening with a base attachment,
    wherein a means for gripping comprises the pocket and the pocket attachment, and
    wherein the one or more hands of one or more lifters pass through the at least one open portion,
    whereby the jumper is able to:
    i) apply the leg glove over the leg of the jumper,
    ii) run and jump free of discomfort or interference from the leg glove, and
    iii) be supported more securely and higher by at least one lifter when jumping to intercept a ball, and
    whereby the lifter is able to:
    iv) readily ascertain the location of the open portion while the jumper is jumping, and
    v) obtain a firm grip on the pocket while lifting, supporting, and lowering the jumper.
  7. 7. A system for supporting a jumper by one or more lifters, said system comprising two leg sleeves in accordance with claim 3, said two leg sleeves comprising a first leg sleeves to be worn on a one leg of the jumper and a second leg sleeves to be worn on the other leg of the jumper,
    wherein, prior to jumping, the first and second leg sleeves are applied to the corresponding legs of the jumper, and
    wherein, when jumping, a first hand of the at least one lifter grips the means of gripping of the first leg sleeve and a second hand of the at least one lifter grips the means of gripping of the second leg sleeve,
    whereby when the jumper jumps to higher position the at least one lifter is able to support the jumper with the first hand on the first leg sleeve and the second hand on the second leg sleeve.
  8. 8. A method for supporting a jumper by one or more lifters comprising the steps of:
    a) applying two of the leg sleeves of claim 1 to the legs of the jumper,
    b) the jumper jumping into the higher position,
    c) the one or more lifters ascertaining the location of each means of gripping,
    d) the one or more lifters gripping a means of gripping with each hand,
    e) lifting the jumper to a second higher position,
    f) holding the jumper firmly in the second higher position until the jumper is able to intercept the ball, and
    g) lowering the jumper safely and securely,
    h) repeating steps b) through g) for a predetermined period of time,
    i) removing the leg sleeves,
    j) reapplying the leg sleeves, and
    k) repeating steps b) through g) for a second predetermined period of time.
  9. 9. The leg sleeve of claim 1, wherein the lifters are consistently able to obtain a firm grip on the leg sleeve,
    whereby the lifters are able to lift the jumper higher,
    whereby the lifters are able to provide a more stable support for the jumper,
    whereby the jumper is able to intercept the ball more often, and
    whereby the jumper is able to jump, be supported, and be lowered more safely.
  10. 10. A method for supporting a jumper by one or more lifters comprising the steps of:
    a) applying two leg sleeves to the legs of the jumper, each leg sleeve comprising a means of gripping,
    b) the jumper jumping into a higher position,
    c) the one or more lifters gripping one of the means of gripping with each hand,
    d) lifting the jumper to a second higher position,
    e) holding the jumper firmly in the second higher position until the jumper is able to intercept the ball,
    f) lowering the jumper,
    g) repeating steps b) through f) at least once,
    h) removing the leg sleeve,
    i) reapplying the leg sleeve, and
    j) repeating steps b) through f) at least once.
  11. 11. The leg sleeve of claim 3 wherein the thickened portion is attached to the front, forming a front grip,
    the leg sleeve further comprising a second thickened portion attached to the back, forming a back grip,
    whereby a first hand of a one of the lifters grasps the front grip and a second hand of one of the lifters grasps the back grip.
  12. 12. A system of comprising two of the leg sleeves of claim 11 and a pair of shorts,
    wherein two lifters having four hands each grasp one of the four grips with one hand per grip.
  13. 13. A leg strap to be worn on a leg of a jumper and gripped by one or more lifters, said leg strap comprising:
    a) a encircling strap, wherein the strap encircles the leg, and
    b) a means of gripping, attached to the encircling strap,
    c) a base layer of material, attached to the encircling strap,
    wherein the encircling strap comprises a thin, flexible, non-elastic material of sufficient size and shape to be worn around the leg of the jumper,
    wherein the means of gripping is positioned such that, when the jumper jumps, the one or more lifters is able to grip said means of gripping with at least one hand,
    wherein the means of gripping is of sufficient size and shape that it is easily gripped by the at least one hand of at least one lifter,
    wherein, when the jumper jumps to obtain a higher position, the jumper is lifted and held in the higher position by the one or more lifter.
  14. 14. The leg strap of claim 13, further comprising an elastic band attached to at least a portion of the top edge of the base layer of material,
    wherein the means for gripping comprises a cross strap, the cross strap connected to the encircling strap, wherein the cross strap has a larger circumference than the circumference of the encircling strap, and
    the base layer of material, attached to at least an attached portion of the cross strap,
    wherein the base layer connects and encloses the area between the encircling strap and the cross strap,
    wherein the cross strap has an open portion which is grasped by the hand of the lifter.
  15. 15. The leg strap of claim 13, further comprising an elastic band attached the top edge of the base layer of material,
    wherein the means for gripping comprises a cross handle, the cross handle connected to the encircling strap at one end and the encircling strap at the other end, and
    wherein the base layer connects and encloses the area between the encircling strap and the elastic band,
    wherein the cross handle has an open portion which is grasped by the hand of the lifter.
US11899529 2006-08-03 2007-09-06 Methods and means for lifting jumper Abandoned US20080032824A1 (en)

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US11800356 US20090098954A1 (en) 2006-08-03 2007-05-04 Methods and means for lifting jumper
US11899529 US20080032824A1 (en) 2006-08-03 2007-09-06 Methods and means for lifting jumper

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US12853237 US8523713B2 (en) 2006-08-03 2010-08-09 Leg gloves with downward diagonal facing pocket openings

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US20130019375A1 (en) * 2008-05-05 2013-01-24 Roman Kendyl A Leg handle comprising thin stretch fabric and rounded cylindrical section
US20160206022A1 (en) * 2015-01-19 2016-07-21 Ideavelopment Product Development & Consulting Inc . Convertible pants
US20160295933A1 (en) * 2015-04-08 2016-10-13 addidas AG Pocket for sports garment

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