US20070022389A1 - Computer Interface Having A Virtual Single-Layer Mode For Viewing Overlapping Objects - Google Patents

Computer Interface Having A Virtual Single-Layer Mode For Viewing Overlapping Objects Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20070022389A1
US20070022389A1 US11/530,883 US53088306A US2007022389A1 US 20070022389 A1 US20070022389 A1 US 20070022389A1 US 53088306 A US53088306 A US 53088306A US 2007022389 A1 US2007022389 A1 US 2007022389A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
windows
window
mode
user
display
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11/530,883
Inventor
Bas Ording
John Louch
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Apple Inc
Original Assignee
Apple Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US10/465,855 priority Critical patent/US8127248B2/en
Priority to US10/689,687 priority patent/US7739617B2/en
Application filed by Apple Inc filed Critical Apple Inc
Priority to US11/530,883 priority patent/US20070022389A1/en
Publication of US20070022389A1 publication Critical patent/US20070022389A1/en
Assigned to APPLE INC. reassignment APPLE INC. CHANGE OF NAME (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: APPLE COMPUTER, INC.
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0484Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] for the control of specific functions or operations, e.g. selecting or manipulating an object or an image, setting a parameter value or selecting a range
    • G06F3/04847Interaction techniques to control parameter settings, e.g. interaction with sliders, dials
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0481Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0481Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance
    • G06F3/0482Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] based on specific properties of the displayed interaction object or a metaphor-based environment, e.g. interaction with desktop elements like windows or icons, or assisted by a cursor's changing behaviour or appearance interaction with lists of selectable items, e.g. menus
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0487Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] using specific features provided by the input device, e.g. functions controlled by the rotation of a mouse with dual sensing arrangements, or of the nature of the input device, e.g. tap gestures based on pressure sensed by a digitiser
    • G06F3/0488Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] using specific features provided by the input device, e.g. functions controlled by the rotation of a mouse with dual sensing arrangements, or of the nature of the input device, e.g. tap gestures based on pressure sensed by a digitiser using a touch-screen or digitiser, e.g. input of commands through traced gestures
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0484Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] for the control of specific functions or operations, e.g. selecting or manipulating an object or an image, setting a parameter value or selecting a range
    • G06F3/04842Selection of a displayed object
    • GPHYSICS
    • G06COMPUTING; CALCULATING; COUNTING
    • G06FELECTRIC DIGITAL DATA PROCESSING
    • G06F3/00Input arrangements for transferring data to be processed into a form capable of being handled by the computer; Output arrangements for transferring data from processing unit to output unit, e.g. interface arrangements
    • G06F3/01Input arrangements or combined input and output arrangements for interaction between user and computer
    • G06F3/048Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI]
    • G06F3/0487Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] using specific features provided by the input device, e.g. functions controlled by the rotation of a mouse with dual sensing arrangements, or of the nature of the input device, e.g. tap gestures based on pressure sensed by a digitiser
    • G06F3/0488Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] using specific features provided by the input device, e.g. functions controlled by the rotation of a mouse with dual sensing arrangements, or of the nature of the input device, e.g. tap gestures based on pressure sensed by a digitiser using a touch-screen or digitiser, e.g. input of commands through traced gestures
    • G06F3/04883Interaction techniques based on graphical user interfaces [GUI] using specific features provided by the input device, e.g. functions controlled by the rotation of a mouse with dual sensing arrangements, or of the nature of the input device, e.g. tap gestures based on pressure sensed by a digitiser using a touch-screen or digitiser, e.g. input of commands through traced gestures for entering handwritten data, e.g. gestures, text

Abstract

A computer-human interface provides a mechanism to manage the available space of a computer display in a manner that facilitated navigation among multiple windows that are overlaid upon one another. The interface includes a user-selectable mode in which the windows are rearranged, and resized if necessary, so that all open windows can be simultaneously viewed within the area if the display, thereby enabling any one of the windows is “flattened” so that all windows appear at the same virtual depth, rather than overlapping one another. With this approach, there is no need to minimize windows in order to access one that is overlaid by another, thereby enabling the user to keep the content of all windows visible and accessible. Subsets of windows can be repositioned in the same manner, or all windows can be removed from the display area for access to desktop objects.

