US20070137250A1 - Comfort grip ring - Google Patents

Comfort grip ring Download PDF

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Publication number
US20070137250A1
US20070137250A1 US11567711 US56771106A US2007137250A1 US 20070137250 A1 US20070137250 A1 US 20070137250A1 US 11567711 US11567711 US 11567711 US 56771106 A US56771106 A US 56771106A US 2007137250 A1 US2007137250 A1 US 2007137250A1
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Patent type
Prior art keywords
ring
sizing
features
digit
shank
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11567711
Inventor
Thomas Kohl
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Kohl Thomas D
Original Assignee
Kohl Thomas D
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A44HABERDASHERY; JEWELLERY
    • A44CJEWELLERY; BRACELETS; OTHER PERSONAL ADORNMENTS; COINS
    • A44C9/00Finger-rings

Abstract

A ring with a shank and two or more sizing features. The shank defines an aperture for receiving a digit, such as a finger. The sizing features extend from the shank into the ring's aperture. The sizing features may be generally arcuate raised surfaces, humps, or bumps. The sizing features prevent a ring from undesirably turning, provide air spaces between a digit and the ring, and/or accommodate finger size fluctuations. The sizing features are spaced either equally or unequally around the ring's aperture. The sizing features may have widths that approximately match the shank's width, or widths less than the shank's width. Rings with the sizing features may be resized by polishing or grinding down the sizing features.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. § 119(e) of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/748,310, filed Dec. 6, 2005 and entitled “Comfort Grip Ring”, which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.
  • INCORPORATION BY REFERENCE
  • [0002]
    This application is related to U.S. Design Application No. 29/244,306, entitled “Shank for Ring,” and filed on Dec. 6, 2005, which is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.
  • FIELD OF INVENTION
  • [0003]
    The present invention generally relates to jewelry, and more particularly to rings.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0004]
    Standard ring shapes and sizes often do not properly fit all ring wearers because each person has a unique finger and knuckle shape and size. An improperly or non-optimally fitted ring may cause discomfort to the wearer, result in undesirable turning of the ring around the wearer's finger, or make it difficult to put on and take off the ring. Also, the size of a person's knuckle and finger varies and fluctuates over time resulting in potential fitting problems even for wearers who do not initially have fitting problems.
  • [0005]
    Various solutions have been developed to address the problems associated with improperly fitted rings. One involves resizing a ring as a wearer's finger size changes. Resizing temporarily solves the fitting issue but does not address future fluctuations in finger size, thus resulting in constant resizing of the ring. Resizing also does not address finger and knuckle size fluctuations that may occur over relatively short-time periods.
  • [0006]
    Another solution involves incorporating leaf and other springs on the ring's shank. A wearer's skin is often caught between the ring shank and the spring. Also, the spring wears out or breaks over time.
  • [0007]
    Yet another solution involves using ring shanks with levers to allow the ring to be placed on fingers with relatively large knuckles. Such a solution allows the ring to be placed on and removed from the finger but generally does not address the problems of undesirable ring turning and discomfort from finger size fluctuations.
  • [0008]
    Accordingly, what is need in the art is an improved ring.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0009]
    One embodiment of the present invention takes the form of a ring including a shank and at least three sizing features. The shank includes a first surface defining an aperture operative to receive a digit. The at least three sizing features extend from the first surface into the digit aperture. In some embodiments, at least one of the at least three sizing features is generally arcuate shaped.
  • [0010]
    Yet another embodiment of the present invention takes the form of a decorative item for a digit including a body and at least three sizing features. The body includes an aperture defined by a first surface of the body. The aperture extends from a first exterior surface of the body to a second exterior surface of the body. The at least three sizing features are operatively associated with the body. Prior to operatively associating the at least three sizing features with the body, a select sized knuckle of a digit may be received through the aperture at a first number of rotational positions of the aperture relative to the longitudinal axis of the digit. After operatively associating the at least three sizing features with the body, the select sized knuckle may be received through the aperture at a second number of rotational positions of the aperture relative to the longitudinal axis of the digit where the first number is greater than the second number.
  • [0011]
    Yet another embodiment of the present invention takes the form of a method for resizing a ring. The method includes providing a ring having a shank and a sizing feature extending a distance into a digit aperture defined by a first surface of the shank. The method further includes reducing the distance the sizing feature extends into the digit aperture.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0012]
    FIG. 1 is a top perspective view of an example of a ring for a digit such as a finger.
  • [0013]
    FIG. 2 is a top perspective view of another example of a ring for a digit.
  • [0014]
    FIG. 3 is a front elevation view of the ring depicted in FIG. 1.
  • [0015]
    FIG. 4 is a cross-sectional view of the ring depicted in FIG. 2, viewed along line 4-4.
  • [0016]
    FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of the ring depicted in FIG. 2, viewed along line 5-5.
  • [0017]
    FIG. 6 is a front perspective view of another example of a ring for a digit such as a finger.
  • [0018]
    FIG. 7 is a front elevation view of the ring illustrated in FIG. 6.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 8 is a cross-sectional view of the ring illustrated in FIG. 7, viewed along line 8-8.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 9 is a cross-sectional view of the ring illustrated in FIG. 8, viewed along line 9-9.
  • [0021]
    FIG. 10 is a front perspective view of another example of a ring for a digit such as a finger.
  • [0022]
    FIG. 11 is a front elevation view of the ring depicted in FIG. 10.
  • [0023]
    FIG. 12 is a front perspective view of another example of a ring for a digit such as a finger.
  • [0024]
    FIG. 13 is a front elevation view of the ring depicted in FIG. 12.
  • [0025]
    FIG. 14 is a front perspective view of another example of a ring for a digit such as a finger.
  • [0026]
    FIG. 15 is a front elevation view of the ring depicted in FIG. 14.
  • [0027]
    FIG. 16 is a front perspective view of another example of a ring for a digit such as a finger.
  • [0028]
    FIG. 17 is a front perspective view of yet another example of a ring for a digit such as a finger.
  • [0029]
    FIG. 18 is a front elevation view of another example of a ring for a digit such as a finger.
  • [0030]
    FIG. 19 is a front elevation view of another example of a ring for a digit such as a finger.
  • [0031]
    FIG. 20 is a front elevation view of another example of a ring for a digit such as a finger.
  • [0032]
    FIG. 21 is a cross-sectional view of the ring illustrated in FIG. 20, viewed along line 21-21.
  • [0033]
    FIG. 22 is an exploded front perspective view of an example of ring with sizing features and a ring without sizing features.
  • [0034]
    FIG. 23 is a front perspective view of the rings illustrated in FIG. 22 joined together.
  • [0035]
    FIG. 24 is a partial cross-sectional view of the rings illustrated in FIG. 22, viewed along ling 24-24.
  • [0036]
    FIG. 25 is a flowchart for designing and manufacturing a ring with sizing features.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0037]
    Described herein are various examples of rings with sizing features. The rings include an inner surface defining a digit aperture to receive a digit such as a finger. The sizing features extend into a digit aperture from this inner surface. The sizing features can make the ring more comfortable to wear, make it easier to adjust the size of the ring, and/or make it easier to place the ring on and remove the ring from a digit.
  • [0038]
    More particularly, the sizing features are the primary contact points between the ring and a digit. As the primary points of contact, the sizing features can be arranged on the ring to avoid putting pressure on the veins of a digit, thereby resulting in a ring that is more comfortable to wear. Further, as the primary points of contact, the sizing features can form an air space between the digit and the ring's inner surface by spacing this surface away from the digit. This air gap or space allows air to reach and flow past the digit where the ring resides, thereby resulting in a ring that is more comfortable to wear. The sizing features also reduce the tendency of a ring to undesirably rotate around a finger since the sizing features create multiple, positive contact points between the ring and the shaft of the finger.
  • [0039]
    The sizing features can also make a ring more comfortable to wear by accommodating finger size fluctuations. Typically, a ring with the sizing features can be comfortably worn on a range of finger sizes. For example, a size seven (7) ring with the sizing features may be comfortably worn on fingers ranging from approximately size six and one-half (6½) to size seven and one-half (7½). This finger size range of a ring with the sizing features allows for the accommodation of finger size fluctuations.
  • [0040]
    The sizing features can make it easier to change a ring's size, especially when the shank of the ring is composed of a hard material such as steel. Ring size is typically determined by the average diameter of a circular digit aperture. Table 1 below shows some typical ring sizes with corresponding average diameters expressed in units of mm. Additional ring sizing information can be found in readily available comparative ring size equivalents and fraction and millimeter conversion charts.
    TABLE 1
    Examples of U.S. Ring Size and
    Corresponding Average Diameters
    U.S. Ring Size Average Diameters (mm)
    6 16.5
    16.9
    7 17.4
    17.8
    8 18.2
  • [0041]
    The sizing features extend into the digit aperture of the ring, thereby reducing the average diameter of the ring's digit aperture at certain portions. This reduction in the diametrical dimension at certain portions of the digit aperture effectively reduces a ring's size since the sizing features are the primary point of contact with the digit. The ring's size can then be increased by reducing the dimensions of (e.g., by polishing or grinding down the sizing feature) and/or removing one or more of the sizing features. In effect, the size of a ring with the sizing features can be readily increased to any ring size between the smaller “effective” ring size created by the sizing features and the “original” ring size (i.e., the ring size prior to implementing the sizing features).
  • [0042]
    When placing a ring on a digit, the ring must generally be slid over one or more knuckles, which tend to be more rigid than the fleshy portions of a digit where a ring typically resides. The relative rigidity of the knuckle compared to other areas of the digit means the knuckle may be a critical feature for sizing a digit aperture of a ring since the less rigid, more fleshy areas of the digit can more readily adapt to allow a ring that may be snug around these areas to be slid over the digit. Further, knuckles may have some diametrical dimensions that are greater than the diametrical dimensions portion of the finger where a ring is worn, especially for people who suffer from arthritis. This size differential can create problems with putting on and taking off the ring.
  • [0043]
    Specifically, for the ring to be inserted onto the shaft of the digit, the ring must have a sufficiently large digit aperture to allow the knuckle to pass through the ring's digit aperture. However, since the maximum diametrical dimension of the digit where the ring is worn usually has a smaller maximum diametrical dimension than the knuckle, a ring sized to clear the knuckle may not fit snugly on the digit of the finger, resulting in undesired rotation of the ring around the digit. On the other hand, if the digit aperture of the ring is sized to minimize turning of the ring, it may be difficult to slide the ring over the knuckle.
  • [0044]
    Knuckles are generally not circularly shaped; in other words, portions of the knuckle will tend to have a greater diametrical distance (i.e., a linear distance from one point on the knuckle to an opposing point on the knuckle) than other portions of the knuckle. Thus, only a portion of the digit aperture's perimeter needs to be sized to clear the knuckle's maximum diametrical dimension. The remaining portion of the digit aperture's perimeter may be sized smaller than the maximum diametrical dimension of the knuckle. This smaller sizing can be accomplished using the sizing features described below.
  • [0045]
    To slide a ring with the sizing features over the knuckle's larger portions, the ring is rotated around the digit so that the larger portions of the digit aperture's perimeter align axially with the portions of the knuckle with the larger diametrical dimensions. Once the ring clears the knuckle, it may be rotated to a desired rotational position on the shaft of the digit. The smaller diametrical distances for the digit aperture created by the sizing features provide a greater probability that a ring sized to clear the knuckle will have one or more points of contact on the shaft of the digit, thereby reducing the potential for the ring to rotate around the digit.
  • [0046]
    FIGS. 1 and 2 depict examples of rings 100, 200 for a digit such as a finger. Each ring 100, 200 includes a shank or body 105 having an inner side 110, an outer side 115, a front side 120, and a rear side (not shown). The rear side is generally similar to the front side 120. With reference to FIG. 4, the outer side 115 includes an opening 120 to a channel 125 to receive at least one gemstone 130. With reference to FIGS. 1, 2 and 4, the opening 120 and the channel 125 each extend substantially around the shank's circumference. In some embodiments, there may be no opening or channel, or the opening and channel may extend partially around the shank's circumference. Gemstones 130 are generally uniformly spaced within the channel 125, although the gemstones 130 may be non-uniformly spaced if desired.
  • [0047]
    As shown in FIG. 4, the shank 105 may further include grooves 135 near the upper end of the channel 125 to receive edge portions of gemstones 130 for retaining the gemstones 130 within the channel 125. Alternatively, studs 140 extending into the channel 125 from the shank 105 may retain each gemstone 130 within the channel 125 as shown in FIG. 1. Referring to FIGS. 1, 2 and 4, the channel's bottom may include two or more gemstone apertures 145 to allow light to pass through the shank 105. The gemstone apertures 145 may be spaced around the channel 125 with center-to-center distances between adjacent gemstone apertures 145 that approximately align with the center-to-center distances between adjacent gemstones 130, thus also allowing light to pass through the gemstones 130. In lieu of or in combination with a channel 125, any other gemstone mounting structure in or on top of each ring 100, 200 may be used.
  • [0048]
    Referring to FIGS. 1 and 2, the shank's inner side or surface 110 defines a digit aperture or hole 150 for receipt of a digit such as a finger or a toe. As depicted in FIGS. 1 and 2, the digit aperture 150 may be generally circular. Although shown as circular, the digit aperture 150 may be any geometric shape suitable for receiving a digit, including, but not limited to, shapes such as ovals and the like. Four sizing features 155 extend from the shank 105 into the digit aperture 150. More or less sizing features 155 are possible. The sizing features 155 may be raised surfaces such as smooth bumps, humps or the like. As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the raised surfaces are generally arcuate. If desired, the raised surfaces may be any other curved or otherwise smooth surface.
  • [0049]
    For shanks 105 with widths less than 3 mm, a sizing feature's width may be approximately equal to the shank's width. For shanks with widths greater than 6 mm, a sizing feature's width may be approximately one-half or less of the shank's width. Although described with specificity for shanks with certain dimensions, the widths for sizing features 155 may be any desired dimension for any sized shank 105. As shown in FIG. 5, gemstone apertures 145 aligning with a gemstone 130 may extend through the shank 105 and the sizing feature 155.
  • [0050]
    Turning back to FIGS. 1 and 2, the sizing features 155 allow each ring 100, 200 to be selectively rotated around a longitudinal axis of a digit so that a knuckle or shaft of the digit may more readily pass through the digit aperture 150. More specifically, opposing portions of each ring's inner surface 110 between the sizing features 155 will have greater diametrical distances than the diametrical distances between opposing sizing features 155 since the sizing features 155 extend into the digit aperture 150. Each ring 100, 200 may be rotated such that the inner surface portions 110 with greater diametrical distances align the larger portion of the knuckle or shaft as each ring 100, 200 is placed on, or removed from, the digit.
  • [0051]
    Effectively, a ring with the sizing features 155 is more optimally designed to correspond to the shapes of fingers, which tend to be more ovoid than circular in cross-section along the digit's longitudinal axis. This more optimal design reduces the number of relative rotational positions that a ring with the sizing features 155 will readily pass over the knuckle compared to similarly sized ring (i.e., ring with similar average diameter). However, because of these reduced rotational positions, when the ring with the sizing features 155 is rotated to position where the ring will not readily pass over the knuckle and/or other portions of the digit, the sizing features 155 engage the digit thus reducing the tendency of the ring to undesirably rotate or turn around the digit. In other words, compared to a ring with a similarly sized digit aperture that does not include the sizing features 155, rings with the sizing features 155 are less likely to undesirably rotate around a digit.
  • [0052]
    More particularly, the sizing features 155 form discrete points of contact with the digit that improve the ring's grip on it, which in turn reduces the ring's tendency to rotate around the digit. The sizing features 155 may also be the primary points of contact between the ring and the shaft of the digit, thereby making the ring more comfortable to wear. More specifically, softer portions of the digit, such as the flesh, can move into the open areas between the sizing features 155 to decrease the ring's snugness on the digit without compromising the ring's grip on it. Further, air spaces may be formed between the digit and the shank 105 without the ring's grip on the digit being compromised, thus permitting air to flow between the ring and the digit. Airflow between the digit and the ring increases the ring wearer's perceived comfort.
  • [0053]
    FIG. 3 shows a side perspective view of the ring 100 illustrated in FIG. 1. For illustrative purposes and with reference to FIGS. 1 and 3, various dimensions for the sizing features 155 and the shank 105, including the thickness of the shank 105, the maximum height of the sizing features 155, the projected length of the sizing features 155, the maximum diametrical distance of the digit aperture 150, and average minimum linear distance between diametrically opposed surfaces of the sizing features 155, are indicated in Table 2 below.
    TABLE 2
    Examples of Measurements for Shank and Sizing Features
    A 3.0 mm +/− .25 mm 
    B 5.5 mm +/− 1.0 mm
    C 1.8 mm +/− .8 mm 
    D 14.1 mm +/− 1.0 mm 
    E 15.3 mm +/− 1.0 mm 
    F 2.0 mm +/− .25 mm
    G 7.0 mm +/− 1.0 mm
    H 17.7 mm +/− 1.0 mm 
  • [0054]
    A ring with the dimensions set forth in Table 2 will generally fit fingers with a size, as typically defined in the industry, from six and one-half (6½) to seven and one-half (7½). Other rings may have greater or lesser values for each of the dimensions indicated in Table 2 to accommodate different finger size ranges, which could span over more or less than one finger size range. Further, to create a ring that will fit a certain range of finger or toe sizes, the maximum height of the sizing features 155 may be a select percentage of the maximum diametrical distance of the digit aperture 150. The percentage may range between approximately five to twenty percent (5-20%) of the maximum diametrical distance. For example, the percentage selected for the ring with the dimensions indicated in Table 2 is approximately ten percent (10%), or about 1.8 mm.
  • [0055]
    As shown the FIGS. 1 and 2, the sizing features 155 are spaced at unequal distances around the shank's inner surface 110. More particularly the upper sizing features 155 are spaced closer to each other than to their corresponding lower sizing features 155, and vice versa. Such spacing effectively forms two ovals within the digit aperture as shown by the dashed lines in FIG. 3. Defining oval spaces within the digit aperture 150 with the sizing features 155 aids in placing the ring on a digit since digits such as fingers often are ovoid shaped. More particularly, as the ring is slid onto an oval shaped finger, it can be rotated such that at least one of the ovals axially aligns with the finger's oval shape. Although depicted and described above as being unequally spaced apart, the sizing features 155 can be spaced apart equally around the shank's inner surface 110.
  • [0056]
    FIGS. 6-9 depict another example of a ring 300 for a digit with like reference numbers used for similar elements. The ring 300 is similar to the ring 100 depicted in FIG. 1 except there is no channel for receiving gemstones, the sizing features 155 do not have widths that approximately match the width of the shank 105, and the location of the sizing features 155 alternate sides. The sizing features' widths may be approximately one-half of the shank's width as illustrated in FIGS. 6, 8 and 9, or any other width less than or equal to the shank's width. The sizing features 155 may be otherwise similar to those described above with respect to FIG. 1 and function in a similar manner.
  • [0057]
    As also shown in FIGS. 6, 8 and 9, some sizing features 155 are located on the front side portion 160 of the shank's width and others are located on the rear side portion 165 of the shank's width. As also shown in FIGS. 6, 8 and 9, the sizing features 155 alternate between extending across the front and rear portions 160, 165 of the shank's width. In other words, for sizing features 155 on the front portion 160 of the shank's width, the sizing features 155 adjacent to them are located on the rear portion 165 of the shank's width. Alternating patterns other than the one depicted in FIGS. 6, 8 and 9 and described above may be used. For example, a first sizing feature may extend partially across the shank's width from the shank's front side, a second sizing feature across the mid-portion of the shank's width, and a third sizing may extend partially across the shank's width from the shank's rear side, and so on.
  • [0058]
    For illustrative purposes and with reference to FIGS. 6 and 7, various dimensions of the sizing features and the shank, including the thickness of the shank, the maximum height of the sizing features, and the projected length of the sizing features, are indicated in Table 3. Other rings may have greater or lesser values for each of the dimensions indicated in Table 3.
    TABLE 3
    Examples of Measurements for Shank and Sizing Feature
    A ½ of total shank width +/− 1.0 mm
    B 5.5 mm +/− 1.0 mm
    C 1.8 mm +/− 1.0 mm
    D 2.0 mm +/− 1.0 mm
  • [0059]
    FIGS. 10 and 11 depict views of another example of a ring 400 with sizing features 155, with like reference numbers used for similar elements. The ring 400 is similar to the ring 100 depicted in FIG. 1 except the bottom portion 170 of the shank 105 is generally flat, a pair of opposing sidewalls 185, 190 extend from the top portion 180 of the shank 105, and the shank 105 does not have a channel for receiving gemstones. The top portion 180 of the shank 105 and the opposing side walls 185, 190 together define a U-shaped opening for receiving a gemstone 130 such as a diamond.
  • [0060]
    The shank's flatter bottom end 170 defines corners 205, 210 on the left and right sides of the shank 105. Each corner region 205, 210 includes a sizing feature 155 such as a raised surface extending into the digit aperture 150. The ring 400 further includes a pair of sizing features 155 on its upper portion 180 extending into the digit aperture 150, each sizing feature 155 approximately upwardly opposite one of the bottom sizing features 155. The sizing features 155 may be similar to those described above with respect to the ring shown in FIG. 1 and function in a similar manner. For illustrative purposes and with reference to FIG. 11, various dimensions of the sizing features 155 and the shank 105, including the thickness of the shank 105, the maximum height of the sizing features 155, and the projected length of the sizing features 155, are indicated in Table 4. Other rings may have greater or lesser values for each of the dimensions indicated in Table 4.
    TABLE 4
    Example of Measurements for Shank and Sizing Features
    A 16.0 mm +/− 1.0 mm 
    B 2.1 mm +/− .5 mm 
    C 5.5 mm +/− 1.0 mm
    D 1.8 mm +/− 1.0 mm
  • [0061]
    FIGS. 12 and 13 depict yet another example of a ring 500 with sizing features 155 with like reference numbers used for similar elements. The ring 500 is generally similar to the ring 400 depicted in FIGS. 10 and 11 except the ring has three sizing features 155, a generally cylindrical bezel or sidewall 215 on the upper portion of the shank for holding a gemstone 130, and four prongs 220 (two on each side of the cylindrical sidewall 215) extending from upper portion 180 of the shank 105 for holding a second gemstone 130. The bezel 215 may be shapes other than cylindrical, such a pentagonal prism and so on.
  • [0062]
    Like the ring 400 depicted in FIGS. 10 and 11, two of the sizing features 155 extend from the corner regions 205, 210 of the shank 105 into the digit aperture 150. The third sizing feature 155 extends from the upper portion 180 of the shank 105 into the digit aperture 150. The third sizing feature 155 may be centered along the upper portion 180 of the shank 105 and may have a length that extends generally along the length of the upper portion 180 of the shank 105 as shown in FIGS. 12 and 13, or may not be centered and/or may not have a length approximately equal to the length of the shank's upper portion 180. The sizing features 155 may be similar to those described above with respect to the ring shown in FIG. 1 and function in a similar manner. For illustrative purposes and with reference to FIG. 13, various dimensions of the sizing features 155 and the shank 105, including the thickness of the shank 105, the maximum height of the sizing features 155, and the projected length of the sizing features 155, are indicated in Table 5. Other rings may have greater or lesser values for each of the dimensions indicated in Table 5.
    TABLE 5
    Example of Measurements for Shank and Sizing Feature
    A 1.8 mm +/− 1.0 mm
    B 6.5 mm +/− 2.0 mm
    C 1.8 mm +/− 1.0 mm
    D 5.5 mm +/− 1.0 mm
  • [0063]
    FIGS. 14 and 15 depict views of still yet another example of a ring 600 with sizing features 155 with like reference numbers used for similar elements. The ring 600 is similar to the one depicted in FIGS. 10 and 11 except it has two sizing features 155 rather than four and two generally cylindrical bezels or sidewalls 215 in the lower portion of the shank 105 for holding gemstones 130. Like the ring 400 depicted in FIGS. 10 and 11, each sizing feature 155 extends into the digit aperture 150 from corner regions 205, 210 in the lower portion 170 of the shank 105. Together, the sizing features 155 and shank 105 generally encompass the cylindrical sidewalls 215 for holding gemstones 130. Like the ring 500 depicted in FIGS. 12 and 13 the sidewalls 215 may be shapes other than cylindrical.
  • [0064]
    The sizing features 155 may be similar to those described above with respect to the ring 100 shown in FIG. 1 and function in a similar manner. For illustrative purposes and with reference to FIG. 15, the dimension of the bezel is indicated in Table 6. Other rings may have greater or lesser values for the dimension indicated in Table 6.
    TABLE 6
    Examples of Measurements for Bezel
    A 2.5 mm +/− 1.0 mm
  • [0065]
    FIGS. 16 and 17 depict perspective front views of more examples of rings 700, 800 with like reference numbers used for similar elements. The rings 700, 800 are similar to the ring 400 depicted in FIGS. 10 and 11 except the rings 700, 800 do not include sizing features. For the ring depicted in FIG. 16, the digital aperture 150 is generally shaped to define an aperture with a depth A greater than width B, thereby creating a better fit on a finger in which the depth of the finger's shaft is greater than the width of the finger's shaft. For example, if the depth of a finger's shaft was approximately one millimeter greater than the width of the finger's shaft, then the depth A could be approximately 1 mm greater than the width B. For the ring depicted in FIG. 17, the digital aperture 150 is generally shaped to define an aperture with a width B greater than the depth A, thereby creating a better fit on a finger in which the width of the finger's shaft is greater than the depth of the finger's shaft. For example, if the width of a finger's shaft was approximately one millimeter greater than the depth of the finger's shaft, then the width B could be approximately 1 mm greater than the depth A. In some embodiments, width C may be approximately 30 percent (30%) to sixty-five percent (65%) of width B.
  • [0066]
    The shanks or bodies for any of the rings described above made be composed of any metal, alloy, or other material used to form shanks or bodies for jewelry including gold, silver, platinum, copper, plastic, steel, the like, and any combination thereof. Any of the gemstones described in the examples above may be any natural or man-made precious stone, semi-precious stone, or other material used with jewelry including diamonds, rubies, emeralds, sapphires, opals, pearls, aquamarines, topazes, cubic zirconia, and so on. The sizing features may be composed of virtually any material including metal, alloy, rubber, plastic, composites, or any other material that may be bonded, fastened, integrated, or otherwise connected, joined, associated, or formed with the shank.
  • [0067]
    The digit aperture defined by an inner surface of the shank may be generally a circle, an oval, or any other geometric shape sized to receive a digit. For example, an oval shaped may be useful for a finger with a generally oval shaped shaft. Further, the dimensions for the major and minor axes of the oval shaped aperture may approximately match, or be slightly greater than, the corresponding dimension dimensions of the finger. The outer surface of the shank of the ring may any desired shape, including, but not limited to, matching the shape of the sizing features 155 as shown for the ring 900 in FIG. 18 or taking any shape as shown in FIGS. 1-15.
  • [0068]
    The sizing features 155 have been described above and illustrated or described in FIGS. 1-15, as either raised surfaces, bumps, or humps. The sizing features 155, however, could take other forms. For example, the sizing features 155 could be studs, beads, projections, spikes, or other devices that selectively reduce the overall linear distance between select opposing points on surfaces defining a digit aperture compared to a similar digit aperture not including the sizing features 155. Further, although the sizing features 155 are generally depicted with smooth and rounded exterior surfaces, the sizing features 155 could have rough exterior surfaces, irregular exterior surfaces, or both rough and irregular exterior surfaces.
  • [0069]
    As generally shown in FIGS. 1-15, the sizing features 155 may be integral with the shank. The integration may be done by forming the shank 105 in molds that include the desired shape of the sizing features 155. Alternatively, the sizing features 155 may not be integral with the shank 105; instead, the sizing features 155 may be separate elements that are operatively associated with the shank 105. For example, the sizing features 155 may be a beads operatively associated with the shank 105 by soldering the sizing features 155 onto the desired locations on the shank 105. Other ways of potentially operatively associated a sizing feature 155 to a shank 105 include welding, bonding, fastening, or otherwise joining or attaching the sizing feature to the shank. For example, a sizing feature 155 could be bonded to the shank 105 using an epoxy, glue, or other adhesive material. As another example, a sizing feature 155 could be fastened to the shank 105 using screws, rivets, bolts, nails, or other mechanical fastening devices.
  • [0070]
    As generally shown in FIGS. 1-15, the sizing features 155 and shank 105 may form a generally contiguous, solid body. The sizing features 155 and shank 105, however, may not form a contiguous, solid body. There may be gaps, holes, cavities, or other hollow or open spaces between a portion of the shank 105 and a sizing feature 155 and/or contained within the sizing feature 155. For example with reference to FIG. 19, a generally arch-shaped element may be used for the sizing feature 155. The arch-shaped element may be connected to the shank 105 at its opposing ends with the concave portion of the arch facing towards the shank 105, thereby defining a hole 250 between a portion of the shank 105 and the arch-shaped element. As another example with reference to FIGS. 20 and 21, a sizing feature 155 having a cavity 255 within the body of the sizing feature 155 may be used. Thus, although the exterior of the sizing feature 155 makes it appear as if the sizing feature 155 is a solid body, the sizing feature 155 actually may contain one or more a hollow spaces 255.
  • [0071]
    One or more gemstones 130 may be associated with the ring by the various methods depicted in FIGS. 1-5 and 10-17 or by other methods used to associate gemstones with rings. For example, the rings may use one or more prongs, channels, bezels, other apertures or holding members, or a combination of these features to associate one or more gemstones 130 with the shank 105 of the ring. Further, gemstones 130 may be set in a channel contained within the shank substantially around the perimeter of the shank as shown in FIG. 1 or around only a portion of the perimeter of the shank 105.
  • [0072]
    As shown in FIGS. 22-24, a ring 1000 with the sizing features 155 may be joined to a ring 1100 without the sizing features 155. The rings 1000, 1100 may be joined by soldering as shown in FIG. 24, or by any other method for joining rings together. By joining a ring 1000 with the sizing features 155 to one without the sizing features 155, at least some, if not all, of the benefits of a ring with sizing features 155 may be obtained for the ring 1100 without the sizing features 155. More specifically, the ring 1100 without sizing features 155 may be sized larger than the wearer's finger to allow for fluctuations in finger size and/or to space at least a portion of the ring's shank 105 away from the finger since the ring 1000 with sizing features 155 may be used to limit both rings 1000, 1100 from undesirably turning. Further, the ring 1000 with sizing features 155 may be selectively removable from the ring 1100 without sizing features 155 to selectively replace the ring 1000 with sizing features 155 with another ring 1000 with sizing features 155, or vice versa. Such interchangeability provides for relatively inexpensive rings 1000 with sizing features 155 to be combined with more expensive, oversized rings 1100 without sizing features 155 to accommodate changes in a wearer's finger size over time without the wearer needing to resize to more expensive ring.
  • [0073]
    FIG. 25 depicts a flowchart for designing and manufacturing a ring with sizing features. In operation 2500, the ring is designed using CAD software. Aesthetic and visual considerations for the rings can be reviewed using the CAD software prior to developing more expensive wax and cast samples. Yet further, the CAD design can be used to manufacture the wax sample.
  • [0074]
    Once designed using CAD or other computer software, a wax sample of the ring with sizing features is created in operation 2510. The wax sample provides a relatively inexpensive way to confirm the functionally and aesthetics of the ring prior to casting a sample ring. If the wax samples fails this inspection because of functional, aesthetic or other reasons, operation 2500 may be repeated to further refine the ring. Alternatively, the dimensions may simply be adjusted without performing further design using the CAD software.
  • [0075]
    Once the wax sample is satisfactory, samples of the ring are cast and finished in operation 2520 using techniques well known in the art. The cast sample of the ring provides another opportunity to inspect the rings for visual, functional and other considerations. If the ring sample fails this inspection because of functional aesthetic or other reasons, operation 2500 may be repeated to further refine the ring. Alternatively, the dimensions may simply be adjusted without performing further design using the CAD software.
  • [0076]
    Once the cast sample is acceptable, one or more molds are created for mass production of the rings in operation 2530. The molds may be made from rubber, metal or other suitable material. The molds are used to form additional wax rings for use in mass production of the rings by method well known in the art (e.g., casting) in operation 2540. Prior to or during mass production, market testing may be done to confirm the commercial viability of the design. Although the operation for design and manufacturing a ring is described with certain specificity, some operations may be skipped or omitted, or performed in another order. For example, market testing may occur at any stage of development or production. As another example, the operation of producing a sample cast may be omitted.
  • [0077]
    All directional references (e.g., upper, lower, upward, downward, left, right, leftward, rightward, top, bottom, above, below, inner, outer, vertical, horizontal, clockwise, and counterclockwise) are only used for identification purposes to aid the reader's understanding of the example of the invention, and do not create limitations, particularly as to the position, orientation, or use of the invention unless specifically set forth in the claims. Joinder references (e.g., attached, coupled, connected, joined, and the like) are to be construed broadly and may include intermediate members between a connection of elements and relative movement between elements. As such, joinder references do not necessarily infer that two elements are directly connected and in fixed relation to each other. As used herein, “diameter” or “diametrical distance” may be the measurement between any two points on the surface of the ring defining the digit aperture, any two points on the sizing feature, or any point on a sizing feature and any point on the surface of the ring defining the digit aperture.
  • [0078]
    In some instances, components are described with reference to “ends” having a particular characteristic and/or being connected with another part. However, those skilled in the art will recognize that the present invention is not limited to components which terminate immediately beyond their points of connection with other parts. Thus, the term “end” should be interpreted broadly, in a manner that includes areas adjacent, rearward, forward of, or otherwise near the terminus of a particular element, link, component, part, member or the like. In methodologies directly or indirectly set forth herein, various steps and operations are described in one possible order of operation, but those skilled in the art will recognize that steps and operations may be rearranged, replaced, or eliminated without necessarily departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention. It is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative only and not limiting. Changes in detail or structure may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

Claims (15)

  1. 1. A ring for a digit comprising:
    a shank including a first surface defining an aperture operative to receive a digit; and
    at least three sizing features extending into the aperture from the first surface.
  2. 2. The ring of claim 1, wherein at least one of the at least three sizing features extends a maximum distance of no less than approximately 1.8 mm from the first surface.
  3. 3. The ring of claim 1, wherein at least one of the at least three sizing features is generally arcuate shaped.
  4. 4. The ring of claim 1, wherein each of the at least three sizing features are generally arcuate shaped.
  5. 5. The ring of claim 1, wherein the at least three sizing features are unequally spaced along the first surface.
  6. 6. The ring of claim 1, wherein the aperture has an average diameter and at least one of the at least three sizing features extends a maximum distance of no less than approximately five percent of the average diameter.
  7. 7. The ring of claim 1, wherein the shank and at least one of the at least three sizing features are composed of the same material.
  8. 8. The ring of claim 1, wherein the shank and at least one of the at least three sizing features are integrally formed.
  9. 9. A decorative item for a digit comprising:
    a body including an aperture defined by a first surface of the body and extending from a first exterior surface of the body to a second exterior surface of the body; and
    at least three sizing features operatively associated with the body;
    wherein a select sized knuckle of a digit may be received through the aperture at a first number of rotational positions of the aperture relative to the longitudinal axis of the digit prior to operatively associating each of the at least three sizing features with the body;
    the select sized knuckle may be received through the aperture at a second number of rotational positions of the aperture relative to the longitudinal axis of the digit after operatively associating each of the at least three sizing features with the body; and
    the first number is greater than the second number.
  10. 10. The ring of claim 9, wherein at least one of the at least three sizing features is generally arcuate shaped.
  11. 11. The ring of claim 9, wherein at least one of the at least three sizing features extends a maximum distance of no less than approximately 1.8 mm from the first surface.
  12. 12. The ring of claim 9, wherein the aperture has an average diameter and at least one of the at least three sizing features extends a maximum distance of no less than approximately five percent of the average diameter.
  13. 13. A method for sizing a ring comprising:
    providing a ring including a shank and a sizing feature extending a distance into a digit aperture defined by a first surface of the shank; and
    reducing the distance the sizing feature extends into the digit aperture.
  14. 14. The method of claim 13, wherein the distance the sizing feature extends into the digit aperture is reduced by polishing the sizing feature.
  15. 15. The method of claim 13, wherein the shank is composed of a first material with a first hardness and the sizing features is composed a second material with a second hardness less than the first hardness.
US11567711 2005-12-06 2006-12-06 Comfort grip ring Abandoned US20070137250A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US74831005 true 2005-12-06 2005-12-06
US11567711 US20070137250A1 (en) 2005-12-06 2006-12-06 Comfort grip ring

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

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US11567711 US20070137250A1 (en) 2005-12-06 2006-12-06 Comfort grip ring
US29329858 USD604193S1 (en) 2006-12-06 2008-12-22 Ring

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US29329858 Continuation USD604193S1 (en) 2005-12-06 2008-12-22 Ring

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US20070137250A1 true true US20070137250A1 (en) 2007-06-21

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US11567711 Abandoned US20070137250A1 (en) 2005-12-06 2006-12-06 Comfort grip ring

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US (1) US20070137250A1 (en)

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080168800A1 (en) * 2007-01-16 2008-07-17 Barry Nisguretsky Irregular finger ring configuration
WO2010132034A1 (en) 2009-05-11 2010-11-18 Edip Akdemir A ring with the ability of multiple size adjustment and a method for this process
US20110072851A1 (en) * 2009-09-25 2011-03-31 Terrence Dashon Howard Diamond jewelry
US20110302958A1 (en) * 2010-06-10 2011-12-15 Joseph Mardkha Ring with Markings for Setting Gemstones
US8677624B2 (en) 2011-12-07 2014-03-25 Joseph Mardkha Ring with outer markings/segments for setting gemstones
USD779362S1 (en) * 2015-08-03 2017-02-21 Cartier International Ag Bracelet
USD780015S1 (en) * 2015-04-09 2017-02-28 Blumlux, Inc. Ring with internal stones
USD780020S1 (en) * 2015-01-20 2017-02-28 Harry Winston Sa Ring
USD780614S1 (en) * 2015-04-02 2017-03-07 Abraham Kaplan Ring

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US3360959A (en) * 1964-08-04 1968-01-02 Palais Jewelers Inc Finger ring including ring guard with undulated bearing surface
US3745788A (en) * 1971-11-26 1973-07-17 J Sullivan Finger ring and radially compressible adjustable sizing device and method of fitting a ring
US4043145A (en) * 1975-09-18 1977-08-23 Andre Chervin Finger ring with means for locking behind the knuckle
US4471634A (en) * 1983-01-26 1984-09-18 Sol Kaplan Plural section ring sizer
USD364830S (en) * 1994-02-07 1995-12-05 Finger ring shank
USD451423S1 (en) * 2001-01-30 2001-12-04 Betzalel Ambar Finger ring
US6672105B1 (en) * 2001-08-28 2004-01-06 Arthur A. Sills Finger ring fit adjuster
USD522902S1 (en) * 2004-06-02 2006-06-13 Merit Diamond Corporation Finger ring interior
US20060162380A1 (en) * 2005-01-21 2006-07-27 Jaguar Casting Adjustable size ring

Patent Citations (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3360959A (en) * 1964-08-04 1968-01-02 Palais Jewelers Inc Finger ring including ring guard with undulated bearing surface
US3745788A (en) * 1971-11-26 1973-07-17 J Sullivan Finger ring and radially compressible adjustable sizing device and method of fitting a ring
US4043145A (en) * 1975-09-18 1977-08-23 Andre Chervin Finger ring with means for locking behind the knuckle
US4471634A (en) * 1983-01-26 1984-09-18 Sol Kaplan Plural section ring sizer
USD364830S (en) * 1994-02-07 1995-12-05 Finger ring shank
USD377916S (en) * 1995-12-21 1997-02-11 Finger ring wrap
USD451423S1 (en) * 2001-01-30 2001-12-04 Betzalel Ambar Finger ring
US6672105B1 (en) * 2001-08-28 2004-01-06 Arthur A. Sills Finger ring fit adjuster
USD522902S1 (en) * 2004-06-02 2006-06-13 Merit Diamond Corporation Finger ring interior
US20060162380A1 (en) * 2005-01-21 2006-07-27 Jaguar Casting Adjustable size ring

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US9320329B2 (en) * 2007-01-16 2016-04-26 Barry Nisguretsky Irregular finger ring configuration
US20080168800A1 (en) * 2007-01-16 2008-07-17 Barry Nisguretsky Irregular finger ring configuration
WO2010132034A1 (en) 2009-05-11 2010-11-18 Edip Akdemir A ring with the ability of multiple size adjustment and a method for this process
US20110072851A1 (en) * 2009-09-25 2011-03-31 Terrence Dashon Howard Diamond jewelry
US20110302958A1 (en) * 2010-06-10 2011-12-15 Joseph Mardkha Ring with Markings for Setting Gemstones
US8567065B2 (en) * 2010-06-10 2013-10-29 Joseph Mardkha Method of augmenting a ring
US8677624B2 (en) 2011-12-07 2014-03-25 Joseph Mardkha Ring with outer markings/segments for setting gemstones
US9386828B2 (en) 2011-12-07 2016-07-12 Joseph Mardkha Ring with outer markings/segments for setting gemstones
USD780020S1 (en) * 2015-01-20 2017-02-28 Harry Winston Sa Ring
USD780017S1 (en) * 2015-01-20 2017-02-28 Harry Winston Sa Ring
USD780614S1 (en) * 2015-04-02 2017-03-07 Abraham Kaplan Ring
USD780015S1 (en) * 2015-04-09 2017-02-28 Blumlux, Inc. Ring with internal stones
USD779362S1 (en) * 2015-08-03 2017-02-21 Cartier International Ag Bracelet

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