US20060124712A1 - Shipping and display tray - Google Patents

Shipping and display tray Download PDF

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Publication number
US20060124712A1
US20060124712A1 US11/301,475 US30147505A US2006124712A1 US 20060124712 A1 US20060124712 A1 US 20060124712A1 US 30147505 A US30147505 A US 30147505A US 2006124712 A1 US2006124712 A1 US 2006124712A1
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Prior art keywords
tray
end
end wall
opposite
product
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US11/301,475
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Charles Weimer
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International Paper Co
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International Paper Co
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Priority to US63608604P priority Critical
Application filed by International Paper Co filed Critical International Paper Co
Priority to US11/301,475 priority patent/US20060124712A1/en
Assigned to INTERNATIONAL PAPER COMPANY reassignment INTERNATIONAL PAPER COMPANY ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: WEIMER, JR., CHARLES P.
Publication of US20060124712A1 publication Critical patent/US20060124712A1/en
Abandoned legal-status Critical Current

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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D5/00Rigid or semi-rigid containers of polygonal cross-section, e.g. boxes, cartons or trays, formed by folding or erecting one or more blanks made of paper
    • B65D5/42Details of containers or of foldable or erectable container blanks
    • B65D5/44Integral, inserted or attached portions forming internal or external fittings
    • B65D5/441Reinforcements
    • B65D5/445Reinforcements formed separately from the container

Abstract

A tray (10, 40, or 50) for shipping, displaying and vending containers of product has side walls (12, 13 or 12′, 13′), end walls (16, 17 or 16′, 17′), an open top, and a bottom wall (11). The sidewalls have an open center portion (15) through which product (P) held in the tray is easily visible and accessible for removal from the tray. The end walls have first and second laminated end wall panels (21 and 22, 23, or 57, 58 and 70, 71), and in one embodiment the sidewalls have laminated sidewall flaps (59, 60 and 62, 63), forming double-wall constructions. A full-height reinforcing divider (18, 19 or 18″, 19″) extends vertically along an inner surface of each end wall substantially midway of the width thereof to reinforce the tray and prevent it from telescoping into another tray when they are stacked. The dividers at opposite ends of the tray are spaced from one another, defining a large opening between them through which product may be removed through the front from the back of the tray without having to lift the product, whereby product can be removed from the back of the tray through the front when multiple trays are stacked on top of one another.

Description

  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. provisional patent application Ser. No. 60/636,086, filed Dec. 14, 2004.
  • TECHNICAL FIELD
  • This invention relates to containers, and more particularly to a tray for shipping and displaying consumer products.
  • BACKGROUND ART
  • Many consumer products are shipped from a manufacturer or distributor to a point of sale in containers that permit the product to be left in the container and displayed at the point of sale. This is especially true of products displayed and sold in large warehouse or club-type stores, wherein the product is commonly left in the shipping container. These containers must have sufficient strength to stack them on top of one another and to withstand handling, and they also desirably are constructed so that the product can be easily seen while it remains in the container. Easy access to and removal of the product from the container by a consumer is also a desirable feature.
  • Some prior art containers meet these needs by providing a container tray having cut-down sidewalls through which the product is visible and accessible. Stacking strength is commonly provided to these containers by a separate, removable, reinforcing divider panel inserted into the container. These divider panels typically extend the full height of the container and extend throughout its length. In order to provide the desired visibility of and access to the product, these dividers usually are removed from the container tray at the point of sale. This necessitates additional handling and disposal. Moreover, the divider panels prevent the containers from telescoping or nesting into one another when they are stacked, especially when some or all of the product has been removed from the container. Thus, the reinforcing divider panels should not be removed from a container tray until that container is at the top of a stack. The consumer is then frequently left with the task of removing the divider panels, and/or sale of the product may be discouraged if the divider panel is left in place and the product is not readily visible and accessible.
  • Other prior art shipping and display containers have divider panels that are fixed in the tray, i.e., are not removable during use, and in some of these the center portion of the divider between the opposite ends of the container does not extend the full height of the container, whereby it would provide visibility to product in the back of the container tray. However, in these prior art containers the divider panel projects upwardly from the bottom of the tray completely along its length, thus requiring that the product be lifted in order to remove it from the back of the container. This, obviously, is not possible or practical when containers are stacked on top of one another. In other containers of this type, the divider is omitted in the center portion of the tray, whereby product does not have to be lifted in order to remove it from the container, but the end walls of the tray do not extend the full height of the container, thus reducing the strength of the container.
  • Accordingly, there is need for a shipping and display container that has the necessary strength and stacking capability without nesting, that provides good visibility of and access to the product, and that does not require removal of a separate divider panel in order to gain access to the product. It would be especially advantageous to have a shipping and display container that has good stacking strength and does not telescope into a subjacent container when stacked, and wherein product is visible and easily accessible from the front of the container even when the product is located at the back of a container having another container stacked on top of it, and wherein product can be removed from the back of the container through the front without having to lift the product. A further advantage would be such a container that is economical and easy to construct.
  • DISCLOSURE OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention is a container or tray for shipping and displaying product at a point of sale, wherein the tray has good stacking strength, can be stacked without nesting or telescoping into one another, provides good visibility of and access to the product, does not require the removal of a separate reinforcing divider panel in order to access the product, and wherein the product can be removed from the back of the tray through the front without having to lift the product.
  • To accomplish the foregoing, the shipping and display tray of the invention comprises a bottom wall, opposite sidewalls that are cut down to provide visibility of and access to the product, opposite end walls, an open top, and reinforcing panels that are left in place during use of the tray and that provide visibility of and easy access to all the product from either side of the tray. The reinforcing panels extend the full height of the tray at its ends to prevent nesting of the trays when they are stacked, but extend inwardly from the middle of the opposite end walls only a relatively short distance, leaving a space or opening between the reinforcing panels through which product may be withdrawn from the back of the tray and through the front without having to lift the product. The end walls of the tray extend the full height of the tray and are of double thickness, and the reinforcing panels define two additional corners in each end of the tray, significantly increasing the strength of the tray. A tray in accordance with the invention can provide a top to bottom compression strength of 2,000 pounds.
  • In one form of the invention, the tray is constructed from a single unitary blank of corrugated paperboard, and is designed so that it can be produced on high-speed machinery. The blank includes a bottom-forming panel, opposite end wall panels, opposite sidewall panels, and extensions on opposite ends of the sidewall panels that form end wall flaps and reinforcing divider panels. In a tray erected from the blank, the end wall flaps each extend the full height of the tray and half way across its width and are glued to the inside of the end wall panels. The reinforcing divider panels also extend the full height of the tray, and extend inwardly a short distance from each end wall along the longitudinal centerline of the tray and are glued together. Both sidewalls are cut down or recessed over most of their height and length, providing large openings in the sides of the tray through which the product is visible and accessible. The narrow reinforcing divider panels provide a large opening between them through which product is visible and easily accessible from either side of the tray.
  • In another form of the invention the tray comprises a bottom portion made from one blank and reinforcing divider panels made from separate blanks. The blanks are folded and glued together to form a shipping and display tray having double thickness end walls and double thickness sidewall end portions, each extending the full height of the tray. The reinforcing divider panels at opposite ends of the tray also are of double thickness and extend the full height of the tray. The tray has height, width and length dimensions, and comprises opposite upstanding side walls, opposite upstanding end walls, an open top, and a bottom wall having opposite side edges and opposite end edges. Each side wall comprises an upstanding sidewall flange on opposite side edges of the bottom wall, and first in-turned sidewall flaps on opposite side edges of each end wall. The respective sidewall flanges and sidewall flaps defining a large opening through each sidewall, through which product held in the tray is easily visible and accessible for removal from the tray. Each end wall includes a first end wall panel connected to a respective end edge of the bottom wall and extending over the full height and width of the tray end wall, and a second end wall panel secured against an inner surface of each said first end wall panel and coterminous in width and height therewith, forming a double-wall laminated end wall construction. A divider extends vertically along an inner surface of each second end wall panel substantially midway of the width thereof and extending the full height of the end wall, said dividers reinforcing the tray and preventing telescoping of trays into one another when they are stacked, and said dividers at opposite ends of the tray being spaced from one another and defining a large opening between them through which product may be removed through the front from the back of the tray without having to lift the product, whereby product can be removed from the back of the tray through the front when multiple trays are stacked on top of one another.
  • In both forms the end walls extend the full height of the tray, and an opening or space is left between the divider panels extending in from opposite ends of the tray.
  • Moreover, the divider panels can extend into the tray a relatively short distance, e.g., about two inches, providing clearance for machinery to apply plastic handles to pairs of the product containers held in the tray. The embodiment shown in FIGS. 9-13 has these relatively narrow divider panels.
  • While the preferred embodiments are made of corrugated paperboard material, the tray could be made of other materials such as plastic, fiberboard, wood, and the like.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The foregoing, as well as other objects and advantages of the invention, will become apparent from the following detailed description when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference characters designate like parts throughout the several views, and wherein:
  • FIG. 1 is a top perspective view of a first embodiment of the shipping and display tray of the invention, showing a typical product container in the tray, and wherein the tray is of one-piece design.
  • FIG. 2 is a top perspective view of the tray of FIG. 1 with the product removed.
  • FIG. 3 is a top perspective view of the tray of FIG. 1, with some of the product removed.
  • FIG. 4 is a top view of the tray and product of FIG. 1.
  • FIG. 5 is a plan view of a blank for making the tray of FIGS. 1-4.
  • FIG. 6 is a plan view of a blank for making a second embodiment of one-piece tray according to the invention, with the dot-and-dash lines representing an alternate construction.
  • FIG. 7 is a top perspective view of a tray made from the blank of FIG. 6.
  • FIG. 8 is a top perspective view of the tray of FIG. 7, with some product therein.
  • FIG. 9 is a top perspective view of a second embodiment of tray according to the invention, with typical product containers shown therein, wherein the tray is made from three pieces. A plastic carrying handle is shown applied to two of the product containers, forming a two-pack.
  • FIG. 10 is a top perspective view of the tray of FIG. 9, with product removed.
  • FIG. 11 is an exploded top perspective view of the bottom portion of the tray and one divider panel insert for making a tray such as that shown in FIG. 10. The tray in this figure is shown narrower and taller than the tray of FIGS. 9 and 10 to depict one of many alternate dimensional relationships the tray can have to accommodate different product.
  • FIG. 12 is a top plan view of the blank for making the bottom portion of the tray shown in FIGS. 9-11.
  • FIG. 13 is a top plan view of the blanks for making the divider insert panels used in the tray of FIGS. 9-11.
  • FIG. 14 is an exploded top perspective view of the bottom portion of the tray and the divider panel inserts being folded and assembled to form the tray of FIGS. 9-11.
  • BEST MODES FOR CARRYING OUT THE INVENTION
  • A first embodiment of the tray according to the invention is represented generally at 10 in FIGS. 1-4. The tray comprises a tray bottom portion having a bottom wall 11, opposite side walls 12 and 13 with large cut-out areas 15, and opposite end walls 16 and 17, and reinforcing divider panels 18 and 19 extending a short distance inwardly of the tray toward one another from the middle of the end walls. In this embodiment, each divider panel extends over approximately one-third the length of the tray, and has a sloping inner edge 20 so that the panels are narrower at their top than at their bottom.
  • The end walls each comprise an outer end wall panel 21 folded upwardly from opposite end edges of the tray bottom wall, and end wall flaps 22 and 23 extending inwardly from opposite ends of the respective side walls. The end wall flaps each extend approximately one half the width of the respective end wall, and lie inside the end wall panels and are glued thereto. The end wall panels and end wall flaps are coterminous in height and extend the full height of the tray.
  • The reinforcing divider panels 18 and 19 each comprise a pair of glued-together divider panel flaps 24 and 25 integral with an inner edge of the respective end wall flaps, and turned inwardly therefrom so that they extend perpendicular to the end walls and lie along a longitudinal centerline of the tray. The reinforcing divider panels are coextensive in height with the end walls, and serve to reinforce the tray and prevent nesting of the trays when they are stacked on top of one another. However, the divider panels at opposite ends of the tray are spaced from one another, leaving a large opening or space between them.
  • In the particular example shown, the product P comprises six one-gallon containers arranged three to a side. As can be clearly seen in the figures, the containers are clearly visible through the recessed side walls and through the large space left between the reinforcing divider panels, and are easily accessible so that they can be removed from either side of the tray without having to lift the containers or remove a divider.
  • A blank B for making the tray of FIGS. 1-4 is indicated generally at 30 in FIG. 5. A suitable placement of adhesive is indicated at 33 applied to one of the end panel flaps 22 and associated reinforcing divider panel flaps 24. Although not illustrated, a similar application of adhesive would be made at the opposite end of the blank. The blank comprises a central tray-bottom-forming panel 11, opposite end wall panels 21 foldably joined to opposite ends of the bottom panel, opposite sidewall panels 12 and 13 foldably joined to opposite side edges of the bottom panel, opposite end wall flaps 22 foldably joined to opposite ends of sidewall panel 12, opposite end wall flaps 23 foldably joined to opposite ends of sidewall panel 13, divider panel flaps 24 foldably joined to respective end wall flaps 22, and divider panel flaps 25 foldably joined to respective end wall flaps 23. Cut-out areas 15 are formed in the sidewall panels 12 and 13.
  • A second embodiment of tray according to the invention is indicated generally at 40 in FIGS. 6-8. This form of the invention is substantially identical to the form shown in FIGS. 1-5, with like reference characters designating like parts. This form differs from the previous form in that the reinforcing divider panels 18′ and 19′ are of substantially less width, each extending over only about 1/10 the length of the tray. In this regard, the divider panels preferably extend inwardly from about two to about six inches. Further, as indicated in full lines, the inner edges 41 of the panels 18′ and 19′ are vertical or straight, rather than sloping as in the previous embodiment. The narrower divider panels provide clearance for machinery (not shown) to apply carrying handles H (see FIG. 9) to form two-packs of the product containers.
  • A blank B for making the FIG. 7 embodiment is shown in FIG. 6. Like reference characters designate like parts to those shown in the FIGS. 1 and 5 embodiment. The essential difference between the blank shown in FIG. 6 from the blank shown in FIG. 5 is in the width and shape of the divider panel flaps 24′ and 25′, which are narrower and have a straight or vertical inner edge 41 instead of the sloping edge 20 of the divider panel flaps 24 and 25 in FIG. 5.
  • A third embodiment is also represented in FIGS. 6 and 8, and this embodiment differs from the second embodiment in that the inner edges 42 of the divider panels are sloping, as indicated by dot-and-dash lines in FIGS. 6 and 8. The blank for making this form of the invention is also shown in FIG. 6, wherein the broken lines indicate the alternate sloping edge 42 that may be employed.
  • A fourth embodiment is shown at 50 in FIGS. 9-14. In this embodiment the tray is made from three separate pieces of material that are folded and glued together to form the tray. When fully assembled (see FIGS. 9 and 10), this form of the invention is very similar to the form shown in FIG. 7 and comprises a bottom wall 11, opposite end walls 16′ and 17′, opposite sidewalls 12′ and 13′, and relatively narrow dividers 18″ and 19″ projecting inwardly along the centerline of the tray and extending vertically the full height of the end walls.
  • As seen best in FIGS. 11-14, the three-piece tray 50 comprises a bottom portion 52 formed from one blank B1, and a pair of substantially identical mirror image inserts 53 and 54 formed, respectively, from two additional blanks B2. The blanks B2 are identically constructed and only one will be described in detail hereinafter.
  • The bottom portion 52 of the tray includes the bottom wall 11, upstanding sidewall flanges 55 and 56 foldably joined to opposite side edges of the bottom wall, and upstanding end wall panels 57 and 58 foldably joined to opposite ends of the bottom wall, with in-turned sidewall flaps 59 and 60 foldably joined to outer edges of the end wall panels and adhesively secured inside the sidewall flanges.
  • Each insert 53, 54 comprises an end wall 61 with in-turned sidewall flaps 62 and 63 foldably joined to opposite side edges thereof, and the dividers 18″, 19″ extending vertically the full height of the respective insert along its centerline and projecting parallel to and in the same direction as the sidewall flaps. The width and height dimensions of the end wall 61 and sidewall flaps 62 and 63 are such that they are, respectively, coterminous with the width and height of the corresponding end wall panels 57, 58 and sidewall flanges 55, 56 on the bottom portion 52 when the inserts are positioned in the bottom portion. The sidewall flanges 55, 56 on the bottom portion 52, and the in-turned sidewall flaps 59, 60 on the end wall panels 57, 58, together with the in-turned flaps 62, 63 on the inserts 53, 54, form the sidewalls 12′, 13′ of the tray. Accordingly, the end walls and sidewalls of the tray comprise a double thickness laminated structure, except for the section of the sidewall flanges extending between the confronting edges of the sidewall flaps, and the area where the sidewall flaps on the insert overlap with the sidewall flaps and flanges on the bottom portion. In the latter area the structure is triple wall laminated.
  • Further, the dividers 18″, 19″ are of double wall laminated construction, and the inner upper corner may be cut away as at 65 to provide extra clearance for machinery used to apply the handles H to the endmost pair of product containers.
  • The blank B1 for making the bottom portion 52 of the tray is shown in FIG. 12, and comprises a central bottom panel 11, sidewall flanges 55 and 56 foldably joined to opposite side edges of the bottom wall, end wall panels 57 and 58 foldably joined to opposite ends of the bottom wall, and sidewall flaps 59 and 60 foldably joined to outer side edges of the end wall panels. The end edges of the sidewall flanges and the bottom edges of the sidewall flaps can be angled slightly so that the side and end walls have a slight inward taper, if desired.
  • The blanks B2 for making the reinforcing inserts 53 and 54 are shown in FIG. 13. The blanks are identical and the description of one will suffice for both. Each blank is substantially rectangular, with first fold lines 66 and 67 adjacent outer end edges of the blank, defining the sidewall flaps 62 and 63. Second fold lines 68 and 69, parallel to the first fold lines, are spaced from the first fold lines and closer to the center of the blank, and with the first fold lines delineate end wall panels 70, 71, each extending over approximately one-half the width of the insert and together forming the insert end wall 61. A third fold line 72 at the center of the blank cooperates with the second fold lines to define a pair of divider panels 73 and 74 that are folded and glued together to form the respective dividers 18″, 19″ in a completed tray. As seen in this figure, a V-shaped notch 75 may be made in one edge of the blank at the center fold line. This notch results in the tapered corner 65 on the divider, visible in FIGS. 9-11.
  • In a tray erected from the blanks B1 and B2, the divider panels 73 and 74 are glued together, the end wall panels 70 and 71 are glued to the inside of the respective end wall panels 57, 58, the sidewall flaps 62 and 63 on the inserts are glued to the inside of the respective sidewall flaps 59, 60 on the end wall panels, and the sidewall flanges 55, 56 on the tray bottom portion are glued to the outside of the sidewall flaps 59, 60 on the end wall panels 57, 58.
  • It should be noted that the specific width of the divider panels is not critical, and the width can be varied as desired, so long as the function of the panels in reinforcing the tray, preventing nesting, and affording visibility and accessibility to the product are maintained. The trays of the invention are designed for high-speed automated machine set-up.
  • Although particular embodiments of the invention are illustrated and described in detail herein, it is to be understood that various changes and modifications may be made to the invention without departing from the spirit and intent of the invention as defined by the scope of the appended claims.

Claims (20)

1. A tray for shipping, displaying and vending containers of product, said tray having height, width and length dimensions, and comprising opposite upstanding side walls, opposite upstanding end walls, an open top, and a bottom wall having opposite side edges and opposite end edges, wherein:
each said side wall has relatively narrow end portions adjacent each end wall, and an open center portion extending over most of the length of the side wall, through which product held in the tray is easily visible and accessible for removal from the tray;
each said end wall includes a first end wall panel connected to a respective end edge of the bottom wall and extending over the full height and width of the tray end wall, and a second end wall panel is secured against an inner surface of each said first end wall panel and coterminous therewith, forming a double-wall laminated end wall construction; and
a divider extends vertically along an inner surface of each said second end wall panel substantially midway of the width thereof and extending the full height of the end wall, said dividers reinforcing the tray and preventing telescoping of trays into one another when they are stacked, and said dividers at opposite ends of the tray being spaced from one another and defining a large opening between them through which product may be removed through the front from the back of the tray without having to lift the product, whereby product can be removed from the back of the tray through the front when multiple trays are stacked on top of one another.
2. A tray as claimed in claim 1, wherein:
inner end edges of the dividers are tapered, whereby a top edge of the dividers is narrower than a bottom edge.
3. A tray as claimed in claim 1, wherein:
the dividers each have a width in the longitudinal direction of the tray that is approximately the same as the width of a product container placed in the tray, and the space defined between the dividers at opposite ends of the tray is larger than the width of a product container.
4. A tray as claimed in claim 2, wherein:
the dividers each have a width in the longitudinal direction of the tray that is approximately the same as the width of a product container placed in the tray, and the space defined between the dividers at opposite ends of the tray is larger than the width of a product container.
5. A tray as claimed in claim 4, wherein:
a plurality of product containers are placed in the tray, said containers having a thickness dimension related to the length and width dimensions of the tray such that a row of three containers are accommodated on each side of the tray, on opposite sides of the divider panels.
6. A tray as claimed in claim 5, wherein:
the containers have a height substantially equal to the height of the tray, whereby when a plurality of trays loaded with containers are stacked on top of one another the containers carry at least part of the load of an upper tray or trays.
7. A tray as claimed in claim 6, wherein:
the divider panels contact the bottom wall of an upper tray and help support the upper tray.
8. A paperboard tray for shipping, displaying and vending containers of product, said tray folded from a single unitary blank of folded paperboard, and having height, width and length dimensions, said tray comprising:
opposite upstanding side walls, opposite upstanding end walls, an open top, and a bottom wall having opposite side edges and opposite end edges;
each said side wall being foldably connected to a respective opposite side edge of the bottom wall, and having relatively narrow opposite end portions of substantially the same height as the tray, and a center portion extending over most of the length of the side wall, each said center portion having a height that is substantially less than the height of the tray and defining an opening in each side wall through which containers of product are visible and accessible for retrieval of the containers through the opening without having to lift the containers upwardly through the open top of the tray;
each said end wall including an end flap foldably connected to each side wall end portion, and an end wall panel foldably connected to each end edge of the bottom wall, said end flaps each extending over approximately one half the width of the respective end wall and having an inner edge contiguous with an inner edge of an opposed end flap, said end wall panels each extending over the full width of the end wall and being disposed outwardly of said end flaps and adhesively attached thereto, said end flaps and end wall panels each having a height substantially equal to the height of the tray; and
an in-turned reinforcing divider panel foldably joined to the inner edge of each end flap, said divider panels extending perpendicular to the end walls and lying along a longitudinal centerline of the tray and having inner end edges, adjacent divider panels being adhesively secured together, and the inner end edges of the divider panels at one end of the tray being spaced from the inner end edges of the divider panels at the opposite end of the tray, defining a large central opening through which product containers are visible and accessible from either side of the tray.
9. A paperboard tray as claimed in claim 8, wherein:
the divider panels have a bottom edge lying contiguous to the tray bottom and a top edge coterminous with the open top of the tray; and
the inner end edges of the divider panels are tapered, whereby the top edge of the divider panels is narrower than the bottom edge.
10. A paperboard container as claimed in claim 8, wherein:
the divider panels each have a width in the longitudinal direction of the tray that is approximately the same as the width of a container of product placed in the tray, and the large central opening defined between confronting inner end edges of the divider panels at opposite ends of the tray is larger than the width of a container.
11. A paperboard container as claimed in claim 9, wherein:
the divider panels each have a width in the longitudinal direction of the tray that is approximately the same as the width of a container of product placed in the tray, and the large central opening defined between confronting inner end edges of the divider panels at opposite ends of the tray is larger than the width of a container.
12. A paperboard container as claimed in claim 11, wherein:
a plurality of containers are placed in the tray, said containers having a thickness dimension related to the length and width dimensions of the tray such that a row of three containers are accommodated on each side of the tray, on opposite sides of the divider panels.
13. A paperboard container as claimed in claim 12, wherein:
the containers have a height substantially equal to the height of the tray, whereby when a plurality of trays loaded with containers are stacked on top of one another the containers carry at least part of the load of an upper tray or trays.
14. A paperboard container as claimed in claim 13, wherein:
the divider panels contact the bottom wall of an upper tray and help support the upper tray.
15. A tray for shipping, displaying and vending containers of product, said tray having height, width and length dimensions, and opposite upstanding side walls, opposite upstanding end walls, an open top, and a bottom wall having opposite side edges and opposite end edges, wherein:
each said side wall comprises an upstanding sidewall flange on opposite side edges of the bottom wall, and first in-turned sidewall flaps on opposite side edges of each end wall, said sidewall flange and sidewall flaps on each side of the tray defining an opening extending over most of the length and height of the side wall, through which containers of product held in the tray are easily visible and accessible for removal from the tray;
each said end wall includes a first end wall panel connected to a respective end edge of the bottom wall and extending over the full height and width of the tray end wall, and a second end wall panel secured against an inner surface of each said first end wall panel and coterminous in width and height therewith, forming a double-wall laminated end wall construction; and
a divider extends vertically along an inner surface of each said second end wall panel substantially midway of the width thereof and extending the full height of the end wall, said dividers reinforcing the tray and preventing telescoping of trays into one another when they are stacked, and said dividers at opposite ends of the tray being spaced from one another and defining a large opening between them through which product containers may be removed through the front from the back of the tray without having to lift the product containers, whereby product containers can be removed from the back of the tray through the front when multiple trays are stacked on top of one another.
16. A tray as claimed in claim 15, wherein:
said tray comprises three separate pieces adhesively connected together to form said tray, including a bottom portion and two reinforcing divider inserts.
17. A tray as claimed in claim 16, wherein:
said bottom portion is made from a single unitary blank of paperboard folded to form said bottom wall, said sidewall flanges, said first end wall panels, and said first in-turned sidewall flaps, said first sidewall flaps being adhesively secured to an inner surface of respective said sidewall flanges; and
said reinforcing divider inserts are each made from a single unitary blank of paperboard folded, respectively, to form said second end wall panel, said second in-turned sidewall flaps on opposite side edges of each said second end wall panel, and said divider in the center of said second end wall panel, said second end wall panel being adhesively secured to an inner surface of a respective said first end wall panel, and said second sidewall flaps being adhesively secured to an inner surface of respective first sidewall flaps.
18. A single unitary blank for making a tray having a bottom wall, opposite sidewalls, an open top, and a divider extending inwardly from each end of the tray along a centerline of the tray, said blank comprising:
a central bottom panel having opposite side edges and opposite end edges, opposite end wall panels foldably joined to opposite end edges of the bottom panel, opposite sidewall panels foldably joined to opposite side edges of the bottom panel, opposite end wall flaps foldably joined to opposite ends of each said sidewall panel, and a divider panel flap foldably joined to each said end wall flap, each said sidewall panel having a cut-out area formed therein.
19. A blank for forming a bottom portion of a tray made from a plurality of separate pieces of material, wherein said bottom portion has a bottom wall, opposite upstanding sidewall flanges, opposite end wall panels, and an open top, said blank comprising:
a central bottom panel having opposite side edges and opposite end edges, a sidewall flange foldably joined to each of the opposite side edges of the bottom panel, an end wall panel foldably joined to each of the opposite end edges of the bottom panel, and a sidewall flap foldably joined to an outer side edge of each of the end wall panels.
20. A blank for forming the reinforcing divider insert of claim 16, wherein:
said blank is substantially rectangular, and first fold lines adjacent outer end edges of the blank define said sidewall flaps; second fold lines parallel to and spaced from the first fold lines delineate with the first fold lines end wall panels each having a width approximately one-half the width of a tray in which the insert is used and together form the insert end wall; and a third fold line at the center of the blank that with the second fold lines delineates a pair of divider panels that are folded together and adhesively secured to form the divider in a completed tray.
US11/301,475 2004-12-14 2005-12-13 Shipping and display tray Abandoned US20060124712A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US63608604P true 2004-12-14 2004-12-14
US11/301,475 US20060124712A1 (en) 2004-12-14 2005-12-13 Shipping and display tray

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US11/301,475 US20060124712A1 (en) 2004-12-14 2005-12-13 Shipping and display tray
PCT/US2005/045192 WO2006065875A2 (en) 2004-12-14 2005-12-14 Shipping and display tray
EP20050853992 EP1824743A2 (en) 2004-12-14 2005-12-14 Shipping and display tray
CA 2590385 CA2590385C (en) 2004-12-14 2005-12-14 Shipping and display tray
MX2007007056A MX2007007056A (en) 2004-12-14 2005-12-14 Shipping and display tray.

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US20060124712A1 true US20060124712A1 (en) 2006-06-15

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CA (1) CA2590385C (en)
MX (1) MX2007007056A (en)
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US20090288975A1 (en) * 2008-05-21 2009-11-26 Groz-Beckert Kg Felting needle package
US20100120594A1 (en) * 2008-11-11 2010-05-13 York Container Company Materials for and method for manufacturing container with end supports and resulting container
US20100234201A1 (en) * 2008-05-15 2010-09-16 York Container Company Materials for and method for manufacturing a container with corner supports and the resulting container
US20100247272A1 (en) * 2009-03-27 2010-09-30 York Container Company Materials for and method for manufacturing retail container and resulting retail container
US20110226649A1 (en) * 2010-03-17 2011-09-22 International Paper Company Pallet skirt
WO2012177342A1 (en) * 2011-06-24 2012-12-27 Rock-Tenn Shared Services, Llc Reinforcing support assemblies for a container and method of making same
WO2015022472A1 (en) * 2013-08-14 2015-02-19 Otor Method and device for fitting reinforcements on a cardboard packaging cutout, and corresponding packaging
US9546014B2 (en) 2015-02-11 2017-01-17 International Paper Company Adjustable container
US20180178945A1 (en) * 2015-06-30 2018-06-28 Westrock Shared Services, Llc Container with a reinforcement structure and method of forming the same

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US20100234201A1 (en) * 2008-05-15 2010-09-16 York Container Company Materials for and method for manufacturing a container with corner supports and the resulting container
US8297490B2 (en) 2008-05-15 2012-10-30 York Container Company Materials for and method for manufacturing a container with corner supports and the resulting container
US8177117B2 (en) 2008-05-15 2012-05-15 York Container Company Materials for and method for manufacturing container with corner supports and resulting container
US20090286663A1 (en) * 2008-05-15 2009-11-19 York Container Company Materials for and method for manufacturing container with corner supports and resulting container
US20090288975A1 (en) * 2008-05-21 2009-11-26 Groz-Beckert Kg Felting needle package
US8038005B2 (en) 2008-05-21 2011-10-18 Groz-Beckert Kg Felting needle package
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US20100120594A1 (en) * 2008-11-11 2010-05-13 York Container Company Materials for and method for manufacturing container with end supports and resulting container
US7810707B2 (en) * 2008-11-11 2010-10-12 York Container Company Materials for and method for manufacturing container with end supports and resulting container
US7981017B2 (en) 2009-03-27 2011-07-19 York Container Company Materials for and method for manufacturing retail container and resulting retail container
US20100247272A1 (en) * 2009-03-27 2010-09-30 York Container Company Materials for and method for manufacturing retail container and resulting retail container
US20110226649A1 (en) * 2010-03-17 2011-09-22 International Paper Company Pallet skirt
US9126721B2 (en) * 2010-03-17 2015-09-08 International Paper Company Pallet skirt
US8800854B2 (en) 2011-06-24 2014-08-12 Rock-Tenn Shared Services, Llc Reinforcing support assemblies for a container and method of making same
WO2012177342A1 (en) * 2011-06-24 2012-12-27 Rock-Tenn Shared Services, Llc Reinforcing support assemblies for a container and method of making same
FR3009713A1 (en) * 2013-08-14 2015-02-20 Otor Sa Method and device for placing reinforcements on cardboard packaging cutting and corresponding packages
WO2015022472A1 (en) * 2013-08-14 2015-02-19 Otor Method and device for fitting reinforcements on a cardboard packaging cutout, and corresponding packaging
US10144191B2 (en) 2013-08-14 2018-12-04 Otor Method and device for fitting reinforcements on a cardboard packaging cutout, and corresponding packaging
US9546014B2 (en) 2015-02-11 2017-01-17 International Paper Company Adjustable container
US20180178945A1 (en) * 2015-06-30 2018-06-28 Westrock Shared Services, Llc Container with a reinforcement structure and method of forming the same

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
EP1824743A2 (en) 2007-08-29
CA2590385C (en) 2010-07-13
CA2590385A1 (en) 2006-06-22
WO2006065875A3 (en) 2006-10-05
WO2006065875A2 (en) 2006-06-22
MX2007007056A (en) 2008-01-14

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Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:WEIMER, JR., CHARLES P.;REEL/FRAME:017109/0859

Effective date: 20051213

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

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