Description

  • This is a continuation of application Ser. No. 10/689,687, filed Oct. 22, 2003, which is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 10/465,855, filed Jun. 20, 2003, the contents of which are incorporated herein by reference.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is generally directed to operating systems for computers, and more particularly to a computer-human interface that manages the manner in which multiple overlapping objects are presented to a user.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • The increased processing power that becomes available with each new generation of personal computers provides users with greater opportunities to accomplish a variety of different tasks. A user is no longer confined to performing a single task at any given time on a personal computer. Rather, multitasking has become a common manner of operating the computer. Such multitasking may occur within a single application program, e.g., a user might have several documents open within a word processing or graphics program. Likewise, it can occur across multiple applications. For instance, the user could open a web browser to access one or more web sites on the Internet, while at the same time running an electronic mail program to read messages and a word processing program to paste the content of the messages or web sites into one or more documents.
  • In graphical user interfaces that employ windows to present data, each task that is being performed by the user may have one or more windows associated with it. For example, each document that is open in a word processing program will have its contents displayed in a separate window. In addition, various functions performed by the program, such as spell checking, print spooling and the like may each have one or more secondary windows associated with them, to provide status information and/or user input. Similarly, every other application program that is running on the computer presents one or more windows to the user. For instance, if a browser is employed to access a number of different types of web sites, e.g., an http site, an ftp site and a news site, the contents of each site might be presented in a different respective window.
  • It can be appreciated that, as multiple tasks are performed on the computer, the number of windows that are simultaneously displayed can become significant. For the inexperienced user, multiple open windows can be a source of frustration or confusion. More particularly, the windows are presented in a layered manner. Every window has a relative depth associated with it, wherein the most recently accessed, or active, window appears in the foreground of the display, and every other window is located “behind” the active window, in inverse relation to the order in which they were accessed. As a result, a window of interest may become completely overlaid by other, later-accessed windows, thereby blocking it from view. The user may not know how to navigate to the desired window without closing, minimizing, or repositioning all of the windows that overlie it, which may not be consistent with the operation intended by the user. Even for the more experienced user, a large number of open windows may present a cluttered interface which detracts from the ability to easily access desired information in a particular window.
  • One approach to solving this problem is described in co-pending, commonly assigned U.S. application Ser. No. 09/447,419, filed Jan. 4, 2000. In this approach, a single-window viewing mode can be selected, in which a single window, or at most a few windows associated with the currently active task, is displayed to the user. All other windows relating to non-active tasks are automatically minimized, to thereby reduce the amount of information presented to the user at any one time.
  • The present invention is directed to an alternative approach to facilitate navigation among multiple windows of information. More particularly, some users may prefer to keep the windows open for all ongoing tasks, rather than reduce most of them to a minimized state. For instance, it may be desirable to keep multiple windows open to enable their content to be easily copied from one to another. As the number of open windows increases, however, the user's ability to locate the one containing the desired content becomes more difficult.
  • While the case of overlapping windows readily illustrates the potential for user difficulties, that is not the only situation in which overlapping objects can be a source of inconvenience to the user. For instance, multiple icons in a folder can lie on top of one another, thereby inhibiting the ability of the user to locate one of interest. More generally, almost any type of object that is displayed in a graphical user interface can appear in front of another object, and thereby interfere with the user experience.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • In accordance with the present invention, a computer-human interface provides a mechanism to manage the available space of a computer display in a manner that facilitates viewing of multiple objects that are overlaid upon one another. The interface includes one or more user-selectable modes in which the objects are rearranged, and resized if necessary, so that the objects can be simultaneously viewed in their entireties within the area of the display, thereby enabling any one of the objects to be easily selected for access. In effect, the presentation of the objects is “flattened” so that all objects appear at the same virtual depth, rather than overlapping one another. Once the desired object has been selected, the display returns to the normal layered view, either automatically or in response to a further user command. With this approach, there is no need to minimize windows, or otherwise manually move objects within the display, in order to access one that is overlaid by another, thereby enabling the user to keep a constant working environment.
  • Further features of the invention, and the advantages attained thereby, are described hereinafter in connection with preferred embodiments of the invention illustrated in the accompanying figures.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a general block diagram of a computer system in which the present invention can be implemented;
  • FIG. 2 is a block diagram showing the relationship of some of the software and hardware components of the computer system;
  • FIGS. 3-8 are screen shots illustrating an example of the effects achieved with the present invention;
  • FIGS. 9-15 depict illustrative examples of one algorithm for repositioning the windows;
  • FIG. 16 is a flowchart summarizing the algorithm;
  • FIG. 17 depicts the use of a border for each window;
  • FIG. 18 illustrates an example of a variation of the invention;
  • FIGS. 19 a-19 d and 20 a-20 d are schematic illustrations of operations in the “Show Desktop” viewing mode;
  • FIG. 21 shows an example of the display in the “Show Desktop” mode;
  • FIG. 22 illustrates a panel for choosing user options to select the different viewing modes; and
  • FIGS. 23 a-23 d are schematic illustrations of the “Application Only” viewing mode.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • To facilitate an understanding of the present invention, it is described hereinafter with particular reference to the viewing of multiple open windows on the desktop of a computer display. It will be appreciated, however, that the principles which underlie the invention are not limited to this particular application. Rather, they can be employed in any environment in which multiple objects might overlie one another, and it is desirable for the user to view each of them substantially in their entireties.
  • In addition, various features of the invention are occasionally described in the context of their implementation in the user interface associated with the Macintosh® Operating System (Mac OS®) provided by Apple Computer, Inc. These features are equally applicable to other types of graphical user interfaces. Consequently, specific aspects of the implementation that are described hereinafter should not be viewed as any limitation on the applicability of the invention to a variety of different computer-human interfaces.
  • The present invention is directed to the presentation of objects to a user in a computer system, such as the display of windows, icons, images, etc. The hardware components of a computer system, of a type in which the invention can be implemented are briefly described herein to provide a thorough understanding of the manner in which the invention operates within the system to produce the desired results. Referring to FIG. 1, an exemplary computer system includes a computer 10 having a variety of external peripheral devices 12 connected thereto. The computer 10 includes a central processing unit 14 and associated memory. This memory generally includes a main memory which is typically implemented in the form of a random access memory 16, a static memory that can comprise a read-only memory 18, and a permanent storage device, such as a magnetic or optical disk 20. The CPU 14 communicates with each of these forms of memory through an internal bus 22. The peripheral devices 12 include a data entry device such as a keyboard 24, and a pointing or cursor control device 26, such as a mouse, trackball, pen or the like. One or more display devices 28, such as a CRT monitor or an LCD screen, provide a visual display of information, including the various components of the graphical user interface. Hard copies of desired information can be provided through a printer 30, or similar such device. A network connection 31 provides the computer with access to one or more servers, which may function as gateways, file storage systems, messaging systems, and the like. Each of these external peripheral devices 12 communicates with the CPU 14 by means of one or more input/output ports 32 on the computer.
  • A significant component of a user's experience in operating a computer is the user interface, i.e., the manner in which the computer presents information to the user via the display device 28. In an effort to make the computing experience as friendly and intuitive to the user as possible, many computer systems employ a graphical user interface. The graphical user interface may constitute an element of the computer's operating system, as in the case of the Mac OS® and the Windows® operating system provided by Microsoft Corporation. In other cases, the graphical user interface may comprise a separate application program that interacts with the operating system, or one that is integrated with the operating system.
  • One of the fundamental components of most graphical user interfaces is the window. In essence, a window functions as a container for a particular type of data that is to be presented to the user, such as the text in a word processing document, graphical images in a drawing document, or the content of an Internet web page. Each different application program that is being executed on the computer presents its associated data within a separate window. For instance, FIG. 2 illustrates an example in which three application programs 34, such as a word processing program, a web browsing program and an electronic mail program, are all running simultaneously on the computer. Some or all of the code for these programs is loaded into the main memory 16, for access by the CPU 14. Whenever one of these programs has data to display to the user, it sends a request to the computer's operating system 36, requesting a window for the presentation of the data. This request is provided to a window manager 38, which sends instructions to a display driver 40 to create the structure of the window on the display 28, and informs the application program of the area within which its data can be displayed.
  • If all three application programs are running concurrently on the computer, three different windows that are respectively associated with the three programs may be displayed. At any given time, one of these windows is the active window, namely the window which pertains to the current task and receives user input from the keyboard 24 and the cursor control device 26. If the user clicks in one of the other windows to perform a new task, it becomes the active window and the previously active window becomes non-active. The window manager is responsive to the action of the cursor control device 26 to cause the displays of the active and non-active windows to be changed accordingly, for example by dimming features of non-active windows or removing color from their components, and bringing the active window to the forefront of the display. In addition, the window manager is responsive to other user actions to store data for each window. Thus, if the user repositions or resizes a window, that information is stored so that the next time the window is opened, it appears at the size and position last set by the user.
  • It is also possible to open several windows under the control of a single application program. For example, if the user is working with multiple documents in a word processing program, each document is displayed in a separate window. Furthermore, different portions of the same document can be displayed in different respective windows. Consequently, it is conceivable that a significant number of windows can be opened on the computer's display 28, particularly for users who perform a number of different tasks on their computers. FIG. 3 illustrates an example of a computer display containing a variety of windows, which may accumulate as a result of all of the tasks that are performed during a typical day of operating the computer.
  • While the ability to have multiple windows simultaneously open on the computer display is advantageous, since it provides the user with instantaneous access to the information associated with a number of different tasks, in some situations such a display may diminish the user experience. For instance, multiple open windows may inhibit the user's ability to navigate to a particular item of information that is desired. More specifically, the windows are displayed in a layered environment. As each new window is opened, it appears in the foreground of the display, and may overlap or completely obscure other windows. Similarly, when a previously opened window is accessed and made active, it is brought to the foreground, and may also overlay or obscure other windows. As a result, the least recently accessed window will appear to be “behind” all of the other windows, making it difficult for the user to find.
  • Of course, the user can locate a desired window by closing all of the other windows that are displayed on top of it. However, such an action may be contrary to the user's intentions, since the closing of a window may effectively terminate the task associated with the information in that window. If the task has not yet been completed, the user may not want to close the window. As an alternative, the user could move all of the windows manually, or minimize them to a designated holding area such as a dock, or hide all of the running applications. However, each of these actions results in a change to the working environment, which may be undesirable. In addition, further effort on the part of the user would be required to restore the environment to its original condition.
  • In accordance with the present invention, these concerns associated with a proliferation of windows are addressed in a user interface that selectively provides a “flattened”, i.e., virtual 2-dimensional, view of the open windows to be viewed. In general, this flattening is accomplished by positioning each open window to be viewed in a respective portion of the total display area, coupled with any resizing that may be required to eliminate overlap of the windows. As a result, the entirety of each window of interest is visible to the user. From this view, the user can easily locate and select any desired window that is open on the display. After the selection takes place, the display is returned to the normal view, with the selected window appearing in the foreground, and all other windows in their previous positions.
  • The effect that is achieved with the present invention is illustrated in the sequence of screen shots depicted in FIGS. 3-8. As noted previously, FIG. 3 illustrates an example of a typical computer display, containing a variety of open windows 42-50. Window 42 is the active window, and therefore appears in the foreground. Since the display presents a layered view of the windows, each of the other windows 44-50 appears to be located behind one or more of the other windows. Thus, one attribute of each window is its layer, or depth, relative to the other windows. After completing a task associated with window 42, the user may desire to access the contents of window 46. For purposes of illustration, outer edges of window 46 are visible behind window 44. It may be the case, however, that window 44 is larger than window 46, as a result of which window 46 would be totally obscured from the user's view.
  • In accordance with the present invention, the user's ability to access window 46, or any other window that is partially or totally obscured, is enhanced by temporarily rearranging the windows into a virtual non-layered, or “flattened” arrangement. To initiate such a viewing mode in one embodiment of the invention, the user might actuate an appropriate control element, e.g. a predetermined key or combination of keys on the keyboard, a control button on one of the windows, a selection from a menu 52, etc. Alternatively, the user might issue a spoken command. In other embodiments, the indication to enter the alternative viewing mode might come from a source other than the user. For instance, a program might request this mode through an application programming interface (API) call. For example, the operating system, an application program, or other component of the computer system may initiate the alternative viewing mode in response to a certain condition.
  • When this viewing mode is requested, the windows transition from the initial layered view of FIG. 3 to the flattened, or single-layer, view of FIG. 5. FIG. 4 illustrates an intermediate state as the windows are moving from the multi-layer view of FIG. 3 to the virtual single-layer view of FIG. 5. As can be seen, the windows are moving away from each other, and shrinking in size. This movement preferably occurs over a discernable period of time, so that the user can visualize the transition from the layered view to the flattened view. At the final stage depicted in FIG. 5, each of the windows occupies its own space within the area of the display, and without overlap, i.e. their locations are mutually exclusive of one another. To achieve this appearance, the windows are repositioned and reduced in size, if necessary. In addition, the desktop area 51 of the display is preferably darkened, to dim icons and other background objects, and thereby highlight the windows being viewed in this mode.
  • From the virtual single-layer view of FIG. 5, the user can easily select a desired window, or an object in any window. For example, the user might select a file in the window 42, and drag it to a folder in the previously obscured window 46. To facilitate identity of each window, particularly if they are significantly scaled down in size, a text label can be drawn in the window over which the cursor is positioned. This label (not shown) can display the title or name of the window.
  • Continuing with the illustrated example, the user has selected window 46, which is depicted in FIG. 6 by the location of the cursor and the shading. After making the selection, the windows return to their original sizes and positions based on the data maintained in the window manager. 38, as depicted in FIGS. 7 and 8, to again present a layered view. The return to this view might be accomplished automatically in response to selecting a window, or may be the result of an affirmative action on the part of the user, e.g. a toggle action on the key or button that was used to initiate the single-layer viewing mode, selecting a command from a menu, actuating a control element in the user interface, etc. Upon returning to the normal layered view, the depth attribute for the selected window 46 has been changed as a result of it having been selected by the user, so that it now appears in the foreground, enabling the user to easily access the contents of this window.
  • The invention takes advantage of the fact that the content of each window is typically buffered in memory associated with the display driver 40. Thus, all of the pixel data for each window is available to be displayed as portions of overlapping windows are uncovered, thereby avoiding the need to request any data from the applications 34, or even have them be aware of the alternative viewing mode. However, even if all of the window content is not buffered, the principles of the invention are still applicable. In such a case, a call can be made to the applications to have them redraw the contents of their windows, once they have been repositioned.
  • The functionality of the present invention can reside in a number of different environments. In the case of the exemplary computer system depicted in FIG. 2, it might be incorporated into the windows manager. In other cases, it could be embodied in a separate program that operates to lay out application windows or other user interface elements, for instance a plug-in module. It could also be present in an application program.
  • In a preferred embodiment of the invention, when the user initiates the single-layer viewing mode, e.g. by pressing a predetermined function key, the new positions for the windows are calculated in the background, while the windows remain in their original positions. Once the new positions have been determined, the windows then move in a smooth fashion from their original, layered positions to the calculated, non-layered positions. One algorithm for calculating new positions for the windows will be described with reference to an illustrative example depicted in FIGS. 9-13. In this example, three windows A, B and C overlap one another in the normal viewing mode, as illustrated in FIG. 9. Once the user performs an action to initiate the virtual single-layer viewing mode, the first step in the process is to define the area within which the windows are to be viewed. The total area of the display is indicated by the rectangle 54 in FIG. 9. In one embodiment, it may be acceptable to allow the windows to cover this entire area. In other cases, however, it may be more appropriate to restrict the windows from certain portions of the display. For example, it may be desirable to keep the menu bar 52 within view at all times, rather than permit the windows to overlap it. Likewise, the display might contain a dock 56 for storing control elements, minimized windows, or the like. This dock might appear at the bottom of the display, as illustrated in FIG. 9, or along one of the sides, and it may be desirable to keep this component in view at all times as well. Taking these considerations into account, a boundary depicted by the rectangle 58 is determined, to define the area within which the windows are permitted to move.
  • Once the boundary 58 has been defined, a target position for each window is determined. In one embodiment of the invention, the algorithm attempts to maintain the relative positioning of the windows, to the extent possible. In this embodiment, therefore, a vector is established for each pair of overlapping windows, which identifies the desired movements of the windows relative to one another. In the example of FIG. 9, the vector VAC indicates the directions of movement of the windows A and C relative to one another. This vector is established by drawing a line between the center points CA and CC of each of the two windows. In a similar manner, vectors VAB and VBC are established by drawing lines through the center points of each other pair of overlapping windows.
  • For each pair of windows, the amount of overlap is determined in each of the horizontal and vertical dimensions. In the example of FIG. 9, the horizontal overlap of windows A and B is identified as ΔXAB, and the vertical overlap is ΔYAB. Similarly, the overlap between windows A and C is measured as ΔXAC and ΔYAC, and the overlap between windows B and C is measured as ΔXBC and ΔYBC. These delta values represent distances by which the respective windows must move away from each other to eliminate overlap. The dimensions can be measured in units of pixels, for instance, or any other suitable metric.
  • In one implementation of the invention, it is preferable to move each window along the vectors VAC, VAB, etc., to thereby maintain their relative positions, to the extent possible. Consistent with this objective, it is also desirable to move the windows the minimum amount necessary to eliminate overlap. For instance, with reference to FIG. 10, it can be seen that two windows D and E have a significant amount of overlap ΔXDE in the horizontal direction, but a relatively small overlap ΔYDE in the vertical direction. For example, ΔXDE may be 20, whereas ΔDE may be 3. Once the two windows have moved vertically away from each other by at least 3 pixels, further relative movement between them is unnecessary, even though they may still “overlap” in the horizontal direction, as illustrated in FIG. 11.
  • To this end, as a further feature of the invention, once the values for ΔXDE and ΔYDE are determined, the smaller value of the two is selected. The value for the other of the two parameters is then calculated as a function of the selected value and the slope of the vector. Thus, in the example given above, where ΔXDE=20 and ΔYDE=3, if it is assumed that the slope of the vector VDE=1.5, then ΔYDE is maintained at its actual value of 3, since it is the smaller of the two values, and ΔXDE is set to the adjusted value of 3/1.5=2.
  • These established delta values are then apportioned between the windows, in each pair. Referring again to FIG. 9, assume that the adjusted value for ΔXAC=12 pixels. In one approach, the values can be equally apportioned between the two windows. In such a case, window A would be assigned a value of ΔxA,C=−6, i.e. movement six units to the left, and window C would be assigned a value ΔxC,A=+6. In another approach, the amount, of movement of each window is weighted in inverse relation to its size, so that a bigger window moves less than a smaller window. If the area of window A is three times larger than that of window C, their relative movements are therefore allocated at a ratio of 1:3. Thus, window A would be assigned a value of ΔxA,C=−3, and window C is assigned a value ΔxC,A=+9.
  • For overlapping windows A and B, if it is assumed that they have approximately the same area, the ΔX value is equally weighted between them. Thus, if ΔXAB=30, window A is assigned a value of ΔxA,B=−15, and window B is assigned a value of ΔxB,A=+15.
  • All of the assigned Δx values for a given window are then algebraically summed, to compute a movement value for that window. For the case where weighting is employed, in the preceding example, the horizontal movement value for window A, ΔXA, is therefore −18. In the same manner, the vertical movement value ΔYA is determined. In this case, the component of this value for the overlap between windows A and B, i.e. ΔyA,B, will be positive, whereas the component attributable to the overlap between windows A and C, ΔyA,C, will be negative. As a result, the composite amount of the vertical movement value is likely to be quite small. In a similar manner, the horizontal and vertical movement values ΔX and ΔY for each of windows B and C are likewise computed.
  • The calculated movement values are then used to determine target positions for the windows. The determination of the target positions for the windows is carried out in an iterative manner. For this purpose, the computed ΔX and ΔY values are multiplied by a suitable moderating factor, and new positions for the windows are calculated in accordance with these moderated amounts. For instance, if the moderating factor is 0.5, after the first iteration each of the three windows will have moved half of the distance necessary to eliminate overlap, as depicted in FIG. 12. The foregoing steps are then repeated in a cyclic manner, until the overlap between windows has been eliminated, or at least substantially eliminated. The moderating factor can remain constant for every iteration, or it can be varied to alter the rate at which the windows are moved during the process. For example, a relatively large moderating factor can be employed at the beginning of the process, and then be decreased during later iterations, so that the effective window movement starts out relatively fast, and then slows down as they approach a final state. Conversely, the moderating factor can progress from large to small, so that the window movement starts out slowly, and then accelerates as the degree of overlap begins to diminish.
  • Other conditions can be employed to determine a suitable moderating factor as well. For instance, if there is a significant amount of overlap among windows, as indicated by the largest of the measured delta values, it may be preferable to start off with small increments of movement, to thereby maintain relative positioning. On the other hand, a minimal amount of overlap would permit a larger moderating factor to be employed, to reduce the number of iterations necessary to define the target positions.
  • As another condition, the number of windows to be repositioned can be considered. If the number of windows is small, e.g. two or three, a larger moderating factor can be employed from the outset. Conversely, if the number of windows is large, a smaller moderating factor might be preferable, to avoid the possibility that a small window might “leap frog” over an adjacent window, particularly where weighting is employed.
  • As new positions for the windows are calculated, some of them will approach the boundary 58. Referring to FIG. 13, after several iterations, windows A and B extend beyond the horizontal dimensions of the boundary 58. To maximize the utilization of the designated display area, therefore, an external force, is selectively added to the movement computations. For this purpose, a bounding rectangle 59 is determined for all of the windows. This bounding rectangle also encompasses the boundary 58. Thus, when all of the windows are contained within the boundary 58, the bounding rectangle 59 is contiguous with the boundary 58. However, when any of the calculated positions for the windows extends beyond the boundary, as depicted in FIG. 13, the bounding rectangle no longer coincides with the boundary.
  • During each iteration, the aspect ratio of the bounding rectangle 59 is compared with the aspect ratio of the boundary 58. In the example of FIG. 13, the boundary 58 may have an aspect ratio of 5:3, or 1.67, whereas the bounding rectangle may have an aspect ratio of 6:3, i.e. 2. Accordingly, a horizontal external force value is added to the movement vector for each window that extends beyond the boundary 58. In the example of FIG. 13, a positive value would be added to the movement vector for window A, to urge it to the right, and a negative force value would be added to the movement vector for window B. The amount of this force can be a function of the difference in the aspect ratios of the boundary 58 and the bounding rectangle 59.
  • The foregoing process is carried out for a suitable number of iterations, to incrementally calculate target positions for each of the windows in the flattened viewing mode. The number of iterations could be fixed, or it can vary in dependence upon different factors. For instance, once the overlap has been eliminated among all windows, or it has reached a suitable minimal value, e.g. less than 1% of the window areas, the process can stop. As another condition, it may be desirable to limit the process according to time, so that the user does not have to wait too long between entering the command for the flattened viewing mode and initiation of window movement.
  • It is possible that the windows could reach a “stalemate” position before the final iteration of the process. For instance, during one iteration a window might move slightly to the left, to reduce overlap with a second window. However, that may cause it to overlap a third window or extend beyond the boundary, in which case it might move to the right on the next iteration. In the stalemate condition, therefore, the windows might simply be bouncing in place, rather than moving to non-overlapping positions. To detect such a situation, the position of each window can be averaged over a suitable number of the most recent iterations, e.g. ten iterations. If this moving average does not change over subsequent iterations, steps can be taken to eliminate the stalemate. For instance, the external force can be reduced to permit the windows to move farther outside the boundary, in an effort to find optimal positions.
  • As illustrated in the example of FIGS. 9, 12 and 13, it may not be possible to completely separate windows A and B and yet maintain them within the boundary 58 if they remain at their original sizes. Accordingly, as a further step, the windows are scaled down in size, if needed. FIG. 14 illustrates the destination positions for the windows after the final calculations have been made. At this point, a determination is made whether any of the dimensions of the bounding rectangle 59 are greater than those of the boundary 58. If so, the windows are scaled down in size by an amount corresponding to the ratio of the dimensions of the two rectangles, as depicted in FIG. 15. Although only one window may have extended beyond the border, it is preferable to apply the scaling factor to all of the windows, so that they maintain their same relative sizes in the single-layer mode. In addition, the scaling should be proportionately applied in both the horizontal and vertical directions, so as to maintain the configurations, e.g., aspect ratios, of the windows.
  • Once the final destinations and scaling factor have been determined, the windows are then repositioned, and resized as necessary. These actions preferably occur as an animation in which the windows transition from their original positions to the target positions and sizes over a discernable period of time. For instance, the movement and resizing can occur in a linear manner over a period of 2-5seconds. Thus, the iterative process is transparent to the user, and only a smooth transition from the original position to the alterative view is displayed.
  • The flowchart of FIG. 16 summarizes one implementation of the general procedure that is carried out in the foregoing process. In response to receipt of a command to change the display to a flattened viewing mode at step 60, the boundary 58 for the display area is determined at step 62. This boundary might be calculated during the step, or it might be pre-defined, in which case it is retrieved from memory during step 62. Thereafter, a list of the overlap, deltas is generated for each pair of overlapping windows at step 64, and a determination is made at step 65 whether all the deltas have a value of zero, i.e. there are no overlapping windows, or some suitable minimum value. If so, the repositioning process can end at that point. If at least two windows overlap, the movement vector for each pair of overlapping windows is determined at step 66. The smaller of the two deltas for each pair of windows is chosen at step 68, and an adjusted value is computed for the other delta at step 70, in accordance with the determined vector. In step 72, the resulting deltas are then allocated between the windows of each pair, as signed values to indicate right/left or up/down movement. At step 74, the aspect ratios of the boundary 58 and the bounding rectangle 59 are compared. If they are not equal, an external force value is computed at step 76 for the windows that extend beyond the boundary. The moving averages for the windows are then checked at step 78, to see if they have been changing. If not, the external force values are reduced, or eliminated, at step 80.
  • A composite delta value for each window is then calculated at step 82, and these values are scaled in accordance with the moderating factor in step 84, to determine the amount and direction of movement for each window.
  • These movement vectors are applied to the current window positions at step 86 to determine new target positions, and the process then returns to step 64, where the amount of overlap of the windows at the new positions is measured for the next iteration. The process continues to loop through each of steps 64-86, and new target positions are calculated, until a determination is made at step 65 that there are no overlapping windows, or some other terminating condition has been reached. At this point, the destination positions have been identified.
  • Once the destination positions have been calculated in this manner, the size of the bounding rectangle 59 is compared to the boundary 58 in step 88. If either dimension of the bounding rectangle exceeds that of the boundary, the excess amount is determined and used to compute a scaling factor in step 90. Then, at step 92, the windows are moved to the destination positions on the display, and simultaneously resized if necessary in accordance with the scaling factor.
  • The original positions and sizes of the windows are maintained by the Window Manager 38, however. Subsequently, when the user issues the command to return to the layered view, the windows move back to their original positions and sizes, again preferably within a discernable time period. If the user has selected a particular window while they were in the flattened view, the Windows Manager changes the relative depth values of the windows accordingly, so that the selected window appears in the foreground when they return to the original positions. If the selected window is a member of a logical group, it may be preferable to bring all of the windows in the group to the foreground. For example, a window group could comprise all of the windows associated with an application. Another type of group might be a primary window and any secondary windows, such as tool palettes, dialog boxes, etc., associated with the primary window.
  • Within this general framework, a number of variations are possible. For example, it may be desirable to add a border to each window, to thereby maintain a gap between them when they are repositioned. For example, as depicted in FIG. 17, a border 94 of a suitable number of pixels could be added to the edge of each window 96. Further in this regard, it is preferable to provide rounded corners on the borders 94, to thereby enable the windows 96 to slide diagonally past one another. The border can be invisible, or it might be displayed to the user, e.g. to present the appearance of a halo around each window.
  • As another variation, it may be useful to attempt to keep windows from the same application together, for example to facilitate cut-and-paste operations. To accomplish such a result, an “attraction” factor can be computed for such windows. For instance, a vector can be established between each pair of windows belonging to the same application, and an attraction value can be computed which would cause them to move along the vector towards each other. This value could be a function of the distance between the windows, e.g. one-tenth of the distance between their centers. It is included in the algebraic addition of the Δx and Δy values of the windows to calculate their composite movement values.
  • In the example of FIGS. 3-8, all open windows on the display are repositioned to be visible and fully accessible, in response to the command that initiates the flattened viewing mode. In variations of this embodiment, additional commands can be included to cause a subset of the open windows to be presented to the user. For example, actuation of a first function key might cause all of the open windows to be repositioned, as shown in FIGS. 3-8, whereas actuation of a second function key may cause only those windows associated with the active application to be brought to the foreground and repositioned. In such a case, the windows associated with non-active applications can remain in their original positions, but be dimmed while the active windows are being repositioned.
  • A third function key can be associated with a command that initiates a “Show Desktop” viewing mode. In one embodiment of this mode, all of the windows appear to slide off the display, so that the user can access the icons on the desktop. For example, FIG. 18 illustrates the windows as they are moving off the display, so that the desktop and its icons become visible. To accomplish this result, the boundary 58 is treated as a stationary window. The foregoing algorithm is then executed to cause all of the other windows to be repositioned to eliminate overlap with this stationary window, which results in their being moved out of the display area.
  • The “Show Desktop” viewing mode facilitates interaction among desktop objects, as well as between desktop objects and open windows. To illustrate, FIG. 19 a schematically depicts a situation in which a number of overlapping windows F-K obscure desktop icons 100. If the user desires to access one of these icons, the “Show Desktop” viewing mode is initiated, for instance by pressing and holding down a predetermined key or combination of keys. As a result, the windows move outside of the boundary 58, and hence outside of the viewing area, as represented in FIG. 19 b by the dashed outlines. In this state, the user can view the desktop icons 100, select a desired one of them, e.g. 100 a, and drag it to any desired location on the desktop, or onto another icon. Upon releasing the key, the windows return to their original positions within the field of view, i.e., the positions illustrated in FIG. 19 a, wherein the icons are once again covered.
  • In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the user can employ the “Show Desktop” viewing mode to transfer information between windows and obscured areas on the desktop. Referring again to FIG. 19 b, if the user exits the “Show Desktop” mode while dragging the icon 100 a, e.g. by releasing the third function key, the icon being dragged remains visible on top of the windows, as depicted in FIG. 19 c. In this context, the term “drag” does not necessarily mean that the icon is moving while the windows are returning to their original positions. Rather, the user only needs to continue to press the mouse button, or perform a similar action that maintains the selection of the icon while the Show Desktop mode is being exited. Once the windows have returned to their original positions, the user can then continue to drag the icon to any desired window, as shown in FIG. 19 d, and drop it into the contents of that window. While the dragging of a single icon is shown in the illustrated example, multiple desktop icons can be selected and dragged to a window as a group.
  • Conversely, while in the normal viewing mode, the user can select and begin dragging an object 100 b contained in an open window, as shown in FIG. 20 a. Upon pressing a key or taking other appropriate action to initiate the “Show Desktop” viewing mode while continuing to drag the object, the open windows disappear from view, but the selected object 100 b remains visible, as depicted in FIG. 20 b. The user can then drop that object onto a desktop icon 100 c, e.g. a disk drive, that was previously obscured by the windows, as shown in FIG. 20 c. Thereafter, the windows are returned to their normal positions, as depicted in FIG. 20 d.
  • Thus, the “Show Desktop” mode enables the user to temporarily remove open windows from view, to provide access to desktop objects obscured by those windows, and then return the windows to their original positions. This operation is easily accomplished without the need to reposition, resize or minimize the windows. In other words, interaction between desktop objects and the contents of windows can be achieved without disturbing the window environment.
  • Alternative techniques for removing the windows to reveal the desktop can be employed. For instance, rather than sliding off the screen, the actuation of the third function key can cause all of the windows to be instantly hidden, or to slowly fade from view, while the key is pressed. Likewise, various forms of 3-dimensional animation might be utilized, such as virtual rotation of the entire screen about an axis that causes the view with the windows to rotate out of sight while the view of the desktop rotates into sight.
  • Rather than completely remove the windows from view in the “Show Desktop” mode, it may be preferable to have an edge of each window remain visible at the border of the display, or to represent the windows by means of tabs or pull-out drawers along the border. As long as the “Show Desktop” mode provides a temporary viewing state where the windows do not obscure the icons 100, the ability to interact between windows and desktop objects is facilitated.
  • FIG. 21 illustrates one example of this concept. When the user performs the appropriate action to go into the “Show Desktop” mode, a translucent screen border 102 fades into view as the windows move to the edges of the display. The windows do not move all the way off the display screen. Rather, a portion 104 of each window remains visible beneath the border 102, confirming for the user that the windows have not disappeared. This can be accomplished, for example, by defining the boundary 58 to be contiguous with the interior of the border. As an alternative to any of the other mechanisms for returning to the normal view, or in addition thereto, the user can click on the area of the border 104, or drag an object such as an icon to the border, which causes the windows to return to their original positions.
  • In the illustrated examples, the “Show Desktop” viewing mode encompasses the entire area of the display. In some cases, it may be preferable to displace only those windows that obscure a predetermined portion of the display. For instance, if the user typically groups icons of interest in a particular area, e.g. in the upper left quadrant or along the right edge, then it is not necessary to remove windows appearing in other areas. In this case, the “Show Desktop” viewing mode might be configured to displace only those windows which appear in a designated portion of the display. This can be accomplished, for example, by dimensioning the boundary rectangle 58 so that it only covers the area of interest, rather than most or all of the display area.
  • While function-keys have been described above as the mechanism for entering the different viewing modes, a number of different approaches can be employed. FIG. 22 illustrates an example of a preferences panel, or control panel, via which the user can select the appropriate mechanisms. As shown in the lower part of the panel, the user has chosen the right mouse button to select the “All Windows” mode, the left Control button on the keyboard to select the “Application Windows” mode, and the F10 function-key to select the “Show Desktop” mode.
  • In addition to keys and mouse buttons, the user can designate active screen corners to initiate the viewing modes. In operation, when the user positions the cursor in one of the designated corners of the display screen, the selected viewing mode is initiated. In the illustrated example, the upper left corner of the screen has been selected for the “All Windows” mode, and the upper right corner has been designated for the “Application Windows” mode. A menu 106 of available choices is displayed for the lower right corner. From this menu, the user can designate the “Desktop” mode, or a different type of functionality. A particular advantage of using active screen corners lies in the fact that, if the user is attempting to drag an object, such as an icon, to a hidden window, by dragging the object, to the active corner the display will automatically switch to the single-layer mode, so that the hidden window will appear and the icon can be dropped onto it. With this approach, the user only has to concentrate on one device during the drag-and-drop operation, namely the mouse or other cursor control device, and move it in a continuous, natural manner. He or she is not required to interrupt the operation to activate a different element, such as a key on the keyboard.
  • Preferably, the user can switch between different single-layer modes. For instance, while in the “Applications Windows” mode, the user can switch the display to the “All Windows” mode by pressing the appropriate key or moving, the cursor to the active corner of the screen. When this occurs, the windows that were dimmed in the background are returned to their normal brightness values, and all windows are repositioned in accordance with the foregoing description. In this case, the application windows that were already in the foreground are moved from their current positions in the “Application Windows” mode, rather than returning to their original positions that they occupied before that mode was initiated. Similarly, if the user selects the “Desktop” mode from one of the other single-layer modes, the windows move off the screen from their current positions in that other mode.
  • While in the “Application Windows” mode, the user can switch among the different applications that are currently running. FIG. 23 a illustrates an example of a display containing a number of open windows that are associated with different applications. The windows labeled “A” are associated with one application, those labeled “B” are associated with a second application, and those. labeled “C” belong to a third application. Upon pressing the second function key or otherwise activating a control element that initiates the “Application Windows” mode, the windows associated with the foreground application, in this case Application A, are repositioned and resized as necessary to present them in a single-layer view, as depicted in FIG. 23 b. The windows associated with the other applications remain in their original positions in the background in a dimmed state, represented by the dashed outlines.
  • While in this view, if the user activates a designated control element, e.g. presses the “Tab” key, the display can switch to the windows associated with the application that was most recently active before the Application A. Referring to FIG. 23 c, the windows for Application B are brought to the foreground, and repositioned and resized as necessary. At the same time, the windows belonging to Application A are dimmed. They can remain in their single-layer positions, rather than returning to the original positions of FIG. 23 a. Each subsequent activation of the control element causes the display to cycle through the windows associated with each of the open application programs, in order of most recently accessed to least recently accessed, or any other suitable order. Thus, as shown in FIG. 23 d, the next depression of the Tab key causes the windows of Application C to be presented in the single-layer view. The same control element could also be operative in the “All Windows” mode, to cause the view to switch to the “Application Windows” mode.
  • To enable the foregoing functionality to be achieved, the computer preferably operates in a modal state when any of the single-layer viewing modes is selected. In such a state, the window manager, or other process that provides the functionality of the present invention, receives notification from an event manager of all events such as keyboard navigation, mouse clicks, etc. These events come under its control, and therefore do not interfere with the operation of any of the application programs that are currently executing. Such a state of control also permits the operating system to handle drag-and-drop actions, and other user interface types of activities that are occurring in the computer system.
  • As noted previously, when the “All Windows” mode is selected, the desktop region is dimmed, to thereby highlight the windows being viewed. Similarly, when the “Application Windows” mode is selected, the windows that are not associated with the active application are dimmed, as well as the desktop region. These dimming functions can be achieved by generating a backdrop window that covers the entire boundary area 58, and has a variable opacity value. This window is inserted at the appropriate level in the series of windows to achieve the desired results. For instance, when the “All Windows” mode is selected, the backdrop window is inserted at the rearmost level, so that it only obscures the view of the desktop objects, but not any of the open windows. The opacity value of this backdrop window might transition from a value of 0% to a value of 60% during the animation in which the windows are being repositioned and resized.
  • For the “Application Windows” mode, the backdrop window is inserted at a level behind the levels of the active application windows, but in front of all other windows. Again, the opacity can transition from 0% to 60%, or any other suitable value, as the application windows are being repositioned.
  • When switching between the “All Windows” mode and the “Application Windows” mode, two backdrop windows are preferably used. For instance, in the “AIl Windows” mode, the rearmost backdrop window may be displayed with an opacity value of 60%. When the “Applications Window” mode is subsequently selected, a second backdrop window is inserted behind the application windows, with an initial opacity value of 0%. Then, as the transition between the two modes is occurring, a cross-fade can occur between the two backdrop windows. As an example, the rear backdrop window fades out, going from 60% opacity to 0% opacity, while the forward backdrop window fades in from 0% to 60%. The fade-in/fade-out rates of the two windows are coordinated so that, as the non-active application windows are dimmed relative to the active application windows, the dimness of the desktop appears to remain constant. Similarly, when transitioning from the “Application Windows” mode to the “All Windows” mode, the converse operation is carried out, so that the non-active windows re-appear while the desktop remains at a constant level of dimness.
  • Some types of secondary windows may not need to appear on the display during the flattened viewing mode. For example, a tool palette typically would not be selectable in this mode. In such a case, therefore, windows of this type can be removed from the display space while the selectable primary windows are being repositioned and viewed in the flattened mode.
  • In other cases, it might be desirable to have certain types of secondary windows remain on the display. For example, it may be useful to be able to view a drawer that extends from a primary window. In such a case, the drawer should stay with the primary window from which it extends. To accomplish such a result, the primary window and the drawer can be treated as a single composite window, so that they remain together as the repositioning is taking place.
  • In the foregoing example, the windows are repositioned in directions corresponding to vectors that interconnect overlapping windows, to thereby maintain their relative positions to the extent possible. In another implementation, a different rule might be used to determine window placement. For example, the foremost window could be placed in the upper left corner of the border area 58. The window at the next depth level could be placed immediately to its right, or below it, and so on, such that the windows appear in rows or columns on the display in accordance with their relative levels of depth. For this arrangement, a visible or invisible grid pattern can be established on the display, and the initial movement vector for each window can extend from the location of the window to a designated cell in the grid. As a variant of this approach, the windows could be grouped by application, so that the windows belonging to one application appear in the upper left corner, those for another application appear in the upper right corner, and so forth.
  • As noted previously, the present invention is not limited to the display of windows in a graphical user interface. Rather, it can be applied to any type of object that is capable of being obscured by another object. For instance, it might be used to reposition icons or thumbnail images in a folder, so that the user can locate and select any desired one of them. It can also be applied to a combination of different types of objects, e.g. menus, icons, windows, control strips, etc., so that they can all be simultaneously viewed by the user.
  • Further in this regard, the ability to reposition objects so that they can all be viewed simultaneously is not limited to objects appearing on the computer display. It can also be applied to the printing of images. For example, it can be employed to arrange multiple photographic images that are to be printed on a single page.
  • In summary, therefore, it can be seen that the user interface of the present invention provides an effective mechanism for accessing any one of a number of objects that are simultaneously presented to the user. By repositioning the objects to mutually exclusive areas on the display or page, and resizing them as necessary to do so, the present invention enables the user to readily ascertain the content of every such object. While the objects are in the flattened viewing mode, the user can select any desired one of them. In the case of windows, the selected window becomes the active window when the display is returned to the normal viewing mode. In addition, while all of the objects are simultaneously accessible, the user can perform other types of operations, such as dragging an attachment for an e-mail message from one window to another window that might be otherwise hidden. Similarly, the user can close any windows that may no longer be desired, or minimize any that need not be currently open.
  • It will be appreciated by those of ordinary skill in the art that the present invention can be embodied in other specific forms, without departing from the spirit or essential characteristics thereof. The presently disclosed embodiments are therefore considered in all respects to be illustrative, and not restrictive. The scope of the invention is indicated by the appended claims, rather than the foregoing description, and all changes that come within the meaning and range of equivalents thereof are intended to be embraced therein.

Claims (20)

1. A method of providing alternate views of a plurality of windows on a display for a graphical user interface executing on a computer, comprising the steps of:
displaying a plurality of windows in a first view where at least one window can obscure another window;
in response to entry of a command to present an alternative view, displaying the windows at respective locations on the display so that at least a portion of each of said windows is visible to a user, while maintaining the proportional sizes of said windows relative to one another, in said alternative view; and
returning the windows to their original locations in response to a user action.
2. The method of claim 1 further including the step of resizing the windows according to a common scale factor to maintain their relative proportional sizes in said alternative view.
3. The method of claim 2 wherein the windows are resized so that all of the displayed windows appear within a defined boundary area of the display in the alternative view.
4. The method of claim 2 further including the step of maintaining the same respective aspect ratios for said windows in both the first view and the alternative view.
5. The method of claim 1, wherein said user action is selection of one of the windows.
6. The method of claim 5, further including the step of displaying the selected window in the foreground when the windows are returned to their original positions.
7. The method of claim 1, wherein said user action is issuance of a second command.
8. The method of claim 1, wherein said windows are displayed without any overlap of one another in said alternative view.
9. The method of claim 1 further including the step of displaying an animation that shows movement of said windows from their locations in said first view to their respective locations in the alternative view.
10. A computer-readable medium containing a program that is executed by a computer to provide an alternative view for a computer user interface of the type that presents a normal viewing mode in which plural windows are displayed in a layered environment in positions where a window can overlap and obscure another window, said program causing said plural windows to move from their positions in said normal viewing mode to respective locations within a display in response to a user command to invoke the alternative view, such that at least a portion of each of said plural windows is visible in said alternative viewing mode, while maintaining the relative proportional sizes of said plural windows, and then return to the positions they occupied in the normal viewing mode.
11. The program of claim 10, wherein said program is responsive to the selection of one of said windows while in said alternative viewing mode to cause the selected window to be displayed in the foreground when the windows are returned to their positions in the normal viewing mode.
12. The program of claim 10, wherein the aspect ratio of each of said windows remains constant in said normal and alternative viewing modes.
13. The program of claim 10, wherein said windows are displayed without any overlap of one another in said alternative viewing mode.
14. The program of claim 10, wherein the movement of said windows to their respective locations in said alternative viewing mode is displayed as an animation.
15. A computer system, comprising:
a display device; and
a graphical user interface having a first mode in which plural windows are displayed in a layered view on said device such that a window can overlap and obscure another window, and a second mode that is invoked upon entry of a command to switch to said second mode, in which said plural windows are temporarily moved from their positions in said first mode to respective locations within the area of said display such that at least a portion of each of said plural windows is visible, while maintaining the relative proportional sizes of said plural windows, and subsequently returned to the positions they occupied in said first mode.
16. The computer system of claim 15, wherein said windows are returned to their positions in the first mode, in response to selection of one of the windows while they are displayed in said second mode.
17. The computer system of claim 16, wherein the selected window is displayed in the foreground when the windows are returned to their positions in the first mode.
18. The computer system of claim 15, wherein said windows are displayed without any overlap of one another in said second mode.
19. The computer system of claim 15 wherein the windows are resized according to a common factor to maintain their relative proportional sizes in said second mode.
20. The computer system of claim 19 wherein the windows are resized in said second mode so that all of the displayed windows appear within a defined boundary area of the display.
US11/530,883 2003-06-20 2006-09-11 Computer Interface Having A Virtual Single-Layer Mode For Viewing Overlapping Objects Abandoned US20070022389A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/465,855 US8127248B2 (en) 2003-06-20 2003-06-20 Computer interface having a virtual single-layer mode for viewing overlapping objects
US10/689,687 US7739617B2 (en) 2003-06-20 2003-10-22 Computer interface having a virtual single-layer mode for viewing overlapping objects
US11/530,883 US20070022389A1 (en) 2003-06-20 2006-09-11 Computer Interface Having A Virtual Single-Layer Mode For Viewing Overlapping Objects

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/530,883 US20070022389A1 (en) 2003-06-20 2006-09-11 Computer Interface Having A Virtual Single-Layer Mode For Viewing Overlapping Objects
US13/773,382 US9164650B2 (en) 2003-06-20 2013-02-21 Computer interface having a virtual single-layer mode for viewing overlapping objects
US14/886,293 US10318134B2 (en) 2003-06-20 2015-10-19 Computer interface having a virtual single-layer mode for viewing overlapping objects

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/689,687 Continuation US7739617B2 (en) 2003-06-20 2003-10-22 Computer interface having a virtual single-layer mode for viewing overlapping objects

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/892,155 Continuation US8386956B2 (en) 2003-06-20 2007-08-20 Computer interface having a virtual single-layer mode for viewing overlapping objects

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20070022389A1 true US20070022389A1 (en) 2007-01-25

Family

ID=33423583

Family Applications (4)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/530,883 Abandoned US20070022389A1 (en) 2003-06-20 2006-09-11 Computer Interface Having A Virtual Single-Layer Mode For Viewing Overlapping Objects
US11/892,155 Active 2026-02-10 US8386956B2 (en) 2003-06-20 2007-08-20 Computer interface having a virtual single-layer mode for viewing overlapping objects
US13/773,382 Active 2024-08-13 US9164650B2 (en) 2003-06-20 2013-02-21 Computer interface having a virtual single-layer mode for viewing overlapping objects
US14/886,293 Active 2025-03-18 US10318134B2 (en) 2003-06-20 2015-10-19 Computer interface having a virtual single-layer mode for viewing overlapping objects

Family Applications After (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/892,155 Active 2026-02-10 US8386956B2 (en) 2003-06-20 2007-08-20 Computer interface having a virtual single-layer mode for viewing overlapping objects
US13/773,382 Active 2024-08-13 US9164650B2 (en) 2003-06-20 2013-02-21 Computer interface having a virtual single-layer mode for viewing overlapping objects
US14/886,293 Active 2025-03-18 US10318134B2 (en) 2003-06-20 2015-10-19 Computer interface having a virtual single-layer mode for viewing overlapping objects

Country Status (4)

Country Link
US (4) US20070022389A1 (en)
EP (2) EP1491990B1 (en)
DE (1) DE202004009752U1 (en)
WO (1) WO2004114113A1 (en)

Cited By (44)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20070050729A1 (en) * 2005-08-31 2007-03-01 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Display apparatus, method, and program
US20070126732A1 (en) * 2005-12-05 2007-06-07 Microsoft Corporation Accessing 2D graphic content using axonometric layer views
WO2009001981A1 (en) * 2007-06-26 2008-12-31 Chang Sun Moon System and method for providing virtual interface
US20090031243A1 (en) * 2007-07-24 2009-01-29 Ntt Docomo, Inc. Method and apparatus for controlling display of windows
US20090119617A1 (en) * 2007-11-07 2009-05-07 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for controlling the arrangements of windows on a display
US20090164936A1 (en) * 2007-12-19 2009-06-25 Sony Corporation Information processing apparatus, display control method and display control program
US20090183107A1 (en) * 2008-01-16 2009-07-16 Microsoft Corporation Window minimization trigger
US20090262091A1 (en) * 2008-01-07 2009-10-22 Tetsuo Ikeda Information Processing Apparatus and Vibration Control Method in Information Processing Apparatus
US20100011316A1 (en) * 2008-01-17 2010-01-14 Can Sar System for intelligent automated layout and management of interactive windows
US20100037243A1 (en) * 2008-08-06 2010-02-11 Mo Sang-Dok Apparatus and method of supporting plurality of operating systems
US20100062811A1 (en) * 2008-09-11 2010-03-11 Jun-Serk Park Terminal and menu display method thereof
US20100313164A1 (en) * 2009-06-08 2010-12-09 John Louch User interface for multiple display regions
US20110154328A1 (en) * 2009-12-21 2011-06-23 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Virtualization Apparatus and Method
US20110173563A1 (en) * 2007-04-04 2011-07-14 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Information processing apparatus and display method
US20110181780A1 (en) * 2010-01-25 2011-07-28 Barton James M Displaying Content on Detected Devices
US20110185036A1 (en) * 2010-01-25 2011-07-28 Brian Lanier Playing Multimedia Content on Multiple Devices
US20120047463A1 (en) * 2010-08-20 2012-02-23 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method of configuring menu screen, user device for performing the method and computer-readable storage medium having recorded thereon program for executing the method
US20130104018A1 (en) * 2010-06-11 2013-04-25 Visual Domains Ltd. Method and system for displaying visual content in a virtual three-dimensional space
US20130346894A1 (en) * 2012-06-04 2013-12-26 Htc Corporation Method, apparatus and computer-readable medium for adjusting size of screen object
US20140004937A1 (en) * 2012-06-27 2014-01-02 DeNA Co., Ltd. Device for providing a game content
US20140006988A1 (en) * 2011-04-15 2014-01-02 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Content display device, content display method, program, and recording medium
US20140033117A1 (en) * 2012-07-27 2014-01-30 Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. Display device for executing multiple applications and method for controlling the same
US20140055388A1 (en) * 2012-08-22 2014-02-27 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for constructing a home screen in a terminal having a touch screen
US20140096072A1 (en) * 2009-01-09 2014-04-03 Sony Corporation Display device and display method
US20140267105A1 (en) * 2013-03-12 2014-09-18 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Drawing device, display method, and recording medium
US20140317559A1 (en) * 2012-04-17 2014-10-23 Franz Antonio Wakefield Method, system, apparatus, and tangible portable interactive electronic device storage medium; that processes custom programs and data for a user by creating, displaying, storing, modifying, performing adaptive learning routines, and multitasking; utilizing cascade windows on an electronic screen display in a mobile electronic intercative device gui (graphical user interface) system
US20140337468A1 (en) * 2013-05-10 2014-11-13 Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd. Information processing device, information processing method, and computer-readable medium
US20150046823A1 (en) * 2013-08-06 2015-02-12 Crackle, Inc Selectively adjusting display parameter of areas within user interface
US20150121300A1 (en) * 2013-10-28 2015-04-30 Lenovo (Beijing) Co., Ltd. Information processing method and electronic device
US20150176846A1 (en) * 2012-07-16 2015-06-25 Rational Aktiengesellschaft Method for Displaying Parameters of a Cooking Process and Display Device for a Cooking Appliance
US9218788B2 (en) 2008-09-09 2015-12-22 Ntt Docomo, Inc. Information-processing device and program for displaying a window group including a plurality of windows
USD748654S1 (en) * 2013-05-10 2016-02-02 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD748653S1 (en) * 2013-05-10 2016-02-02 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD748652S1 (en) * 2013-05-10 2016-02-02 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD749100S1 (en) * 2013-05-10 2016-02-09 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
US20160070423A1 (en) * 2014-09-05 2016-03-10 Microsoft Corporation Combined switching and window placement
US20160085423A1 (en) * 2014-09-19 2016-03-24 Yahoo Japan Corporation Information display apparatus, distribution apparatus, information display method, and non-transitory computer readable storage medium
CN105830456A (en) * 2013-10-23 2016-08-03 汤姆逊许可公司 Method and apparatus for transmission and reception of media data
USD783038S1 (en) * 2015-05-01 2017-04-04 Microsoft Corporation Display screen with animated graphical user interface
USD788809S1 (en) * 2015-06-22 2017-06-06 Gamblit Gaming, Llc Display screen for a graphical user interface
US10042655B2 (en) 2015-01-21 2018-08-07 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc. Adaptable user interface display
US10209849B2 (en) 2015-01-21 2019-02-19 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Adaptive user interface pane objects
US10394323B2 (en) * 2015-12-04 2019-08-27 International Business Machines Corporation Templates associated with content items based on cognitive states
US10402034B2 (en) * 2014-04-02 2019-09-03 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Adaptive user interface pane manager

Families Citing this family (80)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
EP1491990B1 (en) 2003-06-20 2010-02-17 Apple Inc. Graphical user interface system and method of displaying objects in a graphical user interface
KR100596921B1 (en) * 2003-11-20 2006-07-07 엘지전자 주식회사 method for displaying E-mail in mobile
EP1999610A4 (en) * 2006-02-04 2011-05-25 Wayport Inc System and method for providing advertising and content in a distributed internet access environment
US20070265930A1 (en) * 2006-04-26 2007-11-15 Julia Mohr Usability by offering the possibility to change viewing order in a navigation panel
US20070265929A1 (en) * 2006-04-26 2007-11-15 Michael Danninger Portal page personalization offering a direct manipulative window arrangement functionality
US20080040665A1 (en) 2006-07-06 2008-02-14 Carsten Waldeck Method and system for displaying, locating and browsing data files
US7930650B2 (en) * 2006-09-11 2011-04-19 Apple Inc. User interface with menu abstractions and content abstractions
US7743338B2 (en) * 2006-09-11 2010-06-22 Apple Inc. Image rendering with image artifact along a multidimensional path
US7831727B2 (en) * 2006-09-11 2010-11-09 Apple Computer, Inc. Multi-content presentation of unassociated content types
US7984377B2 (en) 2006-09-11 2011-07-19 Apple Inc. Cascaded display of video media
US7853972B2 (en) 2006-09-11 2010-12-14 Apple Inc. Media preview user interface
US7747968B2 (en) * 2006-09-11 2010-06-29 Apple Inc. Content abstraction presentation along a multidimensional path
US7743341B2 (en) * 2006-09-11 2010-06-22 Apple Inc. Rendering icons along a multidimensional path having a terminus position
US8099665B2 (en) * 2006-09-11 2012-01-17 Apple Inc. Organizing and sorting media menu items
WO2008038368A1 (en) 2006-09-28 2008-04-03 Navitime Japan Co., Ltd. Window display system
US8136040B2 (en) * 2007-05-16 2012-03-13 Apple Inc. Audio variance for multiple windows
US7949954B1 (en) 2007-08-17 2011-05-24 Trading Technologies International, Inc. Dynamic functionality based on window characteristics
USD607003S1 (en) 2007-09-04 2009-12-29 Apple Inc. Graphical user interface for a display screen or portion thereof
US20090228838A1 (en) * 2008-03-04 2009-09-10 Ryan Christopher N Content design tool
JP5116514B2 (en) * 2008-03-11 2013-01-09 キヤノン株式会社 Imaging apparatus and display control method
US8024667B2 (en) * 2008-10-24 2011-09-20 Microsoft Corporation In-document floating object re-ordering
US20130024818A1 (en) * 2009-04-30 2013-01-24 Nokia Corporation Apparatus and Method for Handling Tasks Within a Computing Device
KR101601040B1 (en) 2009-05-19 2016-03-09 삼성전자주식회사 Screen Display Method And Apparatus For Portable Device
US8698845B2 (en) 2010-01-06 2014-04-15 Apple Inc. Device, method, and graphical user interface with interactive popup views
US20110209080A1 (en) * 2010-02-24 2011-08-25 Htc Corporation Display method and electronic device for using the same
US9823831B2 (en) 2010-04-07 2017-11-21 Apple Inc. Device, method, and graphical user interface for managing concurrently open software applications
US9058186B2 (en) * 2010-04-07 2015-06-16 Apple Inc. Device, method, and graphical user interface for managing concurrently open software applications
US9513801B2 (en) 2010-04-07 2016-12-06 Apple Inc. Accessing electronic notifications and settings icons with gestures
US20120017171A1 (en) * 2010-07-14 2012-01-19 Wen-Chieh Tseng Interface display adjustment method and touch display apparatus using the same
US9342208B2 (en) * 2010-07-27 2016-05-17 Yahoo! Inc. System and method for optimizing window display
US9483167B2 (en) 2010-09-29 2016-11-01 Adobe Systems Incorporated User interface for a touch enabled device
USD668263S1 (en) 2010-10-08 2012-10-02 Apple Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with icon
US9229636B2 (en) 2010-10-22 2016-01-05 Adobe Systems Incorporated Drawing support tool
US9244606B2 (en) 2010-12-20 2016-01-26 Apple Inc. Device, method, and graphical user interface for navigation of concurrently open software applications
US8842120B2 (en) 2011-03-02 2014-09-23 Adobe Systems Incorporated Physics rules based animation engine
US9142193B2 (en) 2011-03-17 2015-09-22 Intellitact Llc Linear progression based window management
US8898589B2 (en) * 2011-06-30 2014-11-25 International Business Machines Corporation Flattening a subset of configuration user interface (UI) panels in a hierarchy of UI panels
US8539373B1 (en) * 2011-07-05 2013-09-17 Google Inc. Sliding window manager
US8806369B2 (en) 2011-08-26 2014-08-12 Apple Inc. Device, method, and graphical user interface for managing and interacting with concurrently open software applications
US10031641B2 (en) * 2011-09-27 2018-07-24 Adobe Systems Incorporated Ordering of objects displayed by a computing device
US9135022B2 (en) * 2011-11-14 2015-09-15 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Cross window animation
US9395868B2 (en) 2011-12-06 2016-07-19 Google Inc. Graphical user interface window spacing mechanisms
CN102520954B (en) * 2011-12-15 2015-04-22 北京新媒传信科技有限公司 Implementation method and implementation device for mouse following
KR20130072744A (en) * 2011-12-22 2013-07-02 삼성전자주식회사 Method and apparatus for dynamic display split in portable terminal
JP5879536B2 (en) * 2012-01-18 2016-03-08 パナソニックIpマネジメント株式会社 Display device and display method
US20130283203A1 (en) * 2012-04-24 2013-10-24 Yahoo! Inc. Method and system for displaying search results
DE202013012233U1 (en) 2012-05-09 2016-01-18 Apple Inc. Device and graphical user interface for displaying additional information in response to a user contact
EP2847661A2 (en) 2012-05-09 2015-03-18 Apple Inc. Device, method, and graphical user interface for moving and dropping a user interface object
WO2013169842A2 (en) 2012-05-09 2013-11-14 Yknots Industries Llc Device, method, and graphical user interface for selecting object within a group of objects
WO2013169853A1 (en) 2012-05-09 2013-11-14 Industries Llc Yknots Device, method, and graphical user interface for providing tactile feedback for operations performed in a user interface
WO2013169843A1 (en) 2012-05-09 2013-11-14 Yknots Industries Llc Device, method, and graphical user interface for manipulating framed graphical objects
DE112013002412T5 (en) 2012-05-09 2015-02-19 Apple Inc. Apparatus, method and graphical user interface for providing feedback for changing activation states of a user interface object
WO2013169875A2 (en) 2012-05-09 2013-11-14 Yknots Industries Llc Device, method, and graphical user interface for displaying content associated with a corresponding affordance
EP2847660B1 (en) 2012-05-09 2018-11-14 Apple Inc. Device, method, and graphical user interface for selecting user interface objects
WO2013169845A1 (en) 2012-05-09 2013-11-14 Yknots Industries Llc Device, method, and graphical user interface for scrolling nested regions
EP2847659B1 (en) 2012-05-09 2019-09-04 Apple Inc. Device, method, and graphical user interface for transitioning between display states in response to a gesture
WO2013169865A2 (en) 2012-05-09 2013-11-14 Yknots Industries Llc Device, method, and graphical user interface for moving a user interface object based on an intensity of a press input
CN104106035A (en) * 2012-06-28 2014-10-15 汉阳大学校产学协力团 Method for adjusting UI and user terminal using same
GB2505403A (en) 2012-08-06 2014-03-05 Ibm Efficient usage of screen real estate on the electronic device
USD712918S1 (en) 2012-09-11 2014-09-09 Apple Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
CN107832003A (en) 2012-12-29 2018-03-23 苹果公司 Device, method, and graphical user interface for determining whether to scroll or select contents
KR101958582B1 (en) 2012-12-29 2019-07-04 애플 인크. Device, method, and graphical user interface for transitioning between touch input to display output relationships
AU2013368440B2 (en) 2012-12-29 2017-01-05 Apple Inc. Device, method, and graphical user interface for navigating user interface hierarchies
US9874991B2 (en) 2013-01-15 2018-01-23 Apple Inc. Progressive tiling
US8984439B2 (en) * 2013-02-14 2015-03-17 Citibank, N.A. Methods and systems for managing a graphical user interface
KR20140112918A (en) * 2013-03-14 2014-09-24 삼성전자주식회사 Method and apparatus for controlling screen display using temperature and humidity
US9477404B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-10-25 Apple Inc. Device, method, and graphical user interface for managing concurrently open software applications
US9658740B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2017-05-23 Apple Inc. Device, method, and graphical user interface for managing concurrently open software applications
US9569076B2 (en) * 2014-01-15 2017-02-14 Accenture Global Services Limited Systems and methods for configuring tiles in a user interface
US10332200B1 (en) * 2014-03-17 2019-06-25 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Dual-use display screen for financial services applications
US9870188B2 (en) * 2014-08-18 2018-01-16 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Content visibility management
US10048757B2 (en) 2015-03-08 2018-08-14 Apple Inc. Devices and methods for controlling media presentation
US10095396B2 (en) 2015-03-08 2018-10-09 Apple Inc. Devices, methods, and graphical user interfaces for interacting with a control object while dragging another object
US9645732B2 (en) 2015-03-08 2017-05-09 Apple Inc. Devices, methods, and graphical user interfaces for displaying and using menus
US9785305B2 (en) 2015-03-19 2017-10-10 Apple Inc. Touch input cursor manipulation
US9860451B2 (en) 2015-06-07 2018-01-02 Apple Inc. Devices and methods for capturing and interacting with enhanced digital images
US9674426B2 (en) 2015-06-07 2017-06-06 Apple Inc. Devices and methods for capturing and interacting with enhanced digital images
USD771653S1 (en) 2015-07-29 2016-11-15 Apple Inc. Display screen or portion thereof with animated graphical user interface
US20170045981A1 (en) 2015-08-10 2017-02-16 Apple Inc. Devices and Methods for Processing Touch Inputs Based on Their Intensities
US20170344106A1 (en) * 2016-05-24 2017-11-30 International Business Machines Corporation Reducing Hazards During Mobile Device Use

Citations (35)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5060170A (en) * 1989-08-09 1991-10-22 International Business Machines Corp. Space allocation and positioning method for screen display regions in a variable windowing system
US5075675A (en) * 1988-06-30 1991-12-24 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for dynamic promotion of background window displays in multi-tasking computer systems
US5305435A (en) * 1990-07-17 1994-04-19 Hewlett-Packard Company Computer windows management system and method for simulating off-screen document storage and retrieval
US5390295A (en) * 1991-12-20 1995-02-14 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for proportionally displaying windows on a computer display screen
US5497454A (en) * 1994-11-02 1996-03-05 International Business Machines Corporation System for presenting alternate views of a computer window environment
US5561757A (en) * 1994-04-06 1996-10-01 Altera Corporation Computer user interface having tiled and overlapped window areas
US5577187A (en) * 1994-05-20 1996-11-19 Microsoft Corporation Method and system for tiling windows based on previous position and size
US5796402A (en) * 1993-12-03 1998-08-18 Microsoft Corporation Method and system for aligning windows on a computer screen
US5841435A (en) * 1996-07-26 1998-11-24 International Business Machines Corporation Virtual windows desktop
US5856826A (en) * 1995-10-06 1999-01-05 Apple Computer, Inc. Method and apparatus for organizing window groups and windows in a table
US5859639A (en) * 1996-07-17 1999-01-12 International Business Machines Corporation Mechanism to control visible presence of desktop objects in a graphical user interface
US5874962A (en) * 1996-03-08 1999-02-23 International Business Machines System and method for arranging windows displayed by a graphical user interface
US5892511A (en) * 1996-09-30 1999-04-06 Intel Corporation Method for assisting window selection in a graphical user interface
US5920313A (en) * 1995-06-01 1999-07-06 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for associating related user interface objects
US6008809A (en) * 1997-09-22 1999-12-28 International Business Machines Corporation Apparatus and method for viewing multiple windows within a dynamic window
US6011551A (en) * 1996-03-29 2000-01-04 International Business Machines Corporation Method, memory and apparatus for automatically resizing a window while continuing to display information therein
US6075531A (en) * 1997-12-15 2000-06-13 International Business Machines Corporation Computer system and method of manipulating multiple graphical user interface components on a computer display with a proximity pointer
US6091395A (en) * 1997-12-15 2000-07-18 International Business Machines Corporation Computer system and method of manipulating a graphical user interface component on a computer display through collision with a pointer
US6133914A (en) * 1998-01-07 2000-10-17 Rogers; David W. Interactive graphical user interface
US6166736A (en) * 1997-08-22 2000-12-26 Natrificial Llc Method and apparatus for simultaneously resizing and relocating windows within a graphical display
US6429883B1 (en) * 1999-09-03 2002-08-06 International Business Machines Corporation Method for viewing hidden entities by varying window or graphic object transparency
US6473102B1 (en) * 1998-05-11 2002-10-29 Apple Computer, Inc. Method and system for automatically resizing and repositioning windows in response to changes in display
US20020196272A1 (en) * 1998-10-01 2002-12-26 Digimarc Corporation Smart images and image bookmarks for an internet browser
US6590594B2 (en) * 1999-03-25 2003-07-08 International Business Machines Corporation Window scroll-bar
US20030189597A1 (en) * 2002-04-05 2003-10-09 Microsoft Corporation Virtual desktop manager
US6654036B1 (en) * 2000-06-05 2003-11-25 International Business Machines Corporation Method, article of manufacture and apparatus for controlling relative positioning of objects in a windows environment
US20040066414A1 (en) * 2002-10-08 2004-04-08 Microsoft Corporation System and method for managing software applications in a graphical user interface
US6806892B1 (en) * 1999-12-20 2004-10-19 International Business Machines Corporation Layer viewport for enhanced viewing in layered drawings
US20050017978A1 (en) * 2001-09-18 2005-01-27 International Business Machiness Corporation Display controller
US6864905B2 (en) * 2001-03-23 2005-03-08 International Business Machines Corporation Method to redisplay active panels
US6915490B1 (en) * 2000-09-29 2005-07-05 Apple Computer Inc. Method for dragging and dropping between multiple layered windows
US6957395B1 (en) * 2000-01-04 2005-10-18 Apple Computer, Inc. Computer interface having a single window mode of operation
US7007241B2 (en) * 2000-05-12 2006-02-28 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Display device with a focus buoy facility
US20060101352A1 (en) * 2003-01-14 2006-05-11 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Rearranging views on a computer screen
US20060200779A1 (en) * 2001-04-30 2006-09-07 Taylor Steve D Cell based end user interface having action cells

Family Cites Families (32)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4574364A (en) 1982-11-23 1986-03-04 Hitachi, Ltd. Method and apparatus for controlling image display
US5148520A (en) 1988-12-30 1992-09-15 Chipsoft Ca, Corp. Determining the locations of the contents of bordered areas of a generic form
US6141008A (en) * 1992-03-20 2000-10-31 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for providing size adjustment for a maximized window in a computer system graphical user interface
US5442759A (en) * 1992-03-26 1995-08-15 International Business Machines Corporation Interactive online tutorial system with user assistance function for software products
US5371847A (en) 1992-09-22 1994-12-06 Microsoft Corporation Method and system for specifying the arrangement of windows on a display
US5452406A (en) 1993-05-14 1995-09-19 Microsoft Corporation Method and system for scalable borders that provide an appearance of depth
US5956030A (en) * 1993-06-11 1999-09-21 Apple Computer, Inc. Computer system with graphical user interface including windows having an identifier within a control region on the display
US5513342A (en) 1993-12-28 1996-04-30 International Business Machines Corporation Display window layout system that automatically accommodates changes in display resolution, font size and national language
US5459825A (en) 1994-03-14 1995-10-17 Apple Computer, Inc. System for updating the locations of objects in computer displays upon reconfiguration
US5568603A (en) * 1994-08-11 1996-10-22 Apple Computer, Inc. Method and system for transparent mode switching between two different interfaces
US5692143A (en) 1994-12-30 1997-11-25 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for recalling desktop states in a data processing system
US5838317A (en) 1995-06-30 1998-11-17 Microsoft Corporation Method and apparatus for arranging displayed graphical representations on a computer interface
US5712995A (en) * 1995-09-20 1998-01-27 Galileo Frames, Inc. Non-overlapping tiling apparatus and method for multiple window displays
US5838318A (en) * 1995-11-10 1998-11-17 Intel Corporation Method and apparatus for automatically and intelligently arranging windows on a display device
US5930295A (en) * 1996-02-23 1999-07-27 Isley, Jr.; William C. Mobile terminal apparatus including net radio service in a mobile satellite service communication system
US5760772A (en) 1996-08-30 1998-06-02 Novell, Inc. Method for automatically resizing a child window
US8635649B2 (en) 1996-12-19 2014-01-21 Gemstar Development Corporation System and method for modifying advertisement responsive to EPG information
CA2197953C (en) * 1997-02-19 2005-05-10 Steve Janssen User interface and method for maximizing the information presented on a screen
US6832355B1 (en) * 1998-07-28 2004-12-14 Microsoft Corporation Web page display system
US6188405B1 (en) * 1998-09-14 2001-02-13 Microsoft Corporation Methods, apparatus and data structures for providing a user interface, which exploits spatial memory, to objects
US6486898B1 (en) * 1999-03-31 2002-11-26 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Device and method for a lattice display
US6636244B1 (en) 1999-09-13 2003-10-21 International Business Machines Corporation Pointing device selection method
US6445400B1 (en) * 1999-09-23 2002-09-03 International Business Machines Corporation Computer controlled user interactive display system with each of a plurality of windows having a border of a color varied to reflect a variable parameter being tracked for the window
US6628310B1 (en) * 2000-06-16 2003-09-30 Chapelle Planning Co., Ltd. Method of and system for turning over a window that is laid over another window, and recording medium having program of turning over a window that is laid over another window
US7191407B1 (en) * 2000-07-12 2007-03-13 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for learning computer interface attributes
US7257777B1 (en) * 2000-07-19 2007-08-14 International Business Machines Corporation System and method for automatic control of window viewing
US7032007B2 (en) 2001-12-05 2006-04-18 International Business Machines Corporation Apparatus and method for monitoring instant messaging accounts
GB0206090D0 (en) * 2002-03-15 2002-04-24 Koninkl Philips Electronics Nv Previewing documents on a computer system
US7343567B2 (en) 2003-04-25 2008-03-11 Microsoft Corporation System and method for providing dynamic user information in an interactive display
EP1491990B1 (en) 2003-06-20 2010-02-17 Apple Inc. Graphical user interface system and method of displaying objects in a graphical user interface
US8127248B2 (en) 2003-06-20 2012-02-28 Apple Inc. Computer interface having a virtual single-layer mode for viewing overlapping objects
US20050204306A1 (en) 2003-09-15 2005-09-15 Hideya Kawahara Enhancements for manipulating two-dimensional windows within a three-dimensional display model

Patent Citations (38)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5075675A (en) * 1988-06-30 1991-12-24 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for dynamic promotion of background window displays in multi-tasking computer systems
US5060170A (en) * 1989-08-09 1991-10-22 International Business Machines Corp. Space allocation and positioning method for screen display regions in a variable windowing system
US5305435A (en) * 1990-07-17 1994-04-19 Hewlett-Packard Company Computer windows management system and method for simulating off-screen document storage and retrieval
US5390295A (en) * 1991-12-20 1995-02-14 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for proportionally displaying windows on a computer display screen
US5796402A (en) * 1993-12-03 1998-08-18 Microsoft Corporation Method and system for aligning windows on a computer screen
US5561757A (en) * 1994-04-06 1996-10-01 Altera Corporation Computer user interface having tiled and overlapped window areas
US5577187A (en) * 1994-05-20 1996-11-19 Microsoft Corporation Method and system for tiling windows based on previous position and size
US5497454A (en) * 1994-11-02 1996-03-05 International Business Machines Corporation System for presenting alternate views of a computer window environment
US5920313A (en) * 1995-06-01 1999-07-06 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for associating related user interface objects
US5856826A (en) * 1995-10-06 1999-01-05 Apple Computer, Inc. Method and apparatus for organizing window groups and windows in a table
US5874962A (en) * 1996-03-08 1999-02-23 International Business Machines System and method for arranging windows displayed by a graphical user interface
US6011551A (en) * 1996-03-29 2000-01-04 International Business Machines Corporation Method, memory and apparatus for automatically resizing a window while continuing to display information therein
US5859639A (en) * 1996-07-17 1999-01-12 International Business Machines Corporation Mechanism to control visible presence of desktop objects in a graphical user interface
US5841435A (en) * 1996-07-26 1998-11-24 International Business Machines Corporation Virtual windows desktop
US5892511A (en) * 1996-09-30 1999-04-06 Intel Corporation Method for assisting window selection in a graphical user interface
US6166736A (en) * 1997-08-22 2000-12-26 Natrificial Llc Method and apparatus for simultaneously resizing and relocating windows within a graphical display
US6008809A (en) * 1997-09-22 1999-12-28 International Business Machines Corporation Apparatus and method for viewing multiple windows within a dynamic window
US6654035B1 (en) * 1997-12-15 2003-11-25 International Business Machines Corporation Computer system and method of manipulating a graphical user interface component on a computer display through collision with a pointer
US6091395A (en) * 1997-12-15 2000-07-18 International Business Machines Corporation Computer system and method of manipulating a graphical user interface component on a computer display through collision with a pointer
US6075531A (en) * 1997-12-15 2000-06-13 International Business Machines Corporation Computer system and method of manipulating multiple graphical user interface components on a computer display with a proximity pointer
US6133914A (en) * 1998-01-07 2000-10-17 Rogers; David W. Interactive graphical user interface
US7155682B2 (en) * 1998-05-11 2006-12-26 Apple Computer, Inc. Method and system for automatically resizing and repositioning windows in response to changes in display
US6473102B1 (en) * 1998-05-11 2002-10-29 Apple Computer, Inc. Method and system for automatically resizing and repositioning windows in response to changes in display
US7216302B2 (en) * 1998-05-11 2007-05-08 Apple Computer, Inc. Method and system for automatically resizing and repositioning windows in response to changes in display
US20020196272A1 (en) * 1998-10-01 2002-12-26 Digimarc Corporation Smart images and image bookmarks for an internet browser
US6590594B2 (en) * 1999-03-25 2003-07-08 International Business Machines Corporation Window scroll-bar
US6429883B1 (en) * 1999-09-03 2002-08-06 International Business Machines Corporation Method for viewing hidden entities by varying window or graphic object transparency
US6806892B1 (en) * 1999-12-20 2004-10-19 International Business Machines Corporation Layer viewport for enhanced viewing in layered drawings
US6957395B1 (en) * 2000-01-04 2005-10-18 Apple Computer, Inc. Computer interface having a single window mode of operation
US7007241B2 (en) * 2000-05-12 2006-02-28 Lenovo (Singapore) Pte. Ltd. Display device with a focus buoy facility
US6654036B1 (en) * 2000-06-05 2003-11-25 International Business Machines Corporation Method, article of manufacture and apparatus for controlling relative positioning of objects in a windows environment
US6915490B1 (en) * 2000-09-29 2005-07-05 Apple Computer Inc. Method for dragging and dropping between multiple layered windows
US6864905B2 (en) * 2001-03-23 2005-03-08 International Business Machines Corporation Method to redisplay active panels
US20060200779A1 (en) * 2001-04-30 2006-09-07 Taylor Steve D Cell based end user interface having action cells
US20050017978A1 (en) * 2001-09-18 2005-01-27 International Business Machiness Corporation Display controller
US20030189597A1 (en) * 2002-04-05 2003-10-09 Microsoft Corporation Virtual desktop manager
US20040066414A1 (en) * 2002-10-08 2004-04-08 Microsoft Corporation System and method for managing software applications in a graphical user interface
US20060101352A1 (en) * 2003-01-14 2006-05-11 Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Rearranging views on a computer screen

Cited By (85)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20070050729A1 (en) * 2005-08-31 2007-03-01 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Display apparatus, method, and program
US7663620B2 (en) * 2005-12-05 2010-02-16 Microsoft Corporation Accessing 2D graphic content using axonometric layer views
US20070126732A1 (en) * 2005-12-05 2007-06-07 Microsoft Corporation Accessing 2D graphic content using axonometric layer views
US20110173563A1 (en) * 2007-04-04 2011-07-14 Canon Kabushiki Kaisha Information processing apparatus and display method
WO2009001981A1 (en) * 2007-06-26 2008-12-31 Chang Sun Moon System and method for providing virtual interface
US20100174988A1 (en) * 2007-06-26 2010-07-08 Chang Sun Moon System and method for providing virtual interface
US20090031243A1 (en) * 2007-07-24 2009-01-29 Ntt Docomo, Inc. Method and apparatus for controlling display of windows
US8490014B2 (en) * 2007-11-07 2013-07-16 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for controlling the arrangements of windows on a display
US20090119617A1 (en) * 2007-11-07 2009-05-07 International Business Machines Corporation Method and system for controlling the arrangements of windows on a display
US9310965B2 (en) * 2007-12-19 2016-04-12 Sony Corporation Information processing apparatus, display control method and display control program
US8631345B2 (en) * 2007-12-19 2014-01-14 Sony Corporation Information processing apparatus, display control method and display control program
US20090164936A1 (en) * 2007-12-19 2009-06-25 Sony Corporation Information processing apparatus, display control method and display control program
US20090262091A1 (en) * 2008-01-07 2009-10-22 Tetsuo Ikeda Information Processing Apparatus and Vibration Control Method in Information Processing Apparatus
US20090183107A1 (en) * 2008-01-16 2009-07-16 Microsoft Corporation Window minimization trigger
US8214760B2 (en) 2008-01-16 2012-07-03 Microsoft Corporation Window minimization trigger
US20100011316A1 (en) * 2008-01-17 2010-01-14 Can Sar System for intelligent automated layout and management of interactive windows
US8555193B2 (en) * 2008-01-17 2013-10-08 Google Inc. System for intelligent automated layout and management of interactive windows
US8314777B2 (en) * 2008-07-01 2012-11-20 Sony Corporation Information processing apparatus and vibration control method in information processing apparatus
US9311125B2 (en) 2008-08-06 2016-04-12 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Apparatus and method of supporting plurality of operating systems
US20100037243A1 (en) * 2008-08-06 2010-02-11 Mo Sang-Dok Apparatus and method of supporting plurality of operating systems
EP2325742B1 (en) * 2008-09-09 2017-01-04 NTT DoCoMo, Inc. Information processing device and program
US9218788B2 (en) 2008-09-09 2015-12-22 Ntt Docomo, Inc. Information-processing device and program for displaying a window group including a plurality of windows
US9621710B2 (en) * 2008-09-11 2017-04-11 Lg Electronics Inc. Terminal and menu display method thereof
US20100062811A1 (en) * 2008-09-11 2010-03-11 Jun-Serk Park Terminal and menu display method thereof
US20140096072A1 (en) * 2009-01-09 2014-04-03 Sony Corporation Display device and display method
US20100313165A1 (en) * 2009-06-08 2010-12-09 John Louch User interface for multiple display regions
US9223465B2 (en) 2009-06-08 2015-12-29 Apple Inc. User interface for multiple display regions
US9081474B2 (en) 2009-06-08 2015-07-14 Apple Inc. User interface for multiple display regions
US20100313156A1 (en) * 2009-06-08 2010-12-09 John Louch User interface for multiple display regions
US8555185B2 (en) 2009-06-08 2013-10-08 Apple Inc. User interface for multiple display regions
US8612883B2 (en) 2009-06-08 2013-12-17 Apple Inc. User interface for managing the display of multiple display regions
US9720584B2 (en) * 2009-06-08 2017-08-01 Apple Inc. User interface for multiple display regions
US8621387B2 (en) 2009-06-08 2013-12-31 Apple Inc. User interface for multiple display regions
US20160085436A1 (en) * 2009-06-08 2016-03-24 Apple Inc. User interface for multiple display regions
US20100313164A1 (en) * 2009-06-08 2010-12-09 John Louch User interface for multiple display regions
US9886295B2 (en) * 2009-12-21 2018-02-06 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Setting server operating system as main domain to provide integrated user interface for a plurality of client operating system set as sub-domains
US20110154328A1 (en) * 2009-12-21 2011-06-23 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Virtualization Apparatus and Method
US9369776B2 (en) * 2010-01-25 2016-06-14 Tivo Inc. Playing multimedia content on multiple devices
US20110181780A1 (en) * 2010-01-25 2011-07-28 Barton James M Displaying Content on Detected Devices
US20110185036A1 (en) * 2010-01-25 2011-07-28 Brian Lanier Playing Multimedia Content on Multiple Devices
US20110181496A1 (en) * 2010-01-25 2011-07-28 Brian Lanier Playing Multimedia Content on a Device Based on Distance from Other Devices
US10349107B2 (en) 2010-01-25 2019-07-09 Tivo Solutions Inc. Playing multimedia content on multiple devices
US20110183654A1 (en) * 2010-01-25 2011-07-28 Brian Lanier Concurrent Use of Multiple User Interface Devices
US20110185296A1 (en) * 2010-01-25 2011-07-28 Brian Lanier Displaying an Environment and Related Features on Multiple Devices
US20130104018A1 (en) * 2010-06-11 2013-04-25 Visual Domains Ltd. Method and system for displaying visual content in a virtual three-dimensional space
US9678925B2 (en) * 2010-06-11 2017-06-13 Yoav Shefi Method and system for displaying visual content in a virtual three-dimensional space
US20120047463A1 (en) * 2010-08-20 2012-02-23 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method of configuring menu screen, user device for performing the method and computer-readable storage medium having recorded thereon program for executing the method
US20140006988A1 (en) * 2011-04-15 2014-01-02 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Content display device, content display method, program, and recording medium
US9292158B2 (en) * 2012-04-17 2016-03-22 Franz Antonio Wakefield Method, system, apparatus, and tangible portable interactive electronic device storage medium; that processes custom programs and data for a user by creating, displaying, storing, modifying, performing adaptive learning routines, and multitasking; utilizing cascade windows on an electronic screen display in a mobile electronic interactive device GUI (graphical user interface) system
US20140317559A1 (en) * 2012-04-17 2014-10-23 Franz Antonio Wakefield Method, system, apparatus, and tangible portable interactive electronic device storage medium; that processes custom programs and data for a user by creating, displaying, storing, modifying, performing adaptive learning routines, and multitasking; utilizing cascade windows on an electronic screen display in a mobile electronic intercative device gui (graphical user interface) system
US9851876B2 (en) * 2012-06-04 2017-12-26 Htc Corporation Method, apparatus and computer-readable medium for adjusting size of screen object
US20130346894A1 (en) * 2012-06-04 2013-12-26 Htc Corporation Method, apparatus and computer-readable medium for adjusting size of screen object
US20140004937A1 (en) * 2012-06-27 2014-01-02 DeNA Co., Ltd. Device for providing a game content
US9132343B2 (en) * 2012-06-27 2015-09-15 DeNA Co., Ltd. Device for providing a game content
US20150176846A1 (en) * 2012-07-16 2015-06-25 Rational Aktiengesellschaft Method for Displaying Parameters of a Cooking Process and Display Device for a Cooking Appliance
KR101984673B1 (en) * 2012-07-27 2019-05-31 삼성전자주식회사 Display apparatus for excuting plurality of applications and method for controlling thereof
US20140033117A1 (en) * 2012-07-27 2014-01-30 Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd. Display device for executing multiple applications and method for controlling the same
KR20140013816A (en) * 2012-07-27 2014-02-05 삼성전자주식회사 Display apparatus for excuting plurality of applications and method for controlling thereof
US10088991B2 (en) * 2012-07-27 2018-10-02 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Display device for executing multiple applications and method for controlling the same
US20140055388A1 (en) * 2012-08-22 2014-02-27 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for constructing a home screen in a terminal having a touch screen
US9766739B2 (en) * 2012-08-22 2017-09-19 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Method and apparatus for constructing a home screen in a terminal having a touch screen
US20140267105A1 (en) * 2013-03-12 2014-09-18 Sharp Kabushiki Kaisha Drawing device, display method, and recording medium
US9298335B2 (en) * 2013-05-10 2016-03-29 Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd. Information processing device, information processing method, and computer-readable medium
USD749100S1 (en) * 2013-05-10 2016-02-09 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD748652S1 (en) * 2013-05-10 2016-02-02 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD748653S1 (en) * 2013-05-10 2016-02-02 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
USD748654S1 (en) * 2013-05-10 2016-02-02 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Display screen or portion thereof with graphical user interface
US20140337468A1 (en) * 2013-05-10 2014-11-13 Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd. Information processing device, information processing method, and computer-readable medium
US20150046823A1 (en) * 2013-08-06 2015-02-12 Crackle, Inc Selectively adjusting display parameter of areas within user interface
US9734797B2 (en) * 2013-08-06 2017-08-15 Crackle, Inc. Selectively adjusting display parameter of areas within user interface
US20160267879A1 (en) * 2013-10-23 2016-09-15 Thomson Licensing Method and apparatus for transmission and reception of media data
CN105830456A (en) * 2013-10-23 2016-08-03 汤姆逊许可公司 Method and apparatus for transmission and reception of media data
US20150121300A1 (en) * 2013-10-28 2015-04-30 Lenovo (Beijing) Co., Ltd. Information processing method and electronic device
US9250780B2 (en) * 2013-10-28 2016-02-02 Lenovo (Beijing) Co., Ltd. Information processing method and electronic device
US10402034B2 (en) * 2014-04-02 2019-09-03 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Adaptive user interface pane manager
US10338765B2 (en) * 2014-09-05 2019-07-02 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Combined switching and window placement
US20160070423A1 (en) * 2014-09-05 2016-03-10 Microsoft Corporation Combined switching and window placement
US20160085423A1 (en) * 2014-09-19 2016-03-24 Yahoo Japan Corporation Information display apparatus, distribution apparatus, information display method, and non-transitory computer readable storage medium
US10121154B2 (en) * 2014-09-19 2018-11-06 Yahoo Japan Corporation Information display apparatus, distribution apparatus, information display method, and non-transitory computer readable storage medium
US10209849B2 (en) 2015-01-21 2019-02-19 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc Adaptive user interface pane objects
US10042655B2 (en) 2015-01-21 2018-08-07 Microsoft Technology Licensing, Llc. Adaptable user interface display
USD783038S1 (en) * 2015-05-01 2017-04-04 Microsoft Corporation Display screen with animated graphical user interface
USD835647S1 (en) 2015-06-22 2018-12-11 Gamblit Gaming, Llc Display screen with graphical user interface
USD788809S1 (en) * 2015-06-22 2017-06-06 Gamblit Gaming, Llc Display screen for a graphical user interface
US10394323B2 (en) * 2015-12-04 2019-08-27 International Business Machines Corporation Templates associated with content items based on cognitive states

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
EP1644816B1 (en) 2016-09-14
US10318134B2 (en) 2019-06-11
DE202004009752U1 (en) 2004-11-11
EP1644816A1 (en) 2006-04-12
EP1491990A3 (en) 2005-01-26
US20130232445A1 (en) 2013-09-05
US20070288863A1 (en) 2007-12-13
EP1491990A2 (en) 2004-12-29
WO2004114113A1 (en) 2004-12-29
US9164650B2 (en) 2015-10-20
US20160110084A1 (en) 2016-04-21
EP1491990B1 (en) 2010-02-17
US8386956B2 (en) 2013-02-26

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US7779475B2 (en) Software-based method for gaining privacy by affecting the screen of a computing device
KR100267489B1 (en) Scroll bar amplification apparatus and method
US8040360B2 (en) Methods of manipulating a screen space of a display device
US6642944B2 (en) Computer system with graphical user interface including drawer-like windows
EP2457148B1 (en) Selective hibernation of activities in an electronic device
KR101366445B1 (en) Method, computer system, and computer readable storage medium for radial menus
EP1086418B1 (en) Method for dynamically displaying controls in a toolbar display based on control usage
US10303325B2 (en) Multi-application environment
US6331863B1 (en) Intelligent scrolling
JP6302987B2 (en) Device and method for navigating between user interfaces
US7913183B2 (en) System and method for managing software applications in a graphical user interface
US7386801B1 (en) System and method that facilitates computer desktop use via scaling of displayed objects with shifts to the periphery
KR101922749B1 (en) Dynamic context based menus
US7490295B2 (en) Layer for accessing user interface elements
CN103649898B (en) Initiator for context based menu
US6898765B2 (en) User friendly remote system interface with menu highlighting
US8140996B2 (en) System for endless loop scrolling and display
US5986657A (en) Method and apparatus for incorporating expandable and collapsible options in a graphical user interface
AU2016100292A4 (en) Touch input cursor manipulation
KR101608095B1 (en) Arranging display areas utilizing enhanced window states
US5546528A (en) Method of displaying multiple sets of information in the same area of a computer screen
JP4933655B2 (en) User interface for centralized management and access provision
JP3337363B2 (en) Visual enhancement method of display of the menu item
KR101450415B1 (en) Device, method, and graphical user interface for navigating through multiple viewing areas
AU2005267129B2 (en) Unified interest layer for user interface

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: APPLE INC., CALIFORNIA

Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:APPLE COMPUTER, INC.;REEL/FRAME:019235/0583

Effective date: 20070109

Owner name: APPLE INC.,CALIFORNIA

Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:APPLE COMPUTER, INC.;REEL/FRAME:019235/0583

Effective date: 20070109

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION