US20050115114A1 - Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies - Google Patents

Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20050115114A1
US20050115114A1 US10/972,749 US97274904A US2005115114A1 US 20050115114 A1 US20050115114 A1 US 20050115114A1 US 97274904 A US97274904 A US 97274904A US 2005115114 A1 US2005115114 A1 US 2005115114A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
member
footwear
shoe
portion
assembly
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10/972,749
Inventor
Harry Miller
Byong Shin
Kwong Dong Chil
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Harry Miller Co Inc
Original Assignee
Harry Miller Co Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US51445603P priority Critical
Application filed by Harry Miller Co Inc filed Critical Harry Miller Co Inc
Priority to US10/972,749 priority patent/US20050115114A1/en
Publication of US20050115114A1 publication Critical patent/US20050115114A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B3/00Footwear characterised by the shape or the use
    • A43B3/26Footwear adjustable as to length or size

Abstract

An improved expandable footwear and inner assembly are disclosed. The footwear has a foot dressing, an adjustable inner assembly disposed within the foot dressing and a stiff member. The adjustable inner assembly has two outwardly extending members, and the stiff member has a channel to nestle the two outwardly extending members to resist undesirable rotation of the inner assembly. The inner assembly has a control for controlling the dimension of the footwear which includes a concave-shaped urging member, that when depressed, allows the footwear to expand or contract, and when not depressed, prohibits such movement.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) to provisional patent application Serial No. 60/514,456 entitled, “Improved Expandable Shoe and Shoe Assemblies,” filed on Oct. 24, 2003.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Technical Field
  • The present invention relates to expandable shoes that may be adjusted longitudinally.
  • 2. Discussion of Related Art
  • Some attempts have been made to provide expandable shoes, which can purportedly withstand day-to-day use. U.S. Pat. No. 3,389,481, for example, discloses a shoe in which a two plate assembly is disposed between an inner and a disjointed outer sole, having overlapping front and back portions. One of the plates includes a spring tongue, and the other plate includes two apertures to receive the spring tongue, each aperture corresponding to a shoe size. To adjust the shoe size, a screw which extends through the heel and into the disjointed soles is removed. The shoe may then be pulled apart allowing the disjointed sole to separate until the spring tongue engages the next aperture. Thus the shoe size may be lengthened by one size, but apparently the size cannot be controlled finely or reduced. The shoe includes two crinkled leather portions 34, one on each side of the shoe, to facilitate expansion of the shoe.
  • WO 01/33986 describes an expandable shoe. The expandable shoe includes an outer shell having a front and a rear outer assembly each attached to a flexible, expandable segment. An adjustable inner assembly is disposed within the outer shell and includes a control mechanism, accessible from the outer shell, that may be urged from a lock state into a state in which the inner assembly and outer shell may be adjusted. A visualization window provides a view port to the inner assembly.
  • Though WO 01/33986 details a desirable expandable shoe design, certain improvements thereto have been discovered to improve ergonomics, torsional rigidity, handling, and the construction of the shoe.
  • SUMMARY
  • Under one aspect of the invention, an expandable shoe is provided which includes a front outer assembly, and a rear outer assembly. An expandable segment attaches to the front and rear outer assemblies to define a shoe outer shell and the expandable segment extends at least partially along each side of the outer shell and transversely across the bottom of the outer shell. An adjustable inner assembly is disposed within the outer shell and has a first board portion and a second board portion in overlapping engagement with each other. The inner assembly also includes a control to adjust the position of the first board portion relative to the second board portion and to thereby adjust a dimension of the inner assembly and thereby a corresponding dimension of the shoe.
  • Under another aspect of the invention, the control includes a locking mechanism shaped to engage and hold one of the first and second board portions, a biasing mechanism to bias the locking mechanism into engagement with one of the first and second board portions; and an urging member having a proximal portion external of the shoe outer shell and positioned and movable transversely to a longitudinal direction of the shoe and in transverse alignment with the locking mechanism.
  • Under another aspect of the invention, one of the first and second board portions include transversely extending teeth, and the locking mechanism includes transversely extending teeth and the urging member include a rod portion having at least two diameters. The locking mechanism includes an aperture in alignment with the rod portion and the cross section of the aperture is larger than the smaller of the at least two diameters but smaller than the large of the at least two diameters. When the urging member is moved, the rod portion contacts and moves the locking mechanism with the larger of the two diameters.
  • Under another aspect of the invention, one of the first and second board portions includes an upward-facing cavity containing the control. The opening to the cavity is covered by the other of the first and second board portions when the first and second board portions overlap.
  • Under another aspect of the invention, one of the first and second board portions includes at least one groove extending longitudinally and the other of the first and second board portions includes a corresponding rail in alignment with the groove. The rail is positioned within the groove as the first and second board portions overlap.
  • Under another aspect of the invention, at least one of the first and second board portions includes a lattice support structure.
  • Under another aspect of the invention, one of the first and second board portions includes an index of notches and the other of the first and second board portions includes a protrusion in longitudinal alignment with the index and extending toward the index. When the first and second board portions are moved relative to one another, the protrusion contacts the notches.
  • Under another aspect of the invention, the footwear has a foot dressing, an adjustable inner assembly disposed within the foot dressing, and a stiff member. The adjustable inner assembly has two outwardly extending members, and the stiff member has a channel to nestle the outwardly extending members to resist undesirable rotation of the inner assembly.
  • Under another aspect of the invention, the inner assembly has a control for controlling the dimension of the footwear. The control includes a concave-shaped urging member, that when depressed, allows the footwear to expand or contract, and when not depressed, prohibits such movement.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING
  • In the Drawing,
  • FIGS. 1 and 2 show shoe designs according to certain embodiments of the invention;
  • FIG. 3 is a longitudinal cross sectional view of a shoe according to certain embodiments of the invention;
  • FIGS. 4A-B are exploded views of expandable last boards according to certain embodiments of the invention;
  • FIGS. 5A-C show features of expandable last boards according to certain embodiments of the invention;
  • FIGS. 6 and 7 show an exemplary control mechanism in two states;
  • FIG. 8 shows a perspective view of a stiff member according to one embodiment of the invention; and
  • FIG. 9 shows a cross section of an urging cap according to one embodiment of the invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • Certain embodiments of the present invention provide improvements to the ergonomics, torsional rigidity, handling, and construction of the shoe designs disclosed in WO 01/33986. That reference in conjunction with U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/438,935 is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • FIGS. 1 and 2 show two shoe designs under certain embodiments of the invention. With reference to FIG. 1, shoe 10 includes a front outer sole 12 and a front upper 18 to form a front outer assembly 13, and a rear outer sole 16 and a rear upper 20 to form a rear outer assembly 17. The front outer assembly 13 is attached to one edge 15B of a bellows segment 14, and the rear outer assembly 17 is attached to a second edge 15A, in each case using conventional techniques, such as by using stitching to the uppers 18, 20 and glue along the outer soles 12, 16. The combination of front outer assembly 13, rear outer assembly 17, and bellows segment 14 forms an outer shell 21.
  • An alternative shoe 20 is illustrated in FIG. 2. One principal difference in shoe 20 relative to shoe 10 is the bellows 22 of shoe 20 does not completely surround the shoe, whereas bellows 14 of shoe 10 is a unitary bellows enveloping the circumference of the shoe.
  • Similarly to that described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/438,935, an adjustable inner sole assembly is placed within outer shell 21. An externally-accessible manual control is urged via cap 24 and is used to place the inner sole assembly in a state in which it may be adjusted. When the control is in its natural state (i.e., when it is not urged transversely) it is in a lock state to hold the shoe adjustment fixed. Cap 24 is concave-shaped as shown in FIG. 9. The concave-shaped cap provides more comfort to the user who manually operates the control than a flat-shaped or convex-shaped cap would provide.
  • FIG. 3 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of an exemplary shoe 10. As can be seen in this view, an adjustable inner assembly 30 is positioned within the outer shell 21 and is generally formed from two pieces 31,32 which are shaped to engage and move relative to one another in overlapping relationship. The overlapping and engaging inner assembly 30 provides a relatively rigid last board for desirable foot support. In this embodiment, rear piece 31 is partially positioned within a heel section of the shoe 10 and includes the control mechanism 41, discussed below, which allow the shoe to be adjusted in size. The shoe includes a two piece inner last board 33, 34. This two piece inner last is made from materials, e.g., cloth, used for conventional last boards and is attached or sewn to the outer shell. Over the inner last is a two piece inner sole 36 and 37 made from conventional materials, e.g., foam, and shaped to overlap one another so that the pieces slide as the shoe size is adjusted.
  • FIG. 4A is an exploded view of one embodiment of the inner assembly 30 in relation to rear outer assembly 17. The inner assembly 30 includes front last board piece 31 and rear last board piece 32 positioned in overlapping, slidable and engaging relationship, as will be described more fully below in connection with the description of other figures. The front piece includes a downward facing cavity 40 (shown better in other figures) into which a control mechanism 41 is positioned. Plate 46 is mounted on the front piece 31 over the cavity 40 and encapsulates the control mechanism within the cavity, protecting it from glue and other substances used in the construction of the entire shoe. On the bottom surface of plate 46, shoe size indicia or adjustment indicia may be printed, engraved, labeled, or the like. The heel portion of the inner assembly 30 is positioned within a heel support 47. A plate 48 having magnification window 49 is fixed to the rear piece 32 by protrusions or the like to align the window 49 with the indicia on the bottom surface of plate 46. Cap 24 is fit over the proximal end of pin 45 and the entire assembly is fit within rear outer assembly 17 and the other components of the outer shell 21.
  • FIG. 4B is an exploded view of another embodiment of the inner assembly 30. In this embodiment, the front piece 31 has an upward facing cavity (not shown) into which the control mechanism is placed. The bottom surface of the cavity is integrated into the front piece 31 (as opposed to an attached plate 46), and the control mechanism is encapsulated by the rear piece 32 being positioned over the opening of the cavity. The bottom surface of the front piece, like the plate 46 of the prior embodiment, includes shoe size indicia or adjustment. The bottom surface 34 of the rear piece 32 has a cutout (not shown), through which the indicia may be observed. In particular, a magnification window 49′ is attached to the bottom surface 34 of the rear piece 32 in alignment with the cutout and through which the indicia may be viewed. This figure shows the inner assembly being used with a midsole, 17′ having an attached outer sole 17″. The midsole 17′ has a channel 82 to nestle the two outwardly extending members 84, 86 (shown in FIGS. 7 and 8) of the inner assembly to resist undesirable rotation of the inner assembly. FIG. 4B shows a midsole 17′, but it is understood that other stiff members may be used to provide a channel to nestle the outwardly extending member.
  • With reference to FIGS. 3, 4A, 6, and 7, the control mechanism 41 has a natural, locked state in which a toothed member 42 engages teeth 62 integrated with or attached to the front piece. The locked state prevents the front and rear pieces 31 and 32 from being moved longitudinally relative to one another. By sufficiently pushing pin 45 of the control mechanism 41 in a transverse direction relative to the last board's longitudinal direction, the last board may be placed in an unlocked state in which the toothed member 42 disengages the integrated or fixed tooth segment. Consequently, the front piece 31 may be moved longitudinally relative to the rear piece 32. The longitudinal movement is constrained by the extent of the longitudinal apertures 35, one of two of which is shown in FIG. 3. As the front and rear pieces 31, 32 are moved relative to one another, different indicia will align with the magnification window 49, 49′.
  • The control mechanism 41 of either embodiment includes a toothed member 42, a biasing spring 43, a support guide 44, and an urging pin 45. The teeth of the toothed member 42 are shaped and spaced to engage with teeth 62 (shown in FIG. 6 and 7) integrated into or fixed to a wall 64 of the cavity 40 facing the teeth of the toothed member 42. FIG. 6 shows the support guide 44 and spring 43 biasing the toothed member 42 into engagement with the integrated teeth. This “locked” state prevents the front piece from moving longitudinally relative to the rear piece 32.
  • Pin 45 has a first section 45A of a relatively larger diameter and a second section 45B of a relatively smaller diameter. The pin 45 is sized to fit through aperture 33 in rear section 32, through longitudinal slot 35 (shown in FIG. 3), through the control mechanism 41, and into another aperture corresponding to aperture 33 but on the hidden side of the rear section 32. More specifically, the larger diameter section 45A fits through aperture 33 but is too large to fit through the central aperture 42A of toothed member 42. The smaller diameter section 45B, however, is small enough to fit through the central aperture 42A of member 42 and aperture 44A of support 44. The support 44 includes a circular protrusion 44C which defines the aperture 44A and which fits into the aperture corresponding to the aperture 33 but on the hidden side. Thus, as the pin 45 is pushed through the aperture 33, the larger diameter section 45A eventually contacts toothed member 42 but does not pass through it. Continued pushing of pin 45 will thus cause the toothed member 42 to move transversely and compress spring 43 against support 44. Circular recess 44B of support 44 helps keeps the components in secure alignment. Sufficient pushing of the pin 45 will cause the teeth of member 42 to clear and disengage the integrated teeth of front piece 31, as shown in FIG. 7. This “adjustment” state allows the front piece 31 to be moved longitudinally relative to the rear piece 32, while the teeth are so disengaged. The number of teeth and the spacing in between teeth may be made to index to known adjustments. For example, the amount of teeth and spacing may be made to correspond to a range of sizes 13 to 1 and allow half size increments 13, 13.5, 1.
  • FIGS. 6 and further illustrates an end cap 75. The end cap has a cylindrical protrusion 77 to fit into aperture-defining portion 76 and defines an aperture 78 to receive a distal end of pin 45. The cap further encapsulates the control mechanism protecting it from glue and other debris during manufacturing and use of the shoe.
  • Though the control mechanism and states are shown and described with reference to the embodiment of FIG. 4A, the operation and components are the same for the embodiment of FIG. 4B. The embodiment of FIG. 4B requires the control mechanism (except for pin 45) to be assembled within the cavity of the front piece 31 before the front piece is arranged with the rear piece but it has the advantage of improved encapsulation and protection from glue used in shoe assembly.
  • FIGS. 5A-C show certain improvements to the design of the front and rear pieces relative to embodiments shown in WO 01/33986. The rear piece 32 is generally shaped like the rear piece disclosed in WO 01/33986 having slots 51 and 52 to accept the wings 53 and 54 of the front piece 31 so that the front piece may slide within rear piece 32 in an overlapping relationship. When fully contracted curved sections 55 and 56 of the front piece 31 contact curved walls 57 and 58 of the rear piece 32. Unlike the design shown in WO 01/33986, the rear piece 32 includes two rails 59 and 60 protruding up from the major surface of the rear piece 32, and the front piece includes two slots 61 and 62 shaped to receive these rails. Because the rails protrude from the major surface they help inhibit transverse sliding of the front and rear pieces and improve the torsional rigidity of the last board 30.
  • The top surface of the front piece 31 includes a notched or teeth shaped index 63 and a nib 64 to provide ergonomic feedback to the user when he or she is adjusting the shoe size. The index 64 is in longitudinal alignment with a nib 64 on the underside of rear piece 32. The notches or teeth are positioned to correspond to shoe size adjustments. The nib 64 contacts the teeth or notches of index 63, and thus provides resistance to the user pushing or pulling the two pieces 31,32 together or apart, when the teeth 64 do not align with the teeth of toothed member 42. When the teeth 64 and the toothed member 42 align, the nib will be positioned in a valley or recess of the index 63 and thus provide no resistance to the user, giving the user the tactile sensation of no resistance and signaling that the shoe size adjustment is in alignment.
  • FIG. 5C shows the bottom surface of front piece 31 and illustrates the lattice-shaped support structure 66 integrated into the front piece. Though other arrangements may be substituted, the structure 66 provides improved torsional rigidity in the midsole area while allowing some of the material of the front piece 31 to be removed and to thus reduce weight.
  • The shoe designs of FIGS. 1 and 2 are exemplary. The principles of the invention may be manifested in embodiments including running shoes, biking shoes, ski boots, dress shoes, snow boarding boots, sandals and the like. Depending on the shoe type, the inner assembly may be in the form of a last board, or a combination of a last board and a midsole, or a midsole. Likewise, depending on the shoe type, the materials used will be selected to provide a desired amount of flexibility or rigidity. Moreover, depending on the shoe design the outer shell may differ. In the case of a sandal, for example, the outer shell would only have strapping. Other embodiments, such as a biking shoe, might have either netting, meshing, or no material where the bellows are shown, thus providing increased ventilation.
  • Moreover, the above embodiments described a flexible segment made of a bellows-shaped material, but other embodiments may use other materials, e.g., stretchable nylon, netting or meshing, or it may be omitted. Likewise all of the control features described had external features to activate the control, but other embodiment (e.g., cost-reducing embodiments or embodiments where hiding the control is desirable) may place the control mechanisms on the interior of the outer shell.
  • While the invention has been described in connection with certain preferred embodiments, it will be understood that it is not intended to limit the invention to those particular embodiments. On the contrary, it is intended to cover all alternatives, modifications and equivalents as may be included in the appended claims. Some specific components, figures and types of materials are mentioned, but it is to be understood that such component values,-dimensions and types of materials are, however, given as examples only and are not intended to limit the scope of this invention in any manner.

Claims (9)

1. Footwear, comprising:
a foot dressing;
an adjustable inner assembly, disposed within the foot dressing, and having at least one outwardly extending control member; and
a stabilizing member having a channel adapted to receive the at least one outwardly extending control member to resist rotation of the inner assembly.
2. The footwear of claim 1 wherein the inner assembly has two outwardly extending control members and the channel is adapted to receive the two outwardly extending members.
3. The footwear of claim 1 wherein the foot dressing has an upper foot portion and a sole portion and the stabilizing member is in contact with the upper foot portion and the sole portion.
4. The footwear of claim 1 wherein the foot dressing has a toe portion and a heel portion and the stabilizing member is in the heel portion.
5. The footwear of claim 1 wherein the stabilizing member is a midsole.
6. The footwear of claim 1 wherein the channel is U-shaped and the at least one outwardly extending control member is cylindrical.
7. The footwear of claim 1 further comprising a rod extending through the at least one outwardly extending control member.
8. Footwear comprising:
a foot dressing and
an adjustable assembly, at least a portion of which is coupled to the foot dressing, the adjustable assembly having a first member and a second member in overlapping engagement with each other and a control integral to the footwear to adjust the position of the first member relative to the second member and to thereby adjust a dimension of the adjustable assembly and thereby a corresponding dimension of the footwear, the control having a manually depressible concave-shaped member that, when depressed allows the first and second members to be moved relative to each other and when not depressed, inhibits such movement.
9. Footwear, comprising:
a foot dressing; and
an adjustable assembly, in contact with the foot dressing, the adjustable assembly having a first member and a second member, each shaped for relative movement with respect to the other; and a manual adjustment assembly having a concave shaped portion thereof manually accessible from the foot dressing and another portion thereof engageable with an engagement member fixed to one of the first and second members, wherein the engagement member is translationally urgable to at least one of two states, in which a first state allows the first and second members to be moved relative to each other to adjust a dimension of the footwear and wherein the second state inhibits such movement.
US10/972,749 2003-10-24 2004-10-25 Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies Abandoned US20050115114A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US51445603P true 2003-10-24 2003-10-24
US10/972,749 US20050115114A1 (en) 2003-10-24 2004-10-25 Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/972,749 US20050115114A1 (en) 2003-10-24 2004-10-25 Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20050115114A1 true US20050115114A1 (en) 2005-06-02

Family

ID=34549337

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/972,749 Abandoned US20050115114A1 (en) 2003-10-24 2004-10-25 Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies

Country Status (3)

Country Link
US (1) US20050115114A1 (en)
EP (1) EP1684607A2 (en)
WO (1) WO2005041705A2 (en)

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20060230638A1 (en) * 2005-04-18 2006-10-19 Roces S.R.L. Ski boot
US20070251126A1 (en) * 2004-10-27 2007-11-01 Peeerfect Fit, Llc Personally Adjustable Footwear
US20080209768A1 (en) * 2006-10-19 2008-09-04 Gerhard Trinkaus Sports shoe, in particular an alpine ski shoe
US20100275460A1 (en) * 2006-08-11 2010-11-04 Shin Kyung Co., Ltd. Footwear outsole

Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2112052A (en) * 1934-09-28 1938-03-22 Norman B Smith Shoe construction
US5285584A (en) * 1991-06-12 1994-02-15 Dubner Benjamin B Mechanical custom molding of footgear
US5437110A (en) * 1993-02-04 1995-08-01 L.A. Gear, Inc. Adjustable shoe heel spring and stabilizer
US5729912A (en) * 1995-06-07 1998-03-24 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear having adjustable width, footform and cushioning
US5903985A (en) * 1996-05-22 1999-05-18 Salomon S.A. Sport boot provided with an adjustable arch support, and an adjustable arch support therefor
US6138385A (en) * 1995-03-09 2000-10-31 Puma Aktiengellschaft Rudolf Dassler Sport Shoe sole, and shoe with such a sole
US20020069557A1 (en) * 1999-11-12 2002-06-13 Harry Miller Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US20020170206A1 (en) * 1999-11-12 2002-11-21 Harry Miller Co., Inc. Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US20030097770A1 (en) * 2001-11-27 2003-05-29 Midori Karasawa Shoemaking Method and shoes

Patent Citations (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2112052A (en) * 1934-09-28 1938-03-22 Norman B Smith Shoe construction
US5285584A (en) * 1991-06-12 1994-02-15 Dubner Benjamin B Mechanical custom molding of footgear
US5437110A (en) * 1993-02-04 1995-08-01 L.A. Gear, Inc. Adjustable shoe heel spring and stabilizer
US6138385A (en) * 1995-03-09 2000-10-31 Puma Aktiengellschaft Rudolf Dassler Sport Shoe sole, and shoe with such a sole
US5729912A (en) * 1995-06-07 1998-03-24 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear having adjustable width, footform and cushioning
US5813146A (en) * 1995-06-07 1998-09-29 Nike, Inc. Article of footwear having adjustable width, footform and cushioning
US5903985A (en) * 1996-05-22 1999-05-18 Salomon S.A. Sport boot provided with an adjustable arch support, and an adjustable arch support therefor
US20020069557A1 (en) * 1999-11-12 2002-06-13 Harry Miller Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US20020170206A1 (en) * 1999-11-12 2002-11-21 Harry Miller Co., Inc. Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US6574888B2 (en) * 1999-11-12 2003-06-10 Harry Miller Company, Inc. Expandable shoe and shoe assemblies
US20030097770A1 (en) * 2001-11-27 2003-05-29 Midori Karasawa Shoemaking Method and shoes

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20070251126A1 (en) * 2004-10-27 2007-11-01 Peeerfect Fit, Llc Personally Adjustable Footwear
US8011119B2 (en) * 2004-10-27 2011-09-06 Peeerfect Fit Llc Personally adjustable footwear
US7565755B2 (en) * 2004-10-27 2009-07-28 Peeerfect Fit Llc Personally adjustable footwear
US20090307929A1 (en) * 2004-10-27 2009-12-17 Ofer Tvoua Personally adjustable footwear
US20060230638A1 (en) * 2005-04-18 2006-10-19 Roces S.R.L. Ski boot
US7676958B2 (en) * 2005-04-18 2010-03-16 Roces S.R.L. Ski boot
US20100275460A1 (en) * 2006-08-11 2010-11-04 Shin Kyung Co., Ltd. Footwear outsole
US8458930B2 (en) * 2006-08-11 2013-06-11 Shin Kyung Co., Ltd. Footwear outsole
US7992326B2 (en) * 2006-10-19 2011-08-09 Atomic Austria Gmbh Sports shoe, in particular an alpine ski shoe
US20080209768A1 (en) * 2006-10-19 2008-09-04 Gerhard Trinkaus Sports shoe, in particular an alpine ski shoe

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
WO2005041705A3 (en) 2006-04-06
EP1684607A2 (en) 2006-08-02
WO2005041705A2 (en) 2005-05-12

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US9307804B2 (en) Automatic lacing system
US7036244B1 (en) Rigid articulated Pointe shoe
US6189239B1 (en) Articulated footwear having a flexure member
US4815221A (en) Shoe with energy control system
US6045144A (en) Adjustable roller skate
US7168188B2 (en) Article footwear with removable heel pad
US6748676B1 (en) Sport footwear component construction
DE10036100C1 (en) Sports shoe has inner sole layer with openings, support layer with second openings that overlap first openings and outer sole layer with at least one opening that overlaps second openings
US7287342B2 (en) Shoe with lacing
US6367169B1 (en) Shoe having an at least partially elastic lining and volume adjusting system
US7997013B2 (en) Footwear with a shank system
US7234251B2 (en) Toe protection sandal
US4360979A (en) Sport shoe with a dynamic adjustable cuff assembly
US7631440B2 (en) Shoe with anatomical protection
CN1106167C (en) Adjustable fit shoe construction
DE19619677C2 (en) snowboard boots
US4132016A (en) Shoe, particularly for general sporting activities and training
US9700101B2 (en) Guides and components for closure systems and methods therefor
US5813146A (en) Article of footwear having adjustable width, footform and cushioning
JP4777959B2 (en) shoes
US20050022426A1 (en) Shoe construction
US7610696B2 (en) Adjustable fit insole system for shoes
US20100024251A1 (en) Attachment System For Shoe Uppers
US5467537A (en) Shoe with adjustable closure system
US8607475B2 (en) Shock absorbing footwear construction

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION