US20050168902A1 - Bathing unit system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities - Google Patents

Bathing unit system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20050168902A1
US20050168902A1 US10/831,114 US83111404A US2005168902A1 US 20050168902 A1 US20050168902 A1 US 20050168902A1 US 83111404 A US83111404 A US 83111404A US 2005168902 A1 US2005168902 A1 US 2005168902A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
controller
bathing unit
defined
power
control device
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10/831,114
Inventor
Benoit Laflamme
Daniel Gaudreau
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Gecko Alliance Group Inc
Original Assignee
9090-3493 QUEBEC Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US10/768,130 priority Critical patent/US7327275B2/en
Application filed by 9090-3493 QUEBEC Inc filed Critical 9090-3493 QUEBEC Inc
Priority to US10/831,114 priority patent/US20050168902A1/en
Assigned to 9090-3493 QUEBEC INC. reassignment 9090-3493 QUEBEC INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: GAUDREAU, DANIEL, LAFLAMME, BENOIT
Priority claimed from CA2492252A external-priority patent/CA2492252C/en
Publication of US20050168902A1 publication Critical patent/US20050168902A1/en
Assigned to GECKO ALLIANCE GROUP INC. reassignment GECKO ALLIANCE GROUP INC. MERGER (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: 9069-1494 QUEBEC INC., 9090-3493 QUEBEC INC., 9092-4135 QUEBEC INC., 9092-4523 QUEBEC INC., GECKO ELECTRONIQUE INC.
Assigned to CAISSE CENTRALE DESJARDINS, CAISSE POPULAIRE DESJARDINS DE CHARLESBOURG reassignment CAISSE CENTRALE DESJARDINS SECURITY AGREEMENT Assignors: GECKO ALLIANCE GROUP INC.
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G05CONTROLLING; REGULATING
    • G05BCONTROL OR REGULATING SYSTEMS IN GENERAL; FUNCTIONAL ELEMENTS OF SUCH SYSTEMS; MONITORING OR TESTING ARRANGEMENTS FOR SUCH SYSTEMS OR ELEMENTS
    • G05B23/00Testing or monitoring of control systems or parts thereof
    • G05B23/02Electric testing or monitoring
    • G05B23/0205Electric testing or monitoring by means of a monitoring system capable of detecting and responding to faults
    • G05B23/0218Electric testing or monitoring by means of a monitoring system capable of detecting and responding to faults characterised by the fault detection method dealing with either existing or incipient faults
    • G05B23/0224Process history based detection method, e.g. whereby history implies the availability of large amounts of data
    • G05B23/0227Qualitative history assessment, whereby the type of data acted upon, e.g. waveforms, images or patterns, is not relevant, e.g. rule based assessment; if-then decisions
    • G05B23/0235Qualitative history assessment, whereby the type of data acted upon, e.g. waveforms, images or patterns, is not relevant, e.g. rule based assessment; if-then decisions based on a comparison with predetermined threshold or range, e.g. "classical methods", carried out during normal operation; threshold adaptation or choice; when or how to compare with the threshold
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61HPHYSICAL THERAPY APPARATUS, e.g. DEVICES FOR LOCATING OR STIMULATING REFLEX POINTS IN THE BODY; ARTIFICIAL RESPIRATION; MASSAGE; BATHING DEVICES FOR SPECIAL THERAPEUTIC OR HYGIENIC PURPOSES OR SPECIFIC PARTS OF THE BODY
    • A61H33/00Bathing devices for special therapeutic or hygienic purposes
    • A61H33/005Electrical circuits therefor

Abstract

A controller for identifying an abnormal operational condition in a bathing unit system that includes a power source and a set of bathing unit components. The controller comprises a power control device and a processing module. The power control device is capable of acquiring a first state and a second state. In the first state, said power control device enables the power source to supply power to the set of bathing unit components, and in the second state, said power control device prevents the power source from supplying power to the set of bathing unit components. The processing module is operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition associated with the bathing unit system, and more particularly with the controller itself. Upon detection of an abnormal operational condition associated with the controller, the processing module causes the power control device to acquire the second state.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation-in-part of co-pending U.S. patent application Ser. No. 10/768,130, which was filed on Feb. 2, 2004.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention relates to controllers suitable for use in bathing unit systems and, more particularly, to controllers adapted for detecting abnormal operational conditions in bathing unit systems.
  • BACKGROUND
  • Bathing unit systems that include control systems are well known in the art. Examples of such bathing unit systems include whirlpools, hot tubs, bathtubs, therapeutic baths and swimming pools, among others. Typically, these bathing unit systems include various functional components, such as water pumps, heating modules, filter systems, air blowers, ozone generators, and lighting systems, among others. It is generally, the control system of the bathing unit system that actuates and manages the various functional components of the bathing unit system for setting the different operational characteristics of these functional components. For example, the control system can control the activation and de-activation of the water pumps and of the heating module in order to maintain the water within the water receptacle at a desired temperature.
  • Generally, bathing unit control systems include a controller to which the various bathing unit components are connected. This controller is adapted to control the power supplied from a power source to each one of the various components. More specifically, in response to signals received from a user of the bathing unit system, for example via a control panel, and/or in response to signals received from various sensors, the controller will activate or de-activate the various bathing unit components by supplying power, or ceasing to supply power, to those components.
  • The various functional components of a bathing unit system are susceptible to abnormal operational conditions, in which they operate in manners that do not correspond to their respective normal operational conditions. An abnormal operational condition may result, for example, from an operational failure in one or multiple components of the bathing system. Such an operational failure in a functional component can be due to a mechanical or electronic malfunction in the component, or to the component experiencing operating conditions in which it was not designed to operate. Traditional control systems are generally able to detect and control abnormal operational conditions that result due to a failure of one or more of the various bathing unit components.
  • Abnormal operational conditions may also occur within the controller of a bathing unit system. Unfortunately, traditional control systems are not equipped to detect and control abnormal operational conditions that occur due to a failure of the controller. An operational failure within the controller may be caused by, for example, corrupted software or a circuit overheating, among other possibilities. When the controller experiences such an operational failure, the controller may be damaged and/or lose its ability to control the activation and de-activation of the various functional components of the bathing unit system. In such a case, it is desirable that there be an emergency feature for preventing further damage to the bathing unit system, and preventing harm to users of the bathing unit system.
  • In light of the above, there is a need in the industry to provide a controller suitable for a bathing system that alleviates at least in part the problems associated with existing controllers.
  • SUMMARY
  • In accordance with a broad aspect, the invention provides a controller for a bathing unit system.
  • The bathing unit system includes a power source and a set of bathing unit components. The controller comprises a power control device and a processing module. The power control device interfaces between the power source and the set of bathing unit components and is capable of acquiring either one of a first state and a second state. In the first state, the power control device enables the power source to supply power to the set of bathing unit components, and in the second state, said power control device prevents the power source from supplying power to the set of bathing unit components. The processing module is in communication with the power control device and is operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition associated with the bathing unit system and, upon detection of an abnormal operational condition of the bathing system, causing the power control device to acquire the second state.
  • In a non-limiting example of implementation, the controller includes an output module, wherein upon detection by the processing module of an abnormal operational condition of the bathing unit system, the output module is operative for conveying information to a user indicative of an error condition.
  • In accordance with another broad aspect, the invention provides a method for monitoring a bathing unit system that includes a power source, a set of bathing unit components and a power control device for interfacing between the power source and the set of bathing unit components. The power control device is capable of acquiring a first state and a second state. In the first state, the power control device enables the power source to supply power to the set of bathing unit components, and in the second state, the power control device prevents the power source from supplying power to the set of bathing unit components. The method comprises detecting an abnormal operational condition associated with the bathing unit system and causing the power control device to acquire the second state upon detection of an abnormal operational condition associated with the bathing unit system.
  • In accordance with yet another broad aspect, the invention provides a bathing unit system comprising a power source, a set of bathing unit components in communication with the power source, a power control device and a processing module. The power control device interfaces between the power source and the set of bathing unit components and is capable of acquiring a first state and a second state. In the first state, the power control device enables the power source to supply power to the set of bathing unit components, and in the second state, the power control device prevents the power source from supplying power to the set of bathing unit components. The processing module is in communication with the power control device, and is operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition associated with the bathing unit system and causing said power control device to acquire the second state upon detection of an abnormal operational condition associated with the bathing unit system.
  • In accordance with yet another broad aspect, the invention provides a system for monitoring a controller that is operative for supplying power from a power source to a set of operational components. The system comprises a power control device and a processing module. The power control device interfaces between the power source and the set of operational components and is capable of acquiring a first state and a second state. In the first state, the power control device enables the power source to supply power to the set of operational components, and in the second state, the power control device prevents the power source from supplying power to the set of operational components. The processing module is in communication with the power control device, and is operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition associated with the controller and causing the power control device to acquire the second state upon detection of an abnormal operational condition associated with the controller.
  • These and other aspects and features of the present invention will now become apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art upon review of the following description of specific embodiments of the invention in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • A detailed description of the embodiments of the present invention is provided herein below, by way of example only, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which:
  • FIG. 1 is a block diagram of a bathing unit system that is equipped with a controller, in accordance with a non-limiting example of implementation of the present invention;
  • FIG. 2 is a block diagram of the controller of FIG. 1 in accordance with a non-limiting example of implementation of the present invention;
  • FIG. 3 is a flow chart depicting a process for monitoring the bathing unit system in accordance with a non-limiting example of implementation of the present invention;
  • FIG. 4 is a block diagram of a diagnostic unit in accordance with a non-limiting example of implementation of the present invention; and
  • FIG. 5A-5C are block diagrams of various embodiments of an output module suitable for use with a controller in accordance with specific non-limiting examples of implementation of the present invention.
  • In the drawings, the embodiments of the invention are illustrated by way of examples. It is to be expressly understood that the description and drawings are only for the purpose of illustration and are an aid for understanding. They are not intended to be a definition of the limits of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a block diagram of a bathing unit system 10 in accordance with a specific example of implementation of the present invention. It is to be understood that the expression “bathing unit system”, as used for the purposes of the present description, refers to spas, whirlpools, hot tubs, bath tubs, therapeutic baths, swimming pools and any other type of bathing receptacle that can be equipped with a control system for controlling various operational settings.
  • The Bathing Unit System 10
  • The bathing unit system 10, shown in FIG. 1, includes a water receptacle 18 for holding water, a plurality of jets 20, a plurality of drains 22, a control system and a plurality of bathing unit components. The bathing unit components shown in FIG. 1 include water pumps 11 and 12, filter 26, air blower 24, and heating module 60. It should be understood that the bathing unit system 10 can include more or less bathing unit components without departing from the spirit of the invention. For example, although not shown in FIG. 1, the bathing unit system 10 could also include an ozonator, lighting components for lighting up the water in the water receptacle 18, multimedia components such as a CD/DVD player and/or any other components suitable for use in a bathing unit system 10.
  • In normal operation, water flows from the water receptacle 18, through one or more drains 22 and is pumped by water pump 12 through the heating module 60 where the water is heated. The heated water then leaves the heating module 60 and re-enters the water receptacle 18 through one or more jets 20. This cycle of water leaving the water receptacle 18 through one or more drains 22, passing through the heating module 60 and re-entering the water receptacle 18 through one or more jets 20 is repeated continuously while the water pump 12 is active.
  • In addition, in normal operation, the water also passes through a cycle wherein the water flows from the water receptacle 18, through one or more drains 22 and is pumped by water pump 11 through a filter 26. After having been filtered, the water then re-enters the water receptacle through one or more jets 20. This cycle of water leaving the water receptacle 18 through drains 22, passing through the filter 26 and re-entering the water receptacle 18 through jets 20 is repeated continuously while the water pump 11 is active, in order to keep the water clean from particulate impurities.
  • In the non-limiting embodiment shown, the control system includes a control panel 32, a controller 30, an (optional) auxiliary I/O device 51 and a plurality of sensors 70 that monitor the various components of the spa.
  • The plurality of sensors 70 are operative for monitoring various operational conditions of the bathing unit system 10. For example, the sensors 70 may include temperature sensors for monitoring the temperature of the water, and liquid level sensors for monitoring the water level at various locations in the bathing unit system 10. Other sensors that are suitable for use within a bathing unit system 10 can also be included without departing from the spirit of the invention.
  • The control panel 32 is typically in the form of a user interface that allows a user to enter command signals for controlling the various operational settings of the bathing unit system 10. The control panel 32 can include buttons, levers or any other device known in the art for enabling a user to enter input commands for controlling the various operational settings of the bathing unit system 10. In addition, in a non-limiting embodiment, the control panel 32 can include a screen for conveying information to a user, such as the water temperature, the ambient air temperature and the time, among other possibilities.
  • Some non-limiting examples of the operational settings of the bathing unit system 10 that can be controlled by the control panel 32 include on/off settings, temperature control settings, jet control settings, lighting settings, etc. In a non-limiting example of implementation, the bathing unit system 10 includes entertainment and/or multimedia components, such that the operational settings of the bathing unit may also include audio settings and video settings, amongst others. Consequently, the expression “operational settings”, for the purpose of the present invention, is intended to cover operational settings for any suitable component that is part of the bathing unit system 10.
  • The controller 30 is operative to control the distribution of power supplied to the various bathing unit components on the basis of control signals received from the various sensors 70 and the control panel 32, in order to cause the desired operational settings to be implemented. In the non-limiting embodiment shown, the controller 30 is in communication with a power source 29, via service wiring 31, for receiving electrical power from the power source 29. As such, the controller 30 is able to control the distribution of power supplied from the power supply 29 to the various bathing unit components. More specifically, on the basis of signals received from the various sensors 70 as well as command signals received from the control panel 32, the controller 30 can control the distribution of power to the bathing unit components in order to cause the desired operational settings to be implemented. In a non-limiting implementation, the power source 29 is connected to the controller 30 via service wiring 31 which is passed through a ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) 86. The GFCI 86 is adapted for tripping in the presence of a current leakage to the ground, such that the power source 29 is unable to provide power to the set of bathing unit components. The ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) 86 provides an added safety measure to the bathing unit system. GFCI's are known in the art, and as such will not be described in further detail herein.
  • The power source 29 is operative to supply the controller 30 with any conventional power service suitable for residential or commercial use. In a non-limiting implementation, the power source 29 can supply 240 volts (V) AC to the controller 30 via service wiring 31. In an alternative non-limiting implementation, the power source 29 can supply 120 V AC to the controller 30 via service wiring 31. In an alternative non-limiting implementation, the power source 29 can supply 120 V and 240 V AC to the controller 30 via service wiring 31. It is to be appreciated that other voltage supply values or voltage supply combinations, for example depending on geographical location, are possible without detracting from the spirit and scope of the invention.
  • The auxiliary I/O device 51, as mentioned above, is an optional component of the bathing unit control system can be in the form of a laptop, a PDA, or a cellphone, among other possibilities. Auxiliary I/O devices 51 can be used to perform a variety of different functions, which will be described in more detail further on in the description.
  • The Controller 30
  • The controller 30, in accordance with a non-limiting embodiment of the present invention is shown in more detail in FIG. 2. FIG. 2 shows the controller 30 as being in communication with the power source 29, the control panel 32, at least one sensor 70, the auxiliary I/O device 51 and the plurality of bathing unit components 47. For the sake of simplicity, the bathing unit components shown in FIG. 2 are all referred to by reference number 47. It should be understood, however, that each of the bathing unit components 47 shown in FIG. 2 could be representative of the water pump 11 or 12, the heating module 60, the filter 26, the air blower 26, an ozonator (not shown) or any lighting components, and/or audio/visual components that are included within the bathing unit system 10.
  • Specific to the present invention, and as will be described below, the controller 30 is operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition associated with the bathing unit system 10 and, upon detection of the abnormal operational condition, is operative for causing a power control device 33 to prevent the power source 29 from supplying power to the set of bathing unit components 47. As such, the controller 30 is operative for monitoring the bathing unit system 10 for causing the power control device 33 to cut the power to the set of bathing unit components 47 in the case where an abnormal operational condition is detected. In a non-limiting example of implementation, the abnormal operational condition is associated to the controller 30, itself.
  • In the non-limiting embodiment shown, the controller 30 includes a power control device 33, a processing module 40, a circuit element 50 and a memory unit 48 that is in communication with the processing module 40.
  • It should be understood that the processing module 40 and the memory unit 48 can be integrated into a single physical element or be implemented as distinct elements without detracting from the spirit and scope of the present invention. Moreover, it is also to be understood that the processing module 40, the memory unit 48, and the circuit element 50 could be part of a single printed circuit board mounted within the housing of the controller 30.
  • The memory unit 48 is operative for storing measurements and values associated with normal operational conditions of the bathing unit system 10, such that the data stored within the memory unit 48 may be used by the processing module 40 when the bathing unit system 10 is in use. The measurements and values stored in the memory unit 48 can be entered into the memory unit 48 via an input port in the controller 30. For example, the auxiliary I/O device 51 can upload the data to the processing module 40 such as to cause the measurements and values associated with normal operational conditions of the bathing unit system 10 to be written into the memory unit 48. The auxiliary I/O device 51 can be a laptop, a PDA or a cellular phone, for example, and can transmit signals to the processing module 40 over a wireless link or a wire-line link without detracting from the sprit of the invention. For example, the link between the auxiliary I/O device 51 and the control unit 58 can be configured to be used as a serial link such as RS-232, RS-485 or other serial link standard. In an alternative example, the link between the auxiliary I/O device 51 and the control unit 58 may be a wireless link such as a RF or IR link. In such an alternative example, the controller 30 includes a receiver adapted to receive signals over the wireless link from the auxiliary I/O device 51. The auxiliary I/O device 51 is equipped with a corresponding wireless transmitter to transmit the signal to the controller receiver. In yet another embodiment, the memory unit 48 may be directly programmable by the auxiliary I/O device and the processing module 40 may be by-passed during the programming operation.
  • In an alternative embodiment, the storage in the memory unit 48 of measurements and values associated with normal operational conditions of the bathing unit system 10 can be effected by a self-programming operation. More specifically, during this self-programming operation, the processing module 40 obtains measurements and values associated to different operational conditions of the bathing unit system 10 and stores those measurements and values in the memory unit 48. The processing module 40 is operative to determine whether the measurements/values are “normal” prior to storing them in the memory unit 48. A more detailed description of a self-programming operation is described in more detail in the parent case filed on Feb. 2, 2004.
  • In yet another alternative embodiment, the measurements and values associated with normal operational conditions of the bathing unit system 10 can be entered into the processing module 40, and stored in the memory unit 48, via entries submitted by the user through the control panel 32.
  • In yet another alternative embodiment, the measurements and values associated with normal operational conditions of the bathing unit system 10 can be pre-programmed into the memory unit 48.
  • The memory unit 48 may be implemented using any suitable memory device such as an EPROM, EEPROM, RAM, FLASH, disc or any other suitable type of memory device. In a preferred implementation, the memory unit 48 includes a non-volatile memory component and the control unit 58 stores the measurements and values in the non-volatile memory component of the memory unit 48. As will be further detailed below, the information stored in the memory unit can be used by the processing module 40 to detect the occurrence of an abnormal operational condition of the bathing unit system 10.
  • As described above, the controller 30 includes a circuit element 50. The circuit element 50 is adapted to convert power received from the power source 29, via service wiring 31, into a particular voltage and/or current to be supplied to a given bathing unit component 47 connected to the controller 30. Amongst other elements, the circuit element 50 includes a set of actuators 52, such as switches, relays, contactors, or triacs, each adapted to enable or prevent the flow of an electrical current to a respective component 47 of the bathing unit system 10. As such, each one of the bathing unit components 47 of the bathing unit system 10 is capable of acquiring either one of an activated state and a non-activated state. In the activated state, the actuator 52 associated to a given bathing unit component 47 enables the bathing unit component 47 to receive power from the power source 29 by drawing an electrical current at a certain voltage from the controller 30 via a respective electrical cable. The given bathing unit component 47 is then able to utilize the received power to perform the function for which it was designed. Conversely, in the non-activated state, the actuator 52 associated to a given component prevents the given component from receiving power from the controller 30 and as such, the given component is essentially turned off. For instance, when in the activated state, pump 12 draws an electrical current at a certain voltage from the controller 30 in order to perform the function for which it was designed, which is basically to pump water from water receptacle 18 through drains 22, into heating module 60, and back into receptacle 18 through jets 20. When in the non-activated state, pump 12 does not draw any current from the controller 30 and thus does not perform any pumping action.
  • In the non-limiting embodiment shown, the processing module 40 includes a diagnostic unit 42 and a control unit 58. It is the control unit 58 of the processing module 40 that is operative for controlling the distribution of power supplied to the various bathing unit components. By controlling the actuators 52, the control unit 58 is operative for causing each of the bathing unit components 47 to acquire one of the activated and non-activated states. More specifically, the control unit 58 is operative for issuing command signals over communication line 44 for causing respective ones of the actuators 52 to either enable or prevent the bathing unit components 47 from receiving power, which causes the respective bathing unit components 47 to acquire either the activated or the non-activated state.
  • The control unit 58 is operative for issuing command signals to the circuit element 50 for causing each of the bathing unit components 47 to acquire either the activated or the non-activated state, on the basis of signals received from the control panel 32, signals received from the sensors 70 and optionally, signals received from the auxiliary I/O device 51. For example, in the case where a user enters input command signals at the control panel 32, the control unit 58 is responsive to receipt of those input command signals to issue signals to the circuit element 50. If a user of the bathing unit system 10 desires that the water temperature be increased, the user can enter an input command via the control panel 32 indicative that the water temperature should be increased. Upon receipt of this input command signal at the control unit 58, the control unit 58 issues a signal to the circuit element 50 for causing the actuator associated to the heating module to enable power to be supplied to the heating module. As such, the heating module acquires the activated state such that it acts to heat up the water. Alternatively, the control unit 58 may be adapted to receive command signals from the auxiliary I/O device 51, which could be in the form of a laptop, a PDA or a cellular phone. It should be appreciated that the control unit 58 can communicate with the I/O device 51 over a wireless link or a wire-line link without detracting from the spirit of the invention.
  • In yet another embodiment, the control unit 58 can issue signals to the circuit element 50 on the basis of signals received from the sensors 70. For example, in the case where the sensor 70 is a water temperature sensor, and the control unit 58 has been programmed to keep the water temperature within a predetermined temperature range, upon receipt of a signal from the sensor 70 indicative that the water temperature has fallen below the minimum temperature value of the predetermined temperature range, the control unit 58 issues a signal to the circuit element 50 for causing the heating module to acquire the activated state. Likewise, upon receipt of a signal from the sensor 70 indicative that the water temperature has exceeded the maximum temperature value of the predetermined temperature range, the control unit 58 issues a signal to the circuit element 50 for causing the heating module to acquire the non-activated state.
  • As described above, the processing module 40 further includes a diagnostic unit 42 that is in communication with the control unit 58. The diagnostic unit 42 is operative for monitoring the operational conditions of the bathing unit system 10 in order to detect when an abnormal operational condition of the bathing unit system 10 occurs. In a more specific case, the diagnostic unit 42 is operative to detect when an abnormal operational condition occurs within the controller 30 itself. As will be described in more detail further on, upon detection of an abnormal operational condition within the controller 30, the diagnostic unit 42 is operative for causing the power control device 33 to prevent power from being supplied from the power source 29 to the set of bathing unit components 47.
  • As shown in FIG. 2, the power control device 33 interfaces between the power source 29 and the plurality of bathing unit components 47. As such, the power supplied by the power source 29 to the circuit element 50, via service wiring 31, passes through the power control device 33. The power control device 33 is adapted for acquiring a first state and a second state. When the power control device 33 is in the first state, it is activated, meaning that the power source 29 is able to supply power to the set of bathing unit components 47. In general, it is the control unit 58 that maintains the power control device 33 in the first state during normal operation of the bathing unit system 10. However, as described above, upon detection of an abnormal operational condition, it is the diagnostic unit 42 of the processing module 40 that is operative for causing the power control device 33 to acquire the second state, such that the power source 29 is prevented from supplying power to the set of bathing unit components 47. Consequently, when the power control device 33 is in the second state, regardless of the positions of actuators 52, the bathing unit components 47 do not receive any power for operation and thus are all shut off.
  • As such, the power control device 33 acts as a security feature for preventing the power source 29 from supplying power to the plurality of bathing unit components 47 when an abnormal operational condition occurs within the bathing unit system 10, and more specifically within the controller 30. In general, the power control device 33 is generally caused to acquire the second state when the processing module 40 detects an abnormal operational condition of the bathing unit system 10 that cannot be resolved by the control unit 58. In a non-limiting embodiment the power control device 33 can be a power contactor, a latching relay, a non-latching coil, or a plurality of relays that, in combination, are able to cut the power to the bathing unit components 47.
  • As shown in FIG. 2, the power source 29 supplies power to the controller 30 via service wiring 31. The service wiring 31 can include four conductor wires, namely a first line wire (line1), a second line wire (line2, second phase), a neutral wire and a ground wire. In a non-limiting example of implementation, when in the second state, the power control device 33 cuts the power flow from at least one of the first and second line wires, which is sufficient to prevent power for the power source 29 from reaching the set of bathing unit components 47. Providing a power control device 33 that is operative to cut only one of the first and second line wires is less costly than providing a power control device 33 that is operative to cut multiple line wires. However, in an alternative embodiment, when in the second state, the power control device 33 is operative to cut the power flow along three of the power line wires, namely line1, line2 and neutral.
  • A more detailed explanation of the manner in which the diagnostic unit 42 detects an abnormal operational condition of the bathing unit system 10 will be described in more detail below with respect to FIGS. 3 and 4.
  • It should be understood that although the control unit 58 and the diagnostic unit 42 are shown as separate elements, the functionality of the diagnostic unit 42 and the control unit 58 could be integrated into a single element without departing from the spirit and scope of the present invention. It will also be appreciated that the functionality of the processing module 40 may be implemented as a programmable logic block or by using any suitable hardware, software or combination thereof.
  • Flow Chart of FIG. 3
  • Shown in FIG. 3 is a broad example of a process used by the processing module 40 for monitoring the operational conditions of the bathing unit system 10. At step 90, the processing module 40 monitors one or more operational conditions of the bathing unit system 10, and more specifically, one or more operational conditions of the controller 30. The term “operational conditions” as used herein, refers to measurements associated to various readings, such as temperature readings, power readings and frequency readings, as well as to the presence of certain signals, or abnormal environmental conditions within the controller 30.
  • At step 92, on the basis of the operational conditions monitored at step 90, the processing module 40 detects whether an abnormal operational condition of the controller 30 exists on the basis of the operational conditions monitored at step 90. The manner in which the processing module 40 detects the presence of an abnormal operational condition will be described in more detail below with respect to FIG. 4. In the case where the processing module 40 does not detect the presence of an abnormal operational condition, the processing module 40 returns to step 90, and continues monitoring the operational conditions of the bathing unit system 10. However, in the case where the processing module 40 does detect the presence of an abnormal operational condition, the processing module 40 proceeds to step 94, wherein it causes the power control device 33 to acquire the second state, such that the power source 29 is prevented from supplying power to the bathing unit components 47.
  • Optionally, once the processing module 40 has caused the power control device 33 to acquire the second state, the processing module 40 may proceed to step 96, wherein the processing module 40 provides information to a user of the bathing unit system 10. The information provided to a user can be indicative of the fact that the bathing unit components 47 have all been shut down, or the information can be indicative of the actual abnormal operational condition that caused the power control device 33 to cause the bathing unit components 47 to be shut down. The manner in which information is communicated to one or more users of the bathing unit system 10 will be described in more detail below.
  • It should be understood that step 90, wherein the processing module 40 monitors the operational conditions of the bathing unit system 10, can occur continuously, or can be initiated periodically at preset time intervals or at random time intervals. For example, a preset time interval could be every minute, or every 30 seconds. In the case where step 90 is initiated at random time intervals, the processing module 40 might include a random number generator, for example.
  • Alternatively, it is within the scope of the present invention for step 90 to be initiated following a certain condition. For example, step 90 may be initiated upon reception by the processing module 40 of a signal indicative of an explicit command to enter step 90. Such a command could be entered by a user of the bathing unit system 10 via the control panel 32, for example. Alternatively, step 90 may be initiated upon start up of the bathing unit system 10 or upon the activation and/or deactivation of a bathing unit component 47. Or, step 90 can be initiated each time the user enters a command signal at the control panel 32. Other conditions based upon which the processing module 40 could initiate step 90 will be known to those of skill in the art and as such will not be described in more detail herein.
  • Diagnostic Unit 42
  • Shown in FIG. 4 is a more detailed diagram of a diagnostic unit 42, in accordance with a non-limiting embodiment of the present invention. As shown, the diagnostic unit 42 is in communication with the power control device 33 and the control unit 58, and includes an energy storage unit 62, a signal frequency detection unit 64, a power detection unit 66, a thermal detection unit 68 and an optical detection unit 72.
  • As shown in FIG. 4, in normal operation and upon start up of the bathing unit system 10, the control unit 78 is operative to issue a signal to the power control device 33 over communication link 78 for causing the power control device 33 to remain in the first state, such that the power source 29 is able to provide power to the set of bathing unit components 47. It is the diagnostic unit 42 that then performs steps 90 through 94 of the process described above. As will be described in more detail below, in the case where the diagnostic unit 42 detects an abnormal operational condition, the diagnostic unit 42 is operative to issue a signal to the power control unit 33 from one of the detection units 64, 66, 68 and 72 listed above, for causing the power control device to acquire the second state, such that the power source 29 is unable to supply power to the set of bathing unit components 47.
  • In the non-limiting embodiment where the power control unit 33 is a power contactor, as shown in FIG. 4, the control unit 58 is operative to issue a signal over communication link 78 to the power contactor for “setting” the power contactor, such that the power contactor acquires the first state. In the first state, the power contactor is “closed”, thereby permitting the power source 29 to supply power to the set of bathing unit components 47. Upon detection of an abnormal operational condition within the controller 30, at least one of the detection units 64, 66, 68 and 72 of the diagnostic unit 42 issues a signal to the power contactor for “resetting” the power contactor, such that the power contactor acquires the second state. In the second state, the power contactor is “open”, thereby preventing the power source 29 from supplying power to the set of bathing unit components 47.
  • In accordance with the non-limiting embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the diagnostic unit 42 is operative for monitoring the following operational conditions of the controller 30, during step 90 of the method described above:
    • 1. the frequency of a certain signal;
    • 2. the power level supplied by the power source 29;
    • 3. the internal temperature of the controller 30;
    • 4. the presence of electric arcs within the controller 30; and
    • 5. the receipt of a command signal indicative that the power control device 33 should acquire the second state.
  • On the basis of these operational conditions, the diagnostic unit 42 is operative for detecting the presence of an abnormal operational condition within the controller 30. The manner in which the diagnostic unit 42 detects the presence of abnormal operational conditions will be described in more detail below with respect to each of the detection units 64, 66, 68 and 72 listed above.
  • It should be understood that the processing module 40 may be implemented as a processor, as discrete logic, as a FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array, as an analog circuit, or as a combination thereof, among other possibilities.
  • In addition, it should be understood that each of the diagnostic unit 42 and the control unit 58, as well as the controller 30 itself, may be implemented as a processor, as discrete logic, as a FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array, as an analog circuit, or as a combination thereof, among other possibilities.
  • Frequency Detection Unit 64
  • As shown in FIG. 4, the diagnostic unit 42 includes a frequency detection unit 64 that is in communication with the control unit 58 via communication link 74. The frequency detection unit 64 is operative to monitor the pulse frequency of a particular signal issued by the control unit 58, where this particular signal is characterized by a known, predetermined frequency value. In a non-limiting example of implementation, the particular signal is generated by the software in the control unit 58 on the basis of the speed of software's the main program loop. The frequency detection unit 64 monitors this particular signal in order to ensure that the frequency of the signal generated on the basis of the speed of the main program loop corresponds to the predetermined frequency value. It should be understood that for the purposes of this specification, the term “frequency value” could also encompass a frequency range.
  • When the control unit 58 is functioning properly, and in accordance with its internal command logic, the particular signal monitored by the frequency detection unit 64 over communication link 74 will have a pulse frequency that corresponds to a normal frequency value or range. Conversely, when the control unit 58 is not functioning properly, for example when the control software is corrupt or lost, no pulse frequency will be received at the frequency detection unit 64, or the particular signal will have a pulse frequency that is outside of the normal frequency range. When this happens, the frequency detection unit 64 determines that the control unit 58 is not functioning properly, and may be unable to properly manage the bathing unit components 47, which could lead to a potentially dangerous situation for the user. For example, if the heating module 60 is in an activated state, and the control unit 58 is unable to cause the heating module 60 to acquire a non-activated state due to the fact that its internal logic is corrupt or lost, then the water in the water receptacle 18 could overheat to a temperature that is dangerous for a user of the bathing unit system 10.
  • As such, the frequency detection unit 64 is in communication with the control unit 58 via communication link 74, and is operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition within the controller 30 when the frequency of the particular signal issued by the control unit 58 over communication link 74 has a frequency that does not correspond to a predetermined frequency value or range. In this manner, the frequency detection unit 64 performs a “watchdog” function, with regard to the control unit's command logic and/or software.
  • As mentioned above, the diagnostic unit 42 detects the presence of an abnormal operational condition, when the frequency detection unit 64 detects that the pulse frequency received over communication link 74 does not correspond to a predetermined frequency value. For example, the diagnostic unit 42 detects the presence of an abnormal operational condition, when the frequency detection unit 64 no longer receives a pulse frequency over communication link 74. This could indicate, for example, that the control unit's software has been lost.
  • Alternatively, the diagnostic unit 42 detects the presence of an abnormal operational condition, when the frequency detection unit 64 detects that the pulse frequency received over communication link 74 is above or below a predetermined frequency value. For example, in the case where the control unit's software has become corrupt, such that main program loop is executed at a much faster rate than normal, the pulse frequency of the signal received at the frequency detection unit 64 would not correspond to a predetermined frequency value or range. In a non-limiting example of implementation, the predetermined frequency value or range, against which the pulse frequency received over communication link 74 is compared, is stored in the memory unit 48 of the controller. As such, in the case where the predetermined frequency value is a specific frequency value, the frequency detection unit 64 detects the presence of an abnormal operational condition of the controller 30 when the frequency of the signal received over communication link 74 does not equal the predetermined frequency value.
  • Once the frequency detection unit 64 has detected an abnormal operational condition within the controller 30, meaning that the pulse frequency of the particular signal received from the control unit 58 does not correspond to the predetermined frequency value, the frequency detection unit 64 issues a signal for causing the power control device 33 to acquire the second state. As such, in the case where the control unit's 58 software is lost or corrupted, the diagnostic unit 42 prevents all power from being provided to the bathing unit components 47, thereby shutting down the bathing unit components 47.
  • It should be understood that the validation of the processing module's integrity can be done in a variety of other ways that are know in the art.
  • Power Detection Unit 66
  • As shown in FIG. 4, the diagnostic unit 42 includes a power detection unit 66 that receives a reading of the power supplied by the power source 29 via communication link 76. The power 20 detection unit 64 is operative to monitor the power issued by the power source 29 in order to ensure that this power does not fall below a predetermined power level.
  • As such, the power detection unit 66 is operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition within the controller 30 when the power level supplied by the power source 29 falls below a predetermined power level.
  • Although not shown in FIG. 4, in a further, non-limiting example of implementation, the power detection unit 66 is further operative to monitor the power exiting from power transformer 57, in order to monitor the lower voltage power being supplied to the control unit 58. This lower voltage 30 power is used by the control unit 58 to power various circuitry. As shown in FIG. 2, the diagnostic unit 42 is operative for receiving such a power reading from the power transformer 57, via communication link 37. As such, the power detection unit 66 is operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition within the controller 30 when the power level supplied by the power transformer 37 falls below a predetermined power level.
  • In a non-limiting example of implementation, the predetermined power levels associated to the power source 29 and the power transformer 57 are stored in the memory unit 48 of the controller 30. As such, the power detection unit 66 detects the presence of an abnormal operational condition of the controller 30 when the power level supplied by the power source 29 falls below the predetermined power level stored in the memory unit 48, or the power detection unit 66 detects the presence of an abnormal operational condition of the controller 30 when the power level supplied by the power transformer 57 falls below a predetermined power level stored in the memory unit 48. The predetermined power level or levels stored in the memory unit 48 can be pre-programmed into the memory unit 48, or can be entered into the memory unit 48 via the control panel 32 or an auxiliary I/O device 51, or can be entered into the memory unit 48 via a self-programming operation performed by the processing module 40.
  • It should also be understood that the power level supplied by the power source 29 can be plugged into a formula, such that it is the result of the formula that is compared with a predetermined power level stored in the memory unit 48.
  • In a further non-limiting example of implementation that is not shown in the Figures, the monitoring of the power can be done directly at the power source 29.
  • Once the power detection unit 66 has detected an abnormal operational condition of the bathing unit system 10, the power detection unit 66 issues a signal for causing the power control device 33 to acquire the second state. As such, in the case where there is a loss of the amount of power supplied by the power source 29 or the power transformer 57 to the controller 30, which may imply a failure of the power source 29 itself and which could lead to problems within the controller 30, the diagnostic unit 42 prevents all power from being provided to the bathing unit components 47.
  • Thermal Detection Unit 68
  • Referring again to FIG. 4, the diagnostic unit 42 further includes a thermal detection unit 68 that is operative to detect when the internal temperature within the controller 30 exceeds a predetermined temperature value. As such, the thermal detection unit 68 is operative to detect and prevent any abnormal occurrence of overheating within the controller 30.
  • The thermal detection unit 68 can include any type of heat sensor known in the art. For example, in a non-limiting embodiment, the thermal detection unit 68 can include thermocouples, thermistors, infrared sensor (thermopile) and/or thermal fuses. In a further non-limiting example of implementation, the thermal detection unit 68 can include a smoke detector.
  • As shown in FIG. 2, the controller 30 includes various different functional components such as the processing module 40 and the circuit element 50, each of which includes electrical circuitry. During use, this electrical circuitry generates heat. While a certain amount of heat is normal, it is desirable to avoid the case where the controller 30 overheats abnormally, since such an overheat situation can cause the circuitry, and therefore the functional components, to be damaged. Replacing a damaged controller 30 can be both time consuming and costly for the owner of the bathing unit system 10. Furthermore, in a worse case scenario, the excessive overheating of the controller 30 can result in an electrical fire within the controller, which can be very dangerous for a user of the bathing unit system 10.
  • As such, in order to avoid the situation where the controller 30 overheats abnormally, the thermal detection unit 68 is operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition within the controller 30, when the internal temperature of the controller 30 exceeds a predetermined temperature value. It should be understood that for the purposes of this specification, the term “temperature value” could also encompass a temperature range.
  • In a first non-limiting example of implementation, such as in the case where the temperature sensor of the thermal detection unit 68 is a thermistor, or a thermocouple, the predetermined temperature value is a property of the temperature sensor. For example, the predetermined temperature can be a defined by a thermal fuse. When the internal temperature of the controller 30 exceeds the predetermined temperature value, the thermal sensor is triggered, thus causing the thermal detection unit 68 to detect an abnormal operational condition of the bathing unit system 10.
  • In an alternative non-limiting example of implementation, the predetermined temperature value is stored in the memory unit 48 of the controller 30. As such, the thermal detection unit 68 can include a thermometer for taking readings of the internal temperature of the controller 30, and can compare those readings to the predetermined temperature value stored in the memory unit 48. In such an embodiment, the thermal detection unit 68 detects the presence of an abnormal operational condition within the controller 30 when the internal temperature of the controller 30 exceeds the predetermined temperature value stored in the memory unit 48. As described above, the predetermined temperature value stored in the memory unit 48 can be pre-programmed into the memory unit 48, or can be entered into the memory unit 48 via the control panel 32 or an auxiliary I/O device 51, or can be entered into the memory unit 48 via a self-programming operation performed by the processing module 40.
  • It should also be understood that the internal temperature of the controller 30, as determined by the thermal detection unit 68 can be plugged into a formula, such that it is the result of the formula that is compared with a predetermined temperature value stored in the memory unit 48.
  • In another alternative non-limiting example of implementation, the predetermined temperature value can be an average temperature value that is obtained based on the temperature within the controller 30 over a certain amount of time. In such an embodiment, the thermal detection unit 68 is operative to regularly measure the temperature within the controller 30, and to re-compute the average temperature value, based on a series of temperature measurements that are temporarily stored in the memory unit 48 and that were taken over the certain amount of time. In this embodiment, the thermal detection unit 68 detects an abnormal operational condition within the controller 30 when the internal temperature value of the controller 30 exceeds the average of the temperature value taken over a certain amount of time. It should be understood that the average temperature value can be taken based on readings taken over any predetermined amount of time, such as 1 minute, or 1 hour.
  • In an alternative example of implementation, the thermal detection unit 68 is operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition within the controller 30 when the thermal detection unit 68 detects smoke within the controller 30.
  • Once the thermal detection unit 68 has detected an abnormal operational condition within the controller 30, meaning that the internal temperature of the controller 30 exceeds the predetermined temperature value, the thermal detection unit 68 issues a signal for causing the power control device 33 to acquire the second state. As such, in the case where the internal temperature of the controller 30 becomes too hot, the diagnostic unit 42 prevents all power from being provided to the bathing unit components 47, thereby shutting down the bathing unit components 47. As such, damage to the controller 30, and the possibility of a fire within the bathing unit system 10, can be avoided.
  • Optical Detection Unit 72
  • As shown in FIG. 4, the diagnostic unit 42 also includes an optical detection unit 72 that is operative for detecting the presence of electric arcs within the controller 30. In general, and as known in the art, arcing is often caused by a joint that has been badly soldered, an overheated connection that results from a worn out relay or other bad components, or a loose connection. In the case where electrical arcs are present, there is the possibility that the control unit 58 is not functioning properly. In addition, the occurrence of electrical arcs is undesirable, because they increase the chances of electrical fires, and can cause damage to the controller 30. In addition, the occurrence of electrical arcs may reduce the life expectancy of the actuators 52.
  • It should be understood that the optical detection unit 72 can include any type of optical sensor known in the art. For example, in a non-limiting embodiment, the optical detection unit 72 can include infrared sensors, phototransitors, LEDs or any other type of light sensing technology.
  • In use, the optical detection unit 72 is operative to detect an abnormal operational condition of the controller 30 when there is the presence of electrical arcs within the controller 30.
  • Once the optical detection unit 72 has detected an abnormal operational condition of the controller 30, meaning that there is the presence of electrical arcs within the controller 30, the optical detection unit 72 issues a signal for causing the power control device 33 to acquire the second state. As such, in the case where electrical arcs occur within the controller 30, the diagnostic unit 42 prevents all power from being provided to the bathing unit components 47, thereby shutting down the bathing unit components 47.
  • Emergency-Off Command Signal
  • In a non-limiting example of implementation, the control unit 58 includes an input for receiving an emergency-off command signal from a user of the bathing unit system. For example, the emergency off command signal can be entered by a user via an “emergency” button located on the control panel 32 or anywhere else on the spa, or within range of the spa location. The control unit 58 is then responsive to the emergency off command signal for causing the power control device 33 to acquire the second state. For example, in the case where the control unit 58 issues a signal over communication link 78 for causing the power control device to acquire the first state, then upon receipt of the emergency-off signal, the control unit 58 ceases to issue a signal over communication link 78 for maintaining the power control device 33 in the first state. As such, in the absence of a signal from the control unit 58 for causing the power control device 33 to remain in the first state, the power control device 33 reverts to the second state. It should be understood that the emergency-off signal entered by a user of the bathing unit system 19 could be issued directly to the diagnostic unit 42, or the power control device 33, thereby bypassing the control unit 58.
  • In an alternative, non-limiting example of implementation, the control unit 58 is operative for detecting when one or more of the actuators 52 is stuck. When one or more actuators is stuck open or closed, it means that the control unit 48 is unable to control the bathing unit component associated with the stuck actuator 52. Depending on the bathing unit component, this can be a dangerous situation. For example, in the case where the actuator 52 associated with the heating module is stuck with the heating module in the activated position, the control unit 58 has no way to prevent the water temperature from heating to an unsafe temperature. In addition, in the case where an actuator associated with a water pump gets stuck, heat is generated by the water pump, which will cause the bathing unit system 10 to overheat and create an unsafe temperature for a user.
  • Under normal operating conditions, the control unit 58 is in communication with a water temperature sensor 70 that is operative for taking measurements of the water temperature within the water receptacle 18. As such, the control unit 58 can cause the heating module, and the water pumps, to intermittently acquire the activated and non-activated states, such that the water temperature remains within a predetermined temperature range. The predetermined temperature range can be specified by a user via the control panel 32 for example.
  • In the case where an actuator 52 associated to either one of the heating module or the water pumps is stuck, such that the water temperature will overheat, the control unit 58 will send one or more signals to the circuit element 50, for causing the heating module and/or the water pump to acquire a non-activated state. Simultaneously, the control unit 58 will monitor the water temperature sensor 70, and will notice that regardless of the fact that the heating module and/or the water pumps should be in the non-activated states, that the water temperature continues to rise. In a non-limiting example of implementation, when the water temperature sensor 70 indicates that the water temperature has exceeded an upper threshold, the control unit 58 will realize that something is wrong, and can cease to issue a signal to the power control device 33, via communication link 78. In the absence of a signal from the control unit 58, the power control device 33 will acquire the second state, wherein it prevents the power source 29 from providing power to the bathing unit components 47. As such, in the case where the water temperature is approaching an unsafe temperature, the control unit 58 is operative for causing the diagnostic unit 42 to cause the power control device 33 to acquire the second state.
  • Energy Storage Unit 62
  • In a non-limiting embodiment, the diagnostic unit 42 includes an energy storage unit 62 that is operative for storing energy that can be used by the diagnostic unit 42 in an emergency situation. For example, in the case where the power source 29 fails to provide sufficient power to the diagnostic unit 42, such that the diagnostic unit 42 is unable to function properly, the diagnostic unit 42 can use the energy reserved in the energy storage unit 62 for causing the power control device 33 to acquire the second state.
  • Power to Control Unit 58
  • Referring again to FIG. 2, the control unit 58 is in communication with the power source 29 via service wiring 35. In the embodiment shown, the power from the power source 29 passes through a power transformer 57 prior to entering the control unit 58, such that the voltage can be reduced.
  • As shown, the control unit 58 is powered independently from the power control device 33. This means that even when the power control device 33 is in the second state, such that the power supplied by the power source 29 is interrupted and the set of bathing unit components 47 are shut down, the control unit 58 continues to receive power for operation.
  • It should be understood that although FIG. 2 shows that the control unit 58 is powered by power source 29 via service wiring 35, it is within the scope of the present invention for the control unit 58 to be powered from a second power source (not shown) that is separate from the power source 29. For example, the bathing unit system 10 may include a control unit power source that is dedicated for providing power to the control unit 58.
  • As such, the controller 30 is designed such that when the power control device 33 is in the second state the control unit 58 continues to receive power for operation. This enables the control unit 58 to continue certain operational functions even when the power control device 33 has cut off the power from the power source 29 to the set of bathing unit components 47. For example, in a non-limiting embodiment, and as described above with respect to optional step 96 in FIG. 3, in the case where the power control device 33 is caused to acquire the second state, the processing module 40, and more specifically the control unit 58, is operative to provide information to a user. As described above, the information provided to the user can be indicative of the fact that there has been an emergency shutdown of the set of bathing unit components 47, or can be indicative of the abnormal operational condition that caused the emergency shutdown, among other possibilities. Therefore, in accordance with optional step 96 described above with respect to FIG. 3, once the power control device 33 has been caused to acquire the second state, such that it prevents the power source 29 from providing power to the bathing unit components 47, the control unit 58 conveys information to a user indicative of an error condition.
  • In the specific non-limiting examples of implementation shown in FIGS. 5A through 5C, the bathing unit system 10 includes an output module 88 in communication with the controller 30. It is the output module 88 that is adapted for conveying the information indicative of the error condition to a user of the bathing unit system 10.
  • In the specific example of implementation shown in FIG. 5A, the output module 88 is a part of the control panel 32, and may include, for example, a visual display element and/or an audio element to respectively convey to a human operator visual and/or audible information indicative of an error condition. The visual display element could be, for instance, a liquid-crystal display (LCD) or one or more light-emitting diodes (LEDs). As such, the information indicative of an error condition may be conveyed to a user in a visual format by displaying a message on a screen of the output module 88, or by turning ON (or OFF) an appropriate LED or causing an appropriate LED to blink. Alternatively, the information indicative of an error condition may be conveyed in an audio format such as by producing a beeping sound, or a verbal message from a voice synthesizer.
  • In another non-limiting embodiment shown in FIG. 5B, the output module 88 is in the housing of the controller 30 and is concealed from the user under typical operation. In such an embodiment, the output module 88 can be accessed by the user when the user realizes that power has been cut off from the bathing unit components 47.
  • In a non-limiting embodiment, the diagnostic unit 42 and the control unit 58 are in communication with each other such that the control unit 58 is operative to identify the abnormal operational condition within the controller 30 that prompted the diagnostic unit 42 to cause the power control device 33 to acquire the second state. For example, the control unit 58 is operative to identify whether the abnormal operational condition was caused by a thermal overheat or a loss of power, for example. As such, the control unit 58 can convey to a user, via the output module 88, a text message or code to identify the abnormal operational condition that caused the power control device 33 to acquire the second state. It should be understood that in the case where the abnormal operational condition is an abnormal frequency of the particular signal issued by the control unit 58, indicative that the control unit software is corrupt, then the controller 30 may not be able to convey to the user information indicative of the error condition.
  • Specific other examples of the manner in which the output module 88 could convey information indicative of an error condition include, without being limited to: text messages, alpha and/or numeric codes, audible signals, IR/RF signals, color lights and discrete LEDs amongst others.
  • In an alternative embodiment not shown in the drawings, the output module 88 is positioned remotely from both the control panel 32 and the controller 30. In such a case, when the messages are displayed in a visual format, the output module 88 may be positioned anywhere such that the messages may be displayed anywhere in the bathing unit system 10 or in the proximity of the bathing unit system 10. For example, the message may be displayed on the controller 30, on any component of the bathing system, on a dedicated user interface, on a user operable console of the bathing unit system 10, on an external direct wire device, on a display device positioned on the skirt of the bathing unit system 10 or on a device positioned remotely from the controller 30. In a specific non-limiting implementation, the output module 88 may be positioned remotely from the controller 30, such as within a house. Depending on where the output module 88 is positioned, it should be understood that the controller 42 can be in either wireless or wire-line communication with the output module 88.
  • In another non-limiting embodiment shown in FIG. 5C, the output module 88 includes a transmitter or transceiver 89 operative to transmit a signal conveying information to a user indicative of an error condition. The signal may include information indicative of the abnormal operational condition within the controller 30 that caused the emergency shutdown of the bathing unit components. The transmitter/transceiver 89 is operative to transmit the signal over either one of a wireless link, such as a radio frequency (RF) link or infra-red (IR) link, or alternatively over a wire-line link. The transmitter/transceiver 89 communicates with an auxiliary I/O device 51, such as a laptop, a PDA or a cellular phone to convey information indicative of the error condition to a human operator. In a specific non-limiting implementation, the auxiliary I/O device 51 is in the form of a dedicated display module suitable to be positioned inside a house and in wireless communication with the transmitter/transceiver 89 of output module 88. Optionally, the output module 88 is adapted to transmit a signal to processing module 40 to confirm the reception of the signal from the bathing unit system 10.
  • In yet another alternative embodiment, instead of conveying the information indicative of an error condition to a user in an audio or visual format via an output module 88, the control unit 58 could store the information indicative of the error condition in the memory unit 48, such that a user could obtain the information by downloading it to an auxiliary I/O device 51, such as a PDA, cell phone or a laptop computer.
  • The above description of the embodiments should not be interpreted in a limiting manner since other variations, modifications and refinements are possible within the spirit and scope of the present invention. The scope of the invention is defined in the appended claims and their equivalents.

Claims (75)

1. A controller for a bathing unit system, the bathing unit system including a power source and a set of bathing unit components, said controller comprising:
a) a power control device that interfaces between the power source and the set of bathing unit components, said power control device capable of acquiring either one of a first state and a second state, wherein:
i. in the first state, said power control device enables the power source to supply power to the set of bathing unit components, and;
ii. in the second state, said power control device prevents the power source from supplying power to the set of bathing unit components;
b) a processing module in communication with said power control device, said processing module being operative for:
i. detecting an abnormal operational condition associated with the bathing unit system;
ii. causing said power control device to acquire said second state upon detection of an abnormal operational condition associated with the bathing unit system.
2. A controller as defined in claim 1, wherein said processing module comprises:
a) a control unit operative for controlling the set of bathing unit components; and
b) a diagnostic unit operative for:
i. detecting an abnormal operational condition associated with the bathing unit system;
ii. upon detection of an abnormal operational condition, issuing a signal to said power control device for causing said power control device to acquire said second state.
3. A controller as defined in claim 2, wherein said abnormal operational condition detected by said diagnostic unit is associated with said controller of the bathing unit system.
4. A controller as defined in claim 1, wherein said processing module is operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition of said bathing unit system when a temperature of the water in said bathing unit system is above a predetermined temperature level.
5. A controller as defined in claim 3, wherein said diagnostic unit includes a signal frequency detection unit operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition of said controller when the frequency of a particular signal issued by said control unit does not correspond to a predetermined frequency value.
6. A controller as defined in claim 3, wherein said diagnostic unit includes a power detection unit operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition of said controller when the power level supplied by the power source falls below a predetermined power level.
7. A controller as defined in claim 6, wherein the predetermined power level is stored in a memory unit of said controller.
8. A controller as defined in claim 3, wherein said controller includes a thermal detection unit operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition of said controller when an internal temperature of said controller exceeds a predetermined temperature value.
9. A controller as defined in claim 8, wherein said predetermined temperature value is stored in a memory unit of said controller.
10. A controller as defined in claim 8, wherein said predetermined temperature value is defined by a thermal fuse.
11. A controller as defined in claim 3, wherein said diagnostic unit includes an optical detection unit operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition of said controller upon detection of the presence of electric arcs within said controller.
12. A controller as defined in claim 1, wherein said power control unit is operative to acquire the second state upon receipt of an emergency-off command signal from a user.
13. A controller as defined in claim 1, wherein said processing module includes an input for receiving command signals from a user, said processing module being responsive to an emergency off command signal received at said input for causing said power control device to acquire said second state.
14. A controller as defined in claim 1, wherein said power control device is selected from the group consisting of a power contactor, a latching relay, a non-latching coil and a plurality of relays.
15. A controller as defined in claim 2, wherein each bathing unit component in the set of bathing unit components is adapted for acquiring an activated state and a non-activated state, wherein in the activated state a bathing unit component is operative for drawing power from the power source, said controller comprising:
a) a plurality of actuators associated to respective bathing unit components; and
b) an input for receiving command signals from a user of the bathing unit system such that said control unit is operative for controlling said plurality of actuators at least in part on the basis of said command signals, for causing the bathing unit components in the set of bathing unit components to acquire either one of the activated state and the non-activated state.
16. A controller as defined in claim 15, wherein each of said plurality of actuators each includes a relay.
17. A controller as defined in claim 15, wherein said command signals received at said input are entered by a user via a control panel.
18. A controller as defined in claim 1, wherein the set of bathing unit components includes at least one bathing unit component selected from the set consisting of a heating module, a pump, an ozonator, a power supply, a CD player and an air blower.
19. A controller as defined in claim 2, wherein said control unit is powered independently from said power control device, whereby when said power control device is in said second state, said control unit continues to receive power for operation.
20. A controller as defined in claim 2, wherein said diagnostic unit includes an energy storage unit.
21. A controller as defined in claim 1, wherein said controller includes an output module, wherein upon detection by said processing module of an abnormal operational condition of the bathing unit system, said output module is operative for conveying information to a user indicative of an error condition.
22. A controller as defined in claim 21, wherein said information indicative of an error condition includes information indicative of an abnormal operational condition.
23. A controller as defined in claim 21, wherein said output module is operative for conveying the information indicative of the error condition in a visual format.
24. A controller as defined in claim 21, wherein said output module is operative for conveying the information indicative of the error condition in an audio format.
25. A controller as defined in claim 21, wherein said output module is included on a control panel of the bathing unit system.
26. A controller as defined in claim 21, wherein said output module is included on said controller.
27. A method for monitoring a bathing unit system, the bathing unit system including a power source, a set of bathing unit components and a power control device that interfaces between the power source and the set of bathing unit components, the power control device capable of acquiring either one of a first state and a second state, wherein in the first state, the power control device enables the power source to supply power to the set of bathing unit components, and in the second state, the power control device prevents the power source from supplying power to the set of bathing unit components, said method comprising:
a) detecting an abnormal operational condition associated with the bathing unit system;
b) causing the power control device to acquire the second state upon detection of an abnormal operational condition associated with the bathing unit system.
28. A method as defined in claim 27, wherein said abnormal operational condition is associated with a controller of the bathing unit system.
29. A method as defined in claim 28, comprising detecting an abnormal operational condition of the controller when a temperature of the water in the bathing unit system is above a predetermined temperature level.
30. A method as defined in claim 28, comprising detecting an abnormal operational condition of the controller when the frequency of a particular signal does not correspond to a predetermined frequency value.
31. A method as defined in claim 28, comprising detecting an abnormal operational condition of the controller when a power level supplied by the power source falls below a predetermined power level.
32. A method as defined in claim 31; wherein the predetermined power level is stored in a memory unit of the bathing unit system.
33. A method as defined in claim 31, wherein the predetermined temperature value is defined by a thermal fuse.
34. A method as defined in claim 28, comprising detecting an abnormal operational condition of the controller when an internal temperature of the controller exceeds a predetermined temperature value.
35. A method as defined in claim 34, wherein the predetermined temperature value is stored in a memory unit of the bathing unit system.
36. A method as defined in claim 28, comprising detecting an abnormal operational condition of the controller upon detection of the presence of electric arcs within the controller.
37. A method as defined in claim 27, comprising causing the power control device to acquire the second state upon receipt of an emergency-off command signal from a user.
38. A method as defined in claim 27, wherein the power control device is selected from the group consisting of a power contactor, a latching relay, a non-latching coil and a plurality of relays.
39. A method as defined in claim 28, wherein each bathing unit component in the set of bathing unit components is adapted for acquiring an activated state and a non-activated state, wherein in the activated state a bathing unit component is operative for drawing power from the power source, said method comprising causing the bathing unit components in the set of bathing unit components to acquire either one of the activated state and the non-activated state, at least in part in response to command signals received from a user.
40. A method as defined in claim 39, wherein said command signals are entered by a user via a control panel.
41. A method as defined in claim 27, wherein the set of bathing unit components includes at least one bathing unit component selected from the set consisting of a heating module, a pump, an ozonator, a power supply, a CD player and an air blower.
42. A method as defined in claim 27, comprising conveying to a user via an output module, information indicative of an error condition, upon detection of an abnormal operational condition of the bathing unit system.
43. A method as defined in claim 42, wherein the information indicative of an error condition includes information indicative of an abnormal operational condition.
44. A method as defined in claim 42, comprising conveying the information indicative of the error condition in a visual format.
45. A method as defined in claim 42, comprising conveying the information indicative of the error condition in an audio format.
46. A method as defined in claim 42, wherein the output module is included on a control panel of the bathing unit system.
47. A method as defined in claim 42, wherein the output module is included on a controller of the bathing unit system.
48. A bathing unit system comprising:
a) a power source;
b) a set of bathing unit components in communication with said power source; and
c) a controller, comprising:
i. a power control device that interfaces between said power source and said set of bathing unit components, said power control device capable of acquiring either one of a first state and a second state, wherein:
(a) in the first state, said power control device enables said power source to supply power to said set of bathing unit components, and;
(b) in the second state, said power control device prevents said power source from supplying power to said set of bathing unit components;
ii. a processing module in communication with said power control device, said processing module being operative for:
(a) detecting an abnormal operational condition associated with the bathing unit system;
(b) causing said power control device to acquire said second state upon detection of an abnormal operational condition associated with the bathing system.
49. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 48, wherein said processing module comprises:
a) a control unit operative for controlling said set of bathing unit components; and
b) a diagnostic unit operative for:
i. detecting an abnormal operational condition associated with the bathing unit system;
ii. upon detection of an abnormal operational condition, issuing a signal to said power control device for causing said power control device to acquire said second state.
50. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 49, wherein said abnormal operational condition detected by said diagnostic unit is associated with said controller of said bathing unit system.
51. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 50, wherein said processing module is operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition of said controller when a temperature of the water in said bathing unit system is above a predetermined temperature level.
52. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 50, wherein said diagnostic unit includes a signal frequency detection unit operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition of said controller when the frequency of a particular signal issued by said control unit does not correspond to a predetermined frequency value.
53. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 50, wherein said diagnostic unit includes a power detection unit operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition of said controller when the power level supplied by the power source falls below a predetermined power level.
54. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 53, wherein the predetermined power level is stored in a memory unit of said controller.
55. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 50, wherein said controller includes a thermal detection unit operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition of said controller when an internal temperature of said controller exceeds a predetermined temperature value.
56. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 55, wherein said predetermined temperature value is stored in a memory unit of said controller.
57. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 55, wherein said predetermined temperature value is defined by a thermal fuse.
58. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 50, wherein said diagnostic unit includes an optical detection unit operative for detecting an abnormal operational condition of said controller upon detection of the presence of electric arcs within said controller.
59. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 48, wherein said power control unit is operative to acquire the second state upon receipt of an emergency-off command signal from a user.
60. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 48, wherein said processing module includes an input for receiving command signals from a user, said processing module being responsive to an emergency off command signal received at said input for causing said power control device to acquire said second state.
61. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 48, wherein said power control device is selected from the group consisting of a power contactor, a latching relay, a non-latching coil and a plurality of relays.
62. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 49, wherein each bathing unit component in said set of bathing unit components is adapted for acquiring an activated state and a non-activated state, wherein in the activated state a bathing unit component is operative for drawing power from the power source, said controller comprising:
a) a plurality of actuators associated to respective bathing unit components; and
b) an input for receiving command signals from a user of the bathing unit system such that said control unit is operative for controlling said plurality of actuators at least in part on the basis of said command signals, for causing the bathing unit components in the set of bathing unit components to acquire either one of the activated state and the non-activated state.
63. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 62, wherein each of said plurality of actuators each includes a relay.
64. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 62, wherein said command signals received at said input are entered by a user via a control panel.
65. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 48, wherein said set of bathing unit components includes at least one bathing unit component selected from the set consisting of a heating module, a pump, an ozonator, a power supply, a CD player and an air blower.
66. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 49, wherein said control unit is powered independently from said power control device, whereby when said power control device is in said second state, said control unit continues to receive power for operation.
67. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 49, wherein said diagnostic unit includes an energy storage unit.
68. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 48, wherein said controller includes an output module, wherein upon detection by said processing module of an abnormal operational condition of the bathing unit system, said output module is operative for conveying information to a user indicative of an error condition.
69. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 68, wherein said information indicative of an error condition includes information indicative of an abnormal operational condition.
70. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 68, wherein said output module is operative for conveying the information indicative of the error condition in a visual format.
71. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 68, wherein said output module is operative for conveying the information indicative of the error condition in an audio format.
72. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 68, wherein said output module is included on a control panel of the bathing unit system.
73. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 68, wherein said output module is included on a control panel of said bathing unit system.
74. A bathing unit system as defined in claim 68, wherein said output module is included on said controller.
75. A system for monitoring a controller, the controller being operative for managing a set of components by controlling the power supplied by a power source to each of the components, said system comprising:
a) a power control device that interfaces between the power source and the set of components, said power control device capable of acquiring either one of a first state and a second state, wherein:
i. in the first state, said power control device enables said power source to supply power to said set of components, and;
ii. in the second state, said power control device prevents said power source from supplying power to said set of components;
b) a processing module in communication with said power control device, said processing module being operative for:
i. detecting an abnormal operational condition associated with the controller;
ii. causing said power control device to acquire said second state upon detection of an abnormal operational condition associated with the controller.
US10/831,114 2004-02-02 2004-04-26 Bathing unit system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities Abandoned US20050168902A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/768,130 US7327275B2 (en) 2004-02-02 2004-02-02 Bathing system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities
US10/831,114 US20050168902A1 (en) 2004-02-02 2004-04-26 Bathing unit system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/831,114 US20050168902A1 (en) 2004-02-02 2004-04-26 Bathing unit system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities
CA2492252A CA2492252C (en) 2004-02-02 2005-01-11 Bathing unit system controller having abnormal operational condition indentification capabilities
EP05100611A EP1564612A3 (en) 2004-02-02 2005-01-31 Bathing unit system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/768,130 Continuation-In-Part US7327275B2 (en) 2004-02-02 2004-02-02 Bathing system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20050168902A1 true US20050168902A1 (en) 2005-08-04

Family

ID=34701320

Family Applications (7)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/768,130 Active 2025-09-15 US7327275B2 (en) 2004-02-02 2004-02-02 Bathing system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities
US10/831,114 Abandoned US20050168902A1 (en) 2004-02-02 2004-04-26 Bathing unit system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities
US11/797,233 Active 2024-04-21 US7701679B2 (en) 2004-02-02 2007-05-02 Bathing system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities
US11/797,239 Active 2027-02-18 US7982625B2 (en) 2004-02-02 2007-05-02 Bathing system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities
US12/000,680 Active 2024-07-13 US7843357B2 (en) 2004-02-02 2007-12-17 Bathing system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities
US12/712,523 Active 2026-10-14 US8624749B2 (en) 2004-02-02 2010-02-25 Bathing system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities
US12/775,145 Active US8164470B2 (en) 2004-02-02 2010-05-06 Bathing system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/768,130 Active 2025-09-15 US7327275B2 (en) 2004-02-02 2004-02-02 Bathing system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities

Family Applications After (5)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/797,233 Active 2024-04-21 US7701679B2 (en) 2004-02-02 2007-05-02 Bathing system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities
US11/797,239 Active 2027-02-18 US7982625B2 (en) 2004-02-02 2007-05-02 Bathing system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities
US12/000,680 Active 2024-07-13 US7843357B2 (en) 2004-02-02 2007-12-17 Bathing system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities
US12/712,523 Active 2026-10-14 US8624749B2 (en) 2004-02-02 2010-02-25 Bathing system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities
US12/775,145 Active US8164470B2 (en) 2004-02-02 2010-05-06 Bathing system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities

Country Status (3)

Country Link
US (7) US7327275B2 (en)
EP (1) EP1564613A3 (en)
CA (2) CA2816862C (en)

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20060096020A1 (en) * 2004-11-08 2006-05-11 Caudilo Jose A Spa switch
US20060238931A1 (en) * 2005-04-22 2006-10-26 Cline David J Shutoff system for pool or spa
WO2008104057A1 (en) * 2007-02-26 2008-09-04 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Bathing unit control system providing multimedia functionality, telephone functionality and/or data network access functionality and bathing unit system including same
WO2008104056A1 (en) * 2007-02-26 2008-09-04 Groupe Gecko Alliance Inc. A method, device and system for use in configuring a bathing unit controller
US20150075516A1 (en) * 2013-09-13 2015-03-19 Asahi Seisakusho Co., Ltd. Cartridge-type gas grill
US9031702B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-05-12 Hayward Industries, Inc. Modular pool/spa control system
US9445482B2 (en) 2014-05-23 2016-09-13 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Light bulb and method and system for use in configuring same
US9641959B2 (en) 2014-05-23 2017-05-02 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Household for industrial device including programmable controller and method device and system for use in configuring same
US20170213451A1 (en) 2016-01-22 2017-07-27 Hayward Industries, Inc. Systems and Methods for Providing Network Connectivity and Remote Monitoring, Optimization, and Control of Pool/Spa Equipment

Families Citing this family (55)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6117144A (en) * 1995-08-24 2000-09-12 Sutura, Inc. Suturing device and method for sealing an opening in a blood vessel or other biological structure
JP2004322740A (en) * 2003-04-22 2004-11-18 Toyota Motor Corp Failure diagnosis device for vehicular control device
US8540493B2 (en) 2003-12-08 2013-09-24 Sta-Rite Industries, Llc Pump control system and method
US7327275B2 (en) * 2004-02-02 2008-02-05 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Bathing system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities
US8177520B2 (en) 2004-04-09 2012-05-15 Regal Beloit Epc Inc. Controller for a motor and a method of controlling the motor
US20110002792A1 (en) * 2004-04-09 2011-01-06 Bartos Ronald P Controller for a motor and a method of controlling the motor
US8133034B2 (en) 2004-04-09 2012-03-13 Regal Beloit Epc Inc. Controller for a motor and a method of controlling the motor
US7854597B2 (en) 2004-08-26 2010-12-21 Pentair Water Pool And Spa, Inc. Pumping system with two way communication
US8602745B2 (en) 2004-08-26 2013-12-10 Pentair Water Pool And Spa, Inc. Anti-entrapment and anti-dead head function
US7845913B2 (en) 2004-08-26 2010-12-07 Pentair Water Pool And Spa, Inc. Flow control
US8019479B2 (en) 2004-08-26 2011-09-13 Pentair Water Pool And Spa, Inc. Control algorithm of variable speed pumping system
US7686589B2 (en) 2004-08-26 2010-03-30 Pentair Water Pool And Spa, Inc. Pumping system with power optimization
US7874808B2 (en) * 2004-08-26 2011-01-25 Pentair Water Pool And Spa, Inc. Variable speed pumping system and method
US8281425B2 (en) 2004-11-01 2012-10-09 Cohen Joseph D Load sensor safety vacuum release system
US7619181B2 (en) * 2005-07-12 2009-11-17 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Heating system for bathing unit
US7514652B2 (en) * 2005-11-16 2009-04-07 Elnar Joseph G Spa with circuit for detecting excessive ground current
MY146753A (en) * 2006-04-26 2012-09-14 Ind Teknologi Mikro Berhad An earth leakage protection device with time alert feature
US20080012681A1 (en) * 2006-05-26 2008-01-17 Paul Kadar Thermally protected electrical wiring device
US9114060B2 (en) * 2006-07-12 2015-08-25 C.G. Air Systemes Inc. Interface system for tubs
US7690897B2 (en) * 2006-10-13 2010-04-06 A.O. Smith Corporation Controller for a motor and a method of controlling the motor
US20080095638A1 (en) 2006-10-13 2008-04-24 A.O. Smith Corporation Controller for a motor and a method of controlling the motor
US8104110B2 (en) * 2007-01-12 2012-01-31 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Spa system with flow control feature
JP4899923B2 (en) * 2007-02-23 2012-03-21 東洋製罐株式会社 Method of welding member having layer made of thermoplastic resin and thermoplastic resin container with lid
KR100857801B1 (en) * 2007-05-09 2008-09-09 엘지전자 주식회사 Controlling method of steam laundry dryer
US20090045803A1 (en) * 2007-08-15 2009-02-19 Optimal Innovations Inc. System and Method for Premises Power Parameter and Power-Factor Reporting and Management
US8112164B2 (en) * 2007-09-27 2012-02-07 Balboa Instruments, Inc. Low maintenance spa control system
US8773827B2 (en) * 2008-02-19 2014-07-08 Simply Automated Incorporated Intelligent circuit breaker apparatus and methods
US8354809B2 (en) 2008-10-01 2013-01-15 Regal Beloit Epc Inc. Controller for a motor and a method of controlling the motor
WO2010042406A1 (en) 2008-10-06 2010-04-15 Pentair Water Pool And Spa, Inc. Method of operating a safety vacuum release system
US9556874B2 (en) 2009-06-09 2017-01-31 Pentair Flow Technologies, Llc Method of controlling a pump and motor
US8392027B2 (en) * 2009-09-28 2013-03-05 Balboa Instruments, Inc. Spa control system with improved flow monitoring
US20110202150A1 (en) * 2009-10-16 2011-08-18 Newport Controls Controller system adapted for SPA
US20110093099A1 (en) * 2009-10-16 2011-04-21 Newport Controls Controller system adapted for spa
US8644960B2 (en) 2010-10-22 2014-02-04 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Method and system for providing ambiance settings in a bathing system
US8612061B2 (en) 2010-10-22 2013-12-17 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Method and system for controlling a bathing system in accordance with an energy savings mode
CN102466780B (en) * 2010-11-03 2016-03-09 苏州普源精电科技有限公司 A kind of starting-up keyboard detection method of instrument and device
AU2011338297B2 (en) 2010-12-08 2016-10-13 Pentair Water Pool And Spa, Inc. Discharge vacuum relief valve for safety vacuum release system
US9034193B2 (en) * 2011-02-10 2015-05-19 Waterpods, Inc. System and method for controlling water quality in a recreational water installation
CA2854162C (en) 2011-11-01 2019-12-24 Pentair Water Pool And Spa, Inc. Flow locking system and method
US9006616B2 (en) * 2012-06-19 2015-04-14 Watkins Manufacturing Corporation Portable spa monitoring and control circuitry
US9885360B2 (en) 2012-10-25 2018-02-06 Pentair Flow Technologies, Llc Battery backup sump pump systems and methods
CN104062517A (en) * 2013-03-20 2014-09-24 鸿富锦精密工业(武汉)有限公司 Detection circuit for central control system power supply state of automatic vending machine
US9974709B2 (en) 2014-02-18 2018-05-22 Nuwhirl Systems Corporation Nozzles
US9413258B2 (en) * 2014-04-09 2016-08-09 Qualcomm Incorporated AC load detection and control unit
US10507162B2 (en) * 2014-05-26 2019-12-17 Dartpoint Tech. Co., Ltd. Massage bathing maintenance system and maintenance method of the same
US9506957B1 (en) 2014-08-05 2016-11-29 Aaron Neal Branstetter Floating apparatus for alerting people of the presence of voltage in water
US10531545B2 (en) 2014-08-11 2020-01-07 RAB Lighting Inc. Commissioning a configurable user control device for a lighting control system
US10085328B2 (en) 2014-08-11 2018-09-25 RAB Lighting Inc. Wireless lighting control systems and methods
US10039174B2 (en) 2014-08-11 2018-07-31 RAB Lighting Inc. Systems and methods for acknowledging broadcast messages in a wireless lighting control network
CN105759778A (en) * 2014-12-16 2016-07-13 青岛经济技术开发区海尔热水器有限公司 Heat-pump water heater control and debugging system and debugging method thereof
US10159624B2 (en) 2015-09-11 2018-12-25 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Method for facilitating control of a bathing unit system and control panel implementing same
CN106856321B (en) * 2015-12-08 2019-11-05 太琦科技股份有限公司 Bathing safety control system and bathing method of controlling security
CN106856499A (en) * 2015-12-08 2017-06-16 太琦科技股份有限公司 Remote diagnosis system and its operating method
USD807985S1 (en) 2016-10-04 2018-01-16 Waterguru Inc. Water test and treatment system
US10228359B2 (en) 2017-03-16 2019-03-12 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Method, device and apparatus for monitoring halogen levels in a body of water

Citations (39)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3953766A (en) * 1974-09-16 1976-04-27 General Electric Company Ground fault circuit interrupter and electronic module therefor
US4424438A (en) * 1981-11-05 1984-01-03 Stanmar Technology Remote actuator system
US4586180A (en) * 1982-02-26 1986-04-29 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Microprocessor fault-monitoring circuit
US4763365A (en) * 1987-04-15 1988-08-16 Tolo, Inc. Spa system having high temperature safety device
US4897755A (en) * 1988-06-28 1990-01-30 Louis S. Polster Apparatus and method for relay control
US5361215A (en) * 1987-05-27 1994-11-01 Siege Industries, Inc. Spa control system
US5536980A (en) * 1992-11-19 1996-07-16 Texas Instruments Incorporated High voltage, high current switching apparatus
US5550753A (en) * 1987-05-27 1996-08-27 Irving C. Siegel Microcomputer SPA control system
US5559664A (en) * 1991-09-05 1996-09-24 Frost Controls, Inc. Electromechanical relay system
US5563799A (en) * 1994-11-10 1996-10-08 United Technologies Automotive, Inc. Low cost/low current watchdog circuit for microprocessor
US5569966A (en) * 1994-06-10 1996-10-29 Northrop Grumman Corporation Electric vehicle propulsion system power bridge with built-in test
US5572177A (en) * 1993-03-10 1996-11-05 Omron Corporation Current detection unit and relay terminal array
US5585025A (en) * 1993-09-13 1996-12-17 Softub, Inc. SPA control circuit
US5682057A (en) * 1995-03-03 1997-10-28 Rohm Co. Ltd. Semiconductor device incorporating a temperature fuse
US5698887A (en) * 1995-04-26 1997-12-16 Rohm Co., Ltd. Semiconductor protection circuit
US5708548A (en) * 1996-05-24 1998-01-13 Cascade Systems Inc. Protection device for a spa pack
US5835885A (en) * 1997-06-05 1998-11-10 Giga-Byte Technology Co., Ltd. Over temperature protection method and device for a central processing unit
US5875087A (en) * 1996-08-08 1999-02-23 George A. Spencer Circuit breaker with integrated control features
US6058353A (en) * 1997-01-23 2000-05-02 Commonwealth Edison Company System and method for providing backup protection for circuit breaker failure
US6080973A (en) * 1999-04-19 2000-06-27 Sherwood-Templeton Coal Company, Inc. Electric water heater
US6097580A (en) * 1999-03-01 2000-08-01 Leviton Manufacturing Co., Inc. GFCI ground fault current filtering
US6238387B1 (en) * 1996-08-23 2001-05-29 Team Medical, L.L.C. Electrosurgical generator
US6253121B1 (en) * 1998-09-03 2001-06-26 Balboa Instruments, Inc. Control system for bathers with ground continuity and ground fault detection
US6282370B1 (en) * 1998-09-03 2001-08-28 Balboa Instruments, Inc. Control system for bathers
US6407469B1 (en) * 1999-11-30 2002-06-18 Balboa Instruments, Inc. Controller system for pool and/or spa
US6441348B1 (en) * 2001-01-10 2002-08-27 Raymond Industrial Limited Heat treatment apparatus and method of using same
US6476363B1 (en) * 2000-09-25 2002-11-05 Gecko Electronique, Inc. Resistive water sensor for hot tub spa heating element
US20020175828A1 (en) * 2001-05-24 2002-11-28 Macey Stephen S. Two-way RF remote control
US20030063900A1 (en) * 2001-12-13 2003-04-03 Carter Group, Inc. Linear electric motor controller and system for providing linear speed control
US20040088593A1 (en) * 2002-11-04 2004-05-06 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. System, controller, software and method for protecting against overheating of a CPU
US6734781B1 (en) * 1999-04-30 2004-05-11 Rohm Co., Ltd. Mounting structure for temperature-sensitive fuse on circuit board
US6756907B2 (en) * 2002-06-11 2004-06-29 Jerrell Penn Hollaway Maintainance support system for an electrical apparatus
US20040141265A1 (en) * 2003-01-17 2004-07-22 Angle Jeffrey R. Voltage monitor for ground fault circuit interrupter
US6782309B2 (en) * 2000-11-07 2004-08-24 9090-3493 Quebec, Inc. SPA controller computer interface
US6836174B1 (en) * 2003-06-17 2004-12-28 Arima Computer Corporation Transistor structure with thermal protection
US6850159B1 (en) * 2001-05-15 2005-02-01 Brian P. Platner Self-powered long-life occupancy sensors and sensor circuits
US6874175B2 (en) * 2003-06-03 2005-04-05 9090-3493 Quebec Inc. Control panel and control system for a spa
US20050097669A1 (en) * 2002-09-13 2005-05-12 Conair Corporation Multifeature foot spa
US20050127197A1 (en) * 2003-12-15 2005-06-16 Dindo Uy Pool/spa heater

Family Cites Families (45)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US175828A (en) * 1876-04-11 Improvement in life-preservers
US89236A (en) * 1869-04-20 Improvement in harvester-cutters
US550753A (en) * 1895-12-03 goodwin
US6965815B1 (en) * 1987-05-27 2005-11-15 Bilboa Instruments, Inc. Spa control system
DE3933118A1 (en) 1989-10-04 1991-04-11 Telefonbau & Normalzeit Gmbh Overcurrent protection circuit for variety of electronic subassemblies - ensures continuing isolation of defective circuit by rupture of fuse on deviation from normal current consumption
FR2656698B1 (en) 1989-12-29 1992-05-07 Vectavib Apparatus for measuring changes in capacitance of a capacitor forming, in particular, a sensor.
DE4108351A1 (en) 1991-03-12 1992-09-17 Schering Ag New leukotriene-b (down arrow) 4 (down arrow) derivatives, methods for their manufacture and their use as medicines
JP2684980B2 (en) * 1993-12-24 1997-12-03 日本電気株式会社 The semiconductor memory device and manufacturing method thereof
JPH07180903A (en) 1993-12-24 1995-07-18 Brother Ind Ltd Circulating warm water bath apparatus
AT404072B (en) 1995-02-28 1998-08-25 Haefely Trench Austria Gmbh Method for detecting a single-pole earth fault in a three-phase system
AT255395T (en) 1996-03-18 2003-12-15 Saunamare Ltd Oy System for ventilating a sauna system
US6144924A (en) * 1996-05-20 2000-11-07 Crane Nuclear, Inc. Motor condition and performance analyzer
JPH10115108A (en) * 1996-10-14 1998-05-06 Shiroyama Sangyo Kk Maintenance-management remote monitor system of pool
US5930852A (en) 1997-03-21 1999-08-03 Aqua-Flo, Incorporated Heat exchanging pump motor for usage within a recirculating water system
US6200108B1 (en) 1998-03-11 2001-03-13 Aqua-Flo, Incorporated Heat exchanging means for a pump motor using a bypass tube within a recirculating water system
JP3688448B2 (en) * 1997-10-02 2005-08-31 富士通株式会社 Switching power supply
JP2902400B1 (en) 1998-07-22 1999-06-07 ヤマハリビングテック株式会社 Whirlpool for abnormality detection device
JP2902399B1 (en) 1998-07-22 1999-06-07 ヤマハリビングテック株式会社 Safety device for a whirlpool bath
US20020020014A1 (en) 1998-10-30 2002-02-21 Michel Authier Water freeze control for hot tub spa
JP2000333859A (en) 1999-05-25 2000-12-05 Bridgestone Corp Power source circuit for jet bath
US6934862B2 (en) 2000-01-07 2005-08-23 Robertshaw Controls Company Appliance retrofit monitoring device with a memory storing an electronic signature
US6355913B1 (en) 2000-05-31 2002-03-12 Gecko Electronique, Inc. Infrared sensor for hot tub spa heating element
US6488408B1 (en) 2000-10-06 2002-12-03 Gecko Electronique, Inc. Temperature probe mounting device for hot tub spa
US7489986B1 (en) 2000-11-07 2009-02-10 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Spa controller computer interface for spas
CA2412221C (en) 2001-11-21 2012-01-31 Gecko Electronique, Inc. Spa controller computer interface
US6900736B2 (en) 2000-12-07 2005-05-31 Allied Innovations, Llc Pulse position modulated dual transceiver remote control
JP4695271B2 (en) 2001-02-08 2011-06-08 ホーチキ株式会社 Tunnel disaster prevention equipment
US6717050B2 (en) 2001-04-25 2004-04-06 9090-3493 Quebec, Inc. Mounting assembly for electronic module
US6813575B2 (en) 2001-08-31 2004-11-02 Quebec, Inc. Portable computer control for cooking appliances and method of using
US6744223B2 (en) 2002-10-30 2004-06-01 Quebec, Inc. Multicolor lamp system
US6829556B2 (en) * 2003-02-13 2004-12-07 General Electric Company Method and system for detecting incipient failures in a traction system
US6942354B2 (en) 2003-03-21 2005-09-13 9090-3493 Quebec Inc. Lighting system and housing therefore
CA2430862C (en) 2003-06-03 2007-11-27 9090-3493 Quebec Inc. Control panel and control system for a spa
US20050045621A1 (en) 2003-09-02 2005-03-03 Francois Chenier Bathing unit control system with capacitive water level sensor
US6929516B2 (en) 2003-10-28 2005-08-16 9090-3493 Québec Inc. Bathing unit controller and connector system therefore
US8540493B2 (en) * 2003-12-08 2013-09-24 Sta-Rite Industries, Llc Pump control system and method
US7112768B2 (en) 2004-02-02 2006-09-26 9090-3493 Quebec Inc. Temperature control system for a bathing unit
CA2492252C (en) 2004-02-02 2015-06-16 9090-3493 Quebec Inc. Bathing unit system controller having abnormal operational condition indentification capabilities
US7327275B2 (en) 2004-02-02 2008-02-05 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Bathing system controller having abnormal operational condition identification capabilities
US7167087B2 (en) 2004-10-20 2007-01-23 Balboa Instruments, Inc. Remote SPA monitor
US7440820B2 (en) 2004-11-30 2008-10-21 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Water flow detection system for a bathing unit
US7593789B2 (en) 2004-11-30 2009-09-22 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Water flow detection system for a bathing unit
CA2499551C (en) 2005-03-07 2012-05-22 9090-3493 Quebec Inc. Bathing unit controller
US7619181B2 (en) 2005-07-12 2009-11-17 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Heating system for bathing unit
US8104110B2 (en) * 2007-01-12 2012-01-31 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Spa system with flow control feature

Patent Citations (46)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3953766A (en) * 1974-09-16 1976-04-27 General Electric Company Ground fault circuit interrupter and electronic module therefor
US4424438A (en) * 1981-11-05 1984-01-03 Stanmar Technology Remote actuator system
US4586180A (en) * 1982-02-26 1986-04-29 Siemens Aktiengesellschaft Microprocessor fault-monitoring circuit
US4763365A (en) * 1987-04-15 1988-08-16 Tolo, Inc. Spa system having high temperature safety device
US5550753A (en) * 1987-05-27 1996-08-27 Irving C. Siegel Microcomputer SPA control system
US5559720A (en) * 1987-05-27 1996-09-24 Irving C. Siegel Spa control system
US6253227B1 (en) * 1987-05-27 2001-06-26 Balboa Instruments, Inc. Spa control system
US5361215A (en) * 1987-05-27 1994-11-01 Siege Industries, Inc. Spa control system
US4897755A (en) * 1988-06-28 1990-01-30 Louis S. Polster Apparatus and method for relay control
US5559664A (en) * 1991-09-05 1996-09-24 Frost Controls, Inc. Electromechanical relay system
US5536980A (en) * 1992-11-19 1996-07-16 Texas Instruments Incorporated High voltage, high current switching apparatus
US5572177A (en) * 1993-03-10 1996-11-05 Omron Corporation Current detection unit and relay terminal array
US5585025A (en) * 1993-09-13 1996-12-17 Softub, Inc. SPA control circuit
US5569966A (en) * 1994-06-10 1996-10-29 Northrop Grumman Corporation Electric vehicle propulsion system power bridge with built-in test
US5563799A (en) * 1994-11-10 1996-10-08 United Technologies Automotive, Inc. Low cost/low current watchdog circuit for microprocessor
US5682057A (en) * 1995-03-03 1997-10-28 Rohm Co. Ltd. Semiconductor device incorporating a temperature fuse
US5698887A (en) * 1995-04-26 1997-12-16 Rohm Co., Ltd. Semiconductor protection circuit
US5708548A (en) * 1996-05-24 1998-01-13 Cascade Systems Inc. Protection device for a spa pack
US5875087A (en) * 1996-08-08 1999-02-23 George A. Spencer Circuit breaker with integrated control features
US6238387B1 (en) * 1996-08-23 2001-05-29 Team Medical, L.L.C. Electrosurgical generator
US6058353A (en) * 1997-01-23 2000-05-02 Commonwealth Edison Company System and method for providing backup protection for circuit breaker failure
US5835885A (en) * 1997-06-05 1998-11-10 Giga-Byte Technology Co., Ltd. Over temperature protection method and device for a central processing unit
US6282370B1 (en) * 1998-09-03 2001-08-28 Balboa Instruments, Inc. Control system for bathers
US6629021B2 (en) * 1998-09-03 2003-09-30 Balboa Instruments, Inc. Techniques for detecting ground failures in bathing installations
US6253121B1 (en) * 1998-09-03 2001-06-26 Balboa Instruments, Inc. Control system for bathers with ground continuity and ground fault detection
US6590188B2 (en) * 1998-09-03 2003-07-08 Balboa Instruments, Inc. Control system for bathers
US6097580A (en) * 1999-03-01 2000-08-01 Leviton Manufacturing Co., Inc. GFCI ground fault current filtering
US6080973A (en) * 1999-04-19 2000-06-27 Sherwood-Templeton Coal Company, Inc. Electric water heater
US6734781B1 (en) * 1999-04-30 2004-05-11 Rohm Co., Ltd. Mounting structure for temperature-sensitive fuse on circuit board
US20020089236A1 (en) * 1999-11-30 2002-07-11 Cline David J. Controller system for pool and/or spa
US7440864B2 (en) * 1999-11-30 2008-10-21 Balboa Instruments, Inc. Controller system for pool and/or spa
US6643108B2 (en) * 1999-11-30 2003-11-04 Balboa Instruments, Inc. Controller system for pool and/or spa
US6407469B1 (en) * 1999-11-30 2002-06-18 Balboa Instruments, Inc. Controller system for pool and/or spa
US6476363B1 (en) * 2000-09-25 2002-11-05 Gecko Electronique, Inc. Resistive water sensor for hot tub spa heating element
US6782309B2 (en) * 2000-11-07 2004-08-24 9090-3493 Quebec, Inc. SPA controller computer interface
US6441348B1 (en) * 2001-01-10 2002-08-27 Raymond Industrial Limited Heat treatment apparatus and method of using same
US6850159B1 (en) * 2001-05-15 2005-02-01 Brian P. Platner Self-powered long-life occupancy sensors and sensor circuits
US20020175828A1 (en) * 2001-05-24 2002-11-28 Macey Stephen S. Two-way RF remote control
US20030063900A1 (en) * 2001-12-13 2003-04-03 Carter Group, Inc. Linear electric motor controller and system for providing linear speed control
US6756907B2 (en) * 2002-06-11 2004-06-29 Jerrell Penn Hollaway Maintainance support system for an electrical apparatus
US20050097669A1 (en) * 2002-09-13 2005-05-12 Conair Corporation Multifeature foot spa
US20040088593A1 (en) * 2002-11-04 2004-05-06 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. System, controller, software and method for protecting against overheating of a CPU
US20040141265A1 (en) * 2003-01-17 2004-07-22 Angle Jeffrey R. Voltage monitor for ground fault circuit interrupter
US6874175B2 (en) * 2003-06-03 2005-04-05 9090-3493 Quebec Inc. Control panel and control system for a spa
US6836174B1 (en) * 2003-06-17 2004-12-28 Arima Computer Corporation Transistor structure with thermal protection
US20050127197A1 (en) * 2003-12-15 2005-06-16 Dindo Uy Pool/spa heater

Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20060096020A1 (en) * 2004-11-08 2006-05-11 Caudilo Jose A Spa switch
US20060238931A1 (en) * 2005-04-22 2006-10-26 Cline David J Shutoff system for pool or spa
US7417834B2 (en) 2005-04-22 2008-08-26 Balboa Instruments, Inc. Shutoff system for pool or spa
WO2008104057A1 (en) * 2007-02-26 2008-09-04 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Bathing unit control system providing multimedia functionality, telephone functionality and/or data network access functionality and bathing unit system including same
WO2008104056A1 (en) * 2007-02-26 2008-09-04 Groupe Gecko Alliance Inc. A method, device and system for use in configuring a bathing unit controller
US20100070059A1 (en) * 2007-02-26 2010-03-18 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Bathing unit control system providing multimedia functionality, telephone functionality and/or data network access functionality and bathing unit system including same
US20100321202A1 (en) * 2007-02-26 2010-12-23 Benoit Laflamme Bathing unit control system providing multimedia functionality, telephone functionality and/or data network access functionality and bathing unit system including same
US20110046796A1 (en) * 2007-02-26 2011-02-24 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Method, device and system for use in configuring a bathing unit controller
US8150552B2 (en) 2007-02-26 2012-04-03 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Method, device and system for use in configuring a bathing unit controller
US9078802B2 (en) 2007-02-26 2015-07-14 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Method, device and system for use in configuring a bathing unit controller
US9031702B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-05-12 Hayward Industries, Inc. Modular pool/spa control system
US9285790B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2016-03-15 Hayward Industries, Inc. Modular pool/spa control system
US9638425B2 (en) * 2013-09-13 2017-05-02 Iwatani Corporation Cartridge-type gas grill
US20150075516A1 (en) * 2013-09-13 2015-03-19 Asahi Seisakusho Co., Ltd. Cartridge-type gas grill
CN104456641A (en) * 2013-09-13 2015-03-25 岩谷产业株式会社 Cartridge-type gas grill
US9445482B2 (en) 2014-05-23 2016-09-13 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Light bulb and method and system for use in configuring same
US9641959B2 (en) 2014-05-23 2017-05-02 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Household for industrial device including programmable controller and method device and system for use in configuring same
US10085330B2 (en) 2014-05-23 2018-09-25 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Light bulb, intelligent lighting device and method and system for use in configuring same
US9713235B2 (en) 2014-05-23 2017-07-18 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Light bulb, intelligent lighting device and method and system for use in configuring same
US10433135B2 (en) 2014-05-23 2019-10-01 Gecko Alliance Group Inc. Household or industrial device including programmable controller and method, device and system for use in configuring same
US20170213451A1 (en) 2016-01-22 2017-07-27 Hayward Industries, Inc. Systems and Methods for Providing Network Connectivity and Remote Monitoring, Optimization, and Control of Pool/Spa Equipment
US10219975B2 (en) 2016-01-22 2019-03-05 Hayward Industries, Inc. Systems and methods for providing network connectivity and remote monitoring, optimization, and control of pool/spa equipment
US10272014B2 (en) 2016-01-22 2019-04-30 Hayward Industries, Inc. Systems and methods for providing network connectivity and remote monitoring, optimization, and control of pool/spa equipment
US10363197B2 (en) 2016-01-22 2019-07-30 Hayward Industries, Inc. Systems and methods for providing network connectivity and remote monitoring, optimization, and control of pool/spa equipment

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
CA2816862A1 (en) 2005-08-02
CA2495622A1 (en) 2005-08-02
US7701679B2 (en) 2010-04-20
EP1564613A2 (en) 2005-08-17
US20100219962A1 (en) 2010-09-02
US20080094235A1 (en) 2008-04-24
US8624749B2 (en) 2014-01-07
EP1564613A3 (en) 2006-05-24
CA2495622C (en) 2013-07-16
US20080030358A1 (en) 2008-02-07
US20100152911A1 (en) 2010-06-17
US7327275B2 (en) 2008-02-05
CA2816862C (en) 2015-12-29
US7843357B2 (en) 2010-11-30
US20070200698A1 (en) 2007-08-30
US20050168900A1 (en) 2005-08-04
US7982625B2 (en) 2011-07-19
US8164470B2 (en) 2012-04-24

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
JP2840352B2 (en) Power management and automated equipment
US4506827A (en) Battery powered thermostat
US6552647B1 (en) Building environment monitor and control system
US6812848B2 (en) Water leak mitigation system
CA2442903C (en) Fluid treatment system with uv sensor and intelligent driver
US6380852B1 (en) Power shut-off that operates in response to prespecified remote-conditions
US6253227B1 (en) Spa control system
RU2413306C2 (en) Device for controlling and monitoring operation of household appliances and entertainment equipment
CN101825341B (en) Water heater and method of operating the same
JP2008522563A (en) System and method for selectively controlling outlets using power profiling
JP5637461B2 (en) Heater control method and upper limit temperature safety stop device
US8836522B2 (en) Safety shut-off device and method of use
US7593789B2 (en) Water flow detection system for a bathing unit
US5654813A (en) Infrared receiver and system for controlling a module
CA2521572C (en) Water flow detection system for a bathing unit
US8867194B2 (en) Programmable landscape lighting controller with self-diagnostic capabilities and fail safe features
CA2466853C (en) Removeable programmable thermostat for air conditioning and heating systems
DE69938245T2 (en) Control system for baths
US5550753A (en) Microcomputer SPA control system
US4763365A (en) Spa system having high temperature safety device
US5585025A (en) SPA control circuit
CN1326079A (en) Control of energy saving water heater
US8747753B2 (en) Controller for UV light purification system
US20050109333A1 (en) Safety device for regulating electrical power to a cooking appliance
CA2752113C (en) Temperature control system for a bathing unit

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: 9090-3493 QUEBEC INC., CANADA

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:LAFLAMME, BENOIT;GAUDREAU, DANIEL;REEL/FRAME:015847/0433

Effective date: 20040603

AS Assignment

Owner name: GECKO ALLIANCE GROUP INC., CANADA

Free format text: MERGER;ASSIGNORS:GECKO ELECTRONIQUE INC.;9092-4523 QUEBEC INC.;9092-4135 QUEBEC INC.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:018951/0164

Effective date: 20061221

AS Assignment

Owner name: CAISSE CENTRALE DESJARDINS,CANADA

Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:GECKO ALLIANCE GROUP INC.;REEL/FRAME:023882/0803

Effective date: 20091204

Owner name: CAISSE POPULAIRE DESJARDINS DE CHARLESBOURG,CANADA

Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:GECKO ALLIANCE GROUP INC.;REEL/FRAME:023882/0803

Effective date: 20091204

Owner name: CAISSE CENTRALE DESJARDINS, CANADA

Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:GECKO ALLIANCE GROUP INC.;REEL/FRAME:023882/0803

Effective date: 20091204

Owner name: CAISSE POPULAIRE DESJARDINS DE CHARLESBOURG, CANAD

Free format text: SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:GECKO ALLIANCE GROUP INC.;REEL/FRAME:023882/0803

Effective date: 20091204

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- AFTER EXAMINER'S ANSWER OR BOARD OF APPEALS DECISION