US20070145680A1 - Shake Responsive Portable Computing Device for Simulating a Randomization Object Used In a Game Of Chance - Google Patents

Shake Responsive Portable Computing Device for Simulating a Randomization Object Used In a Game Of Chance Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20070145680A1
US20070145680A1 US11/563,610 US56361006A US2007145680A1 US 20070145680 A1 US20070145680 A1 US 20070145680A1 US 56361006 A US56361006 A US 56361006A US 2007145680 A1 US2007145680 A1 US 2007145680A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
computing device
portable computing
processor
simulation program
shaking
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11/563,610
Inventor
Louis Rosenberg
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Outland Res LLC
Original Assignee
Outland Res LLC
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US75049005P priority Critical
Priority to US11/539,598 priority patent/US7586032B2/en
Priority to US11/555,784 priority patent/US20070118241A1/en
Application filed by Outland Res LLC filed Critical Outland Res LLC
Priority to US11/563,610 priority patent/US20070145680A1/en
Publication of US20070145680A1 publication Critical patent/US20070145680A1/en
Assigned to OUTLAND RESEARCH, LLC reassignment OUTLAND RESEARCH, LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: ROSENBERG, LOUIS B.
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/04Dice; Dice-boxes; Mechanical dice-throwing devices
    • A63F9/0468Electronic dice; electronic dice simulators
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/24Electric games; Games using electronic circuits not otherwise provided for
    • A63F2009/2401Detail of input, input devices
    • A63F2009/2402Input by manual operation
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/24Electric games; Games using electronic circuits not otherwise provided for
    • A63F2009/2483Other characteristics
    • A63F2009/2488Remotely playable

Abstract

An apparatus, method and computer program product for a shake responsive portable computing device used in simulating a randomization object for playing a game of chance. The portable computing device includes a processor, a motion sensor functionally coupled to the processor and configured to detect shaking motions imparted on the portable computing device by a user, a display coupled to the processor, a memory coupled to the processor and a simulation program operatively loaded into the memory. The simulation program includes instructions executable by the processor to identify deliberately imparted characteristic shaking motions from the detected shaking motions, generate a randomized gaming result in dependence on the identified characteristic shaking motion signals and output the randomized gaming result to the display as a graphical representation of a randomization object.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a non-provisional application claiming benefit and priority under 35 U.S.C. § 119(e) from co-pending U.S. provisional application Ser. No. 60/750,490 filed on Dec. 15, 2005 to a common assignee and the instant inventor;
  • this application is also a continuation-in-part of co-pending U.S. patent application Ser. Nos. 11/539,598 filed on Oct. 6, 2006 and 11/555,784 filed on Nov. 2, 2006 also to the common assignee and inventor;
  • all of the aforementioned patents applications are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety as if fully set forth herein.
  • FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
  • Not Applicable
  • REFERENCE TO A MICROFICHE APPENDIX
  • Not Applicable
  • FIELD OF INVENTION
  • The present inventive embodiments relates generally to portable computing devices and more specifically to shake-responsive portable computing devices for simulating the shaking and tossing of a randomization object used in a game of chance.
  • BACKGROUND
  • As the size and cost of processor driven devices have declined in recent years, portable computing device have become popular consumer products due to their highly portable nature and interconnectivity with existing computer networks. For example, personal digital assistant (PDAs), portable gaming systems, cellular telephones, and portable media players are all examples of common portable computing device that have gained widespread adoption over recent years. In fact, a large percentage of people in America have at least one portable computing device on their person when they leave their home and generally use such devices for a wide range of applications. For example, cellular telephones have come to take on additional computing functions such as gaming, scheduling, picture taking, and media playing.
  • In the relevant art, portable computing devices enable users to play games of chance, for example games that require a user to roll simulated dice and make moves based upon the outcome of the dice roll. For example, “,” is a popular dice game offered for Cingular mobile phones that is based on one of the most popular casino games in Asia called Sic Bo. Another common dice game for Motorola and Nokia mobile phones is “Jacado Dice,” a game in which players place bets and press a button to toss the simulated dice. In general, such dice games work by automatically rolling the dice for the user automatically or based upon a simple button press, which differs significantly from the real world experience in dice rolling. In the real world, there is a causal relationship between physically tossing dice and observing the outcome that has made dice games so popular over the centuries.
  • Unfortunately the modern instantiation of dice games upon portable computing device have removed this physically causal relationship and reduced the appeal of dice games.
  • Unless otherwise indicated herein, the approaches described in this section are not prior art to the claims in this application and are not admitted to be prior art by inclusion in this section.
  • SUMMARY
  • The various exemplary embodiments described herein address the limitations in the relevant art and provides mechanisms which allows a user to physically utilize a portable computing device to simulate a the shaking and tossing of a randomization object for playing a game of chance. In the real world, when a container of some physical substance needs to be mixed, it is a common human action to pick up the container and shake it. As examples, a can of spray paint, salad dressing, orange juice, and other consumer products that often separate into layers requiring agitation to become mixed. Thus shaking is a common metaphor that used to mix or randomize the distribution of the contents within a container. The various inventive embodiments, leverages this metaphor and establishes a unique user interface for a portable computing device in which a user can simulate the physical motions used in playing games of chance in which an actual physically shaking action is performed to initiate the randomization process and result in a randomized outcome.
  • In an exemplary apparatus embodiment, a shake responsive portable computing device for simulating a randomization object used in a game of chance is provided. This exemplary apparatus embodiment comprises a processor, a motion sensor functionally coupled to the processor and configured to detect shaking motions imparted on the portable computing device by a user, a display coupled to the processor, a memory coupled to the processor and a simulation program operatively loaded into the memory.
  • The simulation program includes instructions executable by the processor to identify deliberately imparted characteristic shaking motions from the detected shaking motions, generate a randomized gaming result in dependence on the identified characteristic shaking motion signals and output the randomized gaming result to the display as a graphical representation of the randomization object.
  • In a first related exemplary apparatus embodiment, the randomization object comprises one or more simulated dice, and the simulation program further includes instructions to simulate a tumbling movement of the one or more simulated dice in dependence on the identified characteristic shaking motions.
  • In a second related exemplary apparatus embodiment, the simulation program further includes instructions to simulate the tumbling movement of the one or more dice in approximate coordination with the identified characteristic shaking motions.
  • In a third related exemplary apparatus embodiment, the simulation program further includes instructions to dynamically depict the tumbling movement of the one or more simulated dice coming to rest to reveal the generated gaming result.
  • In a fourth related exemplary apparatus embodiment, the display is encompassed by a housing in common with the processor.
  • In a fifth related exemplary apparatus embodiment, the display is associated with a separate processor in processing communications over a wireless link with the processor.
  • In a sixth related exemplary apparatus embodiment, the tumbling movement of the simulated dice come to rest in response to a detected cessation of the identified characteristic shaking motions.
  • In a seventh related exemplary apparatus embodiment, the portable computing device is one of, a personal data assistant, a cellular telephone, a portable media player, and a handheld game player.
  • In an eighth related exemplary apparatus embodiment, the generated gaming result is one of; a number, a word, a sentence, a phrase, an image, a color and any combination thereof.
  • In a ninth related exemplary apparatus embodiment, the generated gaming result is used to update a status of play in the game of chance.
  • In a tenth related exemplary apparatus embodiment, the generated gaming result is dependent upon at least one dynamic characteristic of the identified characteristic shaking motion.
  • In an eleventh related exemplary apparatus embodiment, the dynamic characteristic of the identified characteristic shaking motion is one of; a time duration, a magnitude, a number of distinct shake events, a frequency of distinct shake events and any combination thereof.
  • In an exemplary methodic embodiment, a method for providing a shake responsive portable computing device for simulating a randomization object used in a game of chance is provided. This exemplary methodic embodiment comprises coupling a motion sensor to a processor associated with the portable computing device, configuring the motion sensor to detect shaking motions imparted on the portable computing device by a user, and loading a simulation program into a memory coupled to the processor.
  • The simulation program includes instructions executable by the processor for identifying deliberately imparted characteristic shaking motions from detected shaking motions, generating a randomized gaming result in dependence on the identified characteristic shaking motion signals and outputting the randomized gaming result to a display coupled to the processor as a graphical representation of the randomization object.
  • In a first related exemplary methodic embodiment, the simulation program further includes instructions executable by the processor for simulating a tumbling movement of one or more simulated dice in dependence on the identified characteristic shaking motions.
  • In a second related exemplary methodic embodiment, the simulation program further includes instructions executable by the processor for simulating the tumbling movement of the one or more dice in approximate coordination with the identified characteristic shaking motions.
  • In a third related exemplary methodic embodiment, the simulation program further includes instructions executable by the processor for dynamically depicting the tumbling movement of the one or more simulated dice coming to rest to reveal the gaming result.
  • In a fourth related exemplary methodic embodiment, the simulation program further includes instructions executable by the processor for generating the randomized gaming result in dependence upon one or more dynamic characteristics of the identified characteristic shaking motions selected from the group consisting essentially of, a time duration, a magnitude, a number of distinct shake events, a frequency of the distinct shake events, and any combination thereof.
  • In a fifth related exemplary methodic embodiment, the tumbling movement of the simulated dice coming to rest in response to a detected cessation of the identified characteristic shaking motions.
  • In a sixth related exemplary methodic embodiment, the display is associated with a separate processor in processing communications over a wireless link with the processor.
  • In an exemplary computer program product (CPP) embodiment, a CPP embodied in a tangible form comprising instructions executable by a processor associated with a shake responsive portable computing device to receive shaking motion signals from an operatively coupled motion sensor, identify deliberately imparted characteristic shaking motions from the detected shaking motions signals, generate a randomized gaming result in dependence on the identified characteristic shaking motion signals and output the randomized gaming result on an operatively coupled display as a graphical representation of a randomization object.
  • In a first related exemplary CPP embodiment, further instructions executable by the processor are provided to simulate a tumbling movement of one or more simulated dice in dependence on the identified characteristic shaking motions.
  • In a second related exemplary CPP embodiment, further instructions executable by the processor are provided for simulating the tumbling movement of the one or more dice in approximate coordination with the identified characteristic shaking motions.
  • In a third related exemplary CPP embodiment, further instructions executable by the processor are provided to dynamically depict the tumbling movement of the one or more dice coming to rest to reveal the gaming result.
  • In a fourth related exemplary CPP embodiment, the tangible form may be one or more of, a logical media, a magnetic media and an optical media.
  • The various exemplary apparatus, methodic and computer program product embodiments described above are provided in related exemplary numeric embodiments for convenience only. No limitation to the various exemplary embodiments disclosed is intended.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
  • The features and advantages of the various exemplary embodiments will become apparent from the following detailed description when considered in conjunction with the accompanying drawings. Where possible, the same reference numerals and characters are used to denote like features, elements, components or portions of the various inventive embodiments. It is intended that changes and modifications can be made to the described embodiment without departing from the true scope and spirit of the subject inventive embodiments as generally defined by the claims.
  • FIG. 1—depicts a generalized and exemplary block diagram of a portable computing device.
  • FIG. 2—depicts an exemplary signal trace of a motion sensor.
  • FIG. 3—depicts a generalized and exemplary block diagram of an embodiment of the portable computing device.
  • FIG. 4—depicts an alternate embodiment where the portable computing device is in processing communications with a second computing device over a wireless communications link.
  • FIG. 5—depicts an exemplary process flow chart of the various exemplary embodiments.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • An apparatus, method and computer program product are described herein for a shake responsive portable computing device. The portable computing device is configured to simulate a randomization object for use in playing a game of chance. In the following description, for the purposes of explanation, numerous specific details are set forth in order to provide a thorough understanding of the various inventive embodiments. It will be apparent to one skilled in the art that the present inventive embodiments may be practiced without these specific details. In other instances, well-known structures and devices are shown in block diagram form in order to avoid unnecessarily obscuring the inventive embodiments.
  • The simulation of the randomization object is performed in response to a user imparting a physical shaking motion upon a suitably equipped portable computing device. Various embodiments provides for the dynamic simulation of the shaking of the randomization object until a randomized result is obtained and visually outputted to a user. The various embodiments utilize one or more parameters to simulate the shaking and/or coming to rest of the simulated randomization object including a magnitude, duration, and/or time-varying profile of the shaking activity imparted by the user upon the portable computing device. Where necessary, computer programs, algorithms and routines are envisioned to be programmed in a high level language object oriented language, for example Java (™) C++, C#, CORBA or Visual Basic (™).
  • Referring to FIG. 1, a generalized block diagram of a portable computing device 100 is depicted. The portable computing device 100 includes a communications infrastructure 90 used to transfer data, memory addresses where data items are to be found and control signals among the various components and subsystems associated with the portable computing device 100. A processor 5 is provided to interpret and execute logical instructions stored in the main memory 10. The main memory 10 is the primary general purpose storage area for instructions and data to be processed by the processor 5. The main memory 10 is used in its broadest sense and includes RAM, EEPROM and ROM. A timing circuit 15 is provided to coordinate activities within the portable computing device 100 in near real time and to make time-based assessments of sensor data collected by intrinsic or extrinsic sensors 75 coupled to the portable computing device 100. The processor 5, main memory 10 and timing circuit 15 are directly coupled to the communications infrastructure 90.
  • A display interface 20 is provided to drive a display 25 associated with the portable computing device 100. The display interface 20 is electrically coupled to the communications infrastructure 90 and provides signals to the display 25 for visually outputting both graphics and alphanumeric characters. In an embodiment, the display 25 visually outputs a graphical representation of a simulated randomization object 305 (FIG. 3.) The display 25 may also output gaming applications that utilize the simulated randomization objects 305 for play. The display 25 may also be used to visually output various controls and/or menus for interacting with the software and/or firmware installed on the portable computing device 100. In another embodiment, the display interface 20 may be used to drive a remote display 25A over a wireless network 85. This arrangement allows networked gaming applications to be communicated to other computing devices over the wireless network 85. In this way, a user may utilize the portable computing device 100 as a remote randomization object peripheral coupled to another computer via the wireless network 85.
  • The display interface 20 may include a dedicated graphics processor and memory to support the displaying of graphics intensive media. The display 25 may be of any type (e.g., cathode ray tube, gas plasma) but in most circumstances will usually be a solid state device such as liquid crystal display (LCD) or polymeric display.
  • A secondary memory subsystem 30 is provided which houses retrievable storage units such as a hard disk drive 35, a removable storage drive 40, an optional logical media storage drive 45 and an optional removal storage unit 50. One skilled in the art will appreciate that the hard drive 35 may be replaced with flash memory. The secondary memory 30 may be used to store a plurality of media files, gaming applications, and/or other files, programs, or data. The removable storage drive 40 may be a replaceable hard drive, optical media storage drive or a solid state flash RAM device. The logical media storage drive 45 may include a flash RAM device, an EEPROM encoded with playable media, or optical storage media (CD, DVD). The removable storage unit 50 may be logical, optical or of an electromechanical (hard disk) design.
  • A communications interface 55 subsystem is provided which allows for standardized electrical connection of peripheral devices to the communications infrastructure 90 including, serial, parallel, USB, and Firewire(™) connectivity. For example, a user interface 60 and a transceiver 65 are electrically coupled to the communications infrastructure 90 via the communications interface 55. For purposes of this specification, the term user interface 60 includes the hardware and operating software by which a user interacts with the portable computing device 100 and the means by which the portable computing device conveys information to the user and may include the display 25.
  • The transceiver 65 facilitates the remote exchange of data and synchronizing signals between the portable computing device 100 and other devices in processing communications 85 with the portable computing device 100. The transceiver 65 is envisioned to be of a radio frequency type normally associated with computer networks for example, wireless computer networks based on BlueTooth (™) or the various IEEE standards 802.11x, where x denotes the various present and evolving wireless computing standards, for example 802.11N, WiMax 802.16 and WRANG 802.22.
  • Alternately, digital cellular communications formats compatible with for example GSM, 3G and evolving cellular communications standards. Both peer-to-peer (PPP) and client-server models are envisioned for implementation of the various inventive embodiments. In a third alternative embodiment, the transceiver 65 may include hybrids of computer communications standards, cellular standards and evolving satellite radio standards.
  • The user interface 60 employed on the portable media play 100 may include a pointing device (not shown) such as a mouse, thumbwheel or track ball, an optional touch screen (not shown); one or more push-button switches 60A, 60B; one or more sliding or circular potentiometer controls (not shown), one or more switches (not shown), and/or one or more tactile feedback units (not shown). The user interface 60 provides interrupt signals to the processor 5 that may be used to interpret user interactions with the portable computing device 100 and may be used in conjunction with the display 25.
  • An optional tactile feedback unit 80 may be used to simulate tactile sensations corresponding to a user's interaction with a simulated randomization object 305 to further increase the realism of the simulated randomization object experience.
  • The user interface 60 further includes a specialized shake interface 70. The shake interface 70 is configured to detect if and when a user imparts characteristic shake motions (CSM) 205 (FIG. 2) upon the portable computing device 100 by shaking the portable computing device 100 in his or her hand. The motion sensor(s) 75 are configured to detect when a user deliberately imparts a manual shaking motion upon the portable computing device 100 by shaking the device back and forth and/or up and down in his or her hand. Various manual shaking motions may be performed which allows for differentiation of the type of interaction with the portable computing device 100 the user is seeking. The manual shaking motions are performed in a manner roughly equivalent to how a user would shake a bottle of salad dressing to mix the bottle's contents. Analogously, a user may simulate a roll of the dice by shaking the portable computing device 100. More specifically, a user may cause simulated dice 305 (FIG. 3) to be shaken by physically shaking the portable computing device 100 in a characteristic way and may cause simulated dice to be tossed and tumble to rest by ceasing to shake the portable computing device 100 in the characteristic way.
  • The shake interface 70 generally includes one or more motion sensors 75 coupled thereto for detecting a shaking action imparted by the user upon the portable computing device 100. The shake interface 70 may include analog to digital conversion circuitry, signal conditioning circuitry, and/or anti-coincidence circuitry. A variety of motion sensors 75 may be employed to detect characteristic shaking motions imparted by the hand of a user upon the casing of a portable computing device 100.
  • The most common motion sensor(s) 75 to be used are typically accelerometers. Accelerometers are operative to detect accelerations imparted by the user upon the portable computing device 100. An accelerometer 75 may be oriented to detect accelerations in one or more degrees of freedom 365 (FIG. 3.) However, for cost, size and power consumption considerations, a miniature accelerometer is preferred. For example, Analog Devices, Inc. manufactures many integrated Micro Electro Mechanical System (™) accelerometers suitable for the various exemplary embodiments described herein. Information regarding the iMEMS (™) accelerometers may be downloaded from the URL www.analog.com.
  • One or more accelerometers 75 may be oriented to detect accelerations in one or more degrees of freedom (axes.) Alternately, a multi-axis accelerometer 75 may be used. In a simple embodiment, a single axis accelerometer 75 is employed; the axis of detection of the accelerometer being preferably oriented along a long axis of the portable computing device 100. In this way, the accelerometer 75 is configured to detect motions imparted upon the portable computing device 100 by a user shaking it up and down generally in parallel to the long axis of the portable computing device 100.
  • The motion sensor(s) 75 are coupled to the sensor interface 70 which allows the one or more sensors 75 to be operatively coupled to the communications infrastructure 90. The sensor interface 70 may monitor interactions with the user interface 60. For example, the sensor interface 70 may be used to monitor a user's interaction with the one or more push-button switches 60A, 60B. An interrupt circuit may be incorporated into the hardware supporting the communications infrastructure 90. The motion sensor(s) 75 is generally installed within the case embodying the electronics which comprise the portable computing device 100.
  • An audio processing subsystem 65 is electrically coupled to the communications infrastructure 90 and provides for the play of sound effects, background music, and the playback and recording of digital media, for example, multi or multimedia encoded in any of the exemplary formats MP3, AVI, WAV, MPG, QT, WMA, AIFF, AU, RAM, RA, MOV, MIDI, etc. The audio processing subsystem 65 may include a microphone input port 65A for input of voice commands and a headphone, headset, ear buds or speaker output 65B. Connection of the microphone 65A and/or headphones 65B includes both traditional cable and wireless arrangements such as BlueTooth(™) are known in the relevant art.
  • As referred to in this specification, “media” refers to video, audio, streaming and any combination thereof. The audio processing subsystem 65 may also be configured to generate and/or play back sound effects which simulates the sounds produced using a particular randomization object 305. The sound effects are generally output to the user in coincidence with the user's shaking of the portable computing device 100 in order to enhance the overall gaming experience. In addition, the audio processing subsystem 65 is envisioned to optionally include features such as graphic equalization, volume, balance, fading, base and treble controls, surround sound emulation, and noise reduction. One skilled in the art will appreciate that the above cited list of file formats is not intended to be all inclusive.
  • The portable computing device 100 includes an operating system, the necessary hardware and software drivers necessary to fully utilize the devices coupled to the communications infrastructure 90 and at least one simulation program 520 (FIG. 5) operatively loaded into the main memory 10. The simulation program 520 may perform multiple functions, for example performing dice rolling simulations 305 (FIG. 3) in response to characteristic shaking motions 205 imparted by the user.
  • The simulation program 520 may also control one or more gaming applications executing upon the portable computing device 100 which utilize the randomized results of the simulated randomization object 305. The simulation program 520 may also communicate the results of the simulated randomization object 305 to one or more other computing devices 400 (FIG. 4) over the communications network 85. The simulation program 520 provides the user with a configuration menu by which he or she may select the type, number and associated parameters of a randomization object 305 to be played. For example, the number of dice to be rolled, the number of faces on each dice to be rolled, and the selectable items upon each face of the dice to be rolled.
  • In another embodiment, the simulation program 520 may also provide a menu which allows the user to select displays images, sounds, and/or tactile feedback corresponding to the simulated randomization object 305 and/or games to be played by the portable computing device 100. For example, the simulation program 520 may be programmed to monitor the shake interface 70 by reading the associated motion sensor(s) 75 and storing data from the motion sensors 75 in memory 30 over time. The simulation program 520 may also read data from the timing circuit 15. The simulation program 520 processes the time varying profile of the sensor data from the motion sensor(s) 75 and determines based upon the time varying characteristics of the sensor data whether or not the user has imparted a characteristic shaking action upon the portable computing device 100. In addition, the simulation program 520 may process the time varying profile of the sensor data to determine based upon the time varying characteristics of the sensor data whether or not a previously imparted characteristic shaking action has been ceased by the user.
  • References to the simulation program 520 may be made in both singular and plural form. No limitation is intended by such grammatical usage as one skilled in the art will appreciate that multiple programs, objects, subprograms, routines, algorithms, applets, contexts, etc. may be implemented programmatically to implement the inventive embodiments.
  • FIG. 2 provides an exemplary signal trace 230 of an accelerometer arranged as a motion sensor 75 suitable for use in the various envisioned embodiments. This particular type of motion sensor 75 provides an analog voltage output signal 230 which varies as a function of the acceleration(s) that the motion sensor 75 is experiencing. For this particular type of motion sensor 75 (accelerometer), a steady state voltage signal of 2000 millivolts (mV) is output from the motion sensor 75 when no accelerations are being detected. When undergoing either a positive or negative acceleration, the voltage output from the accelerometer increases or decreases as functions of the magnitude M! 205 being experienced by the portable computing device 100. When sampled over a time domain t 210, various motion dependent parameters may be determined which are useful for simulating a randomization object 305.
  • In general, deliberate manual shaking motions may be identified from the time-varying motion sensor data 230 based at least in part upon the presence of a roughly cyclic signal profile that falls within certain bounds and/or exceeds certain limits. Such bounds and/or limits may include frequency parameters f 215, magnitude parameters M 205, count parameters N 220, and/or timing parameters t 210. As shown by the time-varying motion sensor signal 230, a characteristic shaking motion includes a set of repeated acceleration impulses NJ, N2, N3 220A,B,C each corresponding with a single manual shake motion imparted by the user. Because the manual shaking motions imparted by the user will generally include a plurality of shake impulses NJ, N2, N3 220A,B,C, each being imparted such that it exceeds a certain magnitude thresholds M+, M− 205A,B and collectively being imparted within certain timing t1, t2 210A,B and/or frequency characteristics f1, 215A,B, characteristic shake events E1, E2, E3 225A,B,C may be identified based upon the count impulses NJ, N2, N3 220A,B,C, magnitude M+, M− 205A,B, timing t1, t2 210A,B, and/or frequency of the acceleration impulses f1, f2 215A,B present in the motion sensor data.
  • More specifically, the characteristic shake events E1, E2, E3 225A,B,C may be identified based upon the presence of impulse events that exceed certain magnitude limits, meet certain duration bounds, meet certain frequency bounds, meet certain temporal spacing requirements, and/or contain a count of impulses that falls within certain numerical bounds.
  • Thus, an analysis of the time-varying acceleration profile of motion data 230 may be performed by the simulation program 520 to determine if a deliberate manual shaking motion has been imparted by the user upon the portable computing device 100 based upon magnitude M! 205; frequency f1 f2 215A,B; timing t1,t2 210A,B; and/or count characteristics NJ, N2, N3 220A,B,C. In general, this analysis includes an identification of impulse events E1, E2, E3 225A,B,C and a determination as to whether the magnitude M! 205 of the impulse events, frequency of impulse events, temporal spacing of impulse events, and/or numerical count of impulse events meet certain bounds and/or exceed certain limits.
  • In some exemplary embodiments, the simulation program 520 is configured to identify a characteristic shake event 225 being imparted by a user when a portion of the time varying motion sensor signal 230 meets a certain magnitude M! 205 and/or temporal bounds Δt 210C. For example, a characteristic shake event E 225 may be identified when a portion of the time varying sensor signal 230 exceeds both a positive and negative magnitude threshold M+, M− 205A,B within a certain time duration Δt 210C.
  • The ability to set a required threshold, timing, and/or sequence the simulation program 520 may be configured to determine that the user imparted a deliberate shaking action upon the portable computing device 100 and generate a specific randomization object 305 response specific to the detected event.
  • For example, a user simulating a pair of dice to be rolled, may provide three characteristic shake events E1, E2, E3 225A,B,C followed by a release characteristic shake event E4, 225D which provides a different acceleration profile indicating that the simulated dice have been released. Alternately the release may be triggered by the user ceasing to impart a next characteristic shake event upon the portable computing device 100 within a certain time interval of a previous characteristic shake event. The simulation program 520 generates a randomized result for the dice which is visually output to the user. The simulation program 520 may also be configured to output sound effects of the sound of shaking a pair of dice in response to the characteristic shake events E1, E2, E3 225A,B,C and a sound of the dice being released in response to the different characteristic shake of the release event E4, 225D (or in response to a determined cessation of the characteristic shaking motion.) The sound effects and visual images are intended to be output in near-real-time with the identified characteristic shake events E 225A-D to provide the user with a convincing illusion that he or she has actually shaken and rolled a pair of dice.
  • In an embodiment, a time duration Δt 210C, magnitude M! 205, number of characteristic shake events N 220, and/or frequency of characteristic shake events f 215 may be used to simulate the time of flight, spin time and/or roll time before a randomized result is obtained for the simulated randomization objects 305. Additionally, the various motion dependent parameters may be determined in multiple geometric axes 325 (FIG. 3) which may be useful for discriminating against unintentional accelerations detected by the motion sensor 75 from being processed by the processor 5. In addition, ambient accelerations imparted due to the constant force of gravity and/or due to a moving reference frame of the user may be filtered from and/or otherwise differentiated from the intentionally imparted shaking motion signal 230 data using traditional signal processing techniques.
  • With respect to the identification of a single characteristic shake event NJ, N2, or N3 220A,B,C, such an event can generally be identified as a rapidly changing acceleration signal that exceeds a certain upper threshold M+ 205A and exceeds a certain lower threshold M− 205B, and accomplishes both within a certain small time period Δt 215C. The threshold values used for M+, M−, 205A,B and Δt 215C may vary and are generally selected based upon the size and weight of the portable computing device 100 itself and the characteristics of the accelerometer employed. For the sensor 75 that generated the signal profile 230, the event duration Δt 210C was defined as 100 milliseconds, although smaller time intervals may be used for greater impulse event discrimination. The upper threshold M+ 205A is approximately 3000 mV; the lower threshold M− 205B is approximately 1000 mV. In some exemplary embodiments a duration t1,t2 210A,B and/or Δt 210C may be determined for a characteristic shake event E 225 the duration being the time during which the magnitude of the signal peaks exceeds one or more thresholds before decaying to a level that does not exceed the thresholds M+, M−, 205A,B.
  • In some exemplary embodiments, a magnitude M! 205 is determined for a characteristic shake event E 225, the magnitude M! 205 being an average of the absolute value of the signal levels over the duration of the characteristic shake event E 225. Alternately, the magnitude M! 205 may be determined from the difference between the maximum positive peak M+ 205A and maximum negative peak M− 205B over the duration of the characteristic shake event E 225. In some exemplary embodiments the magnitude M! 205 may be determined as the absolute value of the maximum peak detected over the duration of the characteristic shake event.
  • As the acceleration (motion) signals 230 are processed over time starting from t=0 and extending forward along time axis 210, there are no characteristic shaking events identified by the simulation program 520 until the time profile reaches approximately 1400 milliseconds in time t 210. At this time, a positive voltage transient exceeds the upper threshold M+ 205A. This voltage transient corresponds with a user moving the portable computing device 100 with sufficient force to exceed the upper threshold M+205A of acceleration. A negative voltage transient which exceeds the lower threshold M− 205B immediately following the positive voltage transient. This corresponds with the user moving the portable computing device 100 with sufficient force in the opposite direction to exceed the lower threshold M− 205B. Both thresholds are crossed within a time span of less than approximately 100 milliseconds (i.e. within the limits of the defined Δt 210C). This means that the user imparted a sufficient acceleration upon the portable computing device 100 in a first direction to exceed the positive threshold M+205A and then immediately reversed direction and within the required time duration Δt 210C, imparted a sufficient acceleration upon the portable computing device 100 in the reverse direction to exceed the negative threshold M− 205B.
  • As such, the simulation program 520, may determine that the voltage transients exceeded both the positive M+ 205A and negative thresholds M− 205B within certain predefined time duration Δt 210C (e.g. 100 milliseconds), to elucidate that a characteristic shake event E 225 has occurred. The simulation program 520 then generates and outputs a simulated randomization object 305 in near-real-time relative to the detected shaking motions. By near real-time it is meant that to the user, it is perceived as approximately simultaneous with the imparted characteristic shake event(s) E 225. Ideally a time delay of less than 50 milliseconds after the completion of the shaking motions, for such a delay sufficiently small such that it is generally perceived as near real-time to a user.
  • The simulation program 520 may further process the data, identifying subsequent impulse events N2, N3, . . . Nn, in a similar manner, and output simulations of randomization objects 305 and dynamic movements thereof. It should be noted that while positive threshold M+205A and negative threshold M− 205B are shown in FIG. 2 to be equally distant from the nominal no-acceleration signal profile 230, this need not be the case in all embodiments. In some exemplary embodiments, a larger threshold may be employed in one direction as compared to the opposite direction. In fact, this is often desired because a human user generally imparts greater acceleration upon an object he is shaking when extending arm muscles as compared to when flexing arm muscles during a reciprocating characteristic shaking motion.
  • In some exemplary embodiments, a sequence of characteristic shake events NJ, N2, and N3 220A,B,C may be specifically required by the simulation program 520 in order for a user to indicate a particular intention to the portable computing device 100. For example, the simulation program 520 may be configured to determine that a characteristic shaking motion has been imparted by the user only if a particular sequence of characteristic shake impulses NJ, N2, N3 220A,B,C events are detected in the sensor signals 230. For example, in some exemplary embodiments, the portable computing device 100 may be configured such that the imparted impulses NJ, N2, N3 220A,B,C are used to determine if the user is deliberately shaking the portable computing device 100; for example, if three or more characteristic single-shake acceleration impulses are detected in sequence within the acceleration data, each single-shake acceleration profile being separated by a certain minimum amount of time (for example 250 milliseconds) t1, t2 210A,B, and all three of the single-shake acceleration profiles being imparted upon the portable computing device 100 within a certain maximum amount of time (e.g., 2000 milliseconds), each of the three characteristic single-shake acceleration impulses NJ, N2, N3 220A,B,C indicating a intentional user shake as a result of exceeding the positive M+205A and negative acceleration threshold M− 205B.
  • In this way, deliberate shaking motions may be more easily distinguished from noise and/or unintentional movements of the portable computing device 100. For example, the portable computing device 100 may be configured such that randomization object simulations do not begin being output until at least three characteristic shake events E1, E2, E3 225A,B,C are detected with certain timing parameters as described above. In this way, a user makes his or her intention clear to the portable computing device 100 that he or she is deliberately performing a gaming instrument randomization object simulation which avoids spurious movements from being detected when not intended by the user.
  • Referring to FIG. 3, an exemplary embodiment of a portable computing device 100 equipped with a motion sensor 75 is depicted. The various embodiments of the portable computing device 100 may be implemented in many common electronic devices including but not limited to a cellular telephone, a portable media player, a personal digital assistant (PDA) and a handheld game player (e.g., GameBoy (™).) The various inventive embodiments leverages a shaking metaphor and establishes a unique user interface for the portable computing device 100 in which a user can cause simulated gaming object to be shaken and outputted to a display 25 of the portable computing device 100 by physically shaking the portable computing device 100 in a characteristic manner
  • In general, the portable computing device 100 is held in the palm of the user's hand such that the display 25 is readily visible. For example, the user holds the portable computing device 100 in the palm of one hand, between the fingers and thumb, by grabbing the sides of the portable computing device 100 to provide control and support during the randomization object simulations.
  • The gaming simulations are initiated by the user imparting a shaking motion by shaking the portable computing device 100 back and forth generally along a defined axis or direction(s) 205, 365. The sensing axis of the motion sensor 75 is orientated to detect accelerations imparted by the user along the long axis 205 of the portable computing device 100. The data from the motion sensor 75 may be processed by the simulation program 520 executing in the portable computing device 100 to determine if it meets the characteristic event profile requirements described above. In an embodiment, an external port 355 is provided to operatively couple an external motion sensor 75 to the portable computing device 100. The external port 355 is electrically connected to the communications interface 55 and/or the shake interface 70.
  • In an embodiment, the simulated randomization objects 305 are visually outputted to the display 25 associated with the portable computing device 100. The simulated randomization objects 305 may be output dynamically 310 to simulate for example the rolling times for a pair of traditional dice, as shown, or the rolling times for various numbers of non-traditional dice with differing numbers of faces and facial content. The results of the simulated randomization object 330 may be outputted numerically 315; in text 320, as a phrase 325, graphically 305 and/or by color (not shown.)
  • The motion of the simulated randomization objects 305 may be performed in a number of ways. In an embodiment, the motion displayed to the user is computed over time based in part upon the shaking motions of the user, thereby reflecting the input of the user as he or she shakes the portable computing device 100. Such embodiments generally employ computer animation techniques for rendering the changing location and orientation of the randomization objects 305 over time.
  • In another embodiment, simulated randomization objects 305 are displayed using prerecorded video or animations that depicts the motion of the randomization objects 305 generally independent from the characteristic shaking motions of the user other than their being outputted coincidentally with the user's shaking motions.
  • In another embodiment, the displayed simulated shaking motion is substantially coordinated in time with the user imparting the characteristic shaking motions, the displayed simulated release (i.e. dice toss) and the rolling to rest (i.e. dice tumbling) is substantially coordinated in time with the user ceasing to impart the characteristic shaking motions.
  • FIG. 4 depicts an alternate embodiment where the portable computing device 100 is configured as a remote peripheral of a second computing device 400. In an embodiment, the portable computing device 100 is processing communications with the second computing device 400 over a wireless communications link 85. A user begins the randomization object simulation by shaking the portable computing device 405 in a characteristic manner 205. The gaming simulation is then visually outputted on a display 25A associated with the second computing device 400.
  • In one embodiment, the simulation program 520 executes primarily on the portable computing device 100 and only the simulation of the randomization object 305 and gaming result 320 are outputted on the display 25A associated with the second computing device 400. In an alternate embodiment, the gaming result is displayed upon both the portable computing device 100 and the second computing device 400. In an alternate embodiment the shaking motion of the simulated randomization object is displayed upon the portable computing device 100, the release and coming to rest of the simulated randomization object is displayed upon the second computing device 400. This creates the illusion to the user that the randomization object (e.g., dice) were first shaken in the hand of the user (as displayed upon the handheld screen of the user), and then were tossed and tumbled to rest onto the screen of the second computing device 400. This illusion is strengthened by substantially coordinating the simulated toss and coming to rest of the randomization object with the actual physical ceasing of the characteristic shaking motions by the user as described previously. One skilled in the art will appreciate that various other arrangements, distributions of processing and display may be accomplished between the portable computing device 100 and the second computing device 400.
  • Referring to FIG. 5, a process flow chart is depicted which provides an exemplary method for implementing the various inventive embodiments described herein. The process is initiated 500 by coupling a motion sensor 75 to a processor 505 associated with a portable computing device 100. The portable computing device 100 may be a personal data assistant (PDA), cellular telephone, portable media player, and/or a handheld game player 510. The motion sensor 75 is configured detect manual shaking motions (MSM) imparted on the portable computing device 100 by a user 515. A simulation program is then operatively loaded into a memory coupled to the processor 520. The simulation program includes various menus to allow the user to properly set up the portable computing device 100, configure the operating conditions of the simulation program 520 and select the randomization object of choice 555.
  • Once the portable computing device 100 has been properly configured 525, the simulation program 520 beings reading signals generated by the motion sensor 530. If spurious motion signals are detected, the simulation program ignores the spurious motion signals and continues to monitor the motion sensor for deliberate manual shaking motions 535. If deliberate manual shaking motion signals are detected 535, for example as a sequence of deliberate shaking events, the simulation program 520 identifies any characteristic shake motions 540 based on preestablished parameters 545 entered during the set-up and configuration process 525.
  • The preestablished parameters may include time duration, number of events, magnitude of the events and frequency of the events 545. Any combination of these parameters may be used to identify the intended characteristic shake motion 540. While the characteristic shaking motion is in progress, the simulation program 520 simulates the shaking of the randomization objects. Once the characteristic shaking motion is determined to have ceased, the simulation program 520 simulates the release and coming to rest of the randomization objects. The simulation program 520 then outputs a randomized gaming result 320 as a graphical representation of a randomization object 305 to a display 25. Thus in related embodiments, the simulation program 520 outputs the randomization object 305 dynamically until the gaming result 320 is determined. In this way, for example, a user is given the illusion of shaking and then releasing a randomization object, for example dice, the gaming result seeming physically responsive to the user's physical motion of shaking and then ceasing to shake.
  • Once the gaming result 320 has been determined, the status of the player may be updated by the simulation program 560. The status of the player includes for example, advancing pieces in a simulated board-game by an amount prescribed by the gaming result, or winning, losing, drawing or other gaming outcomes 565, in a simulated game of chance. The gaming result 550 may take a variety of forms, for example numerical, textual, color-based, and/or pictorial. The simulation program 520 then resumes monitoring the motion sensor 75 for manual shaking motions 530 as described above. In this way the portable computing device may be manually shaken as a means of rolling dice in games that utilize traditional dice such as Backgammon, Monopoly (™), Yahtzee (™) and Craps, as well as games that utilize non-traditional dices with varying numbers of faces and varying facial content, such as Word Yahtzee (™), Mickey Mouse Yahtzee (™), and Dungeons-and-Dragons (™.)
  • The foregoing described exemplary embodiments are provided as illustrations and descriptions. They are not intended to limit an inventive scope to any precise form described. In particular, it is contemplated that functional implementation of the instrument accompaniment program described herein may be implemented equivalently in hardware, software, firmware, and/or other available functional components or building blocks. Other variations and embodiments are possible in light of above teachings, and it is not intended that this Detailed Description limit the scope of inventive embodiments, but rather by the Claims following herein.

Claims (24)

1. A shake responsive portable computing device for simulating a randomization object used in a game of chance comprising:
a processor;
a motion sensor functionally coupled to the processor and configured to detect shaking motions imparted on the portable computing device by a user;
a display coupled to the processor;
a memory coupled to the processor;
a simulation program operatively loaded into the memory including instructions executable by the processor to;
identify deliberately imparted characteristic shaking motions from the detected shaking motions;
generate a randomized gaming result in dependence on the identified characteristic shaking motion signals; and,
output the randomized gaming result to the display as a graphical representation of the randomization object.
2. The portable computing device according to claim 1 wherein the randomization object comprises one or more simulated dice and wherein the simulation program further includes instructions to simulate a tumbling movement of the one or more simulated dice in dependence on the identified characteristic shaking motions.
3. The portable computing device according to claim 2 wherein the simulation program further includes instructions to simulate the tumbling movement of the one or more simulated dice in approximate coordination with the identified characteristic shaking motions.
4. The portable computing device of claim 4 wherein the simulation program further includes instructions to dynamically depict the tumbling movement of the one or more simulated dice coming to rest to reveal the generated gaming result.
5. The portable computing device according to claim 1 wherein the display is encompassed by a housing in common with the processor.
6. The portable computing device according to claim 1 wherein the display is associated with a separate processor in processing communications over a wireless link with the processor.
7. The portable computing device according to claim 4 wherein the simulation program depicts the tumbling movement of the simulated dice coming to rest in response to a detected cessation of the identified characteristic shaking motions.
8. The portable computing device according to claim 1 wherein the portable computing device is one of, a personal data assistant, a cellular telephone, a portable media player and a handheld game player.
9. The portable computing device of claim 1 wherein the generated gaming result is one of; a number, a word, a sentence, a phrase, a color, an image and any combination thereof.
10. The portable computing device of claim 1 wherein the generated gaming result is used to update a status of play in the game of chance.
11. The portable computing device of claim 1 wherein the generated gaming result is dependent upon at least one dynamic characteristic of the identified characteristic shaking motion.
12. The portable computing device of claim 11 wherein the dynamic characteristic of the identified characteristic shaking motion is one of, a time duration, a magnitude, a number of distinct shake events, a frequency of the distinct shake events and any combination thereof.
13. A method for providing a shake responsive portable computing device for simulating a randomization object used in a game of chance comprising:
coupling a motion sensor to a processor associated with the portable computing device;
configuring the motion sensor to detect shaking motions imparted on the portable computing device by a user;
loading a simulation program into a memory coupled to the processor, the simulation program including instructions executable by the processor for;
identifying deliberately imparted characteristic shaking motions from detected shaking motions;
generating a randomized gaming result in dependence on the identified characteristic shaking motion signals; and,
outputting the randomized gaming result to a display coupled to the processor as a graphical representation of the randomization object.
14. The method according to claim 13 wherein the randomization object comprises one or more simulated dice and wherein the simulation program further includes instructions executable by the processor for simulating a tumbling movement of the one or more simulated dice in dependence on the identified characteristic shaking motions.
15. The method according to claim 14 wherein the simulation program further includes instructions executable by the processor for simulating the tumbling movement of the one or more dice in approximate coordination with the identified characteristic shaking motions.
16. The method according to claim 14 wherein the simulation program further includes instructions executable by the processor for dynamically depicting the tumbling movement of the one or more simulated dice coming to rest to reveal the gaming result.
17. The method according to claim 13 wherein the simulation program further includes instructions executable by the processor for generating the randomized gaming result in dependence upon one or more dynamic characteristics of the identified characteristic shaking motions selected from the group consisting essentially of; a time duration, a magnitude, a number of distinct shake events, a frequency of distinct shake events and any combination thereof.
18. The method according to claim 16 wherein the simulation program further includes instructions executable by the processor for depicting the tumbling movement of the simulated dice coming to rest in response to a detected cessation of the identified characteristic shaking motions.
19. The method according to claim 13 wherein the display is associated with a separate processor in processing communications over a wireless link with the processor.
20. A computer program product embodied in a tangible form comprising instructions executable by a processor associated with a shake responsive portable computing device to;
receive shaking motion signals from an operatively coupled motion sensor;
identify deliberately imparted characteristic shaking motions from the detected shaking motions signals;
generate a randomized gaming result in dependence on the identified characteristic shaking motion signals; and,
output the randomized gaming result on an operatively coupled display as a graphical representation of a randomization object.
21. The computer program product according to claim 20 wherein the randomization object comprises one or more simulated dice and wherein the computer program product further including instructions executable by the processor to simulate a tumbling movement of one or more simulated dice in dependence on the identified characteristic shaking motions.
22. The computer program product according to claim 21 further including instructions executable by the processor for simulating the tumbling movement of the one or more dice in approximate coordination with the identified characteristic shaking motions.
23. The computer program product according to claim 21 further including instructions executable by the processor to dynamically depict the tumbling movement of the one or more simulated dice coming to rest to reveal the gaming result.
24. The computer program product according to claim 20 wherein the tangible form is one of; a logical media, a magnetic media and an optical media.
US11/563,610 2005-10-07 2006-11-27 Shake Responsive Portable Computing Device for Simulating a Randomization Object Used In a Game Of Chance Abandoned US20070145680A1 (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US75049005P true 2005-12-15 2005-12-15
US11/539,598 US7586032B2 (en) 2005-10-07 2006-10-06 Shake responsive portable media player
US11/555,784 US20070118241A1 (en) 2005-12-16 2006-11-02 Shake Jamming Portable Media Player
US11/563,610 US20070145680A1 (en) 2005-12-15 2006-11-27 Shake Responsive Portable Computing Device for Simulating a Randomization Object Used In a Game Of Chance

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/563,610 US20070145680A1 (en) 2005-12-15 2006-11-27 Shake Responsive Portable Computing Device for Simulating a Randomization Object Used In a Game Of Chance

Related Parent Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/539,598 Continuation-In-Part US7586032B2 (en) 2005-01-27 2006-10-06 Shake responsive portable media player
US11/555,784 Continuation-In-Part US20070118241A1 (en) 2005-10-07 2006-11-02 Shake Jamming Portable Media Player

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20070145680A1 true US20070145680A1 (en) 2007-06-28

Family

ID=38192716

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/563,610 Abandoned US20070145680A1 (en) 2005-10-07 2006-11-27 Shake Responsive Portable Computing Device for Simulating a Randomization Object Used In a Game Of Chance

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US20070145680A1 (en)

Cited By (34)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20070033012A1 (en) * 2005-07-19 2007-02-08 Outland Research, Llc Method and apparatus for a verbo-manual gesture interface
US20070213110A1 (en) * 2005-01-28 2007-09-13 Outland Research, Llc Jump and bob interface for handheld media player devices
US20090069072A1 (en) * 2007-09-07 2009-03-12 Hong Fu Jin Precision Industry (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd. Shake responsive handheld device and method
US20090167550A1 (en) * 2007-12-27 2009-07-02 Fu-Chiang Chou Data result determination methods and systems
US7586032B2 (en) * 2005-10-07 2009-09-08 Outland Research, Llc Shake responsive portable media player
WO2009111945A1 (en) * 2008-03-10 2009-09-17 创新科技有限公司 A method and a portable media player for emulating keystroke operations by using action changes
US20100035687A1 (en) * 2008-08-06 2010-02-11 Hong Fu Jin Precision Industry (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd Display device
US20100041465A1 (en) * 2008-08-15 2010-02-18 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Shake responsive handheld device
US20100041466A1 (en) * 2008-08-15 2010-02-18 Hong Fu Jin Precision Industry (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd. Shake responsive handheld device
US20100045475A1 (en) * 2008-08-22 2010-02-25 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Shake responsive handheld device
US20100146235A1 (en) * 2008-12-04 2010-06-10 Microsoft Corporation Isolating received information on a locked device
US20100146384A1 (en) * 2008-12-04 2010-06-10 Microsoft Corporation Providing selected data through a locked display
US20100195452A1 (en) * 2005-07-06 2010-08-05 Sony Corporation Contents data reproduction apparatus and contents data reproduction method
EP2306656A2 (en) * 2008-07-24 2011-04-06 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for providing board game service in mobile terminal
US20110111833A1 (en) * 2009-11-12 2011-05-12 Touchtable Ab Electronic gaming system
US20110208472A1 (en) * 2010-02-22 2011-08-25 Oki Semiconductor Co., Ltd. Movement detection device, electronic device, movement detection method and computer readable medium
US20110238194A1 (en) * 2005-01-15 2011-09-29 Outland Research, Llc System, method and computer program product for intelligent groupwise media selection
US20120151415A1 (en) * 2009-08-24 2012-06-14 Park Yong-Gook Method for providing a user interface using motion and device adopting the method
US8285344B2 (en) 2008-05-21 2012-10-09 DP Technlogies, Inc. Method and apparatus for adjusting audio for a user environment
US20130254674A1 (en) * 2012-03-23 2013-09-26 Oracle International Corporation Development mode activation for a mobile device
US8555282B1 (en) 2007-07-27 2013-10-08 Dp Technologies, Inc. Optimizing preemptive operating system with motion sensing
US8587601B1 (en) 2009-01-05 2013-11-19 Dp Technologies, Inc. Sharing of three dimensional objects
US8620353B1 (en) 2007-01-26 2013-12-31 Dp Technologies, Inc. Automatic sharing and publication of multimedia from a mobile device
US8678925B1 (en) * 2008-06-11 2014-03-25 Dp Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus to provide a dice application
US8712723B1 (en) 2006-12-22 2014-04-29 Dp Technologies, Inc. Human activity monitoring device
US8872646B2 (en) 2008-10-08 2014-10-28 Dp Technologies, Inc. Method and system for waking up a device due to motion
US8876738B1 (en) 2007-04-04 2014-11-04 Dp Technologies, Inc. Human activity monitoring device
US8902154B1 (en) 2006-07-11 2014-12-02 Dp Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for utilizing motion user interface
US8949070B1 (en) 2007-02-08 2015-02-03 Dp Technologies, Inc. Human activity monitoring device with activity identification
US8988439B1 (en) 2008-06-06 2015-03-24 Dp Technologies, Inc. Motion-based display effects in a handheld device
US8996332B2 (en) 2008-06-24 2015-03-31 Dp Technologies, Inc. Program setting adjustments based on activity identification
WO2015127204A1 (en) * 2014-02-21 2015-08-27 Groupon, Inc. Method and system for adjusting item relevance based on consumer interactions
US9390229B1 (en) 2006-04-26 2016-07-12 Dp Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for a health phone
US9529437B2 (en) 2009-05-26 2016-12-27 Dp Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for a motion state aware device

Citations (87)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5031914A (en) * 1990-01-29 1991-07-16 Mark Rosenthal Electronic dice game
US5186629A (en) * 1991-08-22 1993-02-16 International Business Machines Corporation Virtual graphics display capable of presenting icons and windows to the blind computer user and method
US5220260A (en) * 1991-10-24 1993-06-15 Lex Computer And Management Corporation Actuator having electronically controllable tactile responsiveness
US5263715A (en) * 1992-10-05 1993-11-23 Irem Corporation Dice displaying apparatus for a computer game machine
US5296871A (en) * 1992-07-27 1994-03-22 Paley W Bradford Three-dimensional mouse with tactile feedback
US5666138A (en) * 1994-11-22 1997-09-09 Culver; Craig F. Interface control
US5754023A (en) * 1995-10-26 1998-05-19 Cybernet Systems Corporation Gyro-stabilized platforms for force-feedback applications
US5767839A (en) * 1995-01-18 1998-06-16 Immersion Human Interface Corporation Method and apparatus for providing passive force feedback to human-computer interface systems
US5781150A (en) * 1995-01-25 1998-07-14 American Technology Corporation GPS relative position detection system
US5825308A (en) * 1996-11-26 1998-10-20 Immersion Human Interface Corporation Force feedback interface having isotonic and isometric functionality
US5828197A (en) * 1996-10-25 1998-10-27 Immersion Human Interface Corporation Mechanical interface having multiple grounded actuators
US5889672A (en) * 1991-10-24 1999-03-30 Immersion Corporation Tactiley responsive user interface device and method therefor
US5890152A (en) * 1996-09-09 1999-03-30 Seymour Alvin Rapaport Personal feedback browser for obtaining media files
US5952959A (en) * 1995-01-25 1999-09-14 American Technology Corporation GPS relative position detection system
US6024576A (en) * 1996-09-06 2000-02-15 Immersion Corporation Hemispherical, high bandwidth mechanical interface for computer systems
US6088017A (en) * 1995-11-30 2000-07-11 Virtual Technologies, Inc. Tactile feedback man-machine interface device
US6154201A (en) * 1996-11-26 2000-11-28 Immersion Corporation Control knob with multiple degrees of freedom and force feedback
US6211861B1 (en) * 1998-06-23 2001-04-03 Immersion Corporation Tactile mouse device
US6256011B1 (en) * 1997-12-03 2001-07-03 Immersion Corporation Multi-function control device with force feedback
US6300938B1 (en) * 1998-04-13 2001-10-09 Immersion Corporation Multiple-cylinder control device for computers and other electronic apparatus
US20020016786A1 (en) * 1999-05-05 2002-02-07 Pitkow James B. System and method for searching and recommending objects from a categorically organized information repository
US6366272B1 (en) * 1995-12-01 2002-04-02 Immersion Corporation Providing interactions between simulated objects using force feedback
US20020078045A1 (en) * 2000-12-14 2002-06-20 Rabindranath Dutta System, method, and program for ranking search results using user category weighting
US20020091796A1 (en) * 2000-01-03 2002-07-11 John Higginson Method and apparatus for transmitting data over a network using a docking device
US6429846B2 (en) * 1998-06-23 2002-08-06 Immersion Corporation Haptic feedback for touchpads and other touch controls
US20020142701A1 (en) * 2001-03-30 2002-10-03 Rosenberg Louis B. Haptic remote control for toys
US20020183118A1 (en) * 2001-05-30 2002-12-05 Scott Wolinsky Method and apparatus for simulating game accessories
US20020186221A1 (en) * 2001-06-05 2002-12-12 Reactrix Systems, Inc. Interactive video display system
US6504571B1 (en) * 1998-05-18 2003-01-07 International Business Machines Corporation System and methods for querying digital image archives using recorded parameters
US6563487B2 (en) * 1998-06-23 2003-05-13 Immersion Corporation Haptic feedback for directional control pads
US20030135490A1 (en) * 2002-01-15 2003-07-17 Barrett Michael E. Enhanced popularity ranking
US6626728B2 (en) * 2000-06-27 2003-09-30 Kenneth C. Holt Motion-sequence activated toy wand
US20030195884A1 (en) * 2002-04-12 2003-10-16 Eric Boyd Method and system for single-action personalized recommendation and display of internet content
US20030217007A1 (en) * 2002-01-29 2003-11-20 Sony Corporation Method for providing and obtaining content
US20030220917A1 (en) * 2002-04-03 2003-11-27 Max Copperman Contextual search
US20030236582A1 (en) * 2002-06-25 2003-12-25 Lee Zamir Selection of items based on user reactions
US20040017482A1 (en) * 2000-11-17 2004-01-29 Jacob Weitman Application for a mobile digital camera, that distinguish between text-, and image-information in an image
US6686911B1 (en) * 1996-11-26 2004-02-03 Immersion Corporation Control knob with control modes and force feedback
US6697044B2 (en) * 1998-09-17 2004-02-24 Immersion Corporation Haptic feedback device with button forces
US6697048B2 (en) * 1995-01-18 2004-02-24 Immersion Corporation Computer interface apparatus including linkage having flex
US20040125073A1 (en) * 2002-12-30 2004-07-01 Scott Potter Portable electronic apparatus and method employing motion sensor for function control
US6768066B2 (en) * 2000-10-02 2004-07-27 Apple Computer, Inc. Method and apparatus for detecting free fall
US20040166937A1 (en) * 2003-02-26 2004-08-26 Rothschild Wayne H. Gaming machine system having a gesture-sensing mechanism
US20040164971A1 (en) * 2003-02-20 2004-08-26 Vincent Hayward Haptic pads for use with user-interface devices
US20040198398A1 (en) * 2003-04-01 2004-10-07 International Business Machines Corporation System and method for detecting proximity between mobile device users
US20040204240A1 (en) * 2000-02-22 2004-10-14 Barney Jonathan A. Magical wand and interactive play experience
US20040215469A1 (en) * 2001-02-22 2004-10-28 Osamu Fukushima Content providing/acquiring system
US20040219961A1 (en) * 2003-04-08 2004-11-04 Ellenby Thomas William Computer games having variable execution dependence with respect to spatial properties of a mobile unit.
US20040224638A1 (en) * 2003-04-25 2004-11-11 Apple Computer, Inc. Media player system
US6822635B2 (en) * 2000-01-19 2004-11-23 Immersion Corporation Haptic interface for laptop computers and other portable devices
US20040252397A1 (en) * 2003-06-16 2004-12-16 Apple Computer Inc. Media player with acceleration protection
US20050096047A1 (en) * 2003-10-31 2005-05-05 Haberman William E. Storing and presenting broadcast in mobile device
US20050129253A1 (en) * 2003-12-12 2005-06-16 Yu-Yu Chen Portable audio device with body/motion signal reporting device
US20050126370A1 (en) * 2003-11-20 2005-06-16 Motoyuki Takai Playback mode control device and playback mode control method
US20050143173A1 (en) * 2000-02-22 2005-06-30 Barney Jonathan A. Magical wand and interactive play experience
US20050154761A1 (en) * 2004-01-12 2005-07-14 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for determining relative relevance between portions of large electronic documents
US20050174319A1 (en) * 2004-02-07 2005-08-11 Hwang Soon-Hoon Computer system and control method thereof
US20050212749A1 (en) * 2004-03-23 2005-09-29 Marvit David L Motion sensor engagement for a handheld device
US20050223002A1 (en) * 2004-03-30 2005-10-06 Sumit Agarwal System and method for rating electronic documents
US6965842B2 (en) * 2001-06-01 2005-11-15 Sony Corporation User input apparatus
US6982700B2 (en) * 1993-07-16 2006-01-03 Immersion Corporation Method and apparatus for controlling force feedback interface systems utilizing a host computer
US20060017692A1 (en) * 2000-10-02 2006-01-26 Wehrenberg Paul J Methods and apparatuses for operating a portable device based on an accelerometer
US20060019724A1 (en) * 2002-04-17 2006-01-26 Microsoft Corporation Reducing power consumption in a networked battery-operated device using sensors
US20060026521A1 (en) * 2004-07-30 2006-02-02 Apple Computer, Inc. Gestures for touch sensitive input devices
US20060060068A1 (en) * 2004-08-27 2006-03-23 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for controlling music play in mobile communication terminal
US20060074551A1 (en) * 2004-09-24 2006-04-06 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Navigation systems, methods, and programs
US20060097991A1 (en) * 2004-05-06 2006-05-11 Apple Computer, Inc. Multipoint touchscreen
US20060129607A1 (en) * 2004-12-10 2006-06-15 Hanna Sairo Velocity adjustment in learning cell identity
US20060167576A1 (en) * 2005-01-27 2006-07-27 Outland Research, L.L.C. System, method and computer program product for automatically selecting, suggesting and playing music media files
US20060164382A1 (en) * 2005-01-25 2006-07-27 Technology Licensing Company, Inc. Image manipulation in response to a movement of a display
US20060256082A1 (en) * 2005-05-12 2006-11-16 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method of providing motion recognition information in portable terminal
US7156773B2 (en) * 2004-04-05 2007-01-02 Sony Corporation Electronic apparatus, input device, and input method
US7163490B2 (en) * 2004-05-27 2007-01-16 Yu-Yu Chen Exercise monitoring and recording device with graphic exercise expenditure distribution pattern
US20070083323A1 (en) * 2005-10-07 2007-04-12 Outland Research Personal cuing for spatially associated information
US20070125852A1 (en) * 2005-10-07 2007-06-07 Outland Research, Llc Shake responsive portable media player
US20070156676A1 (en) * 2005-09-09 2007-07-05 Outland Research, Llc System, Method and Computer Program Product for Intelligent Groupwise Media Selection
US20070236493A1 (en) * 2003-05-27 2007-10-11 Keiji Horiuchi Image Display Apparatus and Program
US7330112B1 (en) * 2003-09-09 2008-02-12 Emigh Aaron T Location-aware services
US7348967B2 (en) * 2001-10-22 2008-03-25 Apple Inc. Touch pad for handheld device
US7354380B2 (en) * 2003-04-23 2008-04-08 Volpe Jr Joseph C Heart rate monitor for controlling entertainment devices
US7373820B1 (en) * 2004-11-23 2008-05-20 James Terry L Accelerometer for data collection and communication
US7383457B1 (en) * 2005-03-23 2008-06-03 Apple Inc. Adaptive power-reduction mode
US20080147217A1 (en) * 2006-12-13 2008-06-19 Ensky Technology (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd. Motion responsive portable media player
US7406612B2 (en) * 2003-11-21 2008-07-29 Dell Products, L.P. Information handling system including standby/wakeup feature dependent on sensed conditions
US7489979B2 (en) * 2005-01-27 2009-02-10 Outland Research, Llc System, method and computer program product for rejecting or deferring the playing of a media file retrieved by an automated process
US7519537B2 (en) * 2005-07-19 2009-04-14 Outland Research, Llc Method and apparatus for a verbo-manual gesture interface
US7603414B2 (en) * 2005-09-09 2009-10-13 Outland Research, Llc System, method and computer program product for collaborative background music among portable communication devices

Patent Citations (91)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5031914A (en) * 1990-01-29 1991-07-16 Mark Rosenthal Electronic dice game
US5186629A (en) * 1991-08-22 1993-02-16 International Business Machines Corporation Virtual graphics display capable of presenting icons and windows to the blind computer user and method
US5220260A (en) * 1991-10-24 1993-06-15 Lex Computer And Management Corporation Actuator having electronically controllable tactile responsiveness
US5559412A (en) * 1991-10-24 1996-09-24 Lex Computer And Management Corporation Actuator having electronically controllable tactile responsiveness
US5889672A (en) * 1991-10-24 1999-03-30 Immersion Corporation Tactiley responsive user interface device and method therefor
US5889670A (en) * 1991-10-24 1999-03-30 Immersion Corporation Method and apparatus for tactilely responsive user interface
US5296871A (en) * 1992-07-27 1994-03-22 Paley W Bradford Three-dimensional mouse with tactile feedback
US5263715A (en) * 1992-10-05 1993-11-23 Irem Corporation Dice displaying apparatus for a computer game machine
US6982700B2 (en) * 1993-07-16 2006-01-03 Immersion Corporation Method and apparatus for controlling force feedback interface systems utilizing a host computer
US5666138A (en) * 1994-11-22 1997-09-09 Culver; Craig F. Interface control
US5767839A (en) * 1995-01-18 1998-06-16 Immersion Human Interface Corporation Method and apparatus for providing passive force feedback to human-computer interface systems
US6697048B2 (en) * 1995-01-18 2004-02-24 Immersion Corporation Computer interface apparatus including linkage having flex
US5781150A (en) * 1995-01-25 1998-07-14 American Technology Corporation GPS relative position detection system
US5952959A (en) * 1995-01-25 1999-09-14 American Technology Corporation GPS relative position detection system
US5754023A (en) * 1995-10-26 1998-05-19 Cybernet Systems Corporation Gyro-stabilized platforms for force-feedback applications
US6088017A (en) * 1995-11-30 2000-07-11 Virtual Technologies, Inc. Tactile feedback man-machine interface device
US6366272B1 (en) * 1995-12-01 2002-04-02 Immersion Corporation Providing interactions between simulated objects using force feedback
US6024576A (en) * 1996-09-06 2000-02-15 Immersion Corporation Hemispherical, high bandwidth mechanical interface for computer systems
US5890152A (en) * 1996-09-09 1999-03-30 Seymour Alvin Rapaport Personal feedback browser for obtaining media files
US5828197A (en) * 1996-10-25 1998-10-27 Immersion Human Interface Corporation Mechanical interface having multiple grounded actuators
US6154201A (en) * 1996-11-26 2000-11-28 Immersion Corporation Control knob with multiple degrees of freedom and force feedback
US5825308A (en) * 1996-11-26 1998-10-20 Immersion Human Interface Corporation Force feedback interface having isotonic and isometric functionality
US6686911B1 (en) * 1996-11-26 2004-02-03 Immersion Corporation Control knob with control modes and force feedback
US6256011B1 (en) * 1997-12-03 2001-07-03 Immersion Corporation Multi-function control device with force feedback
US6300938B1 (en) * 1998-04-13 2001-10-09 Immersion Corporation Multiple-cylinder control device for computers and other electronic apparatus
US6504571B1 (en) * 1998-05-18 2003-01-07 International Business Machines Corporation System and methods for querying digital image archives using recorded parameters
US6563487B2 (en) * 1998-06-23 2003-05-13 Immersion Corporation Haptic feedback for directional control pads
US6429846B2 (en) * 1998-06-23 2002-08-06 Immersion Corporation Haptic feedback for touchpads and other touch controls
US6211861B1 (en) * 1998-06-23 2001-04-03 Immersion Corporation Tactile mouse device
US6697044B2 (en) * 1998-09-17 2004-02-24 Immersion Corporation Haptic feedback device with button forces
US20020016786A1 (en) * 1999-05-05 2002-02-07 Pitkow James B. System and method for searching and recommending objects from a categorically organized information repository
US20020091796A1 (en) * 2000-01-03 2002-07-11 John Higginson Method and apparatus for transmitting data over a network using a docking device
US6822635B2 (en) * 2000-01-19 2004-11-23 Immersion Corporation Haptic interface for laptop computers and other portable devices
US20050143173A1 (en) * 2000-02-22 2005-06-30 Barney Jonathan A. Magical wand and interactive play experience
US20040204240A1 (en) * 2000-02-22 2004-10-14 Barney Jonathan A. Magical wand and interactive play experience
US6626728B2 (en) * 2000-06-27 2003-09-30 Kenneth C. Holt Motion-sequence activated toy wand
US6768066B2 (en) * 2000-10-02 2004-07-27 Apple Computer, Inc. Method and apparatus for detecting free fall
US20060017692A1 (en) * 2000-10-02 2006-01-26 Wehrenberg Paul J Methods and apparatuses for operating a portable device based on an accelerometer
US20040017482A1 (en) * 2000-11-17 2004-01-29 Jacob Weitman Application for a mobile digital camera, that distinguish between text-, and image-information in an image
US20020078045A1 (en) * 2000-12-14 2002-06-20 Rabindranath Dutta System, method, and program for ranking search results using user category weighting
US20040215469A1 (en) * 2001-02-22 2004-10-28 Osamu Fukushima Content providing/acquiring system
US20020142701A1 (en) * 2001-03-30 2002-10-03 Rosenberg Louis B. Haptic remote control for toys
US20020183118A1 (en) * 2001-05-30 2002-12-05 Scott Wolinsky Method and apparatus for simulating game accessories
US6965842B2 (en) * 2001-06-01 2005-11-15 Sony Corporation User input apparatus
US20020186221A1 (en) * 2001-06-05 2002-12-12 Reactrix Systems, Inc. Interactive video display system
US7348967B2 (en) * 2001-10-22 2008-03-25 Apple Inc. Touch pad for handheld device
US20030135490A1 (en) * 2002-01-15 2003-07-17 Barrett Michael E. Enhanced popularity ranking
US20030217007A1 (en) * 2002-01-29 2003-11-20 Sony Corporation Method for providing and obtaining content
US20030220917A1 (en) * 2002-04-03 2003-11-27 Max Copperman Contextual search
US20030195884A1 (en) * 2002-04-12 2003-10-16 Eric Boyd Method and system for single-action personalized recommendation and display of internet content
US20060019724A1 (en) * 2002-04-17 2006-01-26 Microsoft Corporation Reducing power consumption in a networked battery-operated device using sensors
US20030236582A1 (en) * 2002-06-25 2003-12-25 Lee Zamir Selection of items based on user reactions
US20040125073A1 (en) * 2002-12-30 2004-07-01 Scott Potter Portable electronic apparatus and method employing motion sensor for function control
US20040164971A1 (en) * 2003-02-20 2004-08-26 Vincent Hayward Haptic pads for use with user-interface devices
US20040166937A1 (en) * 2003-02-26 2004-08-26 Rothschild Wayne H. Gaming machine system having a gesture-sensing mechanism
US20040198398A1 (en) * 2003-04-01 2004-10-07 International Business Machines Corporation System and method for detecting proximity between mobile device users
US20040219961A1 (en) * 2003-04-08 2004-11-04 Ellenby Thomas William Computer games having variable execution dependence with respect to spatial properties of a mobile unit.
US7354380B2 (en) * 2003-04-23 2008-04-08 Volpe Jr Joseph C Heart rate monitor for controlling entertainment devices
US20040224638A1 (en) * 2003-04-25 2004-11-11 Apple Computer, Inc. Media player system
US20070236493A1 (en) * 2003-05-27 2007-10-11 Keiji Horiuchi Image Display Apparatus and Program
US20040252397A1 (en) * 2003-06-16 2004-12-16 Apple Computer Inc. Media player with acceleration protection
US7330112B1 (en) * 2003-09-09 2008-02-12 Emigh Aaron T Location-aware services
US20050096047A1 (en) * 2003-10-31 2005-05-05 Haberman William E. Storing and presenting broadcast in mobile device
US20050126370A1 (en) * 2003-11-20 2005-06-16 Motoyuki Takai Playback mode control device and playback mode control method
US7406612B2 (en) * 2003-11-21 2008-07-29 Dell Products, L.P. Information handling system including standby/wakeup feature dependent on sensed conditions
US20050129253A1 (en) * 2003-12-12 2005-06-16 Yu-Yu Chen Portable audio device with body/motion signal reporting device
US20050154761A1 (en) * 2004-01-12 2005-07-14 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for determining relative relevance between portions of large electronic documents
US20050174319A1 (en) * 2004-02-07 2005-08-11 Hwang Soon-Hoon Computer system and control method thereof
US20050212749A1 (en) * 2004-03-23 2005-09-29 Marvit David L Motion sensor engagement for a handheld device
US20050223002A1 (en) * 2004-03-30 2005-10-06 Sumit Agarwal System and method for rating electronic documents
US7156773B2 (en) * 2004-04-05 2007-01-02 Sony Corporation Electronic apparatus, input device, and input method
US20060097991A1 (en) * 2004-05-06 2006-05-11 Apple Computer, Inc. Multipoint touchscreen
US7163490B2 (en) * 2004-05-27 2007-01-16 Yu-Yu Chen Exercise monitoring and recording device with graphic exercise expenditure distribution pattern
US20060026521A1 (en) * 2004-07-30 2006-02-02 Apple Computer, Inc. Gestures for touch sensitive input devices
US20060060068A1 (en) * 2004-08-27 2006-03-23 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for controlling music play in mobile communication terminal
US20060074551A1 (en) * 2004-09-24 2006-04-06 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Navigation systems, methods, and programs
US7373820B1 (en) * 2004-11-23 2008-05-20 James Terry L Accelerometer for data collection and communication
US20060129607A1 (en) * 2004-12-10 2006-06-15 Hanna Sairo Velocity adjustment in learning cell identity
US20060164382A1 (en) * 2005-01-25 2006-07-27 Technology Licensing Company, Inc. Image manipulation in response to a movement of a display
US7542816B2 (en) * 2005-01-27 2009-06-02 Outland Research, Llc System, method and computer program product for automatically selecting, suggesting and playing music media files
US7489979B2 (en) * 2005-01-27 2009-02-10 Outland Research, Llc System, method and computer program product for rejecting or deferring the playing of a media file retrieved by an automated process
US20060167576A1 (en) * 2005-01-27 2006-07-27 Outland Research, L.L.C. System, method and computer program product for automatically selecting, suggesting and playing music media files
US7383457B1 (en) * 2005-03-23 2008-06-03 Apple Inc. Adaptive power-reduction mode
US20060256082A1 (en) * 2005-05-12 2006-11-16 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method of providing motion recognition information in portable terminal
US7519537B2 (en) * 2005-07-19 2009-04-14 Outland Research, Llc Method and apparatus for a verbo-manual gesture interface
US7603414B2 (en) * 2005-09-09 2009-10-13 Outland Research, Llc System, method and computer program product for collaborative background music among portable communication devices
US20070156676A1 (en) * 2005-09-09 2007-07-05 Outland Research, Llc System, Method and Computer Program Product for Intelligent Groupwise Media Selection
US20070125852A1 (en) * 2005-10-07 2007-06-07 Outland Research, Llc Shake responsive portable media player
US20070083323A1 (en) * 2005-10-07 2007-04-12 Outland Research Personal cuing for spatially associated information
US7586032B2 (en) * 2005-10-07 2009-09-08 Outland Research, Llc Shake responsive portable media player
US20080147217A1 (en) * 2006-12-13 2008-06-19 Ensky Technology (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd. Motion responsive portable media player

Cited By (48)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20110238194A1 (en) * 2005-01-15 2011-09-29 Outland Research, Llc System, method and computer program product for intelligent groupwise media selection
US20070213110A1 (en) * 2005-01-28 2007-09-13 Outland Research, Llc Jump and bob interface for handheld media player devices
US20100195452A1 (en) * 2005-07-06 2010-08-05 Sony Corporation Contents data reproduction apparatus and contents data reproduction method
US20070033012A1 (en) * 2005-07-19 2007-02-08 Outland Research, Llc Method and apparatus for a verbo-manual gesture interface
US7586032B2 (en) * 2005-10-07 2009-09-08 Outland Research, Llc Shake responsive portable media player
US9390229B1 (en) 2006-04-26 2016-07-12 Dp Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for a health phone
US8902154B1 (en) 2006-07-11 2014-12-02 Dp Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for utilizing motion user interface
US9495015B1 (en) 2006-07-11 2016-11-15 Dp Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for utilizing motion user interface to determine command availability
US8712723B1 (en) 2006-12-22 2014-04-29 Dp Technologies, Inc. Human activity monitoring device
US8620353B1 (en) 2007-01-26 2013-12-31 Dp Technologies, Inc. Automatic sharing and publication of multimedia from a mobile device
US8949070B1 (en) 2007-02-08 2015-02-03 Dp Technologies, Inc. Human activity monitoring device with activity identification
US8876738B1 (en) 2007-04-04 2014-11-04 Dp Technologies, Inc. Human activity monitoring device
US8555282B1 (en) 2007-07-27 2013-10-08 Dp Technologies, Inc. Optimizing preemptive operating system with motion sensing
US9183044B2 (en) 2007-07-27 2015-11-10 Dp Technologies, Inc. Optimizing preemptive operating system with motion sensing
US9940161B1 (en) 2007-07-27 2018-04-10 Dp Technologies, Inc. Optimizing preemptive operating system with motion sensing
US20090069072A1 (en) * 2007-09-07 2009-03-12 Hong Fu Jin Precision Industry (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd. Shake responsive handheld device and method
US20090167550A1 (en) * 2007-12-27 2009-07-02 Fu-Chiang Chou Data result determination methods and systems
WO2009111945A1 (en) * 2008-03-10 2009-09-17 创新科技有限公司 A method and a portable media player for emulating keystroke operations by using action changes
US8285344B2 (en) 2008-05-21 2012-10-09 DP Technlogies, Inc. Method and apparatus for adjusting audio for a user environment
US8988439B1 (en) 2008-06-06 2015-03-24 Dp Technologies, Inc. Motion-based display effects in a handheld device
US8678925B1 (en) * 2008-06-11 2014-03-25 Dp Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus to provide a dice application
US9797920B2 (en) 2008-06-24 2017-10-24 DPTechnologies, Inc. Program setting adjustments based on activity identification
US8996332B2 (en) 2008-06-24 2015-03-31 Dp Technologies, Inc. Program setting adjustments based on activity identification
US20110195763A1 (en) * 2008-07-24 2011-08-11 Kang Sung-Wouk Apparatus and method for providing board game service in mobile terminal
EP2306656A2 (en) * 2008-07-24 2011-04-06 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method for providing board game service in mobile terminal
EP2306656A4 (en) * 2008-07-24 2013-11-20 Samsung Electronics Co Ltd Apparatus and method for providing board game service in mobile terminal
US20100035687A1 (en) * 2008-08-06 2010-02-11 Hong Fu Jin Precision Industry (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd Display device
US20100041465A1 (en) * 2008-08-15 2010-02-18 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Shake responsive handheld device
US20100041466A1 (en) * 2008-08-15 2010-02-18 Hong Fu Jin Precision Industry (Shenzhen) Co., Ltd. Shake responsive handheld device
US20100045475A1 (en) * 2008-08-22 2010-02-25 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Shake responsive handheld device
US8872646B2 (en) 2008-10-08 2014-10-28 Dp Technologies, Inc. Method and system for waking up a device due to motion
US20100146384A1 (en) * 2008-12-04 2010-06-10 Microsoft Corporation Providing selected data through a locked display
US20100146235A1 (en) * 2008-12-04 2010-06-10 Microsoft Corporation Isolating received information on a locked device
US9197738B2 (en) 2008-12-04 2015-11-24 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Providing selected data through a locked display
US20100146437A1 (en) * 2008-12-04 2010-06-10 Microsoft Corporation Glanceable animated notifications on a locked device
US8418086B2 (en) 2008-12-04 2013-04-09 Microsoft Corporation Isolating received information on a locked device
US8587601B1 (en) 2009-01-05 2013-11-19 Dp Technologies, Inc. Sharing of three dimensional objects
US9529437B2 (en) 2009-05-26 2016-12-27 Dp Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for a motion state aware device
US20120151415A1 (en) * 2009-08-24 2012-06-14 Park Yong-Gook Method for providing a user interface using motion and device adopting the method
US20110111833A1 (en) * 2009-11-12 2011-05-12 Touchtable Ab Electronic gaming system
US8851475B2 (en) * 2009-11-12 2014-10-07 Tangiamo Ab Electronic gaming system
US8793098B2 (en) * 2010-02-22 2014-07-29 Lapis Semiconductor Co., Ltd. Movement detection device, electronic device, movement detection method and computer readable medium
US20110208472A1 (en) * 2010-02-22 2011-08-25 Oki Semiconductor Co., Ltd. Movement detection device, electronic device, movement detection method and computer readable medium
US20130254674A1 (en) * 2012-03-23 2013-09-26 Oracle International Corporation Development mode activation for a mobile device
US20150242902A1 (en) * 2014-02-21 2015-08-27 Groupon, Inc. Method and system for facilitating consumer interactions with promotions
US10162513B2 (en) 2014-02-21 2018-12-25 Groupon, Inc. Method and system for adjusting item relevance based on consumer interactions
US10115105B2 (en) 2014-02-21 2018-10-30 Groupon, Inc. Method and system for facilitating consumer interactions for performing purchase commands
WO2015127204A1 (en) * 2014-02-21 2015-08-27 Groupon, Inc. Method and system for adjusting item relevance based on consumer interactions

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Magerkurth et al. Towards the next generation of tabletop gaming experiences
KR101855535B1 (en) Systems and methods for providing haptic effects
KR101735722B1 (en) A method for implementing a computer game
US7762891B2 (en) Game apparatus, recording medium having game program recorded thereon, and game system
US9921666B2 (en) Methods and apparatuses for operating a portable device based on an accelerometer
US9612662B2 (en) Systems and methods for shifting haptic feedback function between passive and active modes
JP5643214B2 (en) Method and apparatus for generating haptic feedback based on mood
JP6335613B2 (en) Systems and methods for haptic available compatible and multifaceted display
EP0768105B1 (en) Method of assisting a player in entering commands in a video game, video game system and video game storage medium
US9727217B2 (en) Haptically enhanced interactivity with interactive content
JP5793595B2 (en) Multiple actuation handheld device
CN103092406B (en) Systems and methods for multi-pressure interaction on the touch-sensitive surface
US20090131165A1 (en) Physical feedback channel for entertainment or gaming environments
US8576073B2 (en) Gesture-based user interface for a wearable portable device
JP5613236B2 (en) Interactive touch screens gaming metaphor with tactile feedback that exceeds multiple platforms
US20110260830A1 (en) Biometric interface for a handheld device
US9433866B2 (en) Method and apparatus for adjustment of game parameters based on measurement of user performance
US20030001882A1 (en) Portable entertainment machines
US7010213B2 (en) Media playing system and process
US10075582B2 (en) Terminal control method and apparatus, and terminal
Vajk et al. Using a mobile phone as a “wii-like” controller for playing games on a large public display
US8562436B2 (en) User interface and method of user interaction
EP1845432A2 (en) Portable electronic apparatus, user interface controlling method, and program
KR20160145054A (en) Non-visual feedback of visual change in a gaze tracking method and device
JP2007244418A (en) Game machine and game program

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: OUTLAND RESEARCH, LLC, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ROSENBERG, LOUIS B.;REEL/FRAME:020209/0321

Effective date: 20071107

Owner name: OUTLAND RESEARCH, LLC,CALIFORNIA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:ROSENBERG, LOUIS B.;REEL/FRAME:020209/0321

Effective date: 20071107