US20050170727A1 - Soft extensible nonwoven webs containing fibers with high melt flow rates - Google Patents

Soft extensible nonwoven webs containing fibers with high melt flow rates Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20050170727A1
US20050170727A1 US11/044,547 US4454705A US2005170727A1 US 20050170727 A1 US20050170727 A1 US 20050170727A1 US 4454705 A US4454705 A US 4454705A US 2005170727 A1 US2005170727 A1 US 2005170727A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
nonwoven web
melt flow
polypropylene
fibers
flow rate
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11/044,547
Inventor
David Melik
Kelyn Arora
Jeffrey Auer
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Procter and Gamble Co
Original Assignee
Procter and Gamble Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Family has litigation
Priority to US53936904P priority Critical
Application filed by Procter and Gamble Co filed Critical Procter and Gamble Co
Priority to US11/044,547 priority patent/US20050170727A1/en
Assigned to PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY, THE reassignment PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY, THE ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: ARORA, KELYN ANNE, AUER, JEFFREY ALLEN, MELIK, DAVID HARRY
Publication of US20050170727A1 publication Critical patent/US20050170727A1/en
First worldwide family litigation filed litigation Critical https://patents.darts-ip.com/?family=34826068&utm_source=google_patent&utm_medium=platform_link&utm_campaign=public_patent_search&patent=US20050170727(A1) "Global patent litigation dataset” by Darts-ip is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B29WORKING OF PLASTICS; WORKING OF SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE IN GENERAL
    • B29DPRODUCING PARTICULAR ARTICLES FROM PLASTICS OR FROM SUBSTANCES IN A PLASTIC STATE
    • B29D7/00Producing flat articles, e.g. films or sheets
    • B29D7/01Films or sheets
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08LCOMPOSITIONS OF MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS
    • C08L23/00Compositions of homopolymers or copolymers of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons having only one carbon-to-carbon double bond; Compositions of derivatives of such polymers
    • C08L23/02Compositions of homopolymers or copolymers of unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbons having only one carbon-to-carbon double bond; Compositions of derivatives of such polymers not modified by chemical after-treatment
    • C08L23/10Homopolymers or copolymers of propene
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D01NATURAL OR MAN-MADE THREADS OR FIBRES; SPINNING
    • D01DMECHANICAL METHODS OR APPARATUS IN THE MANUFACTURE OF ARTIFICIAL FILAMENTS, THREADS, FIBRES, BRISTLES OR RIBBONS
    • D01D5/00Formation of filaments, threads, or the like
    • D01D5/08Melt spinning methods
    • D01D5/098Melt spinning methods with simultaneous stretching
    • D01D5/0985Melt spinning methods with simultaneous stretching by means of a flowing gas (e.g. melt-blowing)
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D01NATURAL OR MAN-MADE THREADS OR FIBRES; SPINNING
    • D01FCHEMICAL FEATURES IN THE MANUFACTURE OF ARTIFICIAL FILAMENTS, THREADS, FIBRES, BRISTLES OR RIBBONS; APPARATUS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF CARBON FILAMENTS
    • D01F8/00Conjugated, i.e. bi- or multicomponent, artificial filaments or the like; Manufacture thereof
    • D01F8/04Conjugated, i.e. bi- or multicomponent, artificial filaments or the like; Manufacture thereof from synthetic polymers
    • D01F8/06Conjugated, i.e. bi- or multicomponent, artificial filaments or the like; Manufacture thereof from synthetic polymers with at least one polyolefin as constituent
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H1/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres
    • D04H1/40Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties
    • D04H1/42Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of staple fibres or like relatively short fibres from fleeces or layers composed of fibres without existing or potential cohesive properties characterised by the use of certain kinds of fibres insofar as this use has no preponderant influence on the consolidation of the fleece
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H13/00Other non-woven fabrics
    • D04H13/001Making non-woven fabrics from staple fibres, filaments or yarns, bonded to at least one web-like material, e.g. woven, knitted non-woven fabric, paper, leather, during consolidation
    • D04H13/002Making non-woven fabrics from staple fibres, filaments or yarns, bonded to at least one web-like material, e.g. woven, knitted non-woven fabric, paper, leather, during consolidation characterised by the disposition or nature of their elements
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H3/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length
    • D04H3/005Synthetic yarns or filaments
    • D04H3/007Addition polymers
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H3/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length
    • D04H3/08Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length characterised by the method of strengthening or consolidating
    • D04H3/14Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length characterised by the method of strengthening or consolidating with bonds between thermoplastic yarns or filaments produced by welding
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H3/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length
    • D04H3/08Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length characterised by the method of strengthening or consolidating
    • D04H3/14Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length characterised by the method of strengthening or consolidating with bonds between thermoplastic yarns or filaments produced by welding
    • D04H3/147Composite yarns or filaments
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04HMAKING TEXTILE FABRICS, e.g. FROM FIBRES OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL; FABRICS MADE BY SUCH PROCESSES OR APPARATUS, e.g. FELTS, NON-WOVEN FABRICS; COTTON-WOOL; WADDING NON-WOVEN FABRICS FROM STAPLE FIBRES, FILAMENTS OR YARNS, BONDED WITH AT LEAST ONE WEB-LIKE MATERIAL DURING THEIR CONSOLIDATION
    • D04H3/00Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length
    • D04H3/08Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length characterised by the method of strengthening or consolidating
    • D04H3/16Non-woven fabrics formed wholly or mainly of yarns or like filamentary material of substantial length characterised by the method of strengthening or consolidating with bonds between thermoplastic filaments produced in association with filament formation, e.g. immediately following extrusion
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C08ORGANIC MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS; THEIR PREPARATION OR CHEMICAL WORKING-UP; COMPOSITIONS BASED THEREON
    • C08LCOMPOSITIONS OF MACROMOLECULAR COMPOUNDS
    • C08L2205/00Polymer mixtures characterised by other features
    • C08L2205/02Polymer mixtures characterised by other features containing two or more polymers of the same C08L -group
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/637Including strand or fiber material which is a monofilament composed of two or more polymeric materials in physically distinct relationship [e.g., sheath-core, side-by-side, islands-in-sea, fibrils-in-matrix, etc.] or composed of physical blend of chemically different polymeric materials or a physical blend of a polymeric material and a filler material
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/637Including strand or fiber material which is a monofilament composed of two or more polymeric materials in physically distinct relationship [e.g., sheath-core, side-by-side, islands-in-sea, fibrils-in-matrix, etc.] or composed of physical blend of chemically different polymeric materials or a physical blend of a polymeric material and a filler material
    • Y10T442/641Sheath-core multicomponent strand or fiber material
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/681Spun-bonded nonwoven fabric
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/697Containing at least two chemically different strand or fiber materials
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T442/00Fabric [woven, knitted, or nonwoven textile or cloth, etc.]
    • Y10T442/60Nonwoven fabric [i.e., nonwoven strand or fiber material]
    • Y10T442/699Including particulate material other than strand or fiber material

