US20060219744A1 - Adjustable belt for carrying sporting equipment - Google Patents

Adjustable belt for carrying sporting equipment Download PDF

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Publication number
US20060219744A1
US20060219744A1 US11/098,537 US9853705A US2006219744A1 US 20060219744 A1 US20060219744 A1 US 20060219744A1 US 9853705 A US9853705 A US 9853705A US 2006219744 A1 US2006219744 A1 US 2006219744A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
strap
pad
belt
holding member
adjustable belt
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Abandoned
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US11/098,537
Inventor
Angelo Spadaccini
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Angelo Spadaccini
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Application filed by Angelo Spadaccini filed Critical Angelo Spadaccini
Priority to US11/098,537 priority Critical patent/US20060219744A1/en
Publication of US20060219744A1 publication Critical patent/US20060219744A1/en
Priority claimed from US11/653,876 external-priority patent/US20070114255A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63CSKATES; SKIS; ROLLER SKATES; DESIGN OR LAYOUT OF COURTS, RINKS OR THE LIKE
    • A63C11/00Accessories for skiing or snowboarding
    • A63C11/02Devices for stretching, clamping or pressing skis or snowboards for transportation or storage
    • A63C11/023Carrying-devices
    • A63C11/025Carrying-devices for skis or ski-sticks
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A45HAND OR TRAVELLING ARTICLES
    • A45FTRAVELLING OR CAMP EQUIPMENT: SACKS OR PACKS CARRIED ON THE BODY
    • A45F3/00Travelling or camp articles; Sacks or packs carried on the body
    • A45F3/14Carrying-straps; Pack-carrying harnesses
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A45HAND OR TRAVELLING ARTICLES
    • A45FTRAVELLING OR CAMP EQUIPMENT: SACKS OR PACKS CARRIED ON THE BODY
    • A45F3/00Travelling or camp articles; Sacks or packs carried on the body
    • A45F3/14Carrying-straps; Pack-carrying harnesses
    • A45F2003/142Carrying-straps

Abstract

The present invention is directed to an adjustable belt for carrying sporting equipment, such as skis, poles and accessories. The adjustable belt includes an elongated flexible strap. First and second holding members are releasably attached to opposite ends of the strap. Each holding member includes a flexible pad having first and second ends. A ridged belt extends outwardly from the first end and a ratcheting buckle is proximate the second end. The ridged belt is received and releasably secured within the ratcheting buckle so that the pad forms a loop having an adjustable diameter by operation of the ratcheting buckle. A method of carrying skiing equipment is also disclosed.

Description

    FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is directed to an adjustable belt for carrying sporting equipment, such as skis, poles and accessories. The adjustable belt includes an elongated flexible strap. First and second holding members are releasably attached to opposite ends of the strap. Each holding member includes a flexible pad having first and second ends. At least one ridged belt extends outwardly from the first end and at least one ratcheting buckle is proximate the second end. The ridged belt is received and releasably secured within the ratcheting buckle so that the pad forms a stable loop that has a diameter that may be adjusted by operation of the ratcheting buckle. A method of carrying skiing equipment is also disclosed.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • The equipment needed for many recreational sports activities can be large, heavy and awkwardly shaped. Such equipment can be cumbersome for an individual to carry. For example, a skier must carry skis, poles and accessories (such as goggles, gloves, a helmet, etc.) over slippery and irregular terrain before or after using the equipment. Transporting skiing equipment to and from a vehicle, across a parking lot, and/ up and down stairs can often be difficult or even treacherous. Equipment used for other sports activities, such as snow boarding, hockey, camping, etc., likewise require bulky equipment that is difficult for an individual to transport.
  • Various equipment carriers have been developed. Some designs include a carrier sling or waist belt having straps forming loops attached to the belt. The ends of the straps may include a D-ring for opening and closing the loop. In one such design, one loop is affixed to the belt, and a second loop is attached to the belt via a lockable sliding device. Therefore, the position of the second loop relative to the belt may be adjusted. However, such designs fail to provide for adjustment of the loop itself. When the straps are clipped together, the diameter of the resulting loop is not adjustable. The resulting loop may therefore have too much slack to properly secure some equipment, or the loop may not be big enough to fit around the equipment. Even if the straps forming the loop are clipped around a component of the equipment, the loop may not be tightened against the equipment being carried. As a result, the equipment tends to swing or twist in the loop, which may be awkward and uncomfortable for the user. In addition, if the equipment does not include a component around which the loops may be attached, it may be difficult to properly secure the equipment. The equipment may become unsecured, resulting in damage to the equipment or injury to the user. For example, if such a carrier were used to carry skis, the user could slip the loops around opposite ends of the skis. However, the skis could easily slide out of the loops when carried in an upright position. If the loops were laced through the ski bindings, the ends of the skis would swing about freely. Thus, such designs have not provided an acceptable or useful carrier for some sports equipment.
  • Other designs include straps which form loops, with sliding bar buckles for adjusting the loops. A belt is provided having male buckle members on opposite ends thereof. The free ends of the loops include female buckle members which releasably attach to the male buckle members. While such designs provide some loop adjustability via the bar buckles, they have not proven effective for heavier equipment, such as skis. The bar buckles tend to loosen as the weight of equipment shifts when being carried by the user. In addition, the male-female buckle members securing the loops to the belt are prone to twisting or tangling as the equipment is being secured or adjusted because the loops clip onto the belt in fixed orientation. Such twisting or tangling may render the load uncomfortable to carry, or require adjustment by the user. Alternatively, the user may attempt to carefully align the free ends of the loops with each other and with the equipment. However, this is time consuming and often difficult with awkwardly shaped equipment. Thus, such carriers do not offer an acceptable design for carrying bulky equipment.
  • Other designs provide for a belt with D-rings secured to opposite ends thereof. The ends are folded back so that portions of each end may be fed through the D-rings to form loops. The loops may be slipped around the equipment being carried. As the central portion of the belt is lifted, the portions proximate the ends slide through the D-rings, thereby tightening the loops. Other deigns include mating clips slidably attached to fixed loops on opposite ends of a belt. The loop is folded into itself, and the clips are secured together to form a double loop, with an inner loop that tightens as the belt is lifted. The slack from the inner loop slides through the clips, thereby tightening the inner loop into the clips. Thus, such designs tighten with the operation of gravity. Unfortunately, such designs also loosen by the same principle. For example, the looped ends of such designs may be slipped around opposite ends of a pair of skis. As the user lifts the belt and skis, the loops tighten around the skis. However, if the belt is slung over the shoulder of the user so that the skis are in a vertical position relative to the ground, the skis may easily slide out of the loops, or slide toward the ground. If the skis bump the ground or some other object, the loops may inadvertently loosen, causing the skis to become unsecured. Or, the user may need to readjust the loops. Readjustment may also be required if the user sets the secured equipment down. Even if the equipment is securely maintained within the loops, the belt is often prone to twisting, particularly as the belt is being lifted and carried, or removed from the user.
  • Some designs provide for first and second straps having ends with relatively light weight mating buckles which form loops. A third strap may be provided with opposite ends having clasps which clip onto O-rings or the like in a fixed orientation. While such designs are useful for carrying relatively light-weight equipment, such as body boards, wake boards, or folding chairs, they are not adequate for securing relatively heavy equipment such as skis. The light-weight buckles often fail to properly secure heavy equipment such as skis. Such equipment tends to slide within the loops of such designs, which ultimately may require readjustment by the user. In addition, such designs typically provide loop portions having a relatively narrow width, which tend to tangle around awkwardly shaped equipment. Relatively long equipment, such as skis or hockey sticks, may slide against such relatively narrow loops. Furthermore, the carrier strap (i.e. third strap) connecting the two loops may tangle and twist given such designs provide for a fixed orientation attachment of the loops to the carrier strap, particularly when the user is putting on or removing the strap, or when the equipment is being secured or adjusted. Accordingly, such designs are inappropriate for use with some sports equipment.
  • Other designs include a carrying strap with opposite ends that split to form first and second arms. For example, some designs provide a strap having an I-shaped configuration. The ends of the arms on each side include Velcro™ loop and hook fastener patches which cooperate to form a loop. Such fasteners are often inadequate for securing relatively heavy and/or bulky equipment. Furthermore, the carrying strap often tangles and twists during use.
  • Therefore, prior designs for equipment carriers suffer various drawbacks. Furthermore, many designs only accommodate specific sporting components. For example, various snowboard or wakeboard carriers are not suitable for use with other sporting equipment.
  • Accordingly, there is a need for an equipment carrier that solves some or all of the above-noted problems.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is directed to an adjustable belt for carrying sporting equipment, such as skis, poles and accessories. The adjustable belt includes an elongated flexible strap. First and second holding members are releasably attached to opposite ends of the strap. Each holding member includes a flexible pad having first and second ends. At least one ridged belt extends outwardly from the first end and at least one ratcheting buckle is proximate the second end. The ridged belt is received and releasably secured within the ratcheting buckle so that the pad forms a loop having an adjustable diameter by operation of the ratcheting buckle.
  • An adjustable belt for carrying sporting equipment according to an embodiment of the present invention includes an elongated flexible strap, a plurality of spaced snap hooks attached to the strap, and first and second flexible holding members releasably attached to opposite ends of the strap via swivel clasps. The swivel clasps allow each holding member to rotate 360° relative to the strap. Each holding member includes a flexible elongated pad having first and second ends. A pair of ridged belts extend outwardly from the first end. A pair of ratcheting buckles are proximate the second end. Each ridged belt is received and releasably secured within a corresponding ratcheting buckle so that the pad forms a loop having an adjustable diameter by operation of the ratcheting buckles.
  • The present invention also relates to a method of carrying skiing equipment. First and second holding members are provided. Each holding member is releasably attached to opposite ends of a flexible strap via swivel clasps that allow each holding member to rotate 360° relative to the strap. Each holding member has a flexible elongated pad with first and second ends. A pair of ridged belts extends outwardly from the first end and a pair of ratcheting buckles are proximate the second end. The first holding member is wrapped around a front end of a pair of skis and poles until the first holding member pad encircles the front end. The first holding member ridged belts are then fed into the corresponding ratcheting buckles. The first holding member pad is tightened around the skis by operating the ratcheting buckles. The second holding member pad is wrapped around a back end of the pair of skis and poles until the second holding member pad encircles the back end. The second holding member ridged belts are fed into the corresponding ratcheting buckles. The second holding member pad is tightened around the skis by operating the ratcheting buckles.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a top plan view an adjustable belt system according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 is a bottom plan view of the system shown in FIG. 1;
  • FIG. 3 is a top plan view of a holding member;
  • FIG. 4 is a top plan view of the system shown in FIG. 1 with a holding member in a closed position;
  • FIG. 5 is a top plan view of the system shown in FIG. 4 with the holding member viewed from a second orientation;
  • FIG. 6 is a perspective view of the system shown in FIG. 1 with a pair of skis secured in the holding members; and
  • FIG. 7 is an elevational view of the system shown in FIG. 1 in a compact orientation, viewed next to a deck of standard playing cards for size comparison.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • An adjustable belt system 10 for carrying sporting equipment according to the present invention is best shown in FIGS. 1, 2, 4 and 5. System 10 includes an elongated flexible strap 12 having first and second opposite ends 14, 16, and first and second holding members 18, 20 releasably attached to ends 14, 16, respectively.
  • As best shown in FIGS. 1-3, each holding member 18, 20 includes a flexible elongated pad 22 having first and second major surfaces 23, 25 and first and second ends 24, 26. Pad 22 may include a stiffened cotton skeleton encased in a water-excluding, sealed nylon sleeve, such as Cordura® ballistic nylon from E. I. DuPont of Wilmington, Del. Alternatively, pad 22 may be formed from a flexible polymer material. A high-density closed cell-foam may be attached to the inner surface of pad 22, so that second major surface 25 is cushioned.
  • Pad 22 preferably has a substantially rectangular configuration with rounded end corners C when flat. First and second ridged flexible belts 28, 30, preferably made from a suitable polymer, are attached to first major surface 23 of pad 22 proximate first end 24, and extend outwardly in spaced parallel relation from first end 24. Belts 28, 30 may be attached to pad 22 using rivets R or some other suitable fastener. Alternatively, belts 28, 30 may be adhesively bonded to pad 22. Belts 28, 30 extend a uniform distance from first end 24.
  • First and second ratcheting buckles 32, 34 are attached to first major surface 23 of pad 22 proximate second end 26. Ratcheting buckles 32, 34 may be attached to pad 22 using rivets R or some other suitable fastener. Alternatively, they may be adhesively bonded thereto. As best shown in FIGS. 4 and 5, ridged belts 28, 30 may be received and releasably secured within ratcheting buckles 32, 34, respectively, so that pad 22 forms a loop for encircling a piece of sports equipment. In that orientation, second major surface 25 contacts with a portion of the equipment. Such ratcheting buckles are operatively associated with a ridged strap are commercially available from M2 of Winooski, Vt. The resulting loop formed by pad 22 has a diameter that is adjustable by operation of ratcheting buckles 32, 34 and cooperating belts 28, 30.
  • Preferably, second major surface 25 has a surface that will not scratch the equipment being secured. Furthermore, the equipment is protected from ratcheting buckles 32, 34 and ridged belts 28, 30 because these components are disposed outwardly on first major surface 23 and do not contact and/or rub against the equipment when holding members 18, 20 are secured around the equipment. Second major surface 25 may include rubber pads or have a textured surface that grips the equipment, so that rotation or movement of the equipment when encircled by pad 22 is minimized, even if the user does not fully tighten ridged belts 28, 30 within ratcheting buckles 32, 34.
  • Pad 22 should have a sufficient width and length for encircling a piece of sporting equipment with which system 10 is to be used. Preferably, the width of pad 22 is greater than the width of strap 12. Pads 22, having a relatively large width compared to the width of the strap 12, provide additional support for securing the equipment. In addition, such pads 22 are less likely to slide against the equipment, which may otherwise potentially scratch the equipment or cause the equipment to become loosened therein. Pads 22 should also have a sufficient length so that pads 22 may be easily wrapped around the equipment being secured. For example, pads 22 may be sufficiently sized to encircle a pair of skis and poles S, as best shown in FIG. 6. Pad 22 of first holding member 18 is wrapped around the skis and poles S proximate a front end thereof, and pad 22 of second holding member 20 is wrapped around the skis and poles S proximate a rear end thereof. Ridged belts 28, 30 are aligned with and received in ratcheting buckles 32, 34. Belts 28, 30 are pulled into and through ratcheting buckles 32, 34 by operation of ratcheting buckles 32, 34. This decreases the diameter of the loop formed by pad 22, thereby tightening the encircled pad 22 against the equipment. Ratcheting buckles 32, 34 include a release which disengages the mechanism from the ridges on ridged belts 28, 30. Upon actuation of the release, belts 28, 30 may be slid from ratcheting buckles 32, 34. This increases the diameter of the loop formed by pad 22, thereby loosening pad 22 from the skis and poles S. Belts 28, 30 may be completely disengaged from ratcheting buckles 32, 34 to remove holding member 18 and/or 20 from the equipment.
  • Holding members 18, 20 are releasably attached to ends 14, 16 via swivel clasps 36, as best shown in FIG. 3. A ring 38 is attached to pad 22, preferably intermediate belts 28, 30 and ratcheting buckles 32, 34. Swivel clasps 36 are attached to ends 14, 16 and releasably attach to rings 38. Swivel clasps 36 include two portions attached at a freely rotating attachment point which allow holding members 18, 20 to rotate 360° relative to strap 12 when attached to rings 38.
  • Pads 22 may be secured around skis and poles S, and thereafter holding members 18, 20 clipped to strap 12. In this way, each holding member 18 may be secured to the equipment without strap 12 and the other holding member 20 getting in the way of the user. However, even if holding members 18, 20 are attached to strap 12 when securing pads 22 around skis S, holding members 18, 20 may rotate relative to strap 12 due to swivel clasps 36. Thus, strap 12 and holding members 18, 20 do not become tangled even if one or both of holding members 18, 20 are rotated while securing pads 22 around skis S. Thus, the orientation of strap 12 may be maintained even if securing pads 22 are rotated while the user is carrying the secured equipment, or if the user rotates one or both of securing pads 22 to adjust their orientation or the orientation of the equipment. Otherwise, such rotation would cause twisting and tangling of the components.
  • Strap 12 preferably includes a buckle 40 for adjusting the length of strap 12. For example, buckle 40 may be a plastic or metal slider buckle. Alternatively, strap 12 could include first and second portions which are joined together by male and female members of a conventional slide release buckle, wherein the length of one or both of the portions of the strap 12 may be adjusted by the corresponding member of the slide release buckle. It should be understood that strap 12 may include any suitable buckle 40 for adjusting its length. Strap 12 may also include a shoulder cushion 42, which is preferably slidably secured to strap 12 so that a user can adjust the position of cushion 42 along strap 12. One or more snap hooks 44 may be attached to strap 12. Snap hooks 44 may be secured to strap 12 in a fixed position, or slidably secured to strap 12. Additional equipment may be clipped onto snap hooks 44. For example, skis and poles S may be secured within holding members 18, 20. The user may then attach a helmet, gloves, goggles, or other accessories to strap 12 by clipping such accessories to snap hooks 44. Thus, all of a user's equipment may be conveniently carried by system 10.
  • Depending on the particularly equipment to be carried by system 10, additional holding members may be clipped onto strap 12. For example, two or more holding members may be clipped to the same swivel clasp 36 on a corresponding end 14 and/or 16. Alternatively, two or more swivel clasps 36 may be provided on each end 14, 16, with each swivel clasp 36 being releasably attached to a corresponding holding member. For example, three holding members may be clipped onto each of ends 14, 16, allowing the user to carry three pairs of skis and poles, along with other accessories via snap hooks 44.
  • Strap 12 and holding members 18, 20 are preferably formed from light-weight materials, so that adjustable belt system 10 is relatively light weight. System 10 is relatively compact, and may be easily fit in most jacket pockets when not in use. Strap 12 may be folded, with first holding member 18 encircling strap 12 and second holding member 20 encircling first holding member 18, thereby reducing system 10 to a size only slightly larger than a deck of standard playing cards D, as best shown in FIG. 7. Thus, system 10 may be easily collapsed and carried by the user. For example, a skier may easily carry system 10 in his or her pocket while skiing. System 10 is then readily accessible. For example, if the skier needed to walk down the mountain, the skies, poles and other accessories could be easily carried by system 10, allowing the skier to walk down the mountain ‘hands free’. Further, a skier could walk to the chair lift, lodge, etc. with his or her hands free of carrying equipment, and disengage the skis, poles and other equipment when required. As such, system 10 would reduce the amount of equipment cluttered around drop-off points at ski lodges. Thus, system 10 allows the user to easily transport sporting equipment hands free. The present invention may be particularly helpful for individuals with arthritis or other ailments of the wrists and hands, which limit their ability to carrying equipment by hand.
  • It will be apparent to one of ordinary skill in the art that various modifications and variations can be made in construction or configuration of the present invention without departing from the scope or spirit of the invention. For example, an embodiment of holding members 18, 20 has been described wherein each holding member includes a separate pad 22 having first and second ridged belts 28, 30 and first and second ratcheting buckles 32, 34. However, pad 22 may also include only one ridged belt operatively associated with one ratcheting buckle. Alternatively, a ridged belt may be provided having a ratcheting buckle attached to one end thereof, wherein the free end of the ridged belt would be looped around and through the ratcheting buckle. In this way, pad 22 would be eliminated. Accordingly, it is intended that the present invention cover all such modifications and variations, provided they come within the scope of the following claims and their equivalents.

Claims (20)

1. An adjustable belt for carrying sporting equipment, comprising:
an elongated flexible strap; and
first and second holding members releasably attached to opposite ends of said strap, each holding member comprising a flexible pad having first and second ends, at least a first ridged belt extending outwardly from said first end and a first ratcheting buckle proximate said second end, said ridged belt for being received and releasably secured within said ratcheting buckle so that said pad may form a loop having an adjustable diameter by operation of said ratcheting buckle.
2. The adjustable belt of claim 1, wherein each holding-member is releasably attached to a corresponding end of said strap via a swivel clasp that allows said holding member to rotate 360° relative to said strap.
3. The adjustable belt of claim 1, wherein said pad includes a second ridged belt extending outwardly from said first end and parallel to and spaced from said first ridged belt and a second ratcheting buckle adjacent said first ratcheting buckle for receiving and releasably securing said second ridged belt therein.
4. The adjustable belt of claim 1, wherein said flexible strap includes a buckle for adjusting the length thereof.
5. The adjustable belt of claim 1, further comprising at least one snap hook attached to said flexible strap.
6. The adjustable belt of claim 5, further comprising a plurality of spaced snap hooks attached to said flexible strap.
7. The adjustable belt of claim 1, further comprising a cushion member slidably attached to said flexible strap.
8. The adjustable belt of claim 1, wherein said pad comprises a stiffened cotton member encased in a sealed nylon sleeve.
9. The adjustable belt of claim 1, wherein said pad has a substantially rectangular configuration with rounded corners.
10. The adjustable belt of claim 9, wherein said pad has a width greater than the width of said strap.
11. The adjustable belt of claim 9, wherein said pad is sized to encircle a pair of skis and poles.
12. The adjustable belt of claim 1, further comprising at least a third holding member releasably attached to an end of said strap.
13. The adjustable belt of claim 12, wherein said second and third holding members are releasably attached to said end via one clasp.
14. The adjustable belt of claim 13, wherein said clasp is a swivel clasp that allows said holding members to rotate 360° relative to said strap.
15. An adjustable belt for carrying sporting equipment, comprising:
an elongated flexible strap;
a plurality of spaced snap hooks attached to said strap; and
first and second flexible holding members releasably attached to opposite ends of said strap via a swivel clasp that allows each holding member to rotate 360° relative to said strap, each holding member comprising a flexible elongated pad having first and second ends, a pair of ridged belts extending outwardly from said first end and a pair of ratcheting buckles proximate said second end, each ridged belt for being received and releasably secured within a corresponding ratcheting buckle so that said pad may form a loop having an adjustable diameter by operation of said ratcheting buckles.
16. The adjustable belt of claim 15, wherein said flexible strap includes a buckle for adjusting the length thereof.
17. The adjustable belt of claim 15, further comprising a cushion member slidably attached to said flexible strap.
18. The adjustable belt of claim 15, wherein said pad includes an inner member encased in a water-excluding sleeve.
19. The adjustable belt of claim 15, wherein said pad has a substantially rectangular configuration having a width greater than the width of said strap.
20. A method of carrying skiing equipment, comprising the steps of:
providing first and second holding members releasably attached to opposite ends of a flexible strap via swivel clasps that allow each holding member to rotate 360° relative to the strap, each holding member having a flexible elongated pad with first and second ends, a pair of ridged belts extending outwardly from the first end and a pair of ratcheting buckles proximate the second end;
wrapping the first holding member pad around a front end of a pair of skis and poles until the first holding member pad encircles the front end;
feeding the first holding member ridged belts within the corresponding ratcheting buckles;
tightening the first holding member pad around the skis and poles by operating the ratcheting buckles;
wrapping the second holding member pad around a back end of the pair of skis and poles until the second holding member pad encircles the back end;
feeding the second holding member ridged belts within the corresponding ratcheting buckles;
tightening the second holding member pad around the skis and poles by operating the ratcheting buckles.
US11/098,537 2005-04-05 2005-04-05 Adjustable belt for carrying sporting equipment Abandoned US20060219744A1 (en)

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US20080078789A1 (en) * 2006-10-03 2008-04-03 Salvatore Fiola Back Strap Chair Carrier
US20120006867A1 (en) * 2010-07-06 2012-01-12 Tami Caldwell Carrier for a Collapsible Chair
US20170247915A1 (en) * 2016-02-29 2017-08-31 Megan Reilly Schuur Security Tether For Skis Or Other Objects

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20080078789A1 (en) * 2006-10-03 2008-04-03 Salvatore Fiola Back Strap Chair Carrier
US20120006867A1 (en) * 2010-07-06 2012-01-12 Tami Caldwell Carrier for a Collapsible Chair
US20170247915A1 (en) * 2016-02-29 2017-08-31 Megan Reilly Schuur Security Tether For Skis Or Other Objects

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