US20060124779A1 - Panel-mounted electrostatic spray nozzle system - Google Patents

Panel-mounted electrostatic spray nozzle system Download PDF

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Publication number
US20060124779A1
US20060124779A1 US11/271,257 US27125705A US2006124779A1 US 20060124779 A1 US20060124779 A1 US 20060124779A1 US 27125705 A US27125705 A US 27125705A US 2006124779 A1 US2006124779 A1 US 2006124779A1
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Prior art keywords
nozzle
electrostatic spray
spray nozzle
adapted
assembly
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Abandoned
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US11/271,257
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Steven Cooper
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Mystic Tan Inc
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Mystic Tan Inc
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Publication date
Priority to US62719104P priority Critical
Priority to US62748004P priority
Application filed by Mystic Tan Inc filed Critical Mystic Tan Inc
Priority to US11/271,257 priority patent/US20060124779A1/en
Priority claimed from CA002597250A external-priority patent/CA2597250A1/en
Assigned to MYSTIC TAN, INC. reassignment MYSTIC TAN, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: COOPER, STEVEN C.
Publication of US20060124779A1 publication Critical patent/US20060124779A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23DBURNERS
    • F23D11/00Burners using a direct spraying action of liquid droplets or vaporised liquid into the combustion space
    • F23D11/32Burners using a direct spraying action of liquid droplets or vaporised liquid into the combustion space by electrostatic means
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B15/00Details of spraying plant or spraying apparatus not otherwise provided for; Accessories
    • B05B15/60Arrangements for mounting, supporting or holding spraying apparatus
    • B05B15/62Arrangements for supporting spraying apparatus, e.g. suction cups
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B15/00Details of spraying plant or spraying apparatus not otherwise provided for; Accessories
    • B05B15/60Arrangements for mounting, supporting or holding spraying apparatus
    • B05B15/65Mounting arrangements for fluid connection of the spraying apparatus or its outlets to flow conduits
    • B05B15/652Mounting arrangements for fluid connection of the spraying apparatus or its outlets to flow conduits whereby the jet can be oriented
    • B05B15/654Mounting arrangements for fluid connection of the spraying apparatus or its outlets to flow conduits whereby the jet can be oriented using universal joints
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B3/00Spraying or sprinkling apparatus with moving outlet elements or moving deflecting elements ; Spraying or sprinkling heads with rotating elements located upstream the outlet
    • B05B3/02Spraying or sprinkling apparatus with moving outlet elements or moving deflecting elements ; Spraying or sprinkling heads with rotating elements located upstream the outlet with rotating elements
    • B05B3/12Spraying or sprinkling apparatus with moving outlet elements or moving deflecting elements ; Spraying or sprinkling heads with rotating elements located upstream the outlet with rotating elements with spray booms or the like rotating around an axis by means independent of the liquid or other fluent material discharged
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B5/00Electrostatic spraying apparatus; Spraying apparatus with means for charging the spray electrically; Apparatus for spraying liquids or other fluent materials by other electric means
    • B05B5/025Discharge apparatus, e.g. electrostatic spray guns
    • B05B5/03Discharge apparatus, e.g. electrostatic spray guns characterised by the use of gas, e.g. electrostatically assisted pneumatic spraying
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B5/00Electrostatic spraying apparatus; Spraying apparatus with means for charging the spray electrically; Apparatus for spraying liquids or other fluent materials by other electric means
    • B05B5/025Discharge apparatus, e.g. electrostatic spray guns
    • B05B5/03Discharge apparatus, e.g. electrostatic spray guns characterised by the use of gas, e.g. electrostatically assisted pneumatic spraying
    • B05B5/032Discharge apparatus, e.g. electrostatic spray guns characterised by the use of gas, e.g. electrostatically assisted pneumatic spraying for spraying particulate materials
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B05SPRAYING OR ATOMISING IN GENERAL; APPLYING LIQUIDS OR OTHER FLUENT MATERIALS TO SURFACES, IN GENERAL
    • B05BSPRAYING APPARATUS; ATOMISING APPARATUS; NOZZLES
    • B05B5/00Electrostatic spraying apparatus; Spraying apparatus with means for charging the spray electrically; Apparatus for spraying liquids or other fluent materials by other electric means
    • B05B5/08Plant for applying liquids or other fluent materials to objects
    • B05B5/14Plant for applying liquids or other fluent materials to objects specially adapted for coating continuously moving elongated bodies, e.g. wires, strips, pipes

Abstract

An electrostatic spray nozzle assembly mounted to a panel made of insulating material. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly includes a nozzle cap having a nozzle outlet, and a liquid tip assembly having a liquid inlet adapted to be connected to a source of coating composition, and a liquid outlet adapted to dispense the coating composition through the nozzle outlet of the nozzle cap. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly further includes a nozzle body, a first side of the nozzle body adapted to be coupled to the nozzle cap, and a substantially electrically non-conductive panel being positioned between the nozzle body and the nozzle cap. The substantially electrically non-conductive panel is adapted to accumulate an electrostatic charge having a same polarity as that of the coating composition dispensed during a spray operation. Further deposition of spray droplets onto the panel is prevented by electrostatic repulsion forces due to the accumulation of sufficient charge onto the surface of the electrically non-conductive panel from an initial deposit of a small volume of spray.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims priority from and incorporates by reference the entire disclosure of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/627,480 filed Nov. 12, 2004 and bearing Docket No. 32272-00152USPL and U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/627,191 filed Nov. 12, 2004 and bearing Docket No. 32272-00153USPL.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Technical Field
  • This invention relates to electrostatic spraying nozzles. Specifically it relates to electrostatic spray nozzle systems utilizing induction charging or contact charging methods to apply static charge to atomized liquids operating in environments with untrained operators.
  • 2. Background
  • Electrostatic charging of spray is well known in many agricultural and industrial processes. Electrostatic spray nozzles have been successfully developed to increase the deposition efficiency of powder and liquid formulations of agricultural pesticides, paints, and other coatings. Recently electrostatic spray devices have been developed for use by the consumer for applying cosmetics and for sunless tanning. A recent publication by the University of Georgia describes a method for applying decontamination sprays to humans utilizing electrostatic spray nozzles (See, Law and Cooper, 2002 Institute of Physics Conference, Edinburgh, Scotland UK).
  • Although electrostatic spray nozzles have been used for many years in a variety of applications, they are generally used in industrial environments with operators trained in the possible hazards associated with the high voltage devices. Electrostatic nozzles have not generally been used in consumer applications where the user is untrained and is unaware of any hazard. Many electrostatic nozzles are operated at voltage levels which can cause an electrical shock hazard. The hazard can come from contact with the high voltage electrode or from wetted nozzle surfaces which create conductive pathways to the high voltage electrode. The safety hazards may be due to contact with the electrical current itself, but more likely the hazard is the reaction to the shock, which may result in bodily harm from falling or contact with an object during involuntary movement away from the source of the shock.
  • Wetted or otherwise contaminated nozzle surfaces can cause diminished spray charging due to electrical leakage currents from the electrode to ground. These electrical currents, if excessive, may reduce power supply voltage causing reduced spray charge. In induction charging types of nozzles, such as that U.S. Pat. No. 4,004,733 to Law modified with a dielectric twin-fluid tip and the invention of U.S. Pat. No. 5,765,761 to Law and Cooper, leakage currents may contact the liquid stream and cause reduced charging by decreasing the electrical field between electrode and liquid. This problem is addressed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,704,554 to Cooper and Law. In this nozzle an annular cavity surrounds the nozzle body and a cover to provide for reduced leakage currents. In addition, the liquid stream is insulated by providing a liquid tip which is an integral, non-removable part of the nozzle body.
  • These aforementioned nozzles utilize an electrode embedded between layers of insulating material along the atomization channel. This design is safe from operator shock since the embedded electrode design prevents human contact with the electrode. However, gross contamination of the surfaces of these aforementioned nozzles can cause leakage currents from the embedded electrode to elevate the voltage of the upstream-grounded liquid stream. This reduces the internal electric field which is critical for proper induction charging. U.S. Pat. No. 5,704,554 to Cooper and Law addresses solutions to internal and external electrical leakage to the liquid channel from the electrode, but does not address electrical contact from other sources such as from the high voltage connector at the rear of the nozzle. The wire connectors, once contaminated with conductive spray residues, create current pathways to the liquid connections at the rear of the nozzle. In some applications these nozzles have been mounted to panels, tubes or oscillating drums. The lack of a seal between the nozzle surface and the mounting surface causes spray residue to eventually cover both high voltage and low voltage sections of the nozzle.
  • A series of patents to Hartman, U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,003,794, 6,138,922 and 6,227,466, show a set of nozzles encased in a nonconductive tube. This device does not provide a barrier between the high voltage and low voltage sections of a nozzle system as evidenced by the design which has an electrode conductor in contact with the tube wall and penetrating through an opening in the tube. The design includes a non-insulated conductive air conduit and non-insulated conductive nozzle bodies within the tube shell that serve as conductors connected to the electrode voltage. Conductors to the electrode which extend through the tube and contact the exterior portion of the tube are covered on one face with a nozzle cap that does not provide an electrically tight sealing surface between inner and outer portions of the tube. The exposed conductors within the shell are in the vicinity of the liquid channels which are meant to be maintained at earth potential. The non-insulated high voltage air tube and nozzle bodies are likely to allow leakage currents to travel through threaded seams in the liquid channels. This effect will draw excessive electrode current, elevate the liquid electrical potential by contact and reduce charging. In addition, the non-insulated high voltage conduits may pose a significant hazard to those adjusting or maintaining the assembly while it is operating.
  • In commercial applications of the nozzle of U.S. Pat. No. 5,704,554 to Cooper and Law, where the nozzles are mounted to an oscillating drum for applications of sunless tanning liquids, the lack of a sealing surface on the nozzle eventually causes liquid to reach the inside of the drum. The presence of this conductive liquid inside the drum provides electrical leakage paths to the liquid channel of the nozzle. Electrical potentials on the liquid have been observed on commercial versions of this system to reach a level of over 80% of the induction electrode voltage. Conductive liquid tube fittings used on the rear of the nozzle accelerate this problem. Because the liquid is near the electrode potential rather than held at ground potential, the induction-charging electric field within the nozzle is greatly reduced, and spray charging is much less than necessary for electrostatic spray deposition. Once the nozzle surfaces have become contaminated they are very difficult to clean to the level necessary to prevent electrical leakage.
  • Induction charging nozzles, such as those previously mentioned, also have the inherent drawback of spray being attracted back to the nozzle itself and to surrounding mounting fixtures. The electrode is of opposite polarity to the charged spray cloud. Once the dielectric nozzle surfaces become slightly wetted or otherwise conductive, the surfaces assume the electrode polarity and attract spray from the oppositely charged spray cloud. Excessive liquid returning to the nozzle not only contaminates the nozzle surface further, it causes spray cloud discharge as the liquid pulls into a peaked shape in the direction of the spray cloud space charge field. The point on the liquid droplet peak will produce air ions that can discharge an estimated ⅓ of the spray charge.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • An embodiment of the present invention comprises of an electrostatic charging nozzle having a sealing surface suited to mounting to an insulating panel. The sealing surface is to prevent liquid leakage and to electrically separate high voltage and low voltage components. The panel is charged to the same polarity as the spray cloud to reduce the amount of spray returning to the nozzle and surrounding surfaces, and block nozzle surfaces from becoming coated with conductive residues. The nozzle body is made from a non-conductive material so that it may be safely handled while operating. In addition, the present invention has a removable liquid tip to allow service to this key component of the nozzle while it is mounted to a panel. The nozzle system may be configured as a contact charging system by connecting the liquid directly to a high voltage source. Alternatively, the system may be configured as an induction charging device by energizing a conductive portion of the annular air cap, in a manner similar to that described by U.S. Pat. No. 4,004,733 to Law.
  • A sealing surface between nozzle and panel is provided to maintain a tight barrier preventing liquid contamination and electrical flow between sides of the panel barrier. The sealing surface may be on the nozzle body. This configuration allows disassembly of the nozzle from the spraying side of the panel. Alternatively the sealing surface may be on the nozzle cap. This configuration allows disassembly of the spray nozzle from the rear of the panel.
  • In accordance with an embodiment of the present invention an electrostatic spray nozzle mounted to a panel made of insulating material. In accordance with this embodiment, high voltage nozzle components are not in contact with the panel, and grounded portions of the nozzle are separated from high voltage portions of the nozzle by the panel. A seal on the nozzle surface prevents fluid leakage and the formation of electrical leakage currents to the opposite side of the panel. The insulating surface of the panel accumulates charge of the same polarity as the spray during the spray operation. Further deposition of spray droplets onto the panel is prevented by electrostatic repulsion forces due to the accumulation of sufficient charge onto the surface of the insulating panel from an initial deposit of a small volume of spray. In accordance with an embodiment of the invention, the fluid tip is removable from either the front or the rear of the nozzle body while the nozzle remains mounted to the panel. The insulating panel further serves as a safety device by preventing ready access to high voltage components of the nozzle system.
  • An electrostatic spray nozzle assembly in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention comprises a nozzle cap having a nozzle outlet, and a liquid tip assembly having a liquid inlet adapted to be connected to a source of coating composition, and a liquid outlet adapted to dispense the coating composition through the nozzle outlet of the nozzle cap. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly further includes a nozzle body, a first side of the nozzle body adapted to be coupled to the nozzle cap, and an electrically insulating panel being positioned between the nozzle body and the nozzle cap. In accordance with an embodiment of the present invention the electrically insulating panel is adapted to accumulate an electrostatic charge having a same polarity as that of the coating composition dispensed during a spray operation.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 shows components of a panel-mounted electrostatic nozzle system according to an embodiment of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 shows the nozzle system of an embodiment of the present invention mounted to the insulating panel by attaching the non-conductive nozzle body to the panel;
  • FIG. 3 shows an embodiment of the nozzle system of the present invention mounted to the insulating panel by attaching the non-conductive nozzle cap to the panel;
  • FIG. 4 shows an embodiment of the nozzle system of the present invention with nozzles mounted to an oscillating drum;
  • FIG. 5 shows an embodiment of the nozzle system of the present invention with nozzles mounted to a dielectric panel such as may be used in a spray booth; and
  • FIG. 6 illustrates a ball and socket mounting of the nozzle system according to an embodiment of the present invention to allow angular positioning of the spray.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • Referring now to FIG. 1, components of a panel mounted electrostatic spray charging system in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention is illustrated. These components are illustrated as suited for an air atomizing induction charging system. However, it should be understood that the system could be easily configured for contact charging by applying voltage directly to the liquid rather than an induction electrode. The main components of an induction charging system as shown include a nozzle body 10, removable liquid tip 20, an electrode retaining cap 30, an electrode air cap 40 having an air cap outlet 45, a sealing surface 50 a, 50 b on the nozzle body 10 and/or the electrode retaining cap 30, and an electrically insulating panel 60. In accordance with various embodiments of the present invention, the electrically insulating panel is substantially electrically non-conductive. In accordance with various embodiments of the invention, the insulating panel may be made of a plastic material. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, the insulating panel is made of an insulating material such that electrical resistance of the insulating panel to earth ground is greater than 2 Megaohms. The nozzle body 10 is preferably made from insulating material. The nozzle body 10 itself does not contain a fluid channel but instead includes a central air channel bore so that it allows the insertion of the removable liquid tip 20 in such a way that air from an air inlet 100 is caused to flow around the removable liquid tip 20 inserted into the central air channel bore. In accordance with various embodiments, the removable liquid tip 20 is positioned into and held concentric with the central air channel bore. Preferably the central air channel bore is such that the remove liquid tip 20 may be inserted or removed from either the front or rear sides of the nozzle body 10. The air inlet 100 is adapted to receive a supply of air or other gas from a source. In various embodiments, the removable liquid tip 20 includes at least one air channel cut 25 (see FIGS. 2 and 3) along a length of the removable liquid tip 20 for allowing air to flow around a liquid outlet of the removable liquid tip 20.
  • The insulating panel 60 is further provided with a plurality of mounting holes 65. In one embodiment of the present invention, the nozzle body 10 is fixedly mounted to the insulating panel 60 using mounting hardware that is coupled to the nozzle body 10 and passes through the mounting holes 65. In still another embodiment, the retaining cap 30 is mounted to the insulating panel 60 using mounting hardware that is coupled to the retaining cap 30 and passes through the mounting holes 65. In accordance with an embodiment of the invention, the mounting hardware can include bolts, screws, rods, attachment clips, etc. In still other embodiments of the invention, the nozzle body 10 and/or the retaining cap 30 can be affixed to the insulating panel 60 using an adhesive. The insulating panel 60 further includes a void 75 for allowing a portion of the nozzle body 10 to be mounted therethrough. In some embodiments of the present invention, a portion of the retaining cap 30 in contact with the insulating panel 60 is of a diameter such that the mounting holes 65 are covered by the retaining cap 30 to inhibit charge leakage through the mounting holes 65.
  • Still referring to FIG. 1, the electrostatic spray charging system further includes a liquid inlet 70 adapted to be connected to a source of spray liquid and supply the spray liquid to the removable liquid tip 20. The electrostatic spray charging system still further includes an electrode wire 80 adapted to supply an electrostatic charge to the induction electrode air cap 40. The electrode retaining cap 30 is provided with an spray outlet 90 allowing for a spray of electrostatically charged liquid to be sprayed from the spray nozzle assembly.
  • At the beginning of a spraying operation, deposition of a small amount of spray on the surface of the insulating panel 60 causes the insulating panel 60 to be charged by accumulation to the same polarity as the spray cloud. As a result, during the remaining portion of the spraying operation the spray cloud is repelled from the insulating panel 60, resulting in a reduction in the amount of spray returning to the spray nozzle and surrounding surfaces, as well as blocking nozzle surfaces from becoming coated with conductive residues.
  • The sealing surface 50 a and/or the sealing surface 50 b functions to prevent, or at least to inhibit, current flow between the electrode air cap 40 of the electrostatic spray nozzle assembly and a pathway to an electrical potential difference, such as a ground. The sealing surface 50 a and/or the sealing surface 50 b serves to prevent or inhibit the formation of charge leakage paths, the presence of which will inhibit optimal charging of the spray by the electrode air cap 40. The prevention or inhibition of current flow between the electrode air cap 40 and components of the electrostatic spray nozzle assembly that are positioned on the opposite side of the insulating panel 60 from the electrode air cap 40 provided by sealing surface 50 a and/or sealing surface 50 b also serves to isolate a person that may come in contact with these components from electrical shock. In various embodiments of the present invention, the spray is charged to a negative charge potential with respect to ground, whereas in other embodiments the spray may be charged to a positive charge value with respect to ground.
  • Referring now to FIG. 2, a side view of an embodiment of the present invention in which a mounting of the nozzle by attaching the nozzle body 10 to the insulating panel 60 is illustrated. In this embodiment, a sealing surface 50 a is located between the nozzle body 10 and the insulating panel 60, and may be fixedly mounted to the insulating panel 60. An example situation in which it may be desirable to implement the embodiment of FIG. 2 is in situations where it is desired to service the nozzle components from the spray outlet side of the insulating panel 60. In this case, removal of the nozzle cap 30 allows access to the removable electrode air cap 40 and the removable liquid tip 20. In this embodiment it is preferable that the sealing surface 50 a be a flat surface of the nozzle body 10 that contacts the insulating panel 60.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a mounting of the nozzle assembly in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention in which the nozzle cap 30 is attached to the insulating panel 60. This mounting configuration is useful when it is desired to have the serviceable components accessible from the rear of the insulating panel 60. One instance in which this may be desirable may be for use in a spray booth where a service door is provided on the rear of the spray booth. Another instance in which rear access is desirable is in a multiple-nozzle spray panel in which adjacent nozzles are continuously operating while an individual nozzle is serviced or its components are replaced or repaired. In the mounting scenario of FIG. 3 it is desirable that the sealing surface 50 b is on a flat area of the fixed nozzle cap 30 that contacts the insulating panel 60.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates an embodiment of the present invention in which a nozzle assembly is mounted on an oscillating spray nozzle drum 110. The nozzle drum 110 is mounted on a pivot axis 120 which allows the nozzle drum to oscillate during a spraying operation, which allows the nozzle drum 110 to be pivoted to create a sweeping spray effect. In accordance with the embodiment of the invention of FIG. 4, the outer surfaces of the nozzle drum 110 are constructed of electrically insulating material through which are mounted one or more nozzle assemblies each comprised of a nozzle cap 30 (or electrode retaining cap), an electrode air cap 40, a removable liquid tip 20, and a nozzle body 10. An example application of the embodiment of FIG. 4 is for use in spray booths that provide for the application of sunless tanning media onto humans. In an embodiment of the present invention, a sealing surface 50 a may be provided between the nozzle body 10 and the mounting surface of the nozzle drum 110 and/or a sealing surface 50 b may be provided between the nozzle cap 30 and the mounting surface of the nozzle drum 110. In still another embodiment, the nozzle system can be mounted either with the nozzle cap 30 or the nozzle body 10 providing the sealing surface.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates a multiple nozzle spray panel in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention such as may be used in a spray booth. The spray system of FIG. 5 includes one or more nozzle assemblies each comprised of a nozzle cap 30, an electrode air cap 40, and a nozzle body 10, mounted to through the surface of an insulating plastic panel 130. A sealing surface may further be provided between the nozzle body 10 and the plastic panel 130 and/or between the nozzle cap 30 and the plastic panel 130. In still other embodiment of the present invention, the nozzle system can be mounted by the nozzle cap 30 or the nozzle body 10 depending on which side of the plastic panel 130 it is desired to have service access.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates a nozzle assembly mounted within a socket in an insulating (or non-conductive) panel. As illustrated in FIG. 2, the nozzle assembly includes a nozzle cap 140 and a sealing surface 160 mounted on a first side of an insulating panel 60, and a nozzle body 170 mounted on a second side of the insulating panel 60. The nozzle cap 140 includes a jet outlet 150 which allows a spray of spray liquid to exit the nozzle assembly during a spraying operation.
  • The sealing surface 160 functions to prevent, or at least to inhibit, current flow between an electrode (not shown) of nozzle assembly and a pathway to an electrical potential difference, such as a ground. The sealing surface 160 serves to prevent or inhibit the formation of charge leakage paths, the presence of which will inhibit optimal charging of the spray by the electrode. The prevention or inhibition of current flow between the electrode and components of the electrostatic spray nozzle assembly that are positioned on the opposite side of the insulating panel 60 from the electrode provided by sealing surface 160 also serves to isolate a person that may come in contact with these components from electrical shock. In various embodiments of the present invention, the spray is charged to a negative charge potential with respect to ground, whereas in other embodiments the spray may be charged to a positive charge value with respect to ground.
  • This mounting arrangement allows the nozzle to pivot against the sealing surface 160 of the spherically-shaped nozzle to allow adjustment of the direction angle of the spray jet such that the nozzle can be set at a particular orientation. Position A of FIG. 6 illustrates the nozzle assembly in which the jet outlet 150 has been rotated in an up position. Position B of FIG. 6 illustrates the nozzle assembly in which the jet outlet 150 has been rotated in a midway position. Position C of FIG. 6 illustrates the nozzle assembly in which the jet outlet 150 has been rotated in a down position. In various embodiments of the invention, the nozzle is pivotally mounted such that the side to side orientation of the nozzle can be changed. Although the embodiment of FIG. 6 illustrates a nozzle body pivotally mounted within a socket of an insulating panel, it should be understood that other methods of pivotally mounting the nozzle body can be used such as using a pivot pin.
  • Although various embodiments of the nozzle assemblies of the present invention have been illustrated as being mounted to a flat insulating panel, it should be understood that other panel shapes can be used. For example, the nozzle assemblies of the present invention may be mounted within a curved insulating panel or a faceted insulation panel.
  • Although the various embodiments of the present invention have been described for use in the application of tanning solutions to a human subject, it should be understood that the present invention can also be applied to other cosmetic spray applications, as well as for the application of medicinal and decontaminant sprays, for example, antibiotics, antitoxins, disinfectants, sanitizers, etc. Further, although a preferred embodiment of the method and apparatus of the present invention has been illustrated in the accompanying Drawings and described in the foregoing Detailed Description, it is understood that the invention is not limited to the embodiment disclosed, but is capable of numerous rearrangements, modifications, and substitutions without departing from the spirit of the invention as set forth and defined by the claims.

Claims (44)

1. An electrostatic spray nozzle assembly comprising:
a nozzle cap having a nozzle outlet;
an electrode;
a liquid tip assembly having a liquid inlet adapted to be connected to a source of coating composition, and a liquid outlet adapted to dispense the coating composition through the nozzle outlet of the nozzle cap;
a nozzle body, a first side of the nozzle body adapted to be coupled to the nozzle cap;
an electrically insulating panel being positioned between the nozzle body and the nozzle cap; and
at least one sealing surface to inhibit current flow between the electrode of the electrostatic spray nozzle assembly and a pathway to a potential difference.
2. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the electrically insulating panel comprises a substantially electrically non-conductive panel.
3. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the electrically insulating panel is adapted to accumulate an electrostatic charge having a same polarity as that of the coating composition dispensed during a spray operation.
4. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the spray nozzle further comprises:
an air cap having an air cap outlet, the air cap being positioned between the nozzle cap and the first side of the nozzle body.
5. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 4, wherein the air cap comprises an electrode adapted to induce a charge to the coating composition.
6. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 4, wherein the air cap is adapted to be removable from the spray nozzle assembly.
7. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the liquid tip assembly is adapted to be removable from the spray nozzle assembly.
8. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the liquid tip assembly is adapted to be positioned into and held concentric with a central air channel bore of the nozzle body.
9. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the liquid tip assembly further includes at least one air channel cut along a length of the liquid tip assembly, the at least one air channel cut adapted to allow air to flow around the liquid outlet.
10. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 9, wherein the nozzle body includes an air inlet being adapted to provide the air to the at least one air channel.
11. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the at least one sealing surface is positioned between the nozzle body and the electrically insulating panel.
12. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the at least one sealing surface is fixedly mounted to the insulating panel and is adapted to provide a liquid seal between the nozzle body and the electrically insulating panel.
13. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 11, wherein the at least one sealing surface is adapted to provide electrical isolation between the nozzle body and the electrically insulating panel.
14. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the at least one sealing surface is positioned between the nozzle cap and the electrically insulating panel.
15. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 14, wherein the at least one sealing surface is adapted to provide a liquid seal between the nozzle cap and the electrically insulating panel.
16. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 14, wherein the at least one sealing surface is adapted to provide electrical isolation between the nozzle cap and the electrically insulating panel.
17. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the electrically insulating panel comprises a nozzle mounting surface of a nozzle drum.
18. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 17, wherein the nozzle drum is adapted for oscillatory movement about a pivot axis.
19. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 17, wherein the nozzle drum is formed of an electrically insulating material.
20. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the nozzle body is pivotally mounted within a socket of the electrically insulating panel.
21. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the nozzle body is formed of a substantially electrically non-conductive material.
22. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 1, wherein the electrically insulating panel includes a void adapted to allow a portion of the nozzle body to be mounted therethrough.
23. The electrostatic spray nozzle of claim 1, wherein the electrically insulating panel is adapted for fixed attachment to the nozzle body.
24. The electrostatic spray nozzle of claim 1, wherein the electrically insulating panel is adapted for fixed attachment to the nozzle cap.
25. The electrostatic spray nozzle of claim 1, wherein the electrically insulating panel is adapted for mounting the nozzle body at a particular orientation.
26. The electrostatic spray nozzle of claim 1, wherein the potential difference comprises a ground.
27. An electrostatic spray nozzle assembly comprising:
a nozzle cap having a nozzle outlet;
an electrode;
a liquid tip assembly having a liquid inlet adapted to be connected to a source of coating composition, and a liquid outlet adapted to dispense the coating composition through the nozzle outlet of the nozzle cap;
a nozzle body, a first side of the nozzle body adapted to be coupled to the nozzle cap;
an electrically insulating panel positioned between the nozzle body and the nozzle cap, the nozzle body being pivotally mounted to the electrically insulating panel; and
at least one sealing surface to inhibit current flow between the electrode of the electrostatic spray nozzle assembly and a pathway to a potential difference.
28. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 27, wherein the electrically insulating panel comprises a substantially electrically non-conductive panel.
29. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 27, wherein the electrically insulating panel is adapted to accumulate an electrostatic charge having a same polarity as that of the coating composition dispensed during a spray operation.
30. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 27, wherein the spray nozzle further comprises:
an air cap having an air cap outlet, the air cap being positioned between the nozzle cap and the first side of the nozzle body.
31. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 30, wherein the air cap comprises an electrode adapted to induce a charge to the coating composition.
32. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 30, wherein the air cap is adapted to be removable from the spray nozzle assembly.
33. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 27, wherein the liquid tip assembly is adapted to be removable from the spray nozzle assembly.
34. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 27, wherein the liquid tip assembly is adapted to be positioned into and held concentric with a central air channel bore of the nozzle body.
35. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 27, wherein the at least one sealing surface is positioned between the nozzle body and the electrically insulating panel.
36. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 27, wherein the at least one sealing surface is fixedly mounted to the insulating panel and is adapted to provide a liquid seal between the nozzle body and the electrically insulating panel.
37. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 27, wherein the at least one sealing surface is adapted to provide electrical isolation between the nozzle body and the electrically insulating panel.
38. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 27, wherein the at least one sealing surface is positioned between the nozzle cap and the electrically insulating panel.
39. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 27, wherein the at least one sealing surface is adapted to provide a liquid seal between the nozzle cap and the electrically insulating panel.
40. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 27, wherein the at least one sealing surface is adapted to provide electrical isolation between the nozzle cap and the electrically insulating panel.
41. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 27, wherein the nozzle body is pivotally mounted within a socket of the electrically insulating panel.
42. The electrostatic spray nozzle assembly of claim 27, wherein the nozzle body is formed of a substantially electrically non-conductive material.
43. The electrostatic spray nozzle of claim 27, wherein the electrically insulating panel is adapted for mounting the nozzle body at a particular orientation.
44. The electrostatic spray nozzle of claim 27, wherein the potential difference comprises a ground.
US11/271,257 2004-11-12 2005-11-10 Panel-mounted electrostatic spray nozzle system Abandoned US20060124779A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US62719104P true 2004-11-12 2004-11-12
US62748004P true 2004-11-12 2004-11-12
US11/271,257 US20060124779A1 (en) 2004-11-12 2005-11-10 Panel-mounted electrostatic spray nozzle system

Applications Claiming Priority (8)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/271,257 US20060124779A1 (en) 2004-11-12 2005-11-10 Panel-mounted electrostatic spray nozzle system
CA002597250A CA2597250A1 (en) 2004-11-12 2005-11-12 Electrostatic spray nozzle system
PCT/US2005/040956 WO2006053229A2 (en) 2004-11-12 2005-11-12 Electrostatic spray nozzle system
EP05823418A EP1817112B1 (en) 2004-11-12 2005-11-12 Electrostatic spray nozzle system
AU2005304395A AU2005304395B2 (en) 2004-11-12 2005-11-12 Electrostatic spray nozzle system
AT05823418T AT476257T (en) 2004-11-12 2005-11-12 Electrostatic sprayer system
DE602005022755T DE602005022755D1 (en) 2004-11-12 2005-11-12 Electrostatic sprayer system
HK08101663.6A HK1107956A1 (en) 2004-11-12 2008-02-15 Electrostatic spray nozzle system

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US20060124779A1 true US20060124779A1 (en) 2006-06-15

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US11/271,257 Abandoned US20060124779A1 (en) 2004-11-12 2005-11-10 Panel-mounted electrostatic spray nozzle system

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US20100291847A1 (en) * 2006-01-05 2010-11-18 Mt Industries Inc. Automatic body spray system excess liquid removal
EP2438992A1 (en) * 2010-10-07 2012-04-11 Alamos Vasquez, Adolfo System for the application of liquid products in agriculture
JP2015157260A (en) * 2014-02-25 2015-09-03 アネスト岩田株式会社 Tip end cover and electrostatic painting device equipped with the same

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Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050279865A1 (en) * 2004-06-18 2005-12-22 Innovative Developments, Llc Fluid spraying system
US20100122745A1 (en) * 2004-06-18 2010-05-20 Mt Industries, Inc. Container for system for spray coating human subject
US20100129557A1 (en) * 2004-06-18 2010-05-27 Mt Industries, Inc. Spray coating at least one portion of a subject
US8920391B2 (en) 2004-06-18 2014-12-30 Sunless, Inc. Container for system for spray coating human subject
US20100291847A1 (en) * 2006-01-05 2010-11-18 Mt Industries Inc. Automatic body spray system excess liquid removal
US8545461B2 (en) 2006-01-05 2013-10-01 Sunless, Inc. Automatic body spray system excess liquid removal
EP2438992A1 (en) * 2010-10-07 2012-04-11 Alamos Vasquez, Adolfo System for the application of liquid products in agriculture
US20120085843A1 (en) * 2010-10-07 2012-04-12 Adolfo Alamos Vasquez System to Apply Mainly Phytosanitary Products that use the Principle of Electrostatic Attraction
US9265242B2 (en) * 2010-10-07 2016-02-23 Adolfo Alamos Vasquez System to apply mainly phytosanitary products that use the principle of electrostatic attraction
JP2015157260A (en) * 2014-02-25 2015-09-03 アネスト岩田株式会社 Tip end cover and electrostatic painting device equipped with the same

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Owner name: MYSTIC TAN, INC., TEXAS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:COOPER, STEVEN C.;REEL/FRAME:017591/0322

Effective date: 20060202

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION