US20060188266A1 - Optical network terminal with wide input range power converter - Google Patents

Optical network terminal with wide input range power converter Download PDF

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Publication number
US20060188266A1
US20060188266A1 US11/313,234 US31323405A US2006188266A1 US 20060188266 A1 US20060188266 A1 US 20060188266A1 US 31323405 A US31323405 A US 31323405A US 2006188266 A1 US2006188266 A1 US 2006188266A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
ont
vdc
range
power
voltage
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
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US11/313,234
Inventor
Cliff Vrla
Mark Paulsen
Mark Biegert
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WHITE OAK GLOBAL ADVISORS LLC
Calix Inc
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Optical Solutions Inc
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Priority to US63986004P priority Critical
Priority to US11/313,234 priority patent/US20060188266A1/en
Application filed by Optical Solutions Inc filed Critical Optical Solutions Inc
Assigned to OPTICAL SOLUTIONS, INC. reassignment OPTICAL SOLUTIONS, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: BIEGERT, MARK, PAULSEN, MARK T., VRLA, CLIFF
Publication of US20060188266A1 publication Critical patent/US20060188266A1/en
Assigned to CALIX NETWORKS, INC. reassignment CALIX NETWORKS, INC. MERGER (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: OPTICAL SOLUTIONS, INC.
Assigned to GREATER BAY VENTURE BANKING, A DIVISION OF GREATER BAY BANK N.A. reassignment GREATER BAY VENTURE BANKING, A DIVISION OF GREATER BAY BANK N.A. SECURITY AGREEMENT Assignors: CALIX NETWORKS, INC.
Assigned to CALIX NETWORKS, INC. reassignment CALIX NETWORKS, INC. RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: GREATER BAY VENTURE BANKING, A DIVISION OF GREATER BAY BANK N.A.
Assigned to WHITE OAK GLOBAL ADVISORS, LLC reassignment WHITE OAK GLOBAL ADVISORS, LLC ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: CALIX NETWORKS, INC.
Assigned to SILICON VALLEY BANK reassignment SILICON VALLEY BANK SECURITY AGREEMENT Assignors: CALIX NETWORKS, INC.
Assigned to CALIX NETWORKS, INC. reassignment CALIX NETWORKS, INC. RELEASE BY SECURED PARTY (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: WHITE OAK GLOBAL ADVISORS, LLC
Assigned to CALIX, INC. reassignment CALIX, INC. CHANGE OF NAME (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: CALIX NETWORKS, INC.
Assigned to SILICON VALLEY BANK reassignment SILICON VALLEY BANK SECURITY INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: CALIX, INC.
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04BTRANSMISSION
    • H04B3/00Line transmission systems
    • H04B3/54Systems for transmission via power distribution lines
    • H04B3/542Systems for transmission via power distribution lines the information being in digital form
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J13/00Circuit arrangements for providing remote indication of network conditions, e.g. an instantaneous record of the open or closed condition of each circuitbreaker in the network; Circuit arrangements for providing remote control of switching means in a power distribution network, e.g. switching in and out of current consumers by using a pulse code signal carried by the network
    • H02J13/0006Circuit arrangements for providing remote indication of network conditions, e.g. an instantaneous record of the open or closed condition of each circuitbreaker in the network; Circuit arrangements for providing remote control of switching means in a power distribution network, e.g. switching in and out of current consumers by using a pulse code signal carried by the network for single frequency AC networks
    • H02J13/0013Circuit arrangements for providing remote indication of network conditions, e.g. an instantaneous record of the open or closed condition of each circuitbreaker in the network; Circuit arrangements for providing remote control of switching means in a power distribution network, e.g. switching in and out of current consumers by using a pulse code signal carried by the network for single frequency AC networks characterised by transmission structure between the control or monitoring unit and the controlled or monitored unit
    • H02J13/0017Circuit arrangements for providing remote indication of network conditions, e.g. an instantaneous record of the open or closed condition of each circuitbreaker in the network; Circuit arrangements for providing remote control of switching means in a power distribution network, e.g. switching in and out of current consumers by using a pulse code signal carried by the network for single frequency AC networks characterised by transmission structure between the control or monitoring unit and the controlled or monitored unit with direct transmission between the control or monitoring unit and the controlled or monitored unit
    • H02J13/002Circuit arrangements for providing remote indication of network conditions, e.g. an instantaneous record of the open or closed condition of each circuitbreaker in the network; Circuit arrangements for providing remote control of switching means in a power distribution network, e.g. switching in and out of current consumers by using a pulse code signal carried by the network for single frequency AC networks characterised by transmission structure between the control or monitoring unit and the controlled or monitored unit with direct transmission between the control or monitoring unit and the controlled or monitored unit using the power network as support for the transmission
    • H02J13/0024Circuit arrangements for providing remote indication of network conditions, e.g. an instantaneous record of the open or closed condition of each circuitbreaker in the network; Circuit arrangements for providing remote control of switching means in a power distribution network, e.g. switching in and out of current consumers by using a pulse code signal carried by the network for single frequency AC networks characterised by transmission structure between the control or monitoring unit and the controlled or monitored unit with direct transmission between the control or monitoring unit and the controlled or monitored unit using the power network as support for the transmission using pulsed signals
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J7/00Circuit arrangements for charging or depolarising batteries or for supplying loads from batteries
    • H02J7/0042Circuit arrangements for charging or depolarising batteries or for supplying loads from batteries characterised by the mechanical construction
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02JCIRCUIT ARRANGEMENTS OR SYSTEMS FOR SUPPLYING OR DISTRIBUTING ELECTRIC POWER; SYSTEMS FOR STORING ELECTRIC ENERGY
    • H02J9/00Circuit arrangements for emergency or stand-by power supply, e.g. for emergency lighting
    • H02J9/04Circuit arrangements for emergency or stand-by power supply, e.g. for emergency lighting in which the distribution system is disconnected from the normal source and connected to a standby source
    • H02J9/06Circuit arrangements for emergency or stand-by power supply, e.g. for emergency lighting in which the distribution system is disconnected from the normal source and connected to a standby source with automatic change-over
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04BTRANSMISSION
    • H04B10/00Transmission systems employing electromagnetic waves other than radio-waves, e.g. infrared, visible or ultraviolet light, or employing corpuscular radiation, e.g. quantum communication
    • H04B10/27Arrangements for networking
    • H04B10/272Star-type networks or tree-type networks
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04BTRANSMISSION
    • H04B10/00Transmission systems employing electromagnetic waves other than radio-waves, e.g. infrared, visible or ultraviolet light, or employing corpuscular radiation, e.g. quantum communication
    • H04B10/80Optical aspects relating to the use of optical transmission for specific applications, not provided for in groups H04B10/03 - H04B10/70, e.g. optical power feeding or optical transmission through water
    • H04B10/806Arrangements for feeding power
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L12/00Data switching networks
    • H04L12/02Details
    • H04L12/10Current supply arrangements
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01MPROCESSES OR MEANS, e.g. BATTERIES, FOR THE DIRECT CONVERSION OF CHEMICAL ENERGY INTO ELECTRICAL ENERGY
    • H01M10/00Secondary cells; Manufacture thereof
    • H01M10/42Methods or arrangements for servicing or maintenance of secondary cells or secondary half-cells
    • H01M10/46Accumulators structurally combined with charging apparatus
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01MPROCESSES OR MEANS, e.g. BATTERIES, FOR THE DIRECT CONVERSION OF CHEMICAL ENERGY INTO ELECTRICAL ENERGY
    • H01M2/00Constructional details or processes of manufacture of the non-active parts
    • H01M2/10Mountings; Suspension devices; Shock absorbers; Transport or carrying devices; Holders
    • H01M2/1016Cabinets, cases, fixing devices, adapters, racks or battery packs
    • H01M2/1022Cabinets, cases, fixing devices, adapters, racks or battery packs for miniature batteries or batteries for portable equipment
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04BTRANSMISSION
    • H04B2203/00Indexing scheme relating to line transmission systems
    • H04B2203/54Aspects of powerline communications not already covered by H04B3/54 and its subgroups
    • H04B2203/5404Methods of transmitting or receiving signals via power distribution lines
    • H04B2203/5408Methods of transmitting or receiving signals via power distribution lines using protocols
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04BTRANSMISSION
    • H04B2203/00Indexing scheme relating to line transmission systems
    • H04B2203/54Aspects of powerline communications not already covered by H04B3/54 and its subgroups
    • H04B2203/5429Applications for powerline communications
    • H04B2203/5437Wired telephone
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04BTRANSMISSION
    • H04B2203/00Indexing scheme relating to line transmission systems
    • H04B2203/54Aspects of powerline communications not already covered by H04B3/54 and its subgroups
    • H04B2203/5429Applications for powerline communications
    • H04B2203/5445Local network
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04BTRANSMISSION
    • H04B2203/00Indexing scheme relating to line transmission systems
    • H04B2203/54Aspects of powerline communications not already covered by H04B3/54 and its subgroups
    • H04B2203/5429Applications for powerline communications
    • H04B2203/545Audio/video application, e.g. interphone
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04BTRANSMISSION
    • H04B2203/00Indexing scheme relating to line transmission systems
    • H04B2203/54Aspects of powerline communications not already covered by H04B3/54 and its subgroups
    • H04B2203/5429Applications for powerline communications
    • H04B2203/5458Monitor sensor; Alarm systems
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04BTRANSMISSION
    • H04B2203/00Indexing scheme relating to line transmission systems
    • H04B2203/54Aspects of powerline communications not already covered by H04B3/54 and its subgroups
    • H04B2203/5462Systems for power line communications
    • H04B2203/547Systems for power line communications via DC power distribution
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04BTRANSMISSION
    • H04B2203/00Indexing scheme relating to line transmission systems
    • H04B2203/54Aspects of powerline communications not already covered by H04B3/54 and its subgroups
    • H04B2203/5462Systems for power line communications
    • H04B2203/5483Systems for power line communications using coupling circuits
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04BTRANSMISSION
    • H04B2210/00Indexing scheme relating to optical transmission systems
    • H04B2210/07Monitoring an optical transmission system using a supervisory signal
    • H04B2210/077Monitoring an optical transmission system using a supervisory signal using a separate fibre
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B90/00Enabling technologies or technologies with a potential or indirect contribution to GHG emissions mitigation
    • Y02B90/20Systems integrating technologies related to power network operation and communication or information technologies mediating in the improvement of the carbon footprint of the management of residential or tertiary loads, i.e. smart grids as enabling technology in buildings sector
    • Y02B90/22Systems characterised by the monitored, controlled or operated end-user elements or equipments
    • Y02B90/222Systems characterised by the monitored, controlled or operated end-user elements or equipments the elements or equipments being or involving energy storage units, uninterruptible power supply [UPS] systems or standby or emergency generators involved in the last power distribution stages
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B90/00Enabling technologies or technologies with a potential or indirect contribution to GHG emissions mitigation
    • Y02B90/20Systems integrating technologies related to power network operation and communication or information technologies mediating in the improvement of the carbon footprint of the management of residential or tertiary loads, i.e. smart grids as enabling technology in buildings sector
    • Y02B90/26Communication technology specific aspects
    • Y02B90/2607Communication technology specific aspects characterised by data transport means between the monitoring, controlling or managing units and the monitored, controlled or operated electrical equipment
    • Y02B90/2615Communication technology specific aspects characterised by data transport means between the monitoring, controlling or managing units and the monitored, controlled or operated electrical equipment using the power network as support for the transmission
    • Y02B90/2623Communication technology specific aspects characterised by data transport means between the monitoring, controlling or managing units and the monitored, controlled or operated electrical equipment using the power network as support for the transmission using pulsed signals
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02BCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO BUILDINGS, e.g. HOUSING, HOUSE APPLIANCES OR RELATED END-USER APPLICATIONS
    • Y02B90/00Enabling technologies or technologies with a potential or indirect contribution to GHG emissions mitigation
    • Y02B90/20Systems integrating technologies related to power network operation and communication or information technologies mediating in the improvement of the carbon footprint of the management of residential or tertiary loads, i.e. smart grids as enabling technology in buildings sector
    • Y02B90/26Communication technology specific aspects
    • Y02B90/2676Communication technology specific aspects
    • Y02B90/2692Communication technology specific aspects using the power network as support for the transmission
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y04INFORMATION OR COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES HAVING AN IMPACT ON OTHER TECHNOLOGY AREAS
    • Y04SSYSTEMS INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO POWER NETWORK OPERATION, COMMUNICATION OR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVING THE ELECTRICAL POWER GENERATION, TRANSMISSION, DISTRIBUTION, MANAGEMENT OR USAGE, i.e. SMART GRIDS
    • Y04S20/00Systems supporting the management or operation of end-user stationary applications, including also the last stages of power distribution and the control, monitoring or operating management systems at local level
    • Y04S20/10System characterised by the monitored, controlled or operated end-user elements or equipments
    • Y04S20/12System characterised by the monitored, controlled or operated end-user elements or equipments the elements or equipments being or involving energy storage units, uninterruptible power supply [UPS] systems or standby or emergency generators involved in the last power distribution stages
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y04INFORMATION OR COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES HAVING AN IMPACT ON OTHER TECHNOLOGY AREAS
    • Y04SSYSTEMS INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO POWER NETWORK OPERATION, COMMUNICATION OR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVING THE ELECTRICAL POWER GENERATION, TRANSMISSION, DISTRIBUTION, MANAGEMENT OR USAGE, i.e. SMART GRIDS
    • Y04S40/00Systems for electrical power generation, transmission, distribution or end-user application management characterised by the use of communication or information technologies, or communication or information technology specific aspects supporting them
    • Y04S40/10Systems for electrical power generation, transmission, distribution or end-user application management characterised by the use of communication or information technologies, or communication or information technology specific aspects supporting them characterised by communication technology
    • Y04S40/12Systems for electrical power generation, transmission, distribution or end-user application management characterised by the use of communication or information technologies, or communication or information technology specific aspects supporting them characterised by communication technology characterised by data transport means between the monitoring, controlling or managing units and monitored, controlled or operated electrical equipment
    • Y04S40/121Using the power network as support for the transmission
    • Y04S40/122Using pulsed signals
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y04INFORMATION OR COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES HAVING AN IMPACT ON OTHER TECHNOLOGY AREAS
    • Y04SSYSTEMS INTEGRATING TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO POWER NETWORK OPERATION, COMMUNICATION OR INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVING THE ELECTRICAL POWER GENERATION, TRANSMISSION, DISTRIBUTION, MANAGEMENT OR USAGE, i.e. SMART GRIDS
    • Y04S40/00Systems for electrical power generation, transmission, distribution or end-user application management characterised by the use of communication or information technologies, or communication or information technology specific aspects supporting them
    • Y04S40/10Systems for electrical power generation, transmission, distribution or end-user application management characterised by the use of communication or information technologies, or communication or information technology specific aspects supporting them characterised by communication technology
    • Y04S40/14Communication technology specific aspects
    • Y04S40/146Communication technology specific aspects using power networks as support for transmission
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T307/00Electrical transmission or interconnection systems
    • Y10T307/50Plural supply circuits or sources
    • Y10T307/615Substitute or emergency source

Abstract

The disclosure describes an optical network terminal (ONT) for use in a passive optical network (PON) that includes power conversion circuitry to accommodate a variety of power source options. In particular, the power conversion circuitry converts a wide range of input direct current (DC) voltages to a DC supply voltage that powers ONT circuitry that supports communication of information via the PON.

Description

  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. provisional application No. 60/639,860, filed Dec. 28, 2004, the entire content of which is incorporated herein by reference.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • The invention relates to networking and, more particularly, to powering an optical network terminal (ONT) in a passive optical network (PON).
  • BACKGROUND
  • A passive optical network (PON) can deliver voice, video and other data among multiple network nodes, using a common optical fiber link. Passive optical splitters and combiners enable multiple optical network terminals (ONT)s to share the optical fiber link. Each ONT terminates the optical fiber link for a residential or business subscriber, and is sometimes referred to as a subscriber premises node that delivers Fiber to the Premises (FTTP). An ONT is connected to one or more subscriber devices, such as televisions, set-top boxes, telephones, computers, or network appliances, which ultimately receive the voice, video and data delivered via the PON.
  • Generally, a PON includes a PON interface, sometimes referred to as an optical line terminator (OLT), having multiple, independent PON interface modules that serve multiple optical fiber links. A PON interface module provides an interface for transmission and reception of data packets over a particular optical fiber link that serves a group of ONTs. A PON is inherently a downstream-multicast medium. Each packet transmitted on an optical fiber link can be received by every ONT served by that link. ONTs identify selected packets or frames on the fiber link based on addressing information included within the packets or frames.
  • Network equipment in a cable or hybrid network may be connected to power provided by a central office, which commonly utilizes battery and generator back-up power to maintain a continuous power supply. In contrast, an ONT in an all-fiber optical network is ordinarily powered locally at the subscriber premises. For this reason, an ONT often includes a battery to provide back up power during a power outage to maintain critical services, such as voice service. Many FTTP service providers provide an uninterruptible power source (UPS) unit that may be mounted within or outside the service subscriber's premises. A UPS unit provides AC-to-DC voltage conversion from line power within the subscriber premises and includes a battery for backup power. In any case, different providers may want to implement different power options depending on several options, such as cost, reliability, and distance from a power source to the ONT.
  • SUMMARY
  • In general, the invention is directed to an optical network terminal (ONT) for use in a passive optical network (PON) that includes power conversion circuitry to accommodate a variety of power source options. In particular, the power conversion circuitry converts a wide range of input direct current (DC) voltages to a DC supply voltage that powers ONT circuitry that supports communication of information via the PON.
  • An ONT is typically powered locally at the subscriber premises. Thus, circuitry is provided to convert standard alternating current (AC) line power to DC power. Some ONTs are generally designed to be powered by either a 12 volt direct current (VDC). Other ONTs are designed to be powered by a 48 VDC power supply. Accordingly, an ONT designed for 12 VDC operation will not operate with a 48 VDC power supply. Similarly, an ONT designed for 48 VDC operation will not operate with a 12 VDC power supply. Consequently, the power supply options offered to the fiber-to-the-premises (FTTP) service provider are generally limited by the design of the ONT.
  • In accordance with an embodiment of the invention, an ONT includes power conversion circuitry comprising a wide input voltage range power converter. The power conversion circuitry accommodates a wide input voltage range, e.g., 10.5-56.5 VDC, and converts the input voltage to an appropriate DC supply voltage to power the ONT. For example, the power conversion circuitry may convert the wide input voltage range to a supply voltage in a range of approximately 8 to 15 VDC for an ONT designed for a 12 VDC power supply. For example, the input power to the ONT circuitry, as generated by the power conversion circuitry, may be 12 VDC. In this manner, the invention enables an ONT to be used with a variety of different input power source options, including 12 VDC or 48 VDC power supplies.
  • In one embodiment, the invention provides an optical network termination (ONT) for use in a passive optical network (PON), the ONT comprising ONT circuitry to support communication of information via the PON, and power conversion circuitry to provide operating power to the ONT circuitry, wherein the power conversion circuitry is capable of converting a range of input voltages to a supply voltage that powers the ONT circuitry.
  • In another embodiment, the invention provides a method for powering an optical network termination (ONT) for use in a passive optical network (PON), the method comprising generating an input voltage, and converting the input voltage to a supply voltage to power circuitry within the ONT using power conversion circuitry that is capable of converting a range of input voltages to the supply voltage.
  • In another embodiment, the invention is directed to a computer-readable medium containing instructions. The instructions cause a programmable processor to
  • The invention may offer one or more advantages. Unlike ONTs designed to be powered by either a 12 VDC or a 48 VDC power supply, the described ONT includes power conversion circuitry that converts a wide range of DC input voltages to a DC supply voltage that powers the ONT. Consequently, rather than the FTTP service provider being limited by the design of the ONT, the FTTP service provider may select from a variety of different power source options, including 12 VDC or 48 VDC for a given ONT. In this manner, the FTTP service provider may select a power source depending on several factors, such as cost, complexity, reliability, and distance from a power source to the ONT. The described invention provides a flexible solution that may be configured to accommodate different ONT power supply options.
  • The details of one or more embodiments of the invention are set forth in the accompanying drawings and the description below. Other features, objects, and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the description and drawings, and from the claims.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating an exemplary passive optical network (PON).
  • FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating an optical network terminal (ONT) on the PON of FIG. 1 that includes power conversion circuitry to accommodate a variety of different power source options.
  • FIG. 3 is a block diagram illustrating another optical network terminal (ONT) on the PON of FIG. 1 that includes power conversion circuitry to accommodate a variety of different power source options.
  • FIG. 4 is a block diagram illustrating yet another optical network terminal (ONT) on the PON of FIG. 1 that includes power conversion circuitry to accommodate a variety of different power source options.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • In general, the invention is directed to an optical network terminal (ONT) for use in a passive optical network (PON) that includes power conversion circuitry to accommodate a variety of power source options. In particular, the power conversion circuitry converts a wide range of input direct current (DC) voltages to a DC supply voltage that powers ONT circuitry that supports communication of information via the PON.
  • In one example, an offline converter converts standard AC input line power to DC power. The offline converter may be located inside the premises of a FTTP subscriber. The wide input voltage range of the power conversion circuitry of the ONT enables the output voltage of the offline converter to be anywhere within a wide input voltage range of the ONT.
  • In another example, an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) unit provides AC-to-DC voltage conversion from line power within the subscriber premises and also includes a battery for backup power during a power outage. The UPS unit may be located within or outside the service subscriber's premises. Again, the wide input voltage range of the power conversion circuitry permits the use of any of a wide range of voltages produced by the UPS unit to power the ONT.
  • In a further example, an offline converter provides a supply voltage to the ONT via the power conversion circuitry and also provides DC power to a UPS unit. The UPS unit may utilize the DC power as a supply voltage for a battery charger. This configuration may be particularly desirable in the event a supplier desires battery backup outside the subscriber premises, but does not have access to AC line power outside the premises.
  • FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating a passive optical network (PON) 10. As shown in FIG. 1, PON 10 can be arranged to deliver voice, data and video content (generally “information”) to a number of network nodes via optical fiber links. Exemplary components for implementing a PON are commercially available from Optical Solutions, Inc., of Minneapolis, Minn., and designated by the tradename Fiberpath™, including the Fiberdrive™ headend bay interface, i.e., OLT, and the Fiberpoint™ subscriber premise node, i.e., ONT. The ONT may conform to any of a variety of PON standards, such as the broadband PON (BPON) standard (ITU G.983) or the gigabit-capable PON (GPON) standard (ITU G.984), as well as future PON standards under development by the Full Service Access Network (FSAN) Group or other organizations.
  • An OLT 12 may receive voice information, for example, from the public switched telephone network (PSTN) 14 via a switch facility 16. In addition, OLT 12 may be coupled to one or more Internet service providers (ISP's) 18 via the Internet and a router 20. As further shown in FIG. 1, OLT 12 may receive video content 22 from video content suppliers via a streaming video headend 24. In each case, OLT 12 receives the information, and distributes it along optical fiber links 11A and 11B (collectively “fiber links 11”) to groups 26A and 26B (collectively “groups 26”) of ONTs 28A, 28B, 28C and 28D (collectively “nodes 28”). Each of groups 26 is coupled to a respective one of optical fiber links 11. OLT 12 may be coupled to any number of fiber links 11. For purposes of illustration FIG. 1 shows only two fiber links 11A, 11B.
  • ONTs 28 include hardware for receiving information from PON 10 via optical fiber links 11, and delivering the information to one or more connected subscriber devices (not shown). For example, each ONT 28 may serve as a PON access point for one or more computers, network appliances, televisions, set-top boxes, wireless devices, or the like, for video and data services. In addition, each ONT 28 may be connected to subscriber telephones for delivery of telephone services. Hence, ONT 28 may provide video to support television applications, data to support Internet access, and voice to support telephone services. ONT 28 includes appropriate conversion hardware to convert optical signals to electrical signals, and electrical signals to optical signals. OLT 12 may be located near or far from a group 26 of ONTs 28. In some existing networks, however, OLT 12 may reside in a central office (CO) situated within approximately ten miles from each ONT 28.
  • An ONT 28 may be located at any of a variety of locations, including residential or business sites, any of which may be referred to as subscriber premises. In addition, a single ONT 28 may operate on a shared basis to deliver information to two or more closely located residences or businesses via copper or additional optical fiber connections, either directly or via a network hub, router or switch. A group 26 of ONTs 28 may refer to nodes served by OLT 12 via a common optical fiber link 11. Each group 26 in FIG. 1 contains two ONTs 28 for purposes of illustration. However, a group 26 may include a single ONT 28, or numerous ONTs.
  • ONT 28 also may include hardware for transmitting information over PON 10. For example, an ONT 28 may transmit voice information over PSTN 14 via OLT 12 and switch facility 16 in the course of a telephone conversation. In addition, an ONT 28 may transmit data to a variety of nodes on the Internet via ISP 18, router 20 and OLT 12. Multiple ONTs 28 typically transmit upstream over a common optical fiber link 11 using time division multiplexing techniques, and rely on a downstream grant packet for assignment of upstream time slots to individual ONTs.
  • Each of ONTs 28 is powered locally at the subscriber premises. ONTs 28 are generally designed to be powered by either a 12 volt direct current (VDC) or 48 VDC power supply, depending on the design of the ONT. Accordingly, an ONT designed for 12 VDC operation will not operate with a 48 VDC power supply. Similarly, an ONT designed for 48 VDC operation will not operate with a 12 VDC power supply. Consequently, the power supply options offered to the FTTP service provider are generally limited by the design of the ONT.
  • In accordance with the invention, however, an ONT is equipped with power conversion circuitry that permits the ONT to be powered by 12 VDC or 48 VDC power supply. The power conversion circuitry accepts a wide input range voltage, e.g., from 10.5 VDC to 56.5 VDC, and converts the voltage to a supply voltage appropriate for the ONT, e.g., 8 to 15 VDC. For example, the power conversion circuitry may output a 12 VDC supply to the ONT processing circuitry. With the wide input voltage range, however, the FTTP service provider has the option of using 12 VDC, 48 VDC or other supply voltages as input voltages for application to the power conversion circuitry of the ONT.
  • Fiber-to-the-premises (FTTP) providers may desire to implement different power options depending on several factors, such as cost, complexity, reliability, and distance from a power source to the ONT. For example, some providers may elect to include battery power, while other providers may elect to eliminate battery power. Similarly, some providers may select implementations that require indoor or outdoor battery placement. Thus, it may be advantageous to provide a flexible solution that can be configured to accommodate different power options rather than provide a unique solution for each power option.
  • Each of ONTs 28 in PON 10 may include power conversion circuitry to convert a wide range of input direct current (DC) voltages to a DC supply voltage that powers the ONT hardware. By permitting a wide range of input DC voltages at the ONT, the FTTP service provider may select a variety of different power source options.
  • FIG. 2 is a block diagram illustrating an ONT 28 that includes power conversion circuitry 36 to accommodate a variety of different power source options. In general, power conversion circuitry converts a wide range of DC input voltages to a DC operating voltage or supply voltage for powering the hardware of ONT 28. In particular, ONT 28 receives a DC input voltage from offline converter 48 as shown in FIG. 2.
  • ONT 28 provides an interface between an optical fiber link 11 on a PON 10 and subscriber equipment 38 in a fiber-to-the-premises (FTTP) network. ONT 28 receives information in the form of voice, video and data from PON 10 over optical fiber link 11 from OLT 12. ONT 28 processes the information to deliver telephone, television and Internet services to subscriber equipment 38. Subscriber equipment 38 may include telephones, computers, televisions, set-top boxes, network applications, and the like. ONT 28 sends video signals to subscriber equipment 38 via coaxial cable, data via network cables such as Ethernet cable, and telephone signals over twisted pair wire. Voice, video and data are examples of information that may be received and transmitted by ONT 28.
  • As further shown in FIG. 2, to support voice, video and data services, ONT 28 includes an optical receiver 30 that receives optical signals from optical fiber link 11 and converts the optical signals to electrical signals, and an optical transmitter 32 that receives electrical signals from ONT processing circuitry 34 and converts the electrical signals to optical signals for transmission over PON 10 via optical fiber link 11. Optical receiver 30 and optical transmitter 32 form an optical interface, and may be formed by conventional opto-electrical conversion hardware.
  • ONT processing circuitry 34 handles reception and transmission of information in the form of frames, packets or other units of information over PON 10. For example, ONT processing circuitry 34 may be responsible for identifying information directed to and from particular subscriber equipment 38, and formatting the information to support respective telephone, video or data services within the subscriber premises and over PON 10. ONT processing circuitry 34 may also include data circuitry, video circuitry, and telephone circuitry to process incoming data for delivery of Internet, television and telephone services, respectively. ONT processing circuitry 34, data circuitry, video circuitry, and telephone circuitry may be implemented together or separately as one or more microprocessors, digital signal processors (DSPs), application specific integrated circuits (ASICs), field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), or other equivalent logic circuitry.
  • ONT 28 is powered locally at the subscriber's premises with AC power supply 49. In particular, offline converter 48 converts power from AC power supply 49 to a DC input voltage for ONT 28. Power conversion circuitry 36 is designed to convert a wide range of DC input voltages to a DC supply voltage that powers ONT 28. For example, power conversion circuitry 36 may accommodate a wide input voltage range of approximately 10.5 to 56.5 VDC and output a supply voltage in a range of approximately 8 to 15 VDC, thereby providing suitable power for an ONT designed to operate with a 12 VDC power supply. Importantly, with the wide input voltage range accommodated by power conversion circuitry 36, the DC voltage out of offline converter 48 can be anywhere in the input voltage range of power conversion circuitry 36, providing the FTTP service provider with flexibility in the selection of power supply options.
  • ONT 28 may be designed to be powered by either a 12 VDC or a 48 VDC power supply. When ONT 28 is designed to be powered by a 12 VDC power supply, power conversion circuitry 36 converts the DC input voltage to a 12 VDC supply voltage. In this manner, offline converter 48 may provide a supply voltage of 12 VDC or 48 VDC, which is converted by power conversation circuitry 36 to 12 VDC to power ONT processing circuitry 34. Similarly, in some embodiments, when ONT 28 is designed to be powered by a 48 VDC power supply, power conversion circuitry 36 may be provided to convert the DC input voltage to a 48 VDC supply voltage.
  • Power conversion circuitry 36 may comprise a wide input voltage range integrated circuit (IC). One example of a suitable wide input voltage range IC is the LTC3703 IC commercially available from Linear Technology Corporation of Milpitas, Calif. However, power conversion circuitry 36 may be any suitable DC-to-DC converter that accommodates a wide input voltage range and outputs an appropriate supply voltage to power ONT 28.
  • Offline converter 48 may comprise an inexpensive “wall wart” or other suitable AC-to-DC converter that outputs a DC voltage within the wide input voltage range of power conversion circuitry 36. Generally, offline converter 48 may include a transformer to reduce the voltage of AC power supply 49 to a DC voltage within the input range of power conversion circuitry 36, a rectifier to perform the AC-to-DC conversion, and a capacitor to filter the output. In any case, offline converter 48 may be located within or outside the premises of a FTTP subscriber.
  • For example, offline converter 48 may be a wall wart that simply plugs into a standard AC outlet within the installation premises. The output voltage generated by offline converter 48 may be delivered to ONT 28 via a power cord. In some embodiments, a supply voltage of 48 VDC may be selected to permit longer power cords due to the lower voltage drop at ONT 28.
  • As further shown in FIG. 2, ONT 28 may also include battery module 40 to provide backup power during a power outage to maintain critical services, such as voice service. Battery module 40 includes a battery 44 to provide backup power to ONT 28, a battery charger 42 to charge battery 44, and battery charger control circuitry 46 to monitor the status of battery 44. The voltage output by offline converter 48 may also be used to power battery module 40.
  • While ONT 28 is illustrated as including battery module 40 in FIG. 2, some providers may choose to eliminate battery module 40 within ONT 28. By eliminating battery module 40, cost, space, and power dissipation can be reduced within ONT 28. However, different service providers may want to implement different power options depending on several factors such as cost, reliability, and distance from a power source to the ONT. For example, the service provider may choose to eliminate backup battery power altogether or, alternatively, provide an external battery module, such as a UPS unit.
  • FIG. 3 is a block diagram illustrating an ONT 28 that is powered locally by a UPS unit 50. Notably, unlike the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 2, ONT 28 does not include battery module 40 because UPS unit 50 provides AC-to-DC conversion from AC power supply 54 and also includes battery 58 to provide backup power. In general, UPS unit 50 delivers a voltage within the wide input voltage range of power conversion circuitry 36 and also provides backup power to ONT 28 during a power outage.
  • Again, ONT 28 includes power conversion circuitry 36 that converts a wide range of DC input voltages, such as approximately 10.5-56.5 VDC, to a DC supply voltage appropriate to power ONT 28. Power conversion circuitry 36 outputs the supply voltage, e.g., 12 VDC, to power optical receiver 30, optical transmitter 32, and ONT processing circuitry 34 to support communication of information over PON 10 and provide voice, video, and data services. In some embodiments, power conversion circuitry 36 may be configured to output a supply voltage of 48 VDC.
  • UPS unit 50 may be located within or outside the subscriber's premises. Because battery performance and reliability are adversely affected by temperature extremes, UPS unit 50 may be located within the subscriber's premises. However, when UPS unit 50 is mounted within the premises, the service provider must gain access to the premises in order to service battery 58, which is generally expensive and inconvenient to obtain. Physical access to UPS unit 50 is important because the inability to maintain battery 58 could result in battery failure during an extended power outage causing ONT 28 to lose power and fail to provide critical voice service. Consequently, in some cases, UPS unit 50 may also be mounted outside the subscriber's premises so that UPS unit may be easily accessed. In this case, UPS unit 50 is typically mounted to an exterior wall and may be mounted near or far from ONT 28.
  • Regardless of where UPS unit 50 is installed, conversion circuitry 52 converts standard power within the subscriber's premises from AC power supply 54 to a DC input voltage within the wide input voltage range (e.g., approximately 10.5 to 56.5 VDC) of power conversion circuitry 36. Again, AC power supply 54 may be obtained from AC line power within the subscriber premises. Battery charger 56 and UPS processing circuitry 59 are also powered by the voltage output by conversion circuitry 52.
  • Battery charger 56 charges battery 58 so that battery 58 may power ONT 28 over an extended period of time, such as approximately 8 hours, during a power outage. In addition, UPS processing circuitry 59 monitors the status of battery 58. For example, UPS processing circuitry 59 may transmit information associated with the status of battery 48 to ONT 28 or OLT 12. The information may indicate a failure in AC power supply 54, low life of battery 58, replace battery 58, or battery 58 is missing.
  • Importantly, ONT 28 permits the use of any voltage in the range accommodated by power conversion circuitry 36. Normally, a UPS unit provides either a 12 VDC or a 48 VDC. Consequently, power conversion circuitry 36 permits the use of any voltage in the range produced by a normal UPS unit to power ONT 28. Accordingly, ONT 28 may be used with a UPS unit 50 having a 12 VDC output, a 48 VDC output, or any other output within the wide input voltage range of power conversion circuitry 36. Power conversion circuitry 36 converts any input voltage in the wide input voltage range to a supply voltage appropriate to power ONT 28, such as 12 VDC. By including circuitry to provide backup power in UPS unit, only the providers that choose to include a battery are required to pay for additional circuitry.
  • FIG. 4 is a block diagram illustrating ONT 28 that receives a DC input voltage from offline converter 48 and includes a UPS unit 60 to provide backup power during a power outage. Specifically, offline converter 48 converts standard AC power within the subscriber's premises from AC power supply 49 to a DC input voltage that powers ONT 28 and UPS unit 60. The embodiment illustrated in FIG. 4 may be particularly advantageous when a service provider wants to place a battery outside the subscriber's premises, but does not readily have access to AC power outside the premises.
  • Similar to the embodiments illustrated in FIG. 2 and FIG. 3, ONT 28 includes power conversion circuitry 36 that converts a wide range of DC input voltages, such as approximately 10.5-56.5 VDC, to a DC supply voltage that powers ONT 28. Power conversion circuitry 36 outputs the supply voltage, e.g., 12 VDC, to power optical receiver 30, optical transmitter 32, and ONT processing circuitry 34 to support communication of information over PON 10 and provide voice, video, and data services. In some embodiments, power conversion circuitry 36 may be configured to output a supply voltage of 48 VDC.
  • As in the example of FIG. 2, offline converter 48 may be a wall wart or other suitable AC-to-DC converter as previously described. For example, offline converter may be an inexpensive wall wart plugged into a standard AC outlet within the subscriber's premises that outputs a DC voltage within the input range of power conversion circuitry 36. Offline converter 48 may deliver the DC voltage to UPS unit 60 and ONT 28 via one or more power cords. As previously described, it may be desirable to output power at a high voltage and low current to minimize power losses and the voltage drop at UPS unit 60 and ONT 28.
  • Offline converter 48 provides DC power to a battery module in the form of UPS unit 60. UPS unit 60 may include battery charger 56 and one or more batteries that function as a UPS unit. UPS unit 60 can be located remotely anywhere between the offline converter 48 and ONT 28. For example, UPS unit 60 may be located within or outside the installation premises and is powered by the DC voltage output by offline converter 48.
  • Because offline converter 48 converts the power provided by AC power supply 49 into a DC voltage, UPS unit 60 does not include AC-to-DC conversion circuitry. Rather, UPS unit 60 includes battery charger 56, battery 58, and UPS processing circuitry 59. Again, battery 58 provides backup power to ONT 28 during a power outage, battery charger charges battery 58, and UPS processing circuitry monitors the status of battery 58.
  • While UPS unit 60 may be mounted within or outside the subscriber's premises, the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 4 is particularly advantageous when AC power is not readily available outside the premises and the service provider desires an external UPS unit. This scenario may be common as most installation sites do not readily have access to AC power and external UPS units are less expensive and easier to maintain than UPS units mounted inside the installation premises. In particular, offline converter 48 may plug into a standard AC outlet within the premises while UPS unit 60 and ONT 28 are mounted outside the premises. Importantly, UPS unit 60 may be located anywhere between offline converter 48 and ONT 28, within or outside the premises.
  • By accommodating a wide voltage input range at ONT 28, the FTTP service provider may select different power options depending on several factors such as cost, complexity, reliability, and distance from the ONT. Thus, ONT 28 provides a flexible solution for various power options. ONT 28 with power conversion circuitry 36 may be powered by various power options unlike ONTs that may be powered by only one particular power option.
  • Various embodiments of the invention have been described. However, one skilled in the art will appreciate that various modifications or additions may be made to the described embodiments without departing from the scope of the claimed inventions.

Claims (35)

1. An optical network termination (ONT) for use in a passive optical network (PON), the ONT comprising:
ONT circuitry to support communication of information via the PON; and
power conversion circuitry to provide operating power to the ONT circuitry, wherein the power conversion circuitry is capable of converting a range of input voltages to a supply voltage that powers the ONT circuitry.
2. The ONT of claim 1, wherein the range of input voltages is in a range of approximately 10.5 volts DC (VDC) to approximately 56.5 VDC.
3. The ONT of claim 1, wherein the range of input voltages includes one of an input voltage of approximately 12 volts direct current (VDC) and an input voltage of approximately 48 volts direct current (VDC).
4. The ONT of claim 1, wherein the supply voltage is in a range of approximately 8 volts direct current (VDC) to 15 VDC.
5. The ONT of claim 1, wherein the supply voltage is approximately 12 volts direct current (VDC).
6. The ONT of claim 1, wherein the power conversion circuitry includes a wide input voltage range integrated circuit that converts a voltage in a wide range of input voltages to the supply voltage.
7. The ONT of claim 6, wherein the range of input voltages is in a range of approximately 10.5 volts DC (VDC) to approximately 56.5 VDC.
8. The ONT of claim 1, wherein the power conversion circuitry is coupled to an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) unit to receive the input voltage.
9. The ONT of claim 1, wherein the power conversion circuitry is coupled to a battery to receive the input voltage.
10. The ONT of claim 1, wherein the power conversion circuitry is coupled to an offline converter to receive the input voltage, wherein the offline converter converts power from an alternating current (AC) power supply to a direct current (DC) input voltage.
11. The ONT of claim 1, wherein the power conversion circuitry is capable of converting both an input voltage of 12 volts direct current (VDC) and an input voltage of 48 VDC to the supply voltage.
12. A method for powering an optical network termination (ONT) for use in a passive optical network (PON), the method comprising:
generating an input voltage; and
converting the input voltage to a supply voltage to power circuitry within the ONT using power conversion circuitry that is capable of converting a range of input voltages to the supply voltage.
13. The method of claim 12, wherein the range of input voltages is in a range of approximately 10.5 volts DC (VDC) to approximately 56.5 VDC.
14. The method of claim 12, wherein the range of input voltages includes an input voltage of approximately 12 volts direct current (VDC).
15. The method of claim 12, wherein the range of input voltages includes an input voltage of approximately 48 volts direct current (VDC).
16. The method of claim 12, wherein the supply voltage is in a range of approximately 8 volts direct current (VDC) to 15 VDC.
17. The method of claim 12, wherein the supply voltage is approximately 12 volts direct current (VDC).
18. The method of claim 12, wherein the power conversion circuitry includes a wide input voltage range integrated circuit that converts a voltage in a wide range of input voltages to the supply voltage.
19. The method of claim 18, wherein the range of input voltages is in a range of approximately 10.5 volts DC (VDC) to approximately 56.5 VDC.
20. The method of claim 12, wherein the power conversion circuitry is coupled to an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) unit to receive the input voltage.
21. The method of claim 12, wherein the power conversion circuitry is coupled to a battery to receive the input voltage.
22. The method of claim 12, wherein the power conversion circuitry is coupled to an offline converter to receive the input voltage, the method further comprising converting power from an alternating current (AC) power supply to a direct current (DC) input voltage using the offline converter.
23. The method of claim 12, wherein the power conversion circuitry is capable of converting both an input voltage of 12 volts direct current (VDC) and an input voltage of 48 VDC to the supply voltage.
24. An optical network termination (ONT) for use in a passive optical network (PON), the ONT comprising:
ONT circuitry to support communication of information via the PON; and
power conversion means for providing operating power to the ONT circuitry, wherein the power conversion means is capable of converting a range of input voltages to a supply voltage that powers the ONT circuitry.
25. The ONT of claim 24, wherein the range of input voltages is in a range of approximately 10.5 volts DC (VDC) to approximately 56.5 VDC.
26. The ONT of claim 24, wherein the range of input voltages includes an input voltage of approximately 12 volts direct current (VDC).
27. The ONT of claim 24, wherein the range of input voltages includes an input voltage of approximately 48 volts direct current (VDC).
28. The ONT of claim 24, wherein the supply voltage is in a range of approximately 8 volts direct current (VDC) to 15 VDC.
29. The ONT of claim 24, wherein the supply voltage is approximately 12 volts direct current (VDC).
30. The ONT of claim 24, wherein the power conversion means includes a wide input voltage range integrated circuit that converts a voltage in a wide range of input voltages to the supply voltage.
31. The ONT of claim 30, wherein the range of input voltages is in a range of approximately 10.5 volts DC (VDC) to approximately 56.5 VDC.
32. The ONT of claim 24, wherein the power conversion means is coupled to an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) unit to receive the input voltage.
33. The ONT of claim 24, wherein the power conversion means is coupled to a battery to receive the input voltage.
34. The ONT of 24, wherein the power conversion means is coupled to an offline converter to receive the input voltage, wherein the offline converter converts power from an alternating current (AC) power supply to a direct current (DC) input voltage.
35. The ONT of claim 24, wherein the power conversion means is capable of converting both an input voltage of 12 volts direct current (VDC) and an input voltage of 48 VDC to the supply voltage.
US11/313,234 2004-12-28 2005-12-20 Optical network terminal with wide input range power converter Abandoned US20060188266A1 (en)

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US8212375B2 (en) 2012-07-03
US20080303679A1 (en) 2008-12-11
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WO2006071641A3 (en) 2006-08-17
US20060192434A1 (en) 2006-08-31

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