US20070118810A1 - Scalable scroll controller - Google Patents

Scalable scroll controller Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20070118810A1
US20070118810A1 US11652277 US65227707A US2007118810A1 US 20070118810 A1 US20070118810 A1 US 20070118810A1 US 11652277 US11652277 US 11652277 US 65227707 A US65227707 A US 65227707A US 2007118810 A1 US2007118810 A1 US 2007118810A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
scale
controller
user event
scalable
receiving
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11652277
Inventor
Randall Ubillos
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Apple Inc
Original Assignee
Apple Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0484Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] for the control of specific functions or operations, e.g. selecting or manipulating an object or an image, setting a parameter value or selecting a range
    • G06F3/0485Scrolling or panning
    • G06F3/04855Interaction with scrollbars
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F19/00Digital computing or data processing equipment or methods, specially adapted for specific applications
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0484Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] for the control of specific functions or operations, e.g. selecting or manipulating an object or an image, setting a parameter value or selecting a range
    • G06F3/04847Interaction techniques to control parameter settings, e.g. interaction with sliders, dials

Abstract

A method for accessing a data field having fine resolution is disclosed. The method includes providing a scalable scroll controller with a scale controller to modify a scale for controlling a magnification for accessing data within the data field. The method also includes receiving a first user event to select the scale controller and receiving a second user event to modify a position of the scale controller. The scale is adjusted based on the position of the scale controller. An apparatus for performing the method is also disclosed.

Description

  • This application is a continuation application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/253,182, filed Sep. 23, 2002, which is a continuation application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/287,720, filed Apr. 7, 1999 (now U.S. Pat. No. 6,486,896).
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • This invention is related to the field of user interfaces and program controls. More particularly, this invention is directed to a method and apparatus for allowing simultaneous zooming and panning of content in a graphical user interface display.
  • DESCRIPTION OF BACKGROUND
  • A portion of the disclosure of this patent document contains material which is subject to copyright protection. The copyright owner has no objection to the facsimile reproduction by any one of the patent disclosure, as it appears in the Patent and Trademark Office patent files or records, but otherwise reserves all copyright rights whatsoever.
  • Many types of data have a broad range and a fine resolution. For example, a video clip is composed of a continuum of frames. The video clip can store up to a series of tens of thousands of frames. Thus, it has approximately five orders of magnitude. Similarly, a five second digital audio clip may require five orders of magnitude to access each bit sample. These types of data are often linear in the sense that there are starting and ending points and many linked “frames” or points of data between the starting and ending points.
  • In order to edit a video clip, one needs frame accurate control over the entire medium. In other words, a user must be able to readily pick out one particular desired frame nestled among tens of thousands of frames. It becomes readily apparent that tasks such as adjusting key frames in an video film or manipulating audio samples, can be quite time consuming and frustrating. What is needed is a method or apparatus which lets the user find and access one particular desired piece of data which is located among a broad range of data.
  • In the past, access to a particular point or frame of data was accomplished by using scroll bars. However, scroll bars typically can handle only two orders of magnitude. Consequently, a scroll bar would either need to be approximately twenty yards long in order to grant access to each frame of a video disk or provide a very compressed view of the frames in the video clip. The former user interface is impracticable, the latter would not be useful.
  • Another method used in the prior art was to implement VCR-type controls. This allows the user control over the entire range of data. However, these types of controls lack selectivity. For example, it would be difficult for a user to stop precisely on one particular desired frame or data point. The user would probably either overshoot or undershoot the desired frame or data point and would need to go back and forth searching for that particular frame or data point. What is needed is a method that gives the user control over a broad range, while giving the user random access to any particular piece of data within that range, especially at fine resolutions.
  • Yet another method used in the prior art to solve this problem is to provide one control for magnification of the data and another control for scanning at the selected magnification. One product utilizing this technique is SoundEdit™ by Farallon Computing, Inc. However, this implementation has a drawback in that it requires two separate controls. A further disadvantage is that these two controls cannot be operated simultaneously. A user has to change the magnification control independently from the navigation control. Such a system results in wasted time and effort. Thus, what is needed is a method and apparatus for providing the user with easy and fluid interaction over varying magnification scales while simultaneously providing the user with the capability of scanning at that magnification scale.
  • SUMMARY OF THE DESCRIPTION
  • In view of the problems associated with providing a user with control over a broad range of data, particularly linear data, one objective of the present invention is to provide the user with access of data down to very fine resolutions in a simple, natural, and effective method by utilizing a cursor positioning device such as a mouse, a paddle, a trackball, touch tablet, joystick or other input device having the capability of providing control for cursor movement in at least a single dimension.
  • Another objective is to increase the speed, accuracy, and selectivity of accessing data over a broad range by providing the user with easy and fluid interaction over varying magnification scales, while simultaneously providing the user with the capability of scanning the data at that magnification scale.
  • A method and device for accessing a broad data field having a fine resolution is described. A default scale is provided and is represented and controlled by a scalable scroll bar with a width that is proportional to the scale that is being represented. The scale controls the magnification at which the user accesses and/or examines the data. At a selected magnification, there is a particular range of the data (from one point in the data to another point in the data) that is provided. The present invention allows the user to modify the scale, which also changes the displayed range to be over different portions of the data field. The scale is varied by the user by manipulating the scalable scroll bar. Thus, the user may “zoom in” and “zoom out” to different portions of the data field. In addition, by moving the range to encompass different portions of the data field, the user can scan that portion of the data field.
  • In one embodiment of the present invention, a particular piece of data within the broad data field can be accessed. First, the scale is selectively varied, thereby controlling a range within the data field. Then, the range is moved to encompass a portion of the data field in which the piece of data resides. Next, the scale is successively decreased while, simultaneously, points successively closer to the location are kept within the range. The scale is decreased, which increased the magnification (i.e., increasing the range's resolution). The range is moved in this manner until the piece of data is actually accessed.
  • This is accomplished by using an input device having at least one degree of freedom (e.g., a mouse, a paddle, trackball, touch tablet, joystick, etc.). For example, movement can be long an x or an y-axis in a Cartesian coordinate system. Combined with the closing of a switch, movement along the axis may control the selection of the scale and the range at that scale. In preferred embodiment, the data from the input device can be remapped to control the position of a cursor on a display screen in one axis of movement, instead of the scale and range. In other words, the same input device can control either the position of a cursor or control the scale and range, simply by remapping the axes of the input device.
  • Other objects, features, and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the accompanying drawings and from the detailed description that follows below.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The present invention is illustrated by way of example, and not by way of limitation, in the figures of the accompanying drawings and in which like reference numerals refer to similar elements and in which:
  • FIG. 1 shows an example of the reduction of a full sized textual document as implemented by one embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 is a block diagram of the computer system upon which the present invention may be implemented;
  • FIG. 3 is a block diagram of one embodiment of the present invention wherein a mouse is utilized;
  • FIG. 4 is a screen shot of a timeline controller integrating a scalable scroll controller in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 5 are a series of screen shots of the timeline controller at various time scales ranging from decades to seconds;
  • FIG. 6 is a screen shot of a multimedia controller integrating the scalable scroll controller in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 7 depicts the multimedia controller where the scalable scroll controller has been selected by the user to decrease the amount of the timeline that is displayed;
  • FIG. 8 depicts the multimedia controller where the scalable scroll controller has been selected by the user to further decrease the amount of the timeline that is displayed;
  • FIG. 9 depicts the multimedia controller where the scalable scroll controller has been selected by the user to move the range of the timeline that is displayed;
  • FIG. 10 is a flow chart of a method of operation of the present invention;
  • FIG. 11 is a block diagram of the contents of a memory in the computer system of FIG. 2.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • A method and apparatus for providing the user with easy and fluid interaction over varying magnification scales, while simultaneously providing the user with the capability of scanning at that scale is described. In the following description, the present invention is implemented in reference to a zooming timeline controller and a zooming multimedia editor/viewer.
  • It will be obvious, however, to one skilled in the art that the present invention can equally be applied to other implementations, as well. For example, the present invention can be used in conjunction with editing textual documents. This invention enhances the user's ability to view a textual document at any point in its creation history by enabling the user to control the historical view of a document that may have been around for years and modified on a time scale of seconds. Thus, the present invention enhances the control of a document by showing the state of the document as it appeared at a selected time. On the other hand, the present invention can be used to graphically reduce a document. By using the structure implicit in the document, a more semantically valid zoom can be achieved. Outlines can progressively collapse the most-indented items, showing just structure and spacing. FIG. 1 shows the reduction of a full sized textual document. The sequence of steps for a textual document as it is zoomed out are: squeezing out white space, squashing all but the first lines of each paragraph, eliminating all but the first lines, eliminating all body text while leaving headings and sub-headings, then eliminating subheads, leaving headings only. Similarly, computer programs may also be edited in this manner.
  • Referring to FIG. 2, the computer system upon which the preferred embodiment of the present invention may be implemented is shown as computer system 100. Computer system 100 comprises a bus or other communication means 101 for communicating information, and a processing means 102 coupled with bus 101 for processing information.
  • Computer system 100 further comprises a random access memory (RAM) or other dynamic storage device 104 (referred to as main memory), coupled to bus 101 for storing information and instructions to be executed by processor 102. For example, code or computer readable instructions is contained in main memory 104. Main memory 104 also may be used for storing temporary variables or other intermediate information during execution of instructions by processor 102.
  • Computer system 100 also comprises a read only memory (ROM) and/or other static storage device 106 coupled to bus 101 for storing static information and instructions for processor 102, and a data storage device 107 such as a magnetic disk or optical disk and its corresponding disk drive. Data storage device 107 is coupled to bus 101 for storing information and instructions.
  • Computer system 100 may further be coupled to a display device 121, such as a cathode ray tube (CRT) coupled to bus 101 for displaying information to a computer user. An alphanumeric input device 122, including alphanumeric and other keys, may also be coupled to bus 101 for communicating information and command selections to processor 102. An additional user input device is cursor control 123, such as a mouse, a trackball, or cursor direction keys, coupled to bus 101 for communicating direction information and command selections to processor 102, and for controlling cursor movement on display 121. This input device typically has two degrees of freedom in two axes, a first axis (e.g. x) and a second axis (e.g. y), which allows the device to specify any position in a plane. Another device which may be coupled to bus 101 is hard copy device 124 which may be used for printing instructions, data, or other information on a medium such as paper, film, or similar types of media. Lastly, computer system 100 may be coupled to a device for sound recording and/or playback 125 such an audio digitizer means coupled to a microphone for recording information. Further, the device may include a speaker which is coupled to a digital to analog (D/A) converter for playing back the digitized sounds.
  • In one embodiment of the present invention, a mouse is used. FIG. 3 is a block diagram showing this embodiment. A mouse 130 is a small hand-held box-like device which is coupled to the computer system 100 by a cable. A sensing mechanism 132 monitors the magnitude and direction of movement of mouse 130 and generates an output signal based thereon. This signal is sent to computer 100 for processing. After processing, computer 100 sends a signal to display device 121, directing the movement of a cursor on the display device screen. One or more push-down button(s) 131 are provided on the mouse 130. By depressing button(s) 131, a signal is sent to computer 100 that a desired location of the cursor on display device 121 has been selected. The combination of moving mouse 130 to point the cursor to an object on the display screen and pressing the button(s) 131, while the cursor is pointing to the object to select the object, is called “point and click.”
  • If mouse 130 is moved while there is a depression on button(s) 131 when the cursor is on a graphical user interface device or widget, then the graphical user interface device will be moved. For example, the placement of the cursor on a graphical user interface control such as a scroll bar and the depression of button(s) 131 will allow the movement of the scroll bar to track the movement of the cursor by mouse 130.
  • Some parameters need an approximate setting. Others demand a more precise value. When controlling a remapped approximate parameter, each unit of motion of the mouse can effect a change in the value of the parameter. For example, if the mouse has units of movements in one hundredth of an inch, each five unit of mouse movements can translate to a movement of one pixel of the cursor. For values that need to be controlled more precisely, one embodiment is to reduce the mouse's motion units by a certain factor. Otherwise, the mouse's movements become too sensitive. For example, the number of units of mouse movements that will cause the cursor to move one pixel can be increased to ten.
  • When values are assigned to parameters, one embodiment is to make the mouse axes consistent with a positive or a negative change in that parameter's value. In other words, if a slider, scroll bar, or other graphic widget is used to represent the value that the mouse is controlling, the mouse axes are remapped to the dominant graphic axes. For example, if the slider is graphically oriented vertically, upward motion of the mouse moves the slider knob up. Even if a parameter value has no graphic representation in the system, a standard is applied consistently. One embodiment of this concept is to define rightward and downward movement to be “more” or increase in value, and leftward and upward movement to be “less” or decrease in value.
  • In one embodiment of the present invention, the mouse is used to allow a user to simultaneously adjust both the control of the time scale and the control for scanning at the selected time scale. This is accomplished by allowing “click and drag” of the mouse to controlling the time scale and the selected value at that time scale. In other words, by depressing the mouse button while the cursor is positioned over certain interface elements, the movement of the mouse adjusts the time scale and selected value at that time scale. These parameters and their control will be explained in greater detail below.
  • In another embodiment, cursor control may be performed through the use of a voice command recognition system, interfaced through use of sound recording and playback device 125. Thus, the user provides controls by voice to move and provide selection commands for the cursor. For example, the user may provide commands to zoom-in on the range by saying “zoom-in 10%” to sound recording and playback device 125. The user may also control the movement of the range that is displayed by saying “shift right, 5 seconds”, which shifts the range that is displayed by 5 seconds (alternatively, the user may shift the displayed range by any other time factor). The control provided by cursor control device 123 may therefore be replicated by voice commands.
  • The present invention as applied to a timeline controller enables the user to browse the time domain for a range of time at any time scale (magnification) or choose an incremental time value by successive refinement. The timeline controller zooms on a time continuum for picking a date/time. This is accomplished by utilizing a mouse with a modified scroll bar in the manner described below.
  • FIG. 4 shows a timeline controller 50. Basically, the user controls the time scale and the range of time that is visible. The time scale is controlled and shown by scalable scroll controller 11. Scalable scroll controller 11 also gives the current scale of timeline 14. The selected time is shown both in the column of fields 12 and by the indicator 13 on timeline 14.
  • Scalable scroll controller 11 is comprised of a horizontal bar 15 and scale controllers 17 and 18. Scalable scroll controller 11 is located in a scroll area 16. By using the mouse or other cursor positioning means to position the cursor on horizontal bar 15 and clicking and holding down the mouse button, scalable scroll controller 11 will track the movement of the mouse by sliding left and right as the mouse is dragged left and right, respectively. Scalable scroll controller 11 will continue to track the horizontal mouse movements until the mouse button is released. All the while that scalable scroll controller 11 is being moved, the range of the history being displayed in timeline 14 is also correspondingly shifted according to the horizontal movements of scalable scroll controller 11.
  • Scalable scroll controller 11 can also be controlled by disassociating the mouse control from the cursor and moving the mouse in a horizontal motion. For example, the disassociation may be done with a modified mouse click and drag, the modification signal being supplied in one embodiment by a switch (e.g., a key) on a keyboard. Scalable scroll controller 11 moves correspondingly to the horizontal movement of the mouse. As scalable scroll controller 11 slides left or right, the range of history that is displayed is shifted left or right, respectively.
  • Scalable scroll controller 11 also includes scale controllers 17 and 18. By placing the cursor on and click-dragging either one of scale controllers 17 and 18, the scale of timeline 14 may be changed. For example, by placing a cursor on scale controller 17 and click-dragging to the left, the scale of timeline 14 increases (i.e., the amount of time covered by the timeline increases), thereby decreasing the resolution of timeline 14. In other words, the magnification at which one observes the data (timeline) decreases. Conversely, as scale controller 17 is moved to the right, the scale of timeline decreases (i.e., the amount of time covered by the timeline decreases), thereby increasing the resolution of timeline 14. Click-dragging scale controller 18 to the right or left has the same effect of increasing or decreasing, respectively, the scale of timeline 14.
  • As the scale of timeline 14 changes, so too is the appearance of the timeline altered to reflect the new scale. In addition, the appearance of scalable scroll controller 11 also changes with the change of scale of timeline 14. For example, if the time scale is compressed such that the portion of the total history that is shown in timeline 14 is increased, then the width of horizontal bar 15 is increased proportionally. If time scale is compressed to the point where the total history is shown in timeline 14, then the width of horizontal bar 15, including scale controllers 17 and 18, expands to fill scroll area 16.
  • FIG. 5 shows screen shots 25-30 of timeline 14 at various scales ranging from decades to seconds. The selected time is shown by the column of fields 12. The column of fields 12 is divided into rows 19-24, corresponding to convenient time fields, shown on the left-hand side, and the selected time units, shown on the right-hand side. Row 19 gives the year field (Year) and the selected year unit (1975). Row 20 gives the month field (Month) and the selected month unit (Jan). Row 21 gives the day field (Day) and the selected day unit (17th). Row 22 gives the hour field (Hour) and the selected hour unit (11 am). Row 23 gives the minute field (Minute) and the selected minute unit (:05). Row 24 gives the seconds field (Second) and the selected second unit (:13). Thus, the selected time in screen shot 25 in FIG. 5A is 13 seconds past 11:05 am of Jan. 17, 1975.
  • It can be seen from screen shots 25-30 that timeline 14 looks different for different time scales, even though they represent the same selected time (i.e., 11:05:03 am Jan. 17, 1975). Screen shot 25 depicts timeline 14 wherein the scale is in years. The selected field is depicted by shading the correct row 19-24 which corresponds to that particular scale. In screen shot 25, since the year field was selected, row 19 which corresponds to the year field, is shaded. The selected year, “1975”, is shown on the right-hand side of row 19. Similarly, screen shot 26 depicts timeline 14 wherein the scale is in months. Accordingly, row 20 which corresponds to the month field, is shaded. Likewise, screen shots 27-30 depict timeline 14 wherein the scale is in days, hours, minutes, and seconds, respectively.
  • It can be seen from screen shots 25-30 of FIG. 5 that as the scale is decreased, the resolution of timeline 14 is increased. Screen shot 25 shows the scale in years. Timeline 14 gives a range of approximately a decade. This allows the user to select a time to a resolution of years. Screen shot 26 shows the scale in months. Its timeline gives a range of approximately two years. This allows the user to select a time to a resolution of months instead of years. As the scale is decreased, the resolution increases. Screen shot 30 shows the scale in seconds. The range of timeline 14 for screen shot 30 covers a range of approximately 15 seconds. This allows the user to select a time to a resolution of seconds. Thus, this embodiment of the present invention allows the user to select a particular time, within seconds, from a range of a century.
  • The fields and the selected times are highlighted up to the current finest-resolved selected time. Finer scales and units are dim, in comparison. This is illustrated in FIG. 5. In screen shot 25, the selected scale is in years and the corresponding selected time unit is 1975. Thus, for that resolution, the “Year” field and the “1975” time unit are highlighted. As the resolution increases, as in screen shot 28, it can be seen that the prior selected fields (i.e., “Year”, “Month”, and “Day”) and selected time units (“1975”, “Jan”, and “17th”) remain highlighted. The current selected field (“Hour”) and the current selected time unit (“11 am”) are also highlighted. Yet the finer fields (“Minute” and “Second”) and time units (“:05” and “:13”) which have yet to be selected by the user, remain dimmed.
  • As shown in FIG. 5, indicator 13 includes an icon and a vertical line segment. The icon for indicator 13 resides halfway along the top of timeline 14. The vertical line segment extends from the bottom of the indicator icon, through timeline 14, to the bottom edge of timeline 14. The line segment intersects timeline 14 which corresponds to the selected time (also displayed by the column of fields 12). As the scale is changed, the icon representing the indicator also changes to reflect the change in the scale. For example, the indicator icon representing the year scale, is in the shape of an hourglass, as shown in screen shot 25. The icon representing indicator 13 changes to the shape of a calendar for time scales of months and days, as shown in screen shots 26 and 27, respectively. The icon representing indicator 13 changes to the shape of a clock for time scales of hours, minutes and seconds, as shown in screen shots 28, 29, and 30, respectively. Part of the clock-shaped indicator 13 corresponding to the seconds scale, is shaded.
  • Once the desired field has been selected, the user may then select any time unit within that field. For example, in screen shot 26 of FIG. 5, since the user has selected the month scale, the user may now select time units corresponding to months of the year (e.g., Jan.-Dec.). Furthermore, once a desired field has been selected, the scale can, nevertheless, be changed within that field. For example, in screen shot 25 of FIG. 5, even though the selected field is “Years”, the user may change the scale of timeline 14 so long as what is displayed remains in years. Thus, timeline 14 may have an enlarged scale such that a decade is shown or may have a reduced scale such that only half a dozen years are shown. Likewise, in screen shot 27, given the same field (“Day”), timeline 14 may have a scale encompassing 12 days (as shown) or may have a reduced scale encompassing only a couple of days.
  • It would be apparent to those skilled in the art that the timeline controller can be linked to and access a database. Some sample databases include musical compositions, films, textual documents, etc. For example, by linking the timeline controller to a musical composition, the user may easily access one particular note among thousands within the composition. This is accomplished by assigning each note to one particular incremental time unit. The user may “zoom out” to locate the general area wherein the desired note resides. The user then “zooms in”on the desired note by successively decreasing the scale (increasing the magnitude) while keeping the note within the range until the desired note is located. Thus, the user may select a desired note by “zooming in” on it in the same manner as one would “zoom in” on a particular date/time. In other words, pieces of data within a database may be sequentially linked to incremental time intervals of the timeline controller. As example of this concept is described further below, wherein the frames of a video (or film) may be easily accessed.
  • FIG. 6 shows an alternative embodiment of the present invention as applied to multimedia editing, the multimedia controller. Basically, the multimedia controller operates in the same manner as the timeline controller described above. Similar to the timeline controller, the user controls the time scale. However, in the multimedia controller, the user controls the selection of a video frame or audio data point within that time scale, instead of a time unit. The scale is controlled in the same manner as described in the timeline controller. An individual frame within that scale is selected in the same manner as a particular time unit was selected in the timeline controller (i.e., manipulating the timeline or moving the indicator along the timeline).
  • In a window 210, a video track 200 contains a set of video clips 42 a to 42 d. In addition, a set of audio clips is also shown in a set of audio tracks 204. Video clips 42 a to 42 d can be removed from video track 200. Additional video clips may be inserted into video track 200 as necessary in a variety of ways, as desired by the user. Similarly, audio clips may also be inserted and removed at all points in audio track 204.
  • In FIG. 6, timeline 36 is divided into units of time which are further subdivided into individual frames in multimedia clips. Thus, the present invention enables a user to select one particular frame among any number of frames in a video clip. The selected time and frame is shown by the position of an indicator 38 a along timeline 36. A corresponding indicator 38 b is also displayed on horizontal bar 15 of scalable scroll controller 11 if horizontal bar 15 is in the appropriate section of scroll area 16. In addition, there is a selected time display 202 that is used to display the exact selected time. In FIG. 6, the currently selected frame corresponds to 0 minutes, 34 seconds and 27 frames into the clip.
  • The frame corresponding to the selected time/frame is pulled from the multimedia clip and displayed in another window (not shown). As the user changes the selected time/frame, the corresponding frame is pulled from the multimedia clip and displayed.
  • Context frames 42 are sampled at the beginning of each portion of the video clip and displayed in the appropriate segment of video track 200. Context frames 42 are used to give the user a reference point as to the section of the video clip which is represented by that section of the timeline. Context frames 42 scroll in concert with timeline 36. If the user positions the cursor over a context frame 42 and “clicks” the mouse button, the multimedia controller responds in the same manner as when timeline 36 is “clicked”.
  • One aspect of the multimedia controller is that it can be used to perform functions similar to the “jog” functions found on some high-end videotape decks. To scan over a video sequence, the user can zoom in (i.e., decrease the scale) so that the whole scene is covered in timeline 36. The user accomplishes this by adjusting the scale in reference to context frames 42. Indicator 38 a is then dragged across timeline 36 to simulate the “jog” control, but at an adjustable scale.
  • As seen in FIG. 6, the size of scalable scroll controller 11 almost occupies all of scrollable area 16 as all available video and audio clips are contained in video track 200 and audio tracks 204, respectively. The total amount of time shown in video track 200 and audio track 204 when scalable scroll controller 11 occupies all, or most, of scrollable area 16 includes some blank portion that is not occupied by video or audio clips, respectively. This is to allow the user to insert video or audio clips as desired at the end of the respective video or audio tracks. In addition, the total amount of time shown in video track 200 and audio track 204 includes some blank portion that is not occupied by video or audio clips, respectively, when scalable scroll controller 11 is moved to the right most position of scrollable area 16.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates where scalable scroll controller 11 has been used to decrease the time scale that is shown in timeline 36. That is, the resolution of the time scale has been increased in window 210. The user has clicked-dragged scale controller 18 to the left to decrease the scale. Horizontal bar 15 is shortened accordingly to reflect that the width of scalable scroll controller 11 only occupies a proportional amount of scrollable area 16 as timeline 36 only represents a portion of the total timeline.
  • Alternatively, the user could have also clicked-dragged scale controller 17 to the right to decrease the scale. In either case, the scale controller that is not click-dragged remains in the substantially the same position. In alternate embodiments, the scale controller that is not click-dragged may move the same distance in the opposite direction of the scale controller that is click-dragged such that the center of scalable scroll controller 11 remains in the same position.
  • Inspecting video track 200, it can be seen that the video clip 42 a is longer in window 210 as the scale of timeline 36 has been changed. In addition, as there is more space to display the video clips that are in the current scale, more preview information, such as the first frame of video clip 42 b, can now be seen. In addition, there is also more space to display the audio clips in the current scale, as can be seen by examining audio track 204.
  • In FIG. 8, scale controller 18 has been click-dragged to the left even further to decrease the scale of information that is displayed in window 210. The size of horizontal bar 15 and, thereby, scalable controller, scale controller 18 has been click-dragged to the left even further to decrease the scale of information that is displayed in window 210. The size of horizontal bar 15 and, thereby, scalable scroll controller 11, is decreased accordingly.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates where the user has click-dragged horizontal bar 15 to the right to scan the information that is in video track 200 and audio track 204. Thus, the range of the video and audio tracks that are being displayed is shifted to the right.
  • A method of the present invention will now be described by referring to FIG. 10. After computer system 100 has been initialized and all instructions and code segments have been loaded and executed such that display 121 shows window 210, the first step 802 is to receive a user selection event to the computer system 100 as shown in FIG. 2. User selection events can include events such as cursor movement and selection events or character entry events. These events are passed to an operating system software and handled by the operating system software.
  • In step 804, computer system 100 detects whether the user selection event is a selection event on a scale controller. Specifically, the computer system 100 detects whether the user has used a cursor control device to position the cursor on and selected either scale controller 17 or 18. If so, operation continues with step 806. Otherwise, operation continues with step 808.
  • Under step 806, if the user has selected scale controller 17 or 18, then a new scale upon which the level of detail of the data that is displayed depends is generated according to the movement of scale controller 17 or 18. The scale is used to create a range that is used to display continuous portions of the data set to the user. Thus, what is depicted by the range is dependent on the scale selected. As the scale is increased, the magnification level decreases. In other words, the range will span a broad portion of the data set. However, the resolution will be low. Conversely, if the scale is decreased, the magnification level increases and smaller portions of the data set are depicted by the range. However, the resolution increases.
  • In one embodiment, the initial scale that is used allows the complete set of data in the broad data set to be displayed in window 210. Thus, scalable scroll controller 11 is approximately the same width as scroll area 16. This allows the user to see the complete set of data. In another embodiment, a predetermined scale is used such that only a predetermined portion of the data is displayed. For example, a scale is chosen such that only one-quarter of the broad data set is displayed.
  • Once the user has released the selection on scale controller 17 or 18, then operation of the scalable scroll controller is complete until the next time a portion of the scalable scroll controller is selected.
  • In block 808, it is determined whether the user has selected horizontal bar 15. Thus, it is determined if the user has moved the cursor to be over horizontal bar 15 and used the cursor control device to select horizontal bar 15. If so, operation continues with step 810. Otherwise, operation continues with block 812.
  • When the user has selected horizontal bar 15, the range of the data set that is displayed may be manipulated and shifted horizontally according to the movement of the horizontal bar 15. For example, if horizontal bar 15 is moved to the left, then the range of the data set that is displayed is shifted the left. In another embodiment, if a vertical bar is used, then the range is shifted vertically. As discussed above, when horizontal bar 15 is moved to the. farthest right, a portion of unused area is displayed for the user to add additional data by an operation such as a drag-and-drop of additional data.
  • In block 812, if the user selection event is not determined to be a selection on the scale controller or the horizontal bar, then the user selection event is passed on to other event handlers in the operating system software of computer system 100.
  • FIG. 11 is a block diagram of main memory 104, containing functional blocks configured in accordance to one embodiment that is able to perform the method as described in FIG. 10. FIG. 11 contains a cursor control event handling unit 1110 communicating with an operating system 1108. Cursor control event handling unit receives all cursor control events such as cursor movement commands, selection commands (e.g., click), and drag commands (e.g., click-and-drag). Operating system 1108 provides system control functions for a computer system such as computer system 100. Operating system 1108 also performs functions such as data retrieval and display.
  • Main memory 104 also contains a window object 1106 that controls the display of a window such as window 210. Window object 1106 provides support for a scale calculation unit 1104 and a scalable scroll controller object 1102. Scalable scroll bar controller object 1102 is responsible for the display and control of a scalable scroll controller such as scalable scroll controller 11. Scale calculation unit 1104 is used to calculate the appropriate scale and range for displaying information in a window object based on the configuration of a scalable scroll controller.

Claims (24)

  1. 1. A method for accessing a data field comprising:
    providing a scalable controller including a scale controller to modify a scale for controlling a magnification for accessing data within the data field;
    receiving a user event to modify scale through the scale controller;
    automatically adjusting the scalable controller to maintain a center of the scalable controller unchanged in response to receiving the user event; and
    adjusting the scale based on the receiving of the user event to modify scale through the scale controller.
  2. 2. The method of claim 1, further comprising:
    receiving a selection of the scale controller.
  3. 3. The method of claim 1, wherein receiving the user event includes receiving a movement of a cursor control device along a first axis.
  4. 4. The method of claim 1, wherein the scalable controller has a width, and the scale is proportional to the width of the scalable controller.
  5. 5. The method of claim 1, wherein the scale controller does not change size as the scale is changed.
  6. 6. The method of claim 1, wherein receiving the user event includes receiving a movement command from a voice command recognition unit.
  7. 7. An article comprising a computer readable medium having instructions stored thereon for accessing a data field, which when executed, causes:
    provision of a scalable controller including a scale controller to modify a scale for controlling a magnification for accessing data within the data field;
    reception of a user event to modify scale through the scale controller;
    automatic adjustment of the scalable controller to maintain a center of the scalable controller unchanged in response to receiving the user event; and
    adjustment of the scale based on the reception of the user event to modify scale through the scale controller.
  8. 8. The article of claim 7, wherein the instructions further cause reception of a selection of the scale controller.
  9. 9. The article of claim 7, wherein reception of the user event includes reception of a movement signal of a cursor control device along a first axis.
  10. 10. The article of claim 7, wherein the scalable controller has a width and the computer readable medium further having instructions stored thereon, which when executed, causes:
    adjustment of the scale to be proportional to the width of the scalable controller.
  11. 11. The article of claim 7, wherein the scale controller does not change size as the scale is changed.
  12. 12. The article of claim 7, wherein reception of the user event includes reception of a movement command from a voice command recognition unit.
  13. 13. An apparatus for accessing a data field, the apparatus comprising:
    means for providing a scalable controller including a scale controller to modify a scale for controlling a magnification for accessing data within the data field;
    means for receiving a user event to modify scale through the scale controller;
    means for automatically adjusting the scalable controller to maintain a center of the scalable controller unchanged in response to receiving the user event; and
    means for adjusting the scale based on the user event to modify scale through the scale controller.
  14. 14. The apparatus of claim 13, further comprising:
    means for receiving a selection of the scale controller.
  15. 15. The apparatus of claim 13, wherein the means for receiving the user event is provided by means for receiving a movement of a cursor control device along a first axis.
  16. 16. The apparatus of claim 13, wherein the scalable controller has a width, and the scale is proportional to the width of the scalable controller.
  17. 17. The apparatus of claim 13, wherein the scale controller does not change size as the scale is changed.
  18. 18. The apparatus of claim 13, wherein the means for receiving the user event is provided by means for receiving a movement command from a voice command recognition unit.
  19. 19. An apparatus for accessing a data field, the apparatus comprising:
    a scalable controller including a scale-controller configured to modify a scale for controlling a magnification for accessing data within the data field;
    a user event detection unit configured to detect a user event to modify scale through the scale controller;
    an automatic adjustment unit configured to automatically adjust the scalable controller to maintain a center of the scalable controller unchanged in response to receiving the user event; and
    a scale adjustment unit configured to adjust the scale based on the user event to modify scale through the scale controller.
  20. 20. The apparatus of claim 19, wherein the user event detection unit is configured to receive a signal from a cursor control device.
  21. 21. The apparatus of claim 19, wherein the user event detection unit is configured to receive a movement of a cursor control device along a first axis.
  22. 22. The apparatus of claim 19, wherein the scalable controller has a width, and the scale is proportional to the width of the scalable controller.
  23. 23. The apparatus of claim 19, wherein the user event detection unit is configured to receive a signal from a voice command recognition unit.
  24. 24. The apparatus of claim 19, wherein the user event detection unit is configured to receive a movement command from a voice command recognition unit.
US11652277 1999-04-07 2007-01-10 Scalable scroll controller Abandoned US20070118810A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US09287720 US6486896B1 (en) 1999-04-07 1999-04-07 Scalable scroll controller
US10253182 US7165227B2 (en) 1999-04-07 2002-09-23 Scalable scroll controller
US11652277 US20070118810A1 (en) 1999-04-07 2007-01-10 Scalable scroll controller

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11652277 US20070118810A1 (en) 1999-04-07 2007-01-10 Scalable scroll controller

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10253182 Continuation US7165227B2 (en) 1999-04-07 2002-09-23 Scalable scroll controller

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20070118810A1 true true US20070118810A1 (en) 2007-05-24

Family

ID=23104046

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09287720 Active US6486896B1 (en) 1999-04-07 1999-04-07 Scalable scroll controller
US10253182 Active 2020-03-27 US7165227B2 (en) 1999-04-07 2002-09-23 Scalable scroll controller
US11652277 Abandoned US20070118810A1 (en) 1999-04-07 2007-01-10 Scalable scroll controller

Family Applications Before (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US09287720 Active US6486896B1 (en) 1999-04-07 1999-04-07 Scalable scroll controller
US10253182 Active 2020-03-27 US7165227B2 (en) 1999-04-07 2002-09-23 Scalable scroll controller

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (3) US6486896B1 (en)

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100281377A1 (en) * 2009-05-01 2010-11-04 Brian Meaney Condensing Graphical Representations of Media Clips in a Composite Display Area of a Media-Editing Application
US20110035700A1 (en) * 2009-08-05 2011-02-10 Brian Meaney Multi-Operation User Interface Tool
US20120030550A1 (en) * 2010-07-28 2012-02-02 Chin Ai Method for editing multimedia
US8698844B1 (en) 2005-04-16 2014-04-15 Apple Inc. Processing cursor movements in a graphical user interface of a multimedia application
US8856655B2 (en) 2009-05-01 2014-10-07 Apple Inc. Media editing application with capability to focus on graphical composite elements in a media compositing area
US20150040061A1 (en) * 2012-08-24 2015-02-05 Jun Lu Method, apparatus and system of displaying a file
US20150277718A1 (en) * 2014-03-26 2015-10-01 Onshape Inc. Numeric Input Control Through A Non-Linear Slider

Families Citing this family (185)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6061062A (en) * 1991-12-20 2000-05-09 Apple Computer, Inc. Zooming controller
GB9722766D0 (en) 1997-10-28 1997-12-24 British Telecomm Portable computers
US7788080B2 (en) 2001-11-19 2010-08-31 Ricoh Company, Ltd. Paper interface for simulation environments
US7743347B2 (en) * 2001-11-19 2010-06-22 Ricoh Company, Ltd. Paper-based interface for specifying ranges
US20010030667A1 (en) 2000-04-10 2001-10-18 Kelts Brett R. Interactive display interface for information objects
US20080060020A1 (en) * 2000-12-22 2008-03-06 Hillcrest Laboratories, Inc. Methods and systems for semantic zooming
US6922816B1 (en) * 2000-08-24 2005-07-26 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for adjusting settings with slider controls having variable sensitivity
US7380216B2 (en) * 2000-11-30 2008-05-27 International Business Machines Corporation Zoom-capable scrollbar
US6950989B2 (en) * 2000-12-20 2005-09-27 Eastman Kodak Company Timeline-based graphical user interface for efficient image database browsing and retrieval
US20050134578A1 (en) * 2001-07-13 2005-06-23 Universal Electronics Inc. System and methods for interacting with a control environment
JP3847098B2 (en) * 2001-03-29 2006-11-15 アルパイン株式会社 Audio information display device
EP1449190B1 (en) * 2001-05-02 2013-07-10 Bitstream, Inc. Methods, systems, and programming for producing and displaying subpixel-optimized images and digital content including such images
US7219309B2 (en) 2001-05-02 2007-05-15 Bitstream Inc. Innovations for the display of web pages
US8028249B2 (en) * 2001-05-23 2011-09-27 Eastman Kodak Company Method and system for browsing large digital multimedia object collections
US6996782B2 (en) * 2001-05-23 2006-02-07 Eastman Kodak Company Using digital objects organized according to a histogram timeline
US6747677B2 (en) * 2001-05-30 2004-06-08 Oracle International Corporation Display system and method for displaying change time information relating to data stored on a database
US7540011B2 (en) * 2001-06-11 2009-05-26 Arrowsight, Inc. Caching graphical interface for displaying video and ancillary data from a saved video
US7162698B2 (en) * 2001-07-17 2007-01-09 Mcafee, Inc. Sliding window packet management systems
US7071915B2 (en) * 2001-09-13 2006-07-04 E-Book Systems Pte Ltd. Method for displaying flipping pages via electromechanical information browsing device
US8539344B2 (en) 2001-11-19 2013-09-17 Ricoh Company, Ltd. Paper-based interface for multimedia information stored by multiple multimedia documents
US7149957B2 (en) 2001-11-19 2006-12-12 Ricoh Company, Ltd. Techniques for retrieving multimedia information using a paper-based interface
US7143362B2 (en) * 2001-12-28 2006-11-28 International Business Machines Corporation System and method for visualizing and navigating content in a graphical user interface
US7650562B2 (en) * 2002-02-21 2010-01-19 Xerox Corporation Methods and systems for incrementally changing text representation
US7549114B2 (en) * 2002-02-21 2009-06-16 Xerox Corporation Methods and systems for incrementally changing text representation
US7487444B2 (en) 2002-03-19 2009-02-03 Aol Llc Reformatting columns of content for display
US7194697B2 (en) * 2002-09-24 2007-03-20 Microsoft Corporation Magnification engine
US7100119B2 (en) * 2002-11-01 2006-08-29 Microsoft Corporation Page bar control
US20040109029A1 (en) * 2002-12-10 2004-06-10 International Business Machines Corporation Method, system, program product and navigator for manipulating a computer display view
US7328412B1 (en) * 2003-04-05 2008-02-05 Apple Inc. Method and apparatus for displaying a gain control interface with non-linear gain levels
US8046705B2 (en) * 2003-05-08 2011-10-25 Hillcrest Laboratories, Inc. Systems and methods for resolution consistent semantic zooming
US9715678B2 (en) 2003-06-26 2017-07-25 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Side-by-side shared calendars
US8799808B2 (en) * 2003-07-01 2014-08-05 Microsoft Corporation Adaptive multi-line view user interface
US7334195B2 (en) * 2003-10-14 2008-02-19 Microsoft Corporation System and process for presenting search results in a histogram/cluster format
US20050108643A1 (en) * 2003-11-17 2005-05-19 Nokia Corporation Topographic presentation of media files in a media diary application
US20050105374A1 (en) * 2003-11-17 2005-05-19 Nokia Corporation Media diary application for use with digital device
US8990255B2 (en) 2003-11-17 2015-03-24 Nokia Corporation Time bar navigation in a media diary application
US8010579B2 (en) * 2003-11-17 2011-08-30 Nokia Corporation Bookmarking and annotating in a media diary application
US7774718B2 (en) * 2003-12-17 2010-08-10 Nokia Corporation Time handle in a media diary application for accessing media files
CN101390034B (en) * 2004-01-29 2012-03-14 辛纳普蒂克斯有限公司 Method and apparatus for initiating one-dimensional signals with a two-dimensional pointing device
US20050187943A1 (en) * 2004-02-09 2005-08-25 Nokia Corporation Representation of media items in a media file management application for use with a digital device
US8468444B2 (en) * 2004-03-17 2013-06-18 Targit A/S Hyper related OLAP
US8621385B2 (en) 2004-05-21 2013-12-31 Sap Ag System and method for controlling a display of data
US20050286428A1 (en) * 2004-06-28 2005-12-29 Nokia Corporation Timeline management of network communicated information
US7562299B2 (en) * 2004-08-13 2009-07-14 Pelco, Inc. Method and apparatus for searching recorded video
US7895531B2 (en) 2004-08-16 2011-02-22 Microsoft Corporation Floating command object
US7703036B2 (en) 2004-08-16 2010-04-20 Microsoft Corporation User interface for displaying selectable software functionality controls that are relevant to a selected object
US8255828B2 (en) 2004-08-16 2012-08-28 Microsoft Corporation Command user interface for displaying selectable software functionality controls
US9015621B2 (en) 2004-08-16 2015-04-21 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Command user interface for displaying multiple sections of software functionality controls
US8146016B2 (en) 2004-08-16 2012-03-27 Microsoft Corporation User interface for displaying a gallery of formatting options applicable to a selected object
US7747966B2 (en) 2004-09-30 2010-06-29 Microsoft Corporation User interface for providing task management and calendar information
US7391423B1 (en) 2004-10-06 2008-06-24 Adobe Systems Incorporated Thumbnail scaling based on display pane size
US8856150B2 (en) * 2005-03-04 2014-10-07 Agfa Healthcare Inc. Managing and displaying solutions for multiple resources in an appointment scheduling system
EP1859396A1 (en) * 2005-03-04 2007-11-28 Quadrat Optimised appointment scheduling method
WO2006094885A1 (en) * 2005-03-04 2006-09-14 Quadrat Method for processing a linked list of time segments
WO2006094890A1 (en) * 2005-03-04 2006-09-14 Quadrat Method for processing a link of time segments
EP1859397A2 (en) * 2005-03-04 2007-11-28 Quadrat User interface for appointment scheduling system showing appointment solutions within a day.
JP2008532152A (en) * 2005-03-04 2008-08-14 クアドラト Improved reservation of the Registration Act and user interface
US7770068B2 (en) * 2005-06-01 2010-08-03 Neustar, Inc. Systems and methods for website monitoring and load testing via simulation
US7847792B2 (en) * 2005-08-15 2010-12-07 Tektronix, Inc. Simple integrated control for zoom/pan functions
US9542667B2 (en) 2005-09-09 2017-01-10 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Navigating messages within a thread
US8627222B2 (en) 2005-09-12 2014-01-07 Microsoft Corporation Expanded search and find user interface
US7765491B1 (en) * 2005-11-16 2010-07-27 Apple Inc. User interface widget for selecting a point or range
JP2007179351A (en) * 2005-12-28 2007-07-12 Sony Corp File management device and image display device
JP4872592B2 (en) * 2006-01-17 2012-02-08 セイコーエプソン株式会社 Input and output devices, input-output method and program
US7934169B2 (en) * 2006-01-25 2011-04-26 Nokia Corporation Graphical user interface, electronic device, method and computer program that uses sliders for user input
US7730422B2 (en) * 2006-01-25 2010-06-01 Microsoft Corporation Smart icon placement across desktop size changes
US8078618B2 (en) 2006-01-30 2011-12-13 Eastman Kodak Company Automatic multimode system for organizing and retrieving content data files
US9395905B2 (en) * 2006-04-05 2016-07-19 Synaptics Incorporated Graphical scroll wheel
US20070250789A1 (en) * 2006-04-20 2007-10-25 Bell Denise A Method for Displaying Graphical Data
US7505038B2 (en) 2006-04-20 2009-03-17 International Business Machines Corporation Method for displaying graphical data
US20090187845A1 (en) * 2006-05-16 2009-07-23 Targit A/S Method of preparing an intelligent dashboard for data monitoring
US9727989B2 (en) 2006-06-01 2017-08-08 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Modifying and formatting a chart using pictorially provided chart elements
JP4384692B2 (en) * 2006-07-28 2009-12-16 ワイズ・ソリューション株式会社 Project information display device, project information display method, project information display program, and electronic medical record information display device
US20080034316A1 (en) * 2006-08-01 2008-02-07 Johan Thoresson Scalable scrollbar markers
US7853566B2 (en) * 2006-08-04 2010-12-14 Apple Inc. Navigation of electronic backups
US20080034004A1 (en) * 2006-08-04 2008-02-07 Pavel Cisler System for electronic backup
US8166415B2 (en) * 2006-08-04 2012-04-24 Apple Inc. User interface for backup management
US8311988B2 (en) * 2006-08-04 2012-11-13 Apple Inc. Consistent back up of electronic information
US8370853B2 (en) * 2006-08-04 2013-02-05 Apple Inc. Event notification management
US7856424B2 (en) * 2006-08-04 2010-12-21 Apple Inc. User interface for backup management
US20080126442A1 (en) * 2006-08-04 2008-05-29 Pavel Cisler Architecture for back up and/or recovery of electronic data
US8677257B2 (en) * 2006-08-04 2014-03-18 Apple Inc. Granular graphical user interface element
US20080034019A1 (en) * 2006-08-04 2008-02-07 Pavel Cisler System for multi-device electronic backup
US20080034017A1 (en) * 2006-08-04 2008-02-07 Dominic Giampaolo Links to a common item in a data structure
US9009115B2 (en) 2006-08-04 2015-04-14 Apple Inc. Restoring electronic information
US7860839B2 (en) * 2006-08-04 2010-12-28 Apple Inc. Application-based backup-restore of electronic information
JP4775179B2 (en) * 2006-08-28 2011-09-21 ソニー株式会社 Scrolling method for a display, the display device and display program
US8291346B2 (en) * 2006-11-07 2012-10-16 Apple Inc. 3D remote control system employing absolute and relative position detection
US8260631B2 (en) * 2006-11-10 2012-09-04 General Electric Company Visual filtering to create logical associations in timeline based metaphors
US8381130B2 (en) * 2006-11-29 2013-02-19 Yahoo! Inc. Method and user interface tool for navigation through grid of scheduled items
JP4899842B2 (en) * 2006-12-06 2012-03-21 ソニー株式会社 Display method and the display device of the window
US7956847B2 (en) * 2007-01-05 2011-06-07 Apple Inc. Gestures for controlling, manipulating, and editing of media files using touch sensitive devices
US7469381B2 (en) 2007-01-07 2008-12-23 Apple Inc. List scrolling and document translation, scaling, and rotation on a touch-screen display
US8813100B1 (en) 2007-01-07 2014-08-19 Apple Inc. Memory management
US7872652B2 (en) * 2007-01-07 2011-01-18 Apple Inc. Application programming interfaces for synchronization
US7903115B2 (en) 2007-01-07 2011-03-08 Apple Inc. Animations
US20080168402A1 (en) 2007-01-07 2008-07-10 Christopher Blumenberg Application Programming Interfaces for Gesture Operations
US8656311B1 (en) 2007-01-07 2014-02-18 Apple Inc. Method and apparatus for compositing various types of content
US7844915B2 (en) * 2007-01-07 2010-11-30 Apple Inc. Application programming interfaces for scrolling operations
KR101406289B1 (en) 2007-03-08 2014-06-12 삼성전자주식회사 Apparatus and method for providing items based on scrolling
US8745501B2 (en) * 2007-03-20 2014-06-03 At&T Knowledge Ventures, Lp System and method of displaying a multimedia timeline
US20080231595A1 (en) * 2007-03-20 2008-09-25 At&T Knowledge Ventures, Lp Remote control apparatus and method of interacting with a multimedia timeline user interface
US8040319B2 (en) 2007-04-13 2011-10-18 Apple Inc. Modifying a value based on a user's directional motions independent of cursor position
DK176516B1 (en) * 2007-04-30 2008-06-30 Targit As Computer-implemented method and computer system and computer readable medium for making videos, podcasts or wear presentations from a Business Intelligence application
US8725965B2 (en) * 2007-06-08 2014-05-13 Apple Inc. System setup for electronic backup
US8307004B2 (en) * 2007-06-08 2012-11-06 Apple Inc. Manipulating electronic backups
US8468136B2 (en) * 2007-06-08 2013-06-18 Apple Inc. Efficient data backup
US8745523B2 (en) * 2007-06-08 2014-06-03 Apple Inc. Deletion in electronic backups
US8429425B2 (en) * 2007-06-08 2013-04-23 Apple Inc. Electronic backup and restoration of encrypted data
US8099392B2 (en) 2007-06-08 2012-01-17 Apple Inc. Electronic backup of applications
US8010900B2 (en) * 2007-06-08 2011-08-30 Apple Inc. User interface for electronic backup
US20080307017A1 (en) * 2007-06-08 2008-12-11 Apple Inc. Searching and Restoring of Backups
US8484578B2 (en) 2007-06-29 2013-07-09 Microsoft Corporation Communication between a document editor in-space user interface and a document editor out-space user interface
US8201103B2 (en) 2007-06-29 2012-06-12 Microsoft Corporation Accessing an out-space user interface for a document editor program
US7913336B2 (en) * 2007-08-14 2011-03-29 Stryker Corporation Shearless pivot for bed
JP5196912B2 (en) * 2007-08-24 2013-05-15 京セラ株式会社 Portable electronic devices
JP5235370B2 (en) * 2007-09-20 2013-07-10 インターナショナル・ビジネス・マシーンズ・コーポレーションInternational Business Machines Corporation To manage the schedule to a display device, method, and program
US8286090B2 (en) * 2007-10-22 2012-10-09 General Electric Company Systems and methods for displaying and visualizing information
US8881049B2 (en) * 2007-12-14 2014-11-04 Apple Inc. Scrolling displayed objects using a 3D remote controller in a media system
US8194037B2 (en) * 2007-12-14 2012-06-05 Apple Inc. Centering a 3D remote controller in a media system
US8341544B2 (en) * 2007-12-14 2012-12-25 Apple Inc. Scroll bar with video region in a media system
US8601388B2 (en) * 2008-01-09 2013-12-03 International Business Machines Corporation Efficiently adjusting a timeline in a time window
KR101503714B1 (en) * 2008-02-05 2015-03-20 삼성전자주식회사 Gui provides methods and apply them multimedia devices
US8793619B2 (en) 2008-03-03 2014-07-29 The United States Of America, As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Graphical user control for multidimensional datasets
US8416196B2 (en) 2008-03-04 2013-04-09 Apple Inc. Touch event model programming interface
DE112009000002T5 (en) 2008-03-04 2010-01-07 Apple Inc., Cupertino Processing touch events for websites
US8645827B2 (en) 2008-03-04 2014-02-04 Apple Inc. Touch event model
US8717305B2 (en) 2008-03-04 2014-05-06 Apple Inc. Touch event model for web pages
US8418084B1 (en) * 2008-05-30 2013-04-09 At&T Intellectual Property I, L.P. Single-touch media selection
US20090309964A1 (en) * 2008-06-13 2009-12-17 Sidney Louis Schrage Portable viewing device
US9665850B2 (en) 2008-06-20 2017-05-30 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Synchronized conversation-centric message list and message reading pane
US8402096B2 (en) 2008-06-24 2013-03-19 Microsoft Corporation Automatic conversation techniques
US20100017740A1 (en) * 2008-07-17 2010-01-21 Microsoft Corporation Pan and zoom control
US8788963B2 (en) * 2008-10-15 2014-07-22 Apple Inc. Scrollable preview of content
US20100325043A1 (en) * 2008-10-16 2010-12-23 Bank Of America Corporation Customized card-building tool
US8473858B2 (en) * 2008-10-16 2013-06-25 Bank Of America Corporation Graph viewer displaying predicted account balances and expenditures
GB0820585D0 (en) * 2008-11-11 2008-12-17 Aeroflex Internat Ltd Apparatus and method
US8285499B2 (en) 2009-03-16 2012-10-09 Apple Inc. Event recognition
US8566044B2 (en) * 2009-03-16 2013-10-22 Apple Inc. Event recognition
US8566045B2 (en) 2009-03-16 2013-10-22 Apple Inc. Event recognition
US9311112B2 (en) 2009-03-16 2016-04-12 Apple Inc. Event recognition
US8400322B2 (en) * 2009-03-17 2013-03-19 International Business Machines Corporation Apparatus, system, and method for scalable media output
US8359537B2 (en) 2009-04-30 2013-01-22 Apple Inc. Tool for navigating a composite presentation
US8881013B2 (en) 2009-04-30 2014-11-04 Apple Inc. Tool for tracking versions of media sections in a composite presentation
US8522144B2 (en) * 2009-04-30 2013-08-27 Apple Inc. Media editing application with candidate clip management
US20100281371A1 (en) * 2009-04-30 2010-11-04 Peter Warner Navigation Tool for Video Presentations
US9658760B2 (en) * 2009-05-07 2017-05-23 Creative Technology Ltd. Methods for searching digital files on a user interface
US9046983B2 (en) * 2009-05-12 2015-06-02 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Hierarchically-organized control galleries
US8423088B2 (en) * 2009-07-22 2013-04-16 Microsoft Corporation Aggregated, interactive communication timeline
US8812985B2 (en) * 2009-10-30 2014-08-19 Motorola Mobility Llc Method and device for enhancing scrolling operations in a display device
CN101727949B (en) * 2009-10-31 2011-12-07 华为技术有限公司 Apparatus, method and system for playing a video positioning
US9684521B2 (en) 2010-01-26 2017-06-20 Apple Inc. Systems having discrete and continuous gesture recognizers
US20110307833A1 (en) 2010-06-14 2011-12-15 Thomas Andrew Cooke Dale Control Selection Approximation
US8875025B2 (en) 2010-07-15 2014-10-28 Apple Inc. Media-editing application with media clips grouping capabilities
US9323438B2 (en) 2010-07-15 2016-04-26 Apple Inc. Media-editing application with live dragging and live editing capabilities
US8966367B2 (en) 2011-02-16 2015-02-24 Apple Inc. Anchor override for a media-editing application with an anchored timeline
US8984029B2 (en) 2011-01-14 2015-03-17 Apple Inc. File system management
US8943026B2 (en) 2011-01-14 2015-01-27 Apple Inc. Visual representation of a local backup
US8775480B2 (en) 2011-01-28 2014-07-08 Apple Inc. Media clip management
US9997196B2 (en) 2011-02-16 2018-06-12 Apple Inc. Retiming media presentations
US9298363B2 (en) 2011-04-11 2016-03-29 Apple Inc. Region activation for touch sensitive surface
US20130145327A1 (en) * 2011-06-07 2013-06-06 Intersect Ptp, Inc. Interfaces for Displaying an Intersection Space
JP5610376B2 (en) * 2011-06-24 2014-10-22 ヤマハ株式会社 Parameter control device and method
US9035967B2 (en) 2011-06-30 2015-05-19 Google Technology Holdings LLC Method and device for enhancing scrolling and other operations on a display
US9501213B2 (en) * 2011-09-16 2016-11-22 Skadool, Inc. Scheduling events on an electronic calendar utilizing fixed-positioned events and a draggable calendar grid
GB201116349D0 (en) * 2011-09-22 2011-11-02 Baldwin Steven Dynamic range control
KR20130085703A (en) * 2012-01-20 2013-07-30 삼성전자주식회사 Apparatus and method for multimedia content interface in visual display terminal
USD744494S1 (en) 2012-03-06 2015-12-01 Apple Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD710381S1 (en) 2012-03-07 2014-08-05 Apple Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with icon
US9386357B2 (en) 2012-04-27 2016-07-05 Arris Enterprises, Inc. Display of presentation elements
US20140007005A1 (en) * 2012-06-29 2014-01-02 Evernote Corporation Scrollable calendar with combined date and time controls
JP2014056300A (en) * 2012-09-11 2014-03-27 Sony Corp Information processor, information processing method and computer program
US9671943B2 (en) * 2012-09-28 2017-06-06 Dassault Systemes Simulia Corp. Touch-enabled complex data entry
US9836204B1 (en) * 2013-03-14 2017-12-05 Visualon, Inc. Scrolling control for media players
US9191422B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-11-17 Arris Technology, Inc. Processing of social media for selected time-shifted multimedia content
US9733716B2 (en) 2013-06-09 2017-08-15 Apple Inc. Proxy gesture recognizer
US20150058730A1 (en) 2013-08-26 2015-02-26 Stadium Technology Company Game event display with a scrollable graphical game play feed
US9542407B2 (en) 2013-09-30 2017-01-10 Blackberry Limited Method and apparatus for media searching using a graphical user interface
USD711427S1 (en) 2013-10-22 2014-08-19 Apple Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with icon
US20150248229A1 (en) * 2014-03-03 2015-09-03 Acer Incorporated Electronic devices and methods for controlling user interface
US20160232217A1 (en) * 2015-02-06 2016-08-11 Adp, Llc Adjustable Graphical Display System
USD780212S1 (en) * 2015-08-12 2017-02-28 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd Display screen or portion thereof with transitional graphical user interface
USD783044S1 (en) * 2015-10-01 2017-04-04 Snap-On Incorporated Display panel or portion thereof with animated graphical user interface
USD782525S1 (en) * 2015-10-01 2017-03-28 Snap-On Incorporated Display panel or portion thereof with animated graphical user interface
USD782524S1 (en) * 2015-10-01 2017-03-28 Snap-On Incorporated Display panel or portion thereof with animated graphical user interface

Citations (26)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US553225A (en) * 1896-01-21 Pulley-facing machine
US4755811A (en) * 1987-03-24 1988-07-05 Tektronix, Inc. Touch controlled zoom of waveform displays
US4790028A (en) * 1986-09-12 1988-12-06 Westinghouse Electric Corp. Method and apparatus for generating variably scaled displays
US4794388A (en) * 1980-02-20 1988-12-27 Summagraphics Corporation Method of and apparatus for controlling a display
US5032989A (en) * 1986-03-19 1991-07-16 Realpro, Ltd. Real estate search and location system and method
US5075673A (en) * 1989-06-16 1991-12-24 International Business Machines Corp. Variable speed, image pan method and apparatus
US5129057A (en) * 1988-05-02 1992-07-07 International Business Machines Corporation Method for presenting compressed electronic day calendar information in an interactive information handling system
US5136690A (en) * 1989-08-07 1992-08-04 At&T Bell Laboratories Dynamic graphical analysis of network data
US5227771A (en) * 1991-07-10 1993-07-13 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for incrementally changing window size on a display
US5418549A (en) * 1993-06-14 1995-05-23 Motorola, Inc. Resolution compensating scroll bar valuator
US5479600A (en) * 1990-05-14 1995-12-26 Wroblewski; David A. Attribute-enhanced scroll bar system and method
US5491781A (en) * 1993-03-12 1996-02-13 Hewlett-Packard Company Method and apparatus for displaying a graphic image
US5533182A (en) * 1992-12-22 1996-07-02 International Business Machines Corporation Aural position indicating mechanism for viewable objects
US5553225A (en) * 1994-10-25 1996-09-03 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for combining a zoom function in scroll bar sliders
US5854629A (en) * 1996-12-31 1998-12-29 International Business Machine Corporation Enhanced scrolling technique for context menus in graphical user interfaces
US5872566A (en) * 1997-02-21 1999-02-16 International Business Machines Corporation Graphical user interface method and system that provides an inertial slider within a scroll bar
US5977972A (en) * 1997-08-15 1999-11-02 International Business Machines Corporation User interface component and method of navigating across a boundary coupled to a scroll bar display element
US6061062A (en) * 1991-12-20 2000-05-09 Apple Computer, Inc. Zooming controller
US6075467A (en) * 1997-08-21 2000-06-13 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Map data selection supporting device, and map data processing system and map data processing device including the same
US6204845B1 (en) * 1994-12-16 2001-03-20 International Business Machines Corporation Ergonomic viewable object processor
US6208343B1 (en) * 1997-12-10 2001-03-27 International Business Machines Corporation Graphical user interface scroll bar that provides varied levels of access granularity
US6229536B1 (en) * 1998-03-05 2001-05-08 Agilent Technologies, Inc. System and method for displaying simultaneously a main waveform display and a magnified waveform display in a signal measurement system
US6320577B1 (en) * 1998-11-03 2001-11-20 Agilent Technologies, Inc. System and method for graphically annotating a waveform display in a signal-measurement system
US6330009B1 (en) * 1997-11-25 2001-12-11 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Scroll controller
US6396487B1 (en) * 1998-03-23 2002-05-28 International Business Machines Corporation User interface enhancement for windows-based operating systems
US20020063737A1 (en) * 2000-11-30 2002-05-30 Ephraim Feig Zoom-capable scrollbar

Family Cites Families (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US197718A (en) * 1877-12-04 Improvement in tile-machines
US160416A (en) * 1875-03-02 Improvement in grain-samplers

Patent Citations (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US553225A (en) * 1896-01-21 Pulley-facing machine
US4794388A (en) * 1980-02-20 1988-12-27 Summagraphics Corporation Method of and apparatus for controlling a display
US5032989A (en) * 1986-03-19 1991-07-16 Realpro, Ltd. Real estate search and location system and method
US4790028A (en) * 1986-09-12 1988-12-06 Westinghouse Electric Corp. Method and apparatus for generating variably scaled displays
US4755811A (en) * 1987-03-24 1988-07-05 Tektronix, Inc. Touch controlled zoom of waveform displays
US5129057A (en) * 1988-05-02 1992-07-07 International Business Machines Corporation Method for presenting compressed electronic day calendar information in an interactive information handling system
US5075673A (en) * 1989-06-16 1991-12-24 International Business Machines Corp. Variable speed, image pan method and apparatus
US5136690A (en) * 1989-08-07 1992-08-04 At&T Bell Laboratories Dynamic graphical analysis of network data
US5479600A (en) * 1990-05-14 1995-12-26 Wroblewski; David A. Attribute-enhanced scroll bar system and method
US5227771A (en) * 1991-07-10 1993-07-13 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for incrementally changing window size on a display
US20030197718A1 (en) * 1991-12-20 2003-10-23 Venolia Daniel Scott Zooming controller
US6061062A (en) * 1991-12-20 2000-05-09 Apple Computer, Inc. Zooming controller
US20040160416A1 (en) * 1991-12-20 2004-08-19 Venolia Daniel Scott Zooming controller
US5533182A (en) * 1992-12-22 1996-07-02 International Business Machines Corporation Aural position indicating mechanism for viewable objects
US5491781A (en) * 1993-03-12 1996-02-13 Hewlett-Packard Company Method and apparatus for displaying a graphic image
US5418549A (en) * 1993-06-14 1995-05-23 Motorola, Inc. Resolution compensating scroll bar valuator
US5553225A (en) * 1994-10-25 1996-09-03 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for combining a zoom function in scroll bar sliders
US6204845B1 (en) * 1994-12-16 2001-03-20 International Business Machines Corporation Ergonomic viewable object processor
US5854629A (en) * 1996-12-31 1998-12-29 International Business Machine Corporation Enhanced scrolling technique for context menus in graphical user interfaces
US5872566A (en) * 1997-02-21 1999-02-16 International Business Machines Corporation Graphical user interface method and system that provides an inertial slider within a scroll bar
US5977972A (en) * 1997-08-15 1999-11-02 International Business Machines Corporation User interface component and method of navigating across a boundary coupled to a scroll bar display element
US6075467A (en) * 1997-08-21 2000-06-13 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Map data selection supporting device, and map data processing system and map data processing device including the same
US6330009B1 (en) * 1997-11-25 2001-12-11 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Scroll controller
US6208343B1 (en) * 1997-12-10 2001-03-27 International Business Machines Corporation Graphical user interface scroll bar that provides varied levels of access granularity
US6229536B1 (en) * 1998-03-05 2001-05-08 Agilent Technologies, Inc. System and method for displaying simultaneously a main waveform display and a magnified waveform display in a signal measurement system
US6396487B1 (en) * 1998-03-23 2002-05-28 International Business Machines Corporation User interface enhancement for windows-based operating systems
US6320577B1 (en) * 1998-11-03 2001-11-20 Agilent Technologies, Inc. System and method for graphically annotating a waveform display in a signal-measurement system
US20020063737A1 (en) * 2000-11-30 2002-05-30 Ephraim Feig Zoom-capable scrollbar

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US8698844B1 (en) 2005-04-16 2014-04-15 Apple Inc. Processing cursor movements in a graphical user interface of a multimedia application
US20100281377A1 (en) * 2009-05-01 2010-11-04 Brian Meaney Condensing Graphical Representations of Media Clips in a Composite Display Area of a Media-Editing Application
US8612858B2 (en) 2009-05-01 2013-12-17 Apple Inc. Condensing graphical representations of media clips in a composite display area of a media-editing application
US8856655B2 (en) 2009-05-01 2014-10-07 Apple Inc. Media editing application with capability to focus on graphical composite elements in a media compositing area
US20110035700A1 (en) * 2009-08-05 2011-02-10 Brian Meaney Multi-Operation User Interface Tool
US20120030550A1 (en) * 2010-07-28 2012-02-02 Chin Ai Method for editing multimedia
US20150040061A1 (en) * 2012-08-24 2015-02-05 Jun Lu Method, apparatus and system of displaying a file
US9535566B2 (en) * 2012-08-24 2017-01-03 Intel Corporation Method, apparatus and system of displaying a file
US20150277718A1 (en) * 2014-03-26 2015-10-01 Onshape Inc. Numeric Input Control Through A Non-Linear Slider
WO2015148341A1 (en) * 2014-03-26 2015-10-01 Onshape Inc. Numeric input control through a non-linear slider
US9442646B2 (en) * 2014-03-26 2016-09-13 Onshape Inc. Numeric input control through a non-linear slider
US10061503B2 (en) * 2014-03-26 2018-08-28 Onshape Inc. Numeric input control through a non-linear slider

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20030016248A1 (en) 2003-01-23 application
US6486896B1 (en) 2002-11-26 grant
US7165227B2 (en) 2007-01-16 grant

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5227771A (en) Method and system for incrementally changing window size on a display
US6853391B2 (en) Multi-node user interface component and method thereof for use in performing a common operation on linked records
US5768607A (en) Method and apparatus for freehand annotation and drawings incorporating sound and for compressing and synchronizing sound
US6544294B1 (en) Method and apparatus for creating, editing, and displaying works containing presentation metric components utilizing temporal relationships and structural tracks
US5442744A (en) Methods and apparatus for displaying and editing multimedia information
US5751283A (en) Resizing a window and an object on a display screen
US7302650B1 (en) Intuitive tools for manipulating objects in a display
US5392388A (en) Method and system for viewing graphic images in a data processing system
US6317142B1 (en) Taxonomy of objects and a system of non-modal property inspectors
US7124366B2 (en) Graphical user interface for a motion video planning and editing system for a computer
US5655144A (en) Audio synchronization system
US6714221B1 (en) Depicting and setting scroll amount
US7551187B2 (en) Systems and methods that utilize a dynamic digital zooming interface in connection with digital inking
US7030872B2 (en) Image data editing
US6384845B1 (en) Display apparatus for interlocked movement of scroll buttons and scroll box of scroll bar, display control method and storage medium
US5596696A (en) Method and apparatus for synchronizing graphical presentations
US6337694B1 (en) Method and system for variable speed scrolling within a data processing system
US7225405B1 (en) System and method for audio creation and editing in a multimedia messaging environment
US6948126B2 (en) Information pointers
US6037943A (en) Multimedia digital foil presentation system
US5428736A (en) Method and apparatus for entering and editing data of a data icon in an enlarged and minimized size
US5148154A (en) Multi-dimensional user interface
US5634100A (en) System and method for event parameter interdependence and adjustment with pen input
US7454708B2 (en) System and method for electronic presentations with annotation of preview material
US20080155459A1 (en) Associating keywords to media

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: APPLE INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:APPLE COMPUTER, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:019281/0818

Effective date: 20070109

Owner name: APPLE INC.,CALIFORNIA

Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:APPLE COMPUTER, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:019281/0818

Effective date: 20070109