Abstract

The present invention provides a polymer composition that enables a nonwoven web to possess high extensibility. The polymer composition comprises a polypropylene having a melt flow rate of from about 100 to about 1000 grams per 10 minutes and a second polymer having a melt flow rate of from about 10 to about 80 grams per 10 minutes. Additionally, the present invention provides low denier fibers that possess softness and enable the formation of nonwoven webs with high extensibility.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/539,369, filed Jan. 27, 2004.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to soft extensible nonwoven webs comprising low denier fibers and disposable articles comprising such nonwoven webs.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Nonwoven webs formed by nonwoven extrusion processes such as, for example, meltblowing and spunbonding processes may be manufactured into products and components of products so inexpensively that the products could be viewed as disposable after only one or a few uses. Representatives of such products include disposable absorbent articles, such as diaper, incontinence briefs, training pants, feminine hygiene garments, wipes, and the like.
  • There is an existing consumer need for nonwovens that can deliver softness and extensibility when used in disposable products. Softer nonwovens are gentler to the skin and help to provide a more garment-like aesthetic for diapers. Nonwovens that are capable of high extensibility at relatively low force can be used to provide sustained fit in products such as disposable diapers, for example, as part of a stretch composite, and facilitate the use of various mechanical post-treatments such as stretching, aperturing, etc. Extensible materials are defined herein as those capable of elongating, but not necessarily recovering all or any of the applied strain. Elastic materials, on the other hand, by definition, must recover a substantial portion of their elongation after the load is removed.
  • There exists within the industry today a need for extensible nonwovens with moderate to low denier fibers that can be made from conventional resins without the need for high cost specialty polymers or elastic polymers. It is well known to those trained in the art that as spinning attenuation velocities increase, molecular orientation increases and fiber elongation decreases. For strong, low denier fibers with low elongation, this is not a problem, but producing low denier fibers with high elongation remains a significant challenge. It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide nonwoven webs comprising low denier fibers that can be made from conventional resins without the need for costly additives. It is a further object of the present invention to provide disposable articles comprising such soft extensible nonwoven webs.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention provides nonwoven webs comprising fibers comprising a polymer composition that enables the nonwoven web to possess high extensibility. Additionally, the present invention provides low denier fibers that possess softness and enable the formation of nonwoven webs with high extensibility.
  • Specifically, the nonwoven web of the present invention comprises fibers having a polymer composition. The polymer composition comprises from about 50% to about 95% of polypropylene having a melt flow rate of from about 100 to about 1000 grams per 10 minutes and from about 5 to about 50% of a polymer having a melt flow rate of from about 10 to about 80 grams per 10 minutes. The melt flow rate of the polymer composition is preferably from about 100 to about 600 grams per 10 minutes. The polymer composition of the present invention may optionally contain an additional ingredient. The lower melt flow rate polymer may be selected from the group consisting of polypropylenes, polyethylene, and polyolefin copolymers or terpolymers, and combinations thereof. Preferably, the lower melt flow rate polymer is also a polypropylene. In a preferred embodiment, the high melt flow rate polypropylene has a melt flow rate of from about 100 to about 600 grams per 10 minutes, and the polymer, which may be a low melt flow rate polypropylene, has a melt flow rate of from about 15 to about 70 grams per 10 minutes. The nonwoven web may have a basis weight of from about 5 to about 100 grams per square meter (gsm) and may be produced by a spunbond process. The diameter of the fibers comprising the web will typically be from about 5 to about 50 microns. The fibers may be a monocomponent fiber containing the polymer composition or the fibers may be a multicomponent fiber in which at least one component contains the polymer composition. The nonwoven web may optionally comprise fibers other than the fibers comprising the polymer composition of the present invention. The strain at peak load in at least one direction of the nonwoven web is preferably greater than about 80 percent.
  • The present invention is also directed to the fibers used in the nonwoven webs. The nonwoven webs of the present invention may be used to make disposable articles.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • As used herein, the term “absorbent article” refers to devices that absorb and contain body exudates, and, more specifically, refers to devices that are placed against or in proximity to the body of the wearer to absorb and contain the various exudates discharged from the body.
  • As used herein, the term “disposable” is used to describe absorbent articles that are not intended to be laundered or otherwise restored or reused as an absorbent article (i.e., they are intended to be discarded after a single use and, preferably, to be recycled, composted or otherwise disposed of in an environmentally compatible manner). A “unitary” absorbent article refers to absorbent articles that are formed of separate parts united together to form a coordinated entity so that they do not require separate manipulative parts like a separate holder and liner.
  • As used herein, the term “nonwoven web” refers to a web that has a structure of individual fibers or threads which are interlaid, but not in any regular, repeating manner. Nonwoven webs have been, in the past, formed by a variety of processes, such as, for example, air laying processes, meltblowing processes, spunbonding processes and carding processes, including bonded carded web processes.
  • As used herein, the term “microfibers” refers to small diameter fibers having an average diameter not greater than about 100 microns, and a length-to-diameter ratio of greater than about 10. Those trained in the art will appreciate that the diameter of the fibers comprising a nonwoven web impact its overall softness and comfort, and that the smaller denier fibers generally result in softer and more comfortable products than larger denier fibers. For fibers of the present invention, it is preferable that the diameters are in the range of about 5 to 50 microns to achieve suitable softness and comfort, more preferable in the range from about 5 to 35 microns in diameter, and even more preferable in the range from about 15 to 30 microns in diameter. The fiber diameter can be determined using, for example, an optical microscope calibrated with a 10 micrometer graticule.
  • As used herein, the term “meltblown fibers” refers to fibers formed by extruding a molten thermoplastic material through a plurality of fine, usually circular, die capillaries as molten threads or filaments into a high velocity gas (e.g., air) stream which attenuates the filaments of molten thermoplastic material to reduce their diameter to generally from 1 to 10 microns, but more typically in the range from 2 to 3 microns in diameter. Thereafter, the meltblown fibers are carried by the high velocity gas stream and are deposited on a collecting surface to form a web of randomly dispersed meltblown fibers.
  • As used herein, the term “spunbonded fibers” refers to small diameter fibers that are formed by extruding a molten thermoplastic material as filaments from a plurality of fine, usually circular, capillaries of a spinneret, with the diameter of the extruded filaments then being rapidly reduced by drawing. A spunbond nonwoven web may be produced, for example, by the conventional spunbond process wherein molten polymer is extruded into continuous filaments which are subsequently quenched, attenuated by a high velocity fluid, and collected in random arrangement on a collecting surface. After filament collection, any thermal, chemical or mechanical bonding treatment, or any combination thereof, may be used to form a bonded web such that a coherent web structure results.
  • As used herein, the term “staple fibers” refers to small diameter fibers that are formed by extruding a molten thermoplastic material as filaments from a plurality of fine, usually circular, capillaries of a spinneret, with the diameter of the extruded filaments then being rapidly reduced by drawing, typically using conventional godet winding systems. The fiber diameter can be further reduced through post-extrusion drawing prior to cutting the fibers into discontinuous lengths. The fibers may also have finish applied or be crimped to aid in, for example, a carding process. Staple fibers may be used, for example, to make nonwoven fabrics using carding, air-laid or wet-laid processes.
  • As used herein, the term “melt spinning” refers to processes that produce staple or spunbonded fibers. Additionally, hybrid processes that encompass aspects of both fall within this definition. For example, extruded filaments that are attenuated by both high velocity air near the die exit and an air drag device near the point of fiber collection.
  • Continuous fibers, staple fibers, hollow fibers, shaped fibers, such as multi-lobal fibers, and monocomponent and multicomponent fibers can all be produced by using the methods of the present invention. Component, as used herein, is defined as a separate part of the fiber that has a spatial relationship to another part of the fiber. Multicomponent fibers, commonly bicomponent fibers, may be in a side-by-side, sheath-core, segmented pie, ribbon, or islands-in-the-sea configuration. The sheath may be continuous or non-continuous around the core. The fibers of the present invention may have different geometries that include round, elliptical, star shaped, rectangular, and other various eccentricities. The fibers of the present invention may also be splittable fibers. Splitting may occur by rheological differences in the polymers or splitting may occur by a mechanical means and/or by fluid induced: distortion. As used herein, the diameter of a noncircular cross section fiber is the equivalent diameter of a circle having the same cross-sectional area.
  • As used herein, the term “extensible” refers to any nonwoven, which upon application of an extending force, has an average strain at peak load in at least one direction of at least about 80%, preferably at least about 100%, more preferably at least about 125%, and most preferably greater than about 150%. The strain at peak load described herein is determined according to the method outlined in the tensile testing methods section for nonwovens. The term elongatable may also be used to describe the extensibility of the nonwoven webs. The extension ratio is the average strain at peak load for the blend nonwoven web divided by the average strain at peak load for a nonwoven web made from the lowest melt flow rate component of the blend. The nonwoven webs will be produced with the same throughput and have the same basis weight and the fibers will have the same diameter. The extension ratio is at least greater than 1, preferably greater than 1.2, and more preferably greater than 1.5. In some cases, the extension ratio will be greater than 2.
  • As used herein, the terms “consolidation” and “consolidated” refer to the bringing together of at least a portion of the fibers of a nonwoven web into closer proximity to form a site, or sites, which function to increase the resistance of the nonwoven to external forces, e.g., abrasion and tensile forces, as compared to the unconsolidated web. “Consolidated” can refer to an entire nonwoven web that has been processed such that at least a portion of the fibers are brought into closer proximity, such as by thermal point bonding. Such a web can be considered a “consolidated web”. In another sense, a specific, discrete region of fibers that is brought into close proximity, such as an individual thermal bond site, can be described as “consolidated”.
  • Consolidation can be achieved by methods that apply heat and/or pressure to the fibrous web, such as thermal spot (i.e., point) bonding. Thermal point bonding can be accomplished by passing the fibrous web through a pressure nip formed by two rolls, one of which is heated and contains a plurality of raised points on its surface, as is described in U.S. Pat. No. 3,855,046 issued to Hansen, et al. Consolidation methods can also include, but are not limited to, ultrasonic bonding, through-air bonding, resin bonding and hydroentanglement. Hydroentanglement typically involves treatment of the fibrous web with high pressure water jets to consolidate the web via mechanical fiber entanglement (friction) in the region desired to be consolidated, with the sites being formed in the area of fiber entanglement. The fibers can be hydroentangled as taught in U.S. Pat. No. 4,021,284 issued to Kalwaites and U.S. Pat. No. 4,024,612 issued to Contrator et al.
  • As used herein, the term “polymer composition” describes a blend of two or more polymers. In the present invention, the polymer composition will comprise a polypropylene having a high melt flow rate and a second polymer with a lower melt flow rate. The polymer composition generally includes, but is not limited to, homopolymers, copolymers, such as, for example, block, graft, random and alternating copolymers, terpolymers, etc., and blends and modifications thereof. The polymer composition shall include all possible geometrical configurations of the material. These configurations include, but are not limited to, isotactic, syndiotactic and random symmetries.
  • Examples of suitable polymers for use in the polymer composition include, but are not limited to polyethylene, polypropylene, polyethylene-polypropylene copolymers, polyesters, polyhydroxyalkanoates, aliphatic ester polycondensates, and mixtures thereof. Other suitable polymers include biodegradable polymers such as PHAs, PLAs, starch compositions and other biodegradable polymers described in U.S. Publication 2002/0188041-A1. Other suitable polymer compositions are described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,476,135 in the description of an olefin polymer composition. Polymer compositions comprise polyolefins such as polyethylene and polypropylene, polyamides, and aliphatic containing polyesters such as poly(butylene succinate) and poly(butylene succinate adipate). Additional aliphatic containing polyesters include, but are not limited to, poly(caprolactone), poly(ethylene succinate), poly(ethylene succinate adipate), aliphatic polyester-based polyurethanes, copolyesters of adipic acid, terephthalic acid, and 1,4-butanediol, polyester-amides, combinations and copolymers thereof, and the like. Other suitable polymers include a low density or ultra low density (p<0.9 g/cc) polyethylene resin and an ethylene-propylene elastomer-containing resin.
  • As used herein, the term “polypropylene composition” is utilized in its ordinary commercial meaning to include any polymer composition which includes polypropylene. Additionally, as used herein, the term “polypropylene composition” generally includes, but is not limited to, homopolymers of propylene, copolymers of propylene, such as, for example, block, graft, random and alternating copolymers, terpolymers, etc., and blends and modifications thereof. Furthermore, unless otherwise specifically limited, the term “polypropylene composition” shall include all possible geometrical configurations of the material. These configurations include, but are not limited to, isotactic, syndiotactic and random symmetries. Examples of suitable polypropylenes for use in the present invention include, but are not limited to, isotactic and syndiotactic polypropylene homopolymers, and copolymers of propylene with ethylene and/or butene. The polypropylene composition may be a composition where two different polypropylene materials, such as a higher melt flow rate polypropylene and a lower melt flow rate polypropylene, are blended. Those trained in the art will appreciate that the incorporation of comonomers such as ethylene or butene or changes in stereoregularity will generally lead to a reduction in the melting temperature of the polypropylene composition. If the melting temperature becomes too low, the properties of the resulting fibers may be unsuitable for use in some products of the present invention. For example, for materials stored in a warehouse in summer, where temperatures can reach above 80° C., the dimensional stability of the product can be compromised if the melt temperature is below about 80° C. For use in the present invention, it is preferred that the melting temperature of the polypropylene composition is greater than about 100° C., more preferably greater than approximately 120° C., and even more preferably greater than about 140° C. The melting temperature as described herein is determined by DSC and is taken as the highest endothermic peak temperature observed on the DSC heating scan using the method outlined in ASTM D 3418, incorporated herein by reference.
  • The polymer and polypropylene compositions of the present invention may optionally include an additional ingredient. Suitable additional ingredients include, but are not limited to, those which are typically used in fiber making, nonwoven processing, polymer composition and polymer formation. In the case of the polymeric blend, desirable additional ingredients are those which form a solid solution and/or homogeneous mixture, with the polymeric blend and other components of the polymeric composition.
  • In one aspect, the additional ingredient is selected from the group such as: nucleating agents, antiblock agents, antistatic agents, a different polymer, pro-heat stabilizers, softening agents, lubricants, surfactants, wetting agents, plasticizers, light stabilizers, weathering stabilizers, weld strength improvers, slip agents, dyes, antioxidants, flame retardants, pro-oxidant additives, natural oils, synthetic oils, anti-blocking agents, fillers, coefficient of friction modifiers, humectants, and combinations thereof. Additionally, any coatings or surface treatments for the fibers may be added during processing or after the fiber is formed.
  • In the polymeric or polypropylene composition, the additional ingredient will comprise an amount effective to achieve the result the additional ingredient is present in the polymeric mixture to achieve. For example, a stabilizing amount for a UV stabilizer, a lubricating amount for a lubricating agent. For a skin conditioning agent, an amount of the agent that has an effect on the skin would be desired. Typically, the additional ingredient is from about 0.1% to about 5% of the composition. These additional ingredients may be employed in conventional amounts although, typically, such ingredients are not required in the composition in order to obtain the advantageous combination of softness and extensibility.
  • The polypropylene compositions comprise a high melt flow rate polypropylene. The polypropylene compositions may also comprise a low melt flow rate polypropylene. The high melt flow rate polypropylene will have a melt flow rate in the range from about 100 to about 1000 grams per 10 minutes, preferably from about 100 to about 800 grams per 10 minutes, and more preferably from about 100 to about 600 grams per 10 minutes. The low melt flow rate polypropylene will have a melt flow rate of from about 10 to about 80 grams per 10 minutes and preferably from about 15 to about 70 grams per 10 minutes. The polypropylene composition blend may have a melt flow rate in the range from about 100 to about 2000 grams per 10 minutes. Preferably, the melt flow rate of the polypropylene composition blend will be from about 100 to about 1000 grams per 10 minutes, and more preferably from about 100 to about 600 grams per 10 minutes. The melt flow rate as described herein is determined according to the method outlined in ASTM D 1238 (condition L; 230/2.16), incorporated herein by reference.
  • Those trained in the art will recognize that the polypropylene compositions with the above described range of melt flow rates are typically used in a melt-blowing process. It has been unexpectedly found, however, that such resins can also be used in melt-spinning processes to make, for example, spunbond fibers. It has further been unexpectedly found that the resultant webs have higher elongation than webs made using typical polypropylene spunbond grade resins at the same low fiber diameters, where the melt flow rate of polypropylene spunbond resins generally ranges from about 25 to 60 grams per 10 minutes.
  • While not intending to be bound by theory, it is believed that the characteristic relaxation time of the high melt flow compositions of the present invention is sufficiently faster than the characteristic spin line strain and crystallization rates so as to result in fibers that are only slightly oriented and thereby maintain high residual elongations to break. By contrast, the characteristic relaxation time of conventional staple or spunbond fiber grade resins is generally slower than the characteristic spin line strain and crystallization rates so as to result in fibers that are highly oriented and thereby maintain low residual elongations to break. It is also believed that the combination of a high melt flow rate polymer and a low melt flow rate polymer is desired as the low melt flow rate polymer may improve the bonding and strength of the nonwoven web while the high melt flow rate polymer may improve the extensibility.
  • Typically, the fibers of the present invention are low denier, which helps to produce extremely soft, extensible and highly uniform nonwoven webs. Nonwoven webs with this combination of properties are particularly well suited for use in disposable absorbent articles such as diapers, adult incontinence products, light incontinence products, training pants, feminine hygiene garments, wipes, and the like, as they are able to be used in portions of the article where extensibility and softness can aid in the article's comfort and overall performance. Suitable applications for the nonwoven webs of the present invention include topsheet for feminine hygiene pads, diapers, and/or incontinence products, stretchable components for diapers such as ears or tabs, and wipes for cleaning the skin such as facial or body cleansing wipes or baby wipes or wipes for cleaning a hard surface such as a floor, counter, or window.
  • Although the nonwoven web of the present invention can find beneficial use as a component of a disposable absorbent article, such as a diaper, its use is not limited to disposable absorbent articles. The nonwoven web of the present invention can be used in any application requiring or benefiting from softness and extensibility, such as wipes, polishing cloths, floor cleansing wipes, furniture linings, durable garments, and the like. Many different wipes, such as facial cleansing cloths, body and personal cleansing cloths and/or hand mitts, and other beauty or personal cleansing applications may be desired.
  • If additional extensibility or activation of the nonwoven web is desired, a post processing treatment may be desired. Both mechanical and chemical post processing treatments may be suitable. Possible mechanical post processing treatments include stretching, tentering, and other treatments found in U.S. Pat. Pub. 2004/0131,820 and 2003/028,165, WO 04/059,061, WO 04/058,214, and U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,518,801 and 5,650,214. Nonwovens that are capable of high extensibility, such as the nonwovens of the present invention, facilitate the use of mechanical post-treatments.
  • The extensible, soft nonwoven of the present invention may also be in the form of a laminate. Laminates may be combined by any number of bonding methods known to those skilled in the art including, but not limited to, thermal bonding, adhesive bonding including, but not limited to spray adhesives, hot melt adhesives, latex based adhesives and the like, sonic and ultrasonic bonding, and extrusion laminating whereby a polymer is cast directly onto another nonwoven, and while still in a partially molten state, bonds to one side of the nonwoven, or by depositing melt blown fiber nonwoven directly onto a nonwoven. These and other suitable methods for making laminates are described in U.S. Pat. No. 6,013,151, Wu et al., and U.S. Pat. No. 5932, 497, Morman et al. One use of the nonwoven web is as a spunbond layer in a spunbond-meltblown-spunbond (SMS) laminate. Alternatively, the nonwoven web could also be used as a meltblown layer.
  • The products and methods of the present invention are further exemplified in the following examples.
  • Experimental Procedures
  • Fiber Analysis
  • Mounting of Fiber Samples: For each sample tested, 10-12 fibers were prepared. Fibers are randomly selected and separated from the bundle. The fiber is then taped to a paper rectangular frame, being sure to wrap tape and the end of the fiber over the backside of the frame. Care is taken not to stretch or deform the fiber in any way.
  • Diameter Measurements: Mounted fibers are viewed on a Zeiss Axioskope microscope equipped with a color video camera and a display monitor. With the fiber in focus under a 40× objective lens and a 1× eyepiece the diameter of the fiber is measured on the monitor in inches with a pair of calipers. The microscope is calibrated for this magnification, using a 1 mm scale divided into 100ths, manufactured by Graticules LTD.
  • Tensile Testing: Mounted fibers are tensile tested on an MTS Synergie 400 material tester equipped with a calibrated 10 Newton load cell and Testworks 4 software version 4.04. Fibers are tested according to ASTM D3822, with a test gauge length of 1 inch and a crosshead speed of 2 inches per minute. The mounted fibers are loaded into tester grips. The paper frame is cut away on both sides of the fiber so paper does not interfere with test. An average of ten fibers is tested, and the average strain at break is used as the measure of extensibility.
  • Nonwoven Handsheet Production and Tensile Testing
  • Nonwoven Handsheet Production: Polyolefin compositions are converted into nonwoven handsheet samples using the following procedure:
  • Neat or compounded materials are first melt spun into fibers (monocomponent or bicomponent) using a two extruder system, where each extruder is a horizontal single-screw extruder. The extrudate rate from each extruder to the spinpack is controlled by a metering melt pump that feeds a 4-hole spin pack (Hills Incorporated, W. Melbourne, Fla.). In all examples the spinpack is fitted with a spinneret for a round hole, and distribution plates for a sheath-core cross-section. For the case of monocomponent fibers, the same resin is used in both extruders for a sheath:core ratio of approximately 50:50. The extruder/melt pump/spinpack system is mounted on an adjustable height platform. The spin line length is maintained constant at a distance of approximately 70 inches, the mass throughput at about 0.4 grams per minute per hole, and the melt extrusion temperature at approximately 230° C. The molten filaments exit the spinneret into a quench cabinet that is located: directly below the spinpack and are drawn down with a height adjustable air drag device that uses compressed air at high pressures to produce a stream of air that surrounds and draws the filaments. The air pressure is adjusted to achieve collected fiber diameters of about 20-25 microns.
  • The fibers are collected on a stationary perforated metal screen (0.25 inch holes, 0.45 inch center-to-center spacing), where the fiber collection pattern is effectively circular with the inner 5 inches or so being suitably uniform for tensile testing and where a sufficient time of collection is used to achieve an average basis weight of about 30-45 grams per square meter within the inner region. The collected fiber sample is then bonded ultrasonically to make a nonwoven handsheet, where the ultrasonic bonding of nonwovens is described by Mao and Goswami in International Nonwovens Journal, Vol. 10, No. 2, pages 38-47, and No. 3, pages 17-28. An ultrasonic bonding system manufactured by Machintek Corporation (Fairfield, Ohio) is used for bonding. This system incorporates a Branson Ultrasonics Corporation (Danbury, Conn.) model 921AE actuator equipped with a model 109-121-392 rectangular slotted horn, and a translation stage to allow for a constant bonding time across the fiber sample. Using a bonding plate having a bond area of about 20% and bonding points approximately 1.2 millimeters long×0.7 millimeters wide arranged in a staggered row configuration, good bonding is found for an actuator amplitude setting of 50%, a horn pressure of about 40 pounds per square inch, and a translational speed of approximately 4 meters per minute. Prior to bonding, a 0.010 inch thick sheet of fiber-reinforced Teflon is placed between the fiber sample and the horn.
  • Tensile Testing for Nonwoven Handsheets: For each nonwoven handsheet, one tensile test strip is prepared by first cutting a 1 inch width strip through the center of the handsheet using a JDC Precision Sample Cutter (Thwing-Albert Instrument Company, Philadelphia, Pa.), whereby the direction of this cut is parallel to the short dimension of the bonding points. The length of the sample strip is then trimmed to about 4 inches, making sure that the center of the sample strip is nearly the center of the handsheet.
  • Each sample strip is tensile tested on a testing machine, for example, on an Instron 1122 modified with a MTS Sintech ReNew Upgrade Package and equipped with a 50 pound load cell, 1 inch width serrated grip faces, and Testworks Software Version 3.1, or on a MTS Synergie 400 test stand equipped with a 100 newton load cell, 1 inch width rubber grip faces, and Testworks Software Version 4.07 (Instron Corporation, Canton, Mass.; MTS Systems Corporation, Eden Praire, Minn.). Sample strips are tested with a gauge length of 2 inches and a crosshead speed of 2 inches per minute. An average of five nonwoven strips is tested, and the average strain at peak load is used as the measure of extensibility. The extension ratio is the average strain at peak load for the blend handsheet or nonwoven divided by the average strain at peak load for the handsheet or nonwoven made from the lowest melt flow rate component of the blend.
  • Spunbond Nonwoven Web Production and Tensile Testing
  • Spunbond Nonwoven Web Production: Polyolefin compositions are converted into spunbond nonwoven webs on pilot and commercial scale spunbond nonwoven lines equipped with slot jet attenuation and thermal calender bonding systems. Line speed is adjusted to achieve desired basis weight.
  • Tensile Testing for Spunbond Nonwoven Webs: For each nonwoven web, one tensile test strip is prepared by first cutting a 1 inch width strip in the direction of interest using a JDC Precision Sample Cutter (Thwing-Albert Instrument Company, Philadelphia, Pa.). The length of the sample strip is then trimmed to about 7 inches.
  • Each sample strip is tensile tested on a testing machine, for example, on an Instron 1122 modified with a MTS Sintech ReNew Upgrade Package and equipped with a 50 pound load cell, 1 inch width serrated grip faces, and Testworks Software Version 3.1, or on a MTS Synergie 400 test stand equipped with a 100 newton load cell, 1 inch width rubber grip faces, and Testworks Software Version 4.07 (Instron Corporation, Canton, Mass.; MTS Systems Corporation, Eden Praire, Minn.). Sample strips are tested with a gauge length of 5 inches and a crosshead speed of 5 inches per minute. An average of ten nonwoven strips is tested, and the average strain at peak load is used as the measure of extensibility. The extension ratio is the average strain at peak load for the blend spunbond nonwoven web divided by the average strain at peak load for the nonwoven web made from the lowest melt flow rate component of the blend.
  • COMPARATIVE EXAMPLE 1
  • This comparative example illustrates the properties resulting from melt spinning a conventional spunbond grade polypropylene. Specifically, a polypropylene resin with a melt flow rate of 35 grams per 10 minutes (ProFax PH835 from Basell Polyolefins Company, Wilmington, Del.) is spun and bonded into nonwoven handsheets. Table 1 shows the average strain at peak load for these handsheets.
  • COMPARATIVE EXAMPLE 2
  • This comparative example illustrates the properties resulting from melt spinning a high melt flow rate polypropylene. Specifically, a polypropylene resin with a melt flow rate of 400 grams per 10 minutes (Valtec HH441 from Basell Polyolefins Company, Wilmington, Del.) is spun and bonded into nonwoven handsheets. Table 1 shows the average strain at peak load for these handsheets.
  • EXAMPLE 1
  • This example demonstrates synergistic properties resulting from melt spinning a blend of a conventional spunbond grade polypropylene and a high melt flow rate polypropylene. Specifically, a 50:50 blend by weight of the polypropylenes from Comparative Example 1 and Comparative Example 2 is spun and bonded into nonwoven handsheets. The blend is pre-compounded in a twin-screw extruder prior to spinning. Table 1 shows the average strain at peak load for the handsheets made from the blend (1) are higher than that for either of the individual constituents (C1, C2), indicating synergistic elongation behavior.
    TABLE 1
    Handsheets Made From Monocomponent Fibers - Neat Polypropylene
    Resins and a High MFR/Low MFR Polypropylene Blend
    STRAIN AT
    EXAM- MFR PEAK LOAD EXTENSION
    PLE # RESIN (g/10 min) (%) RATIO
    C1 Profax PH835 35 72
    C2 Valtec HH441 400 98
    1 50% Profax 118 168 2.3
    PH835 50%
    Valtec HH441
  • The melt flow rate of a blend is calculated using the logarithmic additivity rule, such as described by Abraham et al. in Eur. Polym. J., 26(2), pages 197-200 (1990). The melt flow rate for the blend of Example 1 is therefore calculated according to the following equation:
    log(MFR Blend)=w 1 log(MFR 1)+w 2 log(MFR 2)+ . . . +w n log( MFR n)
    where wi is the weight fraction of constituent i, MFRi the melt flow rate of constituent i, n the total number of constituents in the blend, and w1+w2 + . . . +w n=1.
  • COMPARATIVE EXAMPLE 3
  • This comparative example illustrates the properties resulting from melt spinning a polyolefin copolymer. Specifically, a soft polyolefin resin with a melt flow rate of 25 grams per 10 minutes (Adflex Z104S from Basell Polyolefins Company, Wilmington, Del.) is spun and bonded into nonwoven handsheets. Table 2 shows the average strain at peak load for these handsheets.
  • COMPARATIVE EXAMPLE 4
  • This comparative example illustrates the properties resulting from melt spinning a blend of a conventional spunbond grade polypropylene and a polyolefin copolymer. Specifically, an 80:20 blend by weight of the polypropylene from Comparative Example 1 and the polyolefin copolymer from Comparative Example 3 is spun and bonded into nonwoven handsheets. The blend is pre-compounded in a twin-screw extruder prior to spinning. Table 2 shows the average strain at peak load for the handsheets made from the blend (C4) is between those for the individual constituents (C1, C3).
  • EXAMPLE 2
  • This example illustrates the synergistic properties resulting from melt spinning a blend of a high melt flow rate polypropylene and a polyolefin copolymer. Specifically, an 80:20 blend by weight of the polypropylene from Comparative Example 2 and the polyolefin copolymer from Comparative Example 3 is spun and bonded into nonwoven handsheets. The blend is pre-compounded in a twin-screw extruder prior to spinning. Table 2 shows the average strain at peak load for the handsheets made from the blend (2) are higher than that for either of the individual constituents (C2, C3), indicating synergistic elongation behavior.
    TABLE 2
    Handsheets Made From Monocomponent Fibers - Neat Polypropylene
    and Polyolefin Copolymer Resins and Polypropylene/Polyolefin
    Copolymer Blends
    STRAIN AT
    EXAM- MFR PEAK LOAD EXTENSION
    PLE # RESIN (g/10 min) (%) RATIO
    C1 Profax PH835 35 72
    C2 Valtec HH441 400 98
    C3 Adflex Z104S 25 120
    C4 80% Profax 33 88 0.7
    PH835 20%
    Adflex Z104S
    2 80% Valtec 230 160 1.3
    HH441 20%
    Adflex Z104S
  • The melt flow rate of a blend is calculated using the logarithmic additivity rule, such as described by Abraham et al. in Eur. Polym. J., 26(2), pages 197-200 (1990). The melt flow rate for the blends of Comparative Example 4 and Example 2 are therefore calculated according to the following equation:
    log(MFR Blend)=w 1 log(MFR 1)+w 2 log(MFR 2)+ . . . +w n log(MFR n)
    where wi is the weight fraction of constituent i, MFRi the melt flow rate of constituent i, n the total number of constituents in the blend, and w1+w2+ . . . +wn=1.
  • COMPARATIVE EXAMPLE 5
  • This comparative example illustrates the fiber properties resulting from melt spinning a conventional spunbond grade polypropylene. Specifically, a polypropylene resin with a melt flow rate of 35 grams per 10 minutes (ProFax PH835 from Basell Polyolefins Company, Wilmington, Del.) is spun at a mass throughput of 0.3 grams per hole per minute on a pilot-scale spunbond nonwoven line. Unbonded fiber bundles are collected for single fiber property evaluation. Table 3 shows the resultant diameters and average strain at break of the fibers.
  • EXAMPLE 3
  • This example demonstrates synergistic properties resulting from melt spinning a blend of a conventional spunbond grade polypropylene and a high melt flow rate polypropylene. Fibers of the present invention are prepared from a pre-compounded blend of 50 wt % ProFax PH835 and 50 wt % Valtec HH441 (400 MFR polypropylene resin available from Basell Polyolefins Company, Wilmington, Del.) at a mass throughput of 0.3 grams per hole per minute on a pilot-scale spunbond nonwoven line. Unbonded fiber bundles are collected for single fiber property evaluation. Table 3 shows the resultant diameters and average strain at break of the fibers. At equivalent or even at smaller diameters, fibers prepared from the blend of the present invention exhibit higher extensibility than fibers prepared from the neat 35 MFR polypropylene resin (C5).
    TABLE 3
    Monocomponent Fiber Data - Neat Polypropylene Resin and
    a High MFR/Low MFR Polypropylene Blend
    Diameter Strain at
    Example # Resin (microns) Break (%)
    C5 ProFax PH835 19 267
    3 50% ProFax 19 349
    PH835 and 50
    Valtec HH441
    C5 ProFax PH835 29 407
    3 50% ProFax 23 514
    PH835 and 50
    Valtec HH441
  • COMPARATIVE EXAMPLE 6 AND EXAMPLE 4
  • These examples illustrate the advantageous properties of spunbond nonwoven webs prepared from the blends of the present invention as compared to spunbond nonwoven webs prepared from standard spunbond grade polypropylene resins. Thermally bonded spunbond nonwovens are prepared using the formulations and mass throughputs as described in Comparative Example 5 and Example 3 at a mass throughput of 0.3 grams per hole per minute on a pilot-scale spunbond nonwoven line. For each sample, the data reported is at the optimum bonding temperature as defined by the condition producing the highest strain at peak load in the cross direction. Basis weights, fiber diameters and average strain at peak load measured in the cross-direction are listed in Table 4. The spunbond nonwoven web prepared from the blend of the present invention (4) exhibits higher extensibility as compared to the standard polypropylene control (C6).
    TABLE 4
    Spunbond Nonwoven Webs from Monocomponent Fibers - Neat
    Polypropylene Resin and a High MFR/Low MFR Polypropylene Blend
    Basis Fiber CD Strain
    Weight Diameter at Peak Extension
    Example # Resin (g/m2) (microns) Load (%) Ratio
    C6 ProFax 24 30 66
    PH835
    4 50% ProFax 24 28 115 1.7
    PH835 and
    50 Valtec
    HH441
  • COMPARATIVE EXAMPLE 7
  • This comparative example illustrates the fiber properties resulting from melt spinning a conventional spunbond grade polypropylene. Melt-spun fibers are prepared using a 35 MFR polypropylene resin available from Sunoco Chemicals, Pittsburgh, Pa. (CP-360-H) on a commercial-scale spunbond nonwoven line. Unbonded fiber bundles are collected for single fiber property evaluation. Table 5 shows the resultant diameter and average strain at break of the fibers.
  • EXAMPLE 5
  • This example demonstrates synergistic fiber properties resulting from melt spinning a blend of a conventional spunbond grade polypropylene and a high melt flow rate polypropylene. Melt-spun fibers of the present invention are prepared from a pre-compounded blend of 50 wt % Sunoco CP-360-H and 50 wt% Valtec HH441 (400 MFR polypropylene resin available from Basell Polyolefins Company, Wilmington, Del.) on a commercial-scale spunbond nonwoven line. Unbonded fiber bundles are collected for single fiber property evaluation. Table 5 shows the resultant diameter and average strain at break of the fibers. At equivalent diameter, fibers prepared from the blend of the present invention (5) exhibit higher elongation than fibers prepared from the neat 35 MFR polypropylene resin (C7).
    TABLE 5
    Monocomponent Fiber Data - Neat Polypropylene Resin and
    a High MFR/Low MFR Polypropylene Blend
    Diameter Strain at
    Example # RESIN (microns) Break (%)
    C7 Sunoco CP- 23 411
    360-H
    5 50% Sunoco 23 482
    CP-360-H
    50% Valtec
    HH441
    C7 Sunoco CP- 27 505
    360-H
    5 50% Sunoco 29 624
    CP-360-H
    50% Valtec
    HH441
  • EXAMPLE 6
  • Thermally bonded spunbond nonwovens are prepared from a pre-compounded blend of 50 wt % PP 3155 (35 MFR polypropylene resin available from Exxon/Mobil Chemical Company) and 50 wt % Valtec HH441 (400 MFR polypropylene resin available from Basell Polyolefins) on a commercial-scale spunbond nonwoven line. The data reported is at the optimum bonding temperature as defined by the condition producing the highest elongation at peak in the cross direction. Basis weight is 20 grams per square meter and average fiber diameter is 20 microns. The cross-directional elongation at peak for the resultant nonwoven is 129%.
  • COMPARATIVE EXAMPLE 8 AND EXAMPLES 7 AND 8
  • These examples illustrate the advantageous properties, and in particular the improved processability of spunbond nonwoven webs prepared from the blends of the present invention as compared to spunbond nonwoven webs prepared from standard spunbond grade polypropylene resins. Thermally bonded spunbond nonwovens are prepared using the formulations as described in Comparative Example 7 and Examples 5 and 6 on a commercial-scale spunbond nonwoven line. For each sample, the data reported is at a slightly underbonded condition, that is a temperature approximately 20° F. below the peak temperature as defined by the temperature producing the highest strain at peak load in the cross direction. Basis weights, fiber diameters and average strain at peak load measured in the cross-direction are listed in Table 6. The spunbond nonwoven webs prepared from the blend of the present invention (7,8) exhibit higher extensibility as compared to the standard polypropylene control (C8).
  • In addition, each of the above-described spunbond nonwoven webs is processed according to the method outlined in U.S. patent application 2004/0131820 A1 to form a tufted fibrous web. Line speed is 300 feet per minute and tooling pitch is 0.060 inch pitch set to 0.110 inch depth of engagement. Table 6 also describes the processability of the spunbond nonwoven webs and the quality of the resultant structures, where full loops of unbroken fibers are highly desired for tactile benefit and functionality. The spunbond nonwoven webs of the present invention (7,8) exhibit far greater ease of processing and higher quality looped structures than webs prepared under equivalent conditions but made from standard spunbond grade polypropylene (C8).
    TABLE 6
    Spunbond Nonwoven Webs from Monocomponent Fibers - Neat
    Polypropylene Resin and a High MFR/Low MFR Polypropylene Blend
    CD
    Strain at
    Basis Fiber Peak
    Weight Diameter Load Extension Processing
    Ex # Resin (g/m2) (microns) (%) Ratio Loop Quality Ability
    C8 Sunoco 92 29 95 Sparse, Repeated roll
    CP-360-H short loops wraps
    Matted tops Extremely high
    Many line tensions
    broken fibers Many web
    breaks at normal
    line speeds
    7 50% 89 30 206 2.2 Mostly full Less difficult to
    Sunoco loops strip from roll
    CP-360- Moderate Lower line
    H and height tensions
    50% Fewer Can run at
    Valtec matted tops higher line speeds
    HH441 and broken
    fibers
    8 50% 95 33 196 2.1 Mostly full Less difficult to
    Exxon loops strip from roll
    3155 Moderate Lower line
    and 50% height tensions
    Valtec Fewer Can run at
    HH441 matted tops higher line speeds
    and broken
    fibers
  • The disclosures of all patents, patent applications (and any patents which issue thereon, as well as any corresponding published foreign patent applications), and publications mentioned throughout this description are hereby incorporated by reference herein. It is expressly not admitted, however, that any of the documents incorporated by reference herein teach or disclose the present invention.
  • While particular embodiments of the present invention have been illustrated and described, it would be obvious to those skilled in the art that various other changes and modifications can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. It is intended to cover in the appended claims all such changes and modifications that are within the scope of the invention.

Claims (20)

1. A nonwoven web comprising fibers having a polymer composition comprising:
a. from about 50% to about 95% of a polypropylene having a melt flow rate of from about 100 to about 1000 grams per 10 minutes, and
b. from about 5 to about 50% of a polymer having a melt flow rate of from about 10 to about 80 grams per 10 minutes.
2. The nonwoven web according to claim 1 wherein the polymer is selected from the group consisting of polypropylenes, polyethylene, and polyolefin copolymers or terpolymers, and combinations thereof.
3. The nonwoven web according to claim 2 wherein the polymer is polypropylene.
4. The nonwoven web according to claim 1 wherein the polypropylene has a melt low rate of from about 100 to about 600 grams per 10 minutes and the polymer has a melt flow rate of from about 15 to about 70 grams per 10 minutes.
5. The nonwoven web according to claim 1 wherein the melt flow rate of the polymer composition is from about 100 to about 800 grams per 10 minutes.
6. The nonwoven web according to claim 1 wherein the nonwoven web has a basis weight of from about 5 to about 100 grams per square meter.
7. The nonwoven web according to claim 1 wherein the fibers having a diameter of from about 5 to about 50 microns.
8. The nonwoven web according to claim 1 additionally comprising different fibers.
9. The nonwoven web according to claim 1 wherein the nonwoven web has a strain at peak load in at least one direction of greater than about 80 percent.
10. The nonwoven web according to claim 1 wherein the nonwoven web has an extension ratio of greater than about 1.
11. The nonwoven web according to claim 1 wherein the nonwoven web is produced by a spunbond process.
12. The nonwoven web according to claim 1 wherein the polymer composition comprises an additional ingredient.
13. The nonwoven web according to claim 1 wherein the web is an article selected from the group consisting of a topsheet for feminine hygiene pad, diaper, and/or adult incontinence product, stretchable ears for diapers, wipe for cleaning a hard surface or skin, and combinations thereof.
14. A disposable article comprising the nonwoven web according to claim 1.
15. A fiber comprising a polymer composition wherein the polymer composition comprises:
a. from about 50% to about 95% of polypropylene having a melt flow rate of from about 100 to about 1000 grams per 10 minutes, and
b. from about 5 to about 50% of a polymer having a melt flow rate of from about 10 to about 80 grams per 10 minutes.
16. The fiber according to claim 15 wherein the polymer is selected from the group consisting of polypropylenes, polyethylene, and polyolefin copolymers or terpolymers, and combinations thereof.
17. The fiber according to claim 15 wherein the polymer is polypropylene.
18. The fiber according to claim 15 wherein the fiber has a diameter of from about 5 to about 50 microns.
19. The fiber according to claim 15 wherein the fiber is a multicomponent fiber with the polymer composition comprising one component of the fiber.
20. A laminate nonwoven web comprising one layer comprising fibers having a polymer composition comprising:
a. from about 50% to about 95% of a polypropylene having a melt flow rate of from about 100 to about 1000 grams per 10 minutes, and
b. from about 5 to about 50% of a polymer having a melt flow rate of from about 10 to about 80 grams per 10 minutes.
US11/044,547 2004-01-27 2005-01-27 Soft extensible nonwoven webs containing fibers with high melt flow rates Abandoned US20050170727A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US53936904P true 2004-01-27 2004-01-27
US11/044,547 US20050170727A1 (en) 2004-01-27 2005-01-27 Soft extensible nonwoven webs containing fibers with high melt flow rates

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/044,547 US20050170727A1 (en) 2004-01-27 2005-01-27 Soft extensible nonwoven webs containing fibers with high melt flow rates

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20050170727A1 true US20050170727A1 (en) 2005-08-04

Family

ID=34826068

Family Applications (3)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/044,548 Abandoned US20050164587A1 (en) 2004-01-27 2005-01-27 Soft extensible nonwoven webs containing multicomponent fibers with high melt flow rates
US11/044,547 Abandoned US20050170727A1 (en) 2004-01-27 2005-01-27 Soft extensible nonwoven webs containing fibers with high melt flow rates
US13/710,508 Active US8926877B2 (en) 2004-01-27 2012-12-11 Process of making multicomponent fibers

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/044,548 Abandoned US20050164587A1 (en) 2004-01-27 2005-01-27 Soft extensible nonwoven webs containing multicomponent fibers with high melt flow rates

Family Applications After (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US13/710,508 Active US8926877B2 (en) 2004-01-27 2012-12-11 Process of making multicomponent fibers

Country Status (5)

Country Link
US (3) US20050164587A1 (en)
EP (2) EP1709224B2 (en)
JP (3) JP4599366B2 (en)
MX (2) MXPA06008385A (en)
WO (2) WO2005073447A1 (en)

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20050165173A1 (en) * 2004-01-26 2005-07-28 Autran Jean-Philippe M. Fibers and nonwovens comprising polypropylene blends and mixtures
US20080003908A1 (en) * 2006-06-29 2008-01-03 Hien Nguyen Non-woven structures and methods of making the same
US20080172840A1 (en) * 2007-01-19 2008-07-24 Smita Kacker Spunbond fibers and fabrics from polyolefin blends
US20110104419A1 (en) * 2009-11-02 2011-05-05 Steven Lee Barnholtz Fibrous elements and fibrous structures employing same
US20110104493A1 (en) * 2009-11-02 2011-05-05 Steven Lee Barnholtz Polypropylene fibrous elements and processes for making same
US20110104444A1 (en) * 2009-11-02 2011-05-05 Steven Lee Barnholtz Fibrous structures and methods for making same
US8101534B2 (en) 2007-11-09 2012-01-24 Exxonmobil Chemical Patents Inc. Fibers and non-wovens prepared with propylene-based elastomers
KR101156284B1 (en) 2007-01-19 2012-07-10 엑손모빌 케미칼 패턴츠 인코포레이티드 Spunbond fibers and fabrics from polyolefin blends
US20130137331A1 (en) * 2010-06-15 2013-05-30 Galen C. Richeson Nonwoven Fabrics Made From Polymer Blends And Methods For Making Same
US8852474B2 (en) 2007-07-17 2014-10-07 The Procter & Gamble Company Process for making fibrous structures
US8921244B2 (en) 2005-08-22 2014-12-30 The Procter & Gamble Company Hydroxyl polymer fiber fibrous structures and processes for making same
US9631321B2 (en) 2010-03-31 2017-04-25 The Procter & Gamble Company Absorptive fibrous structures

Families Citing this family (39)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US10024000B2 (en) 2007-07-17 2018-07-17 The Procter & Gamble Company Fibrous structures and methods for making same
US9387138B2 (en) 2009-01-15 2016-07-12 The Procter & Gamble Company Reusable outer covers for wearable absorbent articles
MX2011007569A (en) 2009-01-15 2011-08-04 Procter & Gamble Reusable outer cover for an absorbent article.
CA2749486A1 (en) * 2009-01-15 2010-07-22 The Procter & Gamble Company Reusable outer cover for an absorbent article having zones of varying properties
DE202010017694U1 (en) 2009-01-15 2012-04-24 The Procter & Gamble Company Reusable outer cover for an absorbent article with zones of varying properties
US9011402B2 (en) 2009-01-15 2015-04-21 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable absorbent insert for two-piece wearable absorbent article
CN102281846A (en) 2009-01-15 2011-12-14 宝洁公司 Anchoring subsystem having wearable absorbent article reusable
EP2523641A1 (en) 2010-01-14 2012-11-21 The Procter and Gamble Company Leg and waist band structures for an absorbent article
CA2787261A1 (en) 2010-01-14 2011-07-21 The Procter & Gamble Company Article of commerce including two-piece wearable absorbent article
US8808263B2 (en) 2010-01-14 2014-08-19 The Procter & Gamble Company Article of commerce including two-piece wearable absorbent article
US8585667B2 (en) 2010-05-21 2013-11-19 The Procter & Gamble Company Insert with advantageous fastener configurations and end stiffness characteristics for two-piece wearable absorbent article
US8652114B2 (en) 2010-05-21 2014-02-18 The Procter & Gamble Company Insert with advantageous fastener configurations and end stiffness characteristics for two-piece wearable absorbent article
US8652115B2 (en) 2010-05-21 2014-02-18 The Procter & Gamble Company Insert with advantageous fastener configurations and end stiffness characteristics for two-piece wearable absorbent article
US20120022491A1 (en) 2010-07-22 2012-01-26 Donald Carroll Roe Flexible Reusable Outer Covers For Disposable Absorbent Inserts
US8974432B2 (en) 2010-07-22 2015-03-10 The Procter & Gamble Company Outer cover for an absorbent article
US8821470B2 (en) 2010-07-22 2014-09-02 The Procter & Gamble Company Two-piece wearable absorbent article with advantageous fastener performance configurations
US8546641B2 (en) 2010-07-22 2013-10-01 The Procter & Gamble Company High-capacity disposable absorbent inserts for reusable outer covers
US9078792B2 (en) 2011-06-30 2015-07-14 The Procter & Gamble Company Two-piece wearable absorbent article having advantageous front waist region and landing zone configuration
US10131114B2 (en) * 2011-10-05 2018-11-20 Dow Global Technologies Llc Spunbond nonwoven fabrics
US20130102986A1 (en) 2011-10-19 2013-04-25 The Procter & Gamble Company Wearable Absorbent Articles With Reusable Chassis Having Extensible Body Zones
JP6034022B2 (en) * 2011-12-27 2016-11-30 旭化成株式会社 Nonwoven laminate
CN104302260B (en) 2012-05-15 2016-08-17 宝洁公司 Absorbent article having an elastic member in a plurality of layers
US8932273B2 (en) 2012-06-29 2015-01-13 The Procter & Gamble Company Disposable absorbent insert for two-piece wearable absorbent article
JP6188306B2 (en) * 2012-11-08 2017-08-30 スリーエム イノベイティブ プロパティズ カンパニー Nonwoven and stretch laminate
US9078789B2 (en) 2013-03-08 2015-07-14 The Procter & Gamble Company Outer covers and disposable absorbent inserts for pants
US8926579B2 (en) 2013-03-08 2015-01-06 The Procter & Gamble Company Fastening zone configurations for outer covers of absorbent articles
US20140257228A1 (en) 2013-03-08 2014-09-11 The Procter & Gamble Company Outer covers and disposable absorbent inserts for pants
US8936586B2 (en) 2013-03-08 2015-01-20 The Procter & Gamble Company Ergonomic grasping aids for reusable pull-on outer covers
US20140257231A1 (en) 2013-03-08 2014-09-11 The Procter & Gamble Company Outer covers and disposable absorbent inserts for pants
US9060905B2 (en) 2013-03-08 2015-06-23 The Procter & Gamble Company Wearable absorbent articles
CN105473114B (en) * 2013-05-20 2019-06-07 宝洁公司 Non-woven webs and preparation method with visually different bonded part
JP2016040428A (en) * 2014-03-20 2016-03-24 出光興産株式会社 Crimped fiber and nonwoven fabric
BR112016028274A2 (en) 2014-06-02 2017-08-22 Procter & Gamble multi-layer films of thermoplastic polymers comprising poly (lactic acid)
US20170145198A1 (en) * 2014-07-03 2017-05-25 Idemitsu Kosan Co., Ltd. Spunbonded non-woven fabric and method for manufacturing same
RU2677084C2 (en) * 2014-09-10 2019-01-15 Дзе Проктер Энд Гэмбл Компани Nonwoven web
WO2016073713A1 (en) 2014-11-06 2016-05-12 The Procter & Gamble Company Crimped fiber spunbond nonwoven webs / laminates
US20170056257A1 (en) 2015-08-27 2017-03-02 The Procter & Gamble Company Belted structure
CN108024879A (en) 2015-09-18 2018-05-11 宝洁公司 Absorbent articles comprising substantially identical belt flaps
WO2018139523A1 (en) * 2017-01-27 2018-08-02 東レ株式会社 Spun-bonded nonwoven fabric

Citations (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4960820A (en) * 1988-05-24 1990-10-02 Shell Oil Company Compositions and articles using high melt flow poly-1-butene and polypropylene blends
US5460884A (en) * 1994-08-25 1995-10-24 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Soft and strong thermoplastic polymer fibers and nonwoven fabric made therefrom
US5478646A (en) * 1989-08-25 1995-12-26 Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals, Inc. Polypropylene fiber and a preparation process thereof
US5508318A (en) * 1993-07-15 1996-04-16 Montell North America Inc. Compositions of irradiated and non-irradiated olefin polymer materials with reduced gloss
US5539056A (en) * 1995-01-31 1996-07-23 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Thermoplastic elastomers
US5549876A (en) * 1994-11-28 1996-08-27 Dead Sea Works Production of potassium sulfate using differential contacting
US5622772A (en) * 1994-06-03 1997-04-22 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Highly crimpable spunbond conjugate fibers and nonwoven webs made therefrom
US5629080A (en) * 1992-01-13 1997-05-13 Hercules Incorporated Thermally bondable fiber for high strength non-woven fabrics
US5667750A (en) * 1994-10-12 1997-09-16 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Process of making a nonwoven web
US5672415A (en) * 1995-11-30 1997-09-30 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Low density microfiber nonwoven fabric
US5738745A (en) * 1995-11-27 1998-04-14 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Method of improving the photostability of polypropylene compositions
US5804286A (en) * 1995-11-22 1998-09-08 Fiberweb North America, Inc. Extensible composite nonwoven fabrics
US20010008965A1 (en) * 1999-01-08 2001-07-19 Bba Nonwovens Simpsonville, Inc. Durable hydrophilic nonwoven webs and articles formed therefrom
US6268302B1 (en) * 1994-11-18 2001-07-31 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. High strength spunbond fabric from high melt flow rate polymers
US20020009941A1 (en) * 1999-12-21 2002-01-24 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Fine denier multicomponent fibers
US20020045712A1 (en) * 1993-01-11 2002-04-18 Mikio Hashimoto Propylene polymer compositions
US6395392B1 (en) * 1997-07-28 2002-05-28 Fina Research, S.A. Bicomponent fibers of isotactic and syndiotactic polypropylene, methods of making, products made thereof
US6454989B1 (en) * 1998-11-12 2002-09-24 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Process of making a crimped multicomponent fiber web
US6476135B1 (en) * 2000-06-07 2002-11-05 Basell Poliolefine Italia S.P.A. Polyolefin composition containing low viscosity propylene homopolymer, fiber and extensible non-woven fabric prepared therefrom
US20030124348A1 (en) * 2001-12-14 2003-07-03 Arora Kelyn Anne High elongation, low denier fibers using high extrusion rate spinning
US20030216527A1 (en) * 2002-05-16 2003-11-20 Japan Polychem Corporation Propylene polymer

Family Cites Families (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
JP2759331B2 (en) * 1989-01-11 1998-05-28 大和紡績株式会社 Latent crimpable conjugate fiber and a production method thereof
FI112252B (en) * 1990-02-05 2003-11-14 Fibervisions L P Korkealämpötilasietoisia fiber bonds
JP2971919B2 (en) * 1990-07-10 1999-11-08 宇部日東化成株式会社 Thermal adhesive fiber
JP3055288B2 (en) * 1992-01-18 2000-06-26 ユニチカ株式会社 Stretchable long-fiber nonwoven fabric and a method of manufacturing the same
CA2136575A1 (en) * 1994-06-03 1995-12-04 Ty J. Stokes Highly crimpable conjugate fibers and nonwoven webs made therefrom
US5549867A (en) 1994-11-03 1996-08-27 Fiberweb North America, Inc. Distribution enhanced polyolefin meltspinning process and product
US6417121B1 (en) * 1994-11-23 2002-07-09 Bba Nonwovens Simpsonville, Inc. Multicomponent fibers and fabrics made using the same
EP0719879B1 (en) * 1994-12-19 2000-07-12 Hercules Incorporated Process for producing fibers for high strength non-woven materials, and the resulting fibers and non-wovens
JP3969758B2 (en) * 1995-07-26 2007-09-05 三井化学株式会社 Polyolefin non-woven fabric
JP3742907B2 (en) * 1997-02-06 2006-02-08 日本ポリオレフィン株式会社 Nonwoven fabric made of fibers and the fibers having a core-sheath structure
JPH11323715A (en) * 1998-05-14 1999-11-26 Mitsui Chem Inc Top sheet material for absorptive article
JP3946867B2 (en) 1998-05-15 2007-07-18 三井化学株式会社 The method of manufacturing high-elongation nonwoven fabric
US20010008675A1 (en) * 1998-11-06 2001-07-19 Meece Barry Dewayne Unidirectionally cold stretched nonwoven webs of multipolymer fibers for stretch fabrics and disposable absorbent articles containing them
US6153701A (en) 1998-11-20 2000-11-28 International Paper Company Wettable polypropylene composition and related method of manufacture
DE60032735T2 (en) * 1999-01-08 2007-11-08 Ahlstrom Mount Holly Springs, Llc Durable hydrophilic, non-woven mat for rechargeable alkaline batteries
EP1041180A1 (en) * 1999-03-30 2000-10-04 Fina Research S.A. Polypropylene fibres
US6423800B1 (en) * 1999-05-26 2002-07-23 Fina Technology, Inc. Pelletized polyolefin having ultra-high melt flow and its articles of manufacture
EP1059332A1 (en) 1999-06-10 2000-12-13 Fina Research S.A. Polypropylene with high melt strength and drawability
EP1126053A1 (en) * 2000-02-18 2001-08-22 Atofina Research S.A. Polypropylene fibres
JP2001254256A (en) * 2000-03-08 2001-09-21 Japan Polychem Corp Heat adhesive nonwoven fabric
JP2002069820A (en) * 2000-06-13 2002-03-08 Idemitsu Unitech Co Ltd Spun-bonded nonwoven fabric and absorbing article
JP2002096432A (en) * 2000-09-21 2002-04-02 Mitsui Chemicals Inc Moisture permeable film/non-woven fabric composite
CN1367184A (en) * 2001-01-12 2002-09-04 弗纳技术股份有限公司 Method for producing ultrahigh melt flow polypropylene resin
JP2003027360A (en) * 2001-07-12 2003-01-29 Mitsui Chemicals Inc Laminated material of non-woven fabric
JP4108417B2 (en) * 2001-09-07 2008-06-25 三井化学株式会社 Laminated sheet and manufacturing method thereof

Patent Citations (28)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4960820A (en) * 1988-05-24 1990-10-02 Shell Oil Company Compositions and articles using high melt flow poly-1-butene and polypropylene blends
US5624621A (en) * 1989-08-25 1997-04-29 Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals, Inc. Process of making polyprophylene fibers
US5478646A (en) * 1989-08-25 1995-12-26 Mitsui Toatsu Chemicals, Inc. Polypropylene fiber and a preparation process thereof
US5733646A (en) * 1992-01-13 1998-03-31 Hercules Incorporated Thermally bondable fiber for high strength non-woven fabrics
US5654088A (en) * 1992-01-13 1997-08-05 Hercules Incorporated Thermally bondable fiber for high strength non-woven fabrics
US5629080A (en) * 1992-01-13 1997-05-13 Hercules Incorporated Thermally bondable fiber for high strength non-woven fabrics
US5888438A (en) * 1992-01-13 1999-03-30 Hercules Incorporated Thermally bondable fiber for high strength non-woven fabrics
US20020045712A1 (en) * 1993-01-11 2002-04-18 Mikio Hashimoto Propylene polymer compositions
US5508318A (en) * 1993-07-15 1996-04-16 Montell North America Inc. Compositions of irradiated and non-irradiated olefin polymer materials with reduced gloss
US5622772A (en) * 1994-06-03 1997-04-22 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Highly crimpable spunbond conjugate fibers and nonwoven webs made therefrom
US5460884A (en) * 1994-08-25 1995-10-24 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Soft and strong thermoplastic polymer fibers and nonwoven fabric made therefrom
US5667750A (en) * 1994-10-12 1997-09-16 Kimberly-Clark Corporation Process of making a nonwoven web
US5744548A (en) * 1994-10-12 1998-04-28 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Melt-extrudable thermoplastic polypropylene composition and nonwoven web prepared therefrom
US6268302B1 (en) * 1994-11-18 2001-07-31 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. High strength spunbond fabric from high melt flow rate polymers
US5549876A (en) * 1994-11-28 1996-08-27 Dead Sea Works Production of potassium sulfate using differential contacting
US5539056A (en) * 1995-01-31 1996-07-23 Exxon Chemical Patents Inc. Thermoplastic elastomers
US5804286A (en) * 1995-11-22 1998-09-08 Fiberweb North America, Inc. Extensible composite nonwoven fabrics
US5738745A (en) * 1995-11-27 1998-04-14 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Method of improving the photostability of polypropylene compositions
US5672415A (en) * 1995-11-30 1997-09-30 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Low density microfiber nonwoven fabric
US6395392B1 (en) * 1997-07-28 2002-05-28 Fina Research, S.A. Bicomponent fibers of isotactic and syndiotactic polypropylene, methods of making, products made thereof
US6454989B1 (en) * 1998-11-12 2002-09-24 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Process of making a crimped multicomponent fiber web
US20010008965A1 (en) * 1999-01-08 2001-07-19 Bba Nonwovens Simpsonville, Inc. Durable hydrophilic nonwoven webs and articles formed therefrom
US20020009941A1 (en) * 1999-12-21 2002-01-24 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Fine denier multicomponent fibers
US6878650B2 (en) * 1999-12-21 2005-04-12 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Fine denier multicomponent fibers
US6476135B1 (en) * 2000-06-07 2002-11-05 Basell Poliolefine Italia S.P.A. Polyolefin composition containing low viscosity propylene homopolymer, fiber and extensible non-woven fabric prepared therefrom
US6569945B2 (en) * 2000-06-07 2003-05-27 Basell Poliolefine Italia S.P.A. Polyolefin composition containing low viscosity propylene homopolymer, fiber and extensible non-woven fabric prepared therefrom
US20030124348A1 (en) * 2001-12-14 2003-07-03 Arora Kelyn Anne High elongation, low denier fibers using high extrusion rate spinning
US20030216527A1 (en) * 2002-05-16 2003-11-20 Japan Polychem Corporation Propylene polymer

Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7491770B2 (en) * 2004-01-26 2009-02-17 The Procter & Gamble Company Fibers and nonwovens comprising polypropylene blends and mixtures
US7960478B2 (en) 2004-01-26 2011-06-14 The Procter & Gamble Company Fibers and nonwovens comprising polypropylene blends and mixtures
US20100286339A1 (en) * 2004-01-26 2010-11-11 Jean-Philippe Marie Autran Fibers And Nonwovens Comprising Polypropylene Blends And Mixtures
US7781527B2 (en) * 2004-01-26 2010-08-24 The Procter & Gamble Company Fibers and nonwovens comprising polypropylene blends and mixtures
US20090143536A1 (en) * 2004-01-26 2009-06-04 Jean-Philippe Marie Autran Fibers and Nonwovens Comprising Polypropylene Blends and Mixtures
US20050165173A1 (en) * 2004-01-26 2005-07-28 Autran Jean-Philippe M. Fibers and nonwovens comprising polypropylene blends and mixtures
US8921244B2 (en) 2005-08-22 2014-12-30 The Procter & Gamble Company Hydroxyl polymer fiber fibrous structures and processes for making same
US20080003908A1 (en) * 2006-06-29 2008-01-03 Hien Nguyen Non-woven structures and methods of making the same
WO2008069838A3 (en) * 2006-06-29 2008-07-24 Johnson & Johnson Consumer Layered non-woven structure
WO2008069838A2 (en) * 2006-06-29 2008-06-12 Mcneill-Ppc, Inc. Layered non-woven structure
US8728960B2 (en) * 2007-01-19 2014-05-20 Exxonmobil Chemical Patents Inc. Spunbond fibers and fabrics from polyolefin blends
US20080172840A1 (en) * 2007-01-19 2008-07-24 Smita Kacker Spunbond fibers and fabrics from polyolefin blends
KR101156284B1 (en) 2007-01-19 2012-07-10 엑손모빌 케미칼 패턴츠 인코포레이티드 Spunbond fibers and fabrics from polyolefin blends
US8852474B2 (en) 2007-07-17 2014-10-07 The Procter & Gamble Company Process for making fibrous structures
US9926648B2 (en) 2007-07-17 2018-03-27 The Procter & Gamble Company Process for making fibrous structures
US8101534B2 (en) 2007-11-09 2012-01-24 Exxonmobil Chemical Patents Inc. Fibers and non-wovens prepared with propylene-based elastomers
US20110104444A1 (en) * 2009-11-02 2011-05-05 Steven Lee Barnholtz Fibrous structures and methods for making same
US20110104493A1 (en) * 2009-11-02 2011-05-05 Steven Lee Barnholtz Polypropylene fibrous elements and processes for making same
US20110104419A1 (en) * 2009-11-02 2011-05-05 Steven Lee Barnholtz Fibrous elements and fibrous structures employing same
US9458573B2 (en) 2009-11-02 2016-10-04 The Procter & Gamble Company Fibrous structures and methods for making same
US9714484B2 (en) 2009-11-02 2017-07-25 The Procter & Gamble Company Fibrous structures and methods for making same
US10240297B2 (en) 2010-03-31 2019-03-26 The Procter & Gamble Company Fibrous structures and methods for making same
US9631321B2 (en) 2010-03-31 2017-04-25 The Procter & Gamble Company Absorptive fibrous structures
US20130137331A1 (en) * 2010-06-15 2013-05-30 Galen C. Richeson Nonwoven Fabrics Made From Polymer Blends And Methods For Making Same

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
JP2007526407A (en) 2007-09-13
WO2005073446A1 (en) 2005-08-11
EP1709224A1 (en) 2006-10-11
WO2005073447A1 (en) 2005-08-11
EP1709225B1 (en) 2013-07-17
JP4599366B2 (en) 2010-12-15
US8926877B2 (en) 2015-01-06
JP5676287B2 (en) 2015-02-25
US20050164587A1 (en) 2005-07-28
EP1709225A1 (en) 2006-10-11
MXPA06008385A (en) 2006-08-25
EP1709224B1 (en) 2013-07-17
JP2007524008A (en) 2007-08-23
US20130099408A1 (en) 2013-04-25
MXPA06008389A (en) 2006-08-25
EP1709225B2 (en) 2016-10-19
JP2011099196A (en) 2011-05-19
EP1709224B2 (en) 2016-10-12

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6946413B2 (en) Composite material with cloth-like feel
KR100236629B1 (en) Nonwoven fabric made with multicomponent polymeric strands including a blend of polyolefin and etylene alkylacrylate copolymer
JP3693339B2 (en) Elastic nonwoven web and a method of manufacturing the same
EP1264017B1 (en) Multicomponent fibers and fabrics made using the same
US6417122B1 (en) Multicomponent fibers and fabrics made using the same
US6417121B1 (en) Multicomponent fibers and fabrics made using the same
EP0914508B1 (en) Meltspun multicomponent thermoplastic continuous filaments, products made therefrom, and methods therefor
CN1094419C (en) Fibers and fabrics incorporating lower melting propylene polymers
US20060269748A1 (en) Extensible and elastic conjugate fibers and webs having a nontacky feel
US6506698B1 (en) Extensible composite nonwoven fabrics
JP3404555B2 (en) Hydrophilic fibers and nonwoven, nonwoven fabric article using them
CN100549267C (en) Polyethylene-based, soft nonwoven fabric
EP0868554B1 (en) Meltblown polyethylene fabrics and processes of making same
RU2149931C1 (en) Fastened thermoplastic polymer fiber and nonwoven material made therefrom
EP1704273B1 (en) Nonwoven webs having reduced lint and slough
EP0740714B1 (en) Extensible composite nonwoven fabrics
CA2250436C (en) Polypropylene fibers and items made therefrom
US6632504B1 (en) Multicomponent apertured nonwoven
US6896843B2 (en) Method of making a web which is extensible in at least one direction
US7994078B2 (en) High strength nonwoven web from a biodegradable aliphatic polyester
US6516472B2 (en) Nonwoven fabrics and fabric laminates from multiconstituent polyolefin fibers
US20040170836A1 (en) Hollow fiber fabrics
EP2161360B1 (en) Elastic nonwoven fabric, process for producing the same, and textile product comprising the elastic nonwoven fabric
CA2530322C (en) High strength and high elongation wipe
EP1641853B1 (en) Fibers made from block copolymer

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: PROCTER & GAMBLE COMPANY, THE, OHIO

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:MELIK, DAVID HARRY;ARORA, KELYN ANNE;AUER, JEFFREY ALLEN;REEL/FRAME:016015/0377;SIGNING DATES FROM 20050202 TO 20050203

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- AFTER EXAMINER'S ANSWER OR BOARD OF APPEALS DECISION