US20050103789A1 - Neck band using straight-tear film - Google Patents

Neck band using straight-tear film Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20050103789A1
US20050103789A1 US10/841,714 US84171404A US2005103789A1 US 20050103789 A1 US20050103789 A1 US 20050103789A1 US 84171404 A US84171404 A US 84171404A US 2005103789 A1 US2005103789 A1 US 2005103789A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
neck
neck band
band
tear
bottle
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10/841,714
Inventor
Wayne O'Hara
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
RENAISSANCE MARK Inc
Original Assignee
O'hara Wayne J.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US46843503P priority Critical
Application filed by O'hara Wayne J. filed Critical O'hara Wayne J.
Priority to US10/841,714 priority patent/US20050103789A1/en
Publication of US20050103789A1 publication Critical patent/US20050103789A1/en
Assigned to RENAISSANCE MARK, INC. reassignment RENAISSANCE MARK, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: O'HARA, MR. WAYNE JOHN
Priority claimed from US11/371,976 external-priority patent/US20060225320A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D55/00Accessories for container closures not otherwise provided for
    • B65D55/02Locking devices; Means for discouraging or indicating unauthorised opening or removal of closure
    • B65D55/06Deformable or tearable wires, strings, or strips; Use of seals, e.g. destructible locking pins
    • B65D55/08Annular elements encircling container necks
    • B65D55/0818Destructible or permanently removable bands, e.g. adhesive
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09FDISPLAYING; ADVERTISING; SIGNS; LABELS OR NAME-PLATES; SEALS
    • G09F23/00Advertising on or in specific articles, e.g. ashtrays, letter-boxes
    • G09F23/06Advertising on or in specific articles, e.g. ashtrays, letter-boxes the advertising matter being combined with articles for restaurants, shops or offices
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09FDISPLAYING; ADVERTISING; SIGNS; LABELS OR NAME-PLATES; SEALS
    • G09F3/00Labels, tag tickets, or similar identification or indication means; Seals; Postage or like stamps
    • G09F3/02Forms or constructions
    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09FDISPLAYING; ADVERTISING; SIGNS; LABELS OR NAME-PLATES; SEALS
    • G09F3/00Labels, tag tickets, or similar identification or indication means; Seals; Postage or like stamps
    • G09F3/04Labels, tag tickets, or similar identification or indication means; Seals; Postage or like stamps to be fastened or secured by the material of the label itself, e.g. by thermo-adhesion

Abstract

An improved neck band is provided for a container having a neck and removable closure at the end. The neck band is prepared from a straight-tear film, preferably a polypropylene film that has been oriented in a single direction. The neck band is provided with a tab and is attached to the neck and removable closure so that when the tab is pulled, the polymer material separates along a line around the circumference of the neck adjacent the skirt of the removable closure.

Description

    I. FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • This invention relates to a neck band or label for a bottle or other container comprising a reservoir, a neck, and a removable cap at the end of the neck. The neck band encircles a portion of the cap and the neck of the bottle.
  • II. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Neck bands are frequently used on glass or plastic containers having an elongated “neck” with a closure at the end, such as, a screw cap. For example, neck bands are frequently used on “narrow neck” bottles for consumable products such as salad dressing, barbecue sauce, and alcoholic beverages and for containers of catsup and over-the-counter medicines. The bands contain graphics and information for marketing, product identification and other purposes, e.g., instructions, product expiration date, production lot data, etc. For marketing purposes it is highly desirable that high quality graphics can be imprinted or otherwise applied to the neck band and that the graphics and the band itself are not degraded by handling or environmental conditions encountered in shipping and storage.
  • Neck bands should also help to prevent moisture from entering the container by enclosing the junction of the cap and the bottle. The neck band should also provide evidence if tampering has occurred prior to consumer use by opening of the cap allowing access to the contents of the container. For these reasons, the neck band is securely mounted to both the neck of the container and the skirt of the cap so that the cap cannot be moved to an open position without tearing or breaking the neck band thereby showing visually that the container has been opened. Neck bands may also hide slight variations in fill amounts in the contents of the containers, thereby assuring that all of the containers have an equal chance of selection by a customer. It is highly desirable that neck bands meeting all of these conditions be produced and affixed to containers reliably and efficiently without adding significant cost to the price of the product.
  • Although various forms of neck bands have been employed, none has successfully met all of these objectives.
  • For economic reasons, paper is the predominant material for making most, if not all, commercial neck bands today. A typical prior art paper neck band is shown in FIG. 1. The band 1 comprises paper imprinted with the appropriate graphics, product identification, information and instructions. The ends of the neck band 4 and 5 are wrapped around the neck and cap of the container, and the band is glued so that the upper portion 2 of the band is adhesively secured to the cap of the container and the lower portion 3 is adhesively secured to the neck.
  • There are problems, however, in applying paper to the necks/caps of bottles, e.g., curling of the paper after application of the glue in the wrong direction. In addition, paper is not very resistant to moisture and does not significantly assist the cap and bottle closure in preventing moisture intrusion. Indeed, in the presence of moisture (for example, in direct contact with water), the paper may deteriorate to the point that the neck band becomes completely separated from the container or sufficiently separated that it no longer would indicate if tampering has occurred. Consumers also find that it is difficult to open paper neck bands. While directions on the band frequently advise the consumer to open by twisting the cap, many consumers cannot open the container in this manner. Typically, a knife or other sharp implement must be found and employed to form an incision in the band adjacent the cap and completely around the neck, before the cap can be twisted and removed. This presents the potential for minor injury. At the very least it results in a negative customer experience, e.g., delay and frustration, at the very time the product is to be first enjoyed.
  • In an attempt at improvement, some paper neck bands are perforated along a line adjacent the cap and encircling the neck of the container. Such a prior art band is depicted in FIGS. 1A and 1B. As shown, band 11 comprises upper portion 12 and lower portion 13 and ends 14 and to 15. An intermittent line of perforations 16 extends from one end to the other. FIG. 1B depicts a container 17 with the lower portion 13 of band 11 attached to the neck 18 above the shoulder 17, and the upper portion 12 attached to the cap 20. While the perforations facilitate opening of the container for some users, others still find it necessary to locate a hard sharp object, such as a fingernail, knife, etc, to pierce the perforations and separate the upper and lower portions of the neck band thereby allowing the cap to be removed.
  • In addition, the perforations exacerbate problems in applying the band to the neck of the container. For example, the perforations tend to cause a “doming effect” when the band is placed in the magazine of the labeling machine used for application to containers. This can result in defects in the placement of neck bands on containers, quality control rejects and possible down time of the labeling production line. Variability in the depths of the perforations also presents problems. When the perforations are too shallow, they fail to facilitate the opening of the container. When perforations are too deep, there is a tendency for premature bursting or cracking of the neck band during transit or stocking of the containers resulting in otherwise unnecessary product returns. Regardless of depth, perforations also substantially reduce any effect of the neck band as a moisture and vapor barrier.
  • Alternatively, paper neck bands have also been utilized in which a draw string is located between the band and the neck of the bottle around its circumference. In theory, the consumer should be able to pull the end of the string around the circumference of the container thereby separating the upper and lower portions of the neck band so that the cap can be removed. Thus, easier opening might be accomplished without compromising the neck band's worth as a moisture barrier. In practice, however, it is both difficult and expensive to properly locate and secure the string on the back of the neck band. The draw string has to be precisely placed on the neck band and separately glued. If the draw string is not properly secured to the neck band, it will separate from the neck band without opening it, even if pulled in the proper manner. Moreover, many consumers do not pull the string correctly—only causing the string to separate from the neck band without opening it. These deficiencies, coupled with additional expense, have minimized the use of paper drawstring neck bands.
  • Transparent shrinkable neck bands have also been utilized, either alone or over a paper neck band, primarily to improve moisture resistance. Shrinkable neck bands have not been widely employed commercially, because they still require perforations with the defects associated with that design. In addition, expensive, specialized equipment must be installed to apply these neck bands.
  • Thus, a need exists for an improved neck band obviating these deficiencies. The neck band should be easy to open, should provide a significant moisture and vapor barrier, should clearly show evidence of tampering, should be capable of being applied reliably and efficiently, and should provide a surface for implementing superior graphics. These improvements should be obtained without requiring new equipment or substantial modifications to production lines for manufacturing neck bands or affixing them to product containers.
  • III. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • It has now been discovered that an improved neck band can be prepared by using a straight-tear film that can be manually separated along a line around the neck of the bottle. Preferably, the straight-tear film is a polypropylene-based polymer film that has been directionally oriented in a single direction. The improved neck bands are applied to the neck and cap of the container so that the lines of weakness are parallel to the circumference of the neck. A tab is placed on the neck band adjacent the skirt of the cap, so that when the tab is pulled, the polymer material separates along a line around the circumference of the neck. Preferably, this process does not just separate the neck band, but removes a piece of neck band material around the circumference of the container.
  • Neck bands prepared in accordance with this invention provide a base for permanently imprinting or otherwise providing superior graphics. They provide a moisture proof barrier far superior to paper neck bands. They are easy to open. When the neck band is opened, a piece of the material is visibly removed. Thus, if opening occurs prior to use by the purchaser, the evidence of tampering is clearly apparent. The neck bands of this invention can be manufactured and applied reliably and efficiently with standard, existing equipment.
  • IV. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 is a front view of a prior art paper neck band.
  • FIG. 1A is a front view of a prior art perforated paper neck band.
  • FIG. 1B is a perspective view showing the prior art perforated paper neck band of FIG. 1A as installed on a container. The sequence of steps for opening the neck band and container are identified.
  • FIG. 2 is a front view of a neck band prepared in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention.
  • FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a bottle with the band of FIG. 2 applied to it.
  • FIGS. 3A through 3C depict a side view of the bottle of FIG. 2 as it is opened, first by manually removing a piece of the neck band by pulling the tab as shown in FIGS. 3A and 3B and then by twisting and removing the cap as shown in FIG. 3C.
  • FIG. 4 is a schematic illustrating one typical manufacturing technique employed in preparing a directionally oriented polypropylene material.
  • FIG. 5 is a schematic diagram illustrating a process for manufacturing neck bands from directionally oriented film.
  • FIG. 6 is a schematic illustrating the equipment and process employed in applying neck bands of the present invention to bottles.
  • FIGS. 7A through 7C illustrate some alternative designs for neck bands in accordance with the present invention.
  • IV. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION AND THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT
  • It has now been discovered that an improved neck band can be prepared by using a straight-tear film that can be easily separated manually along one or more lines around the neck of a bottle. FIG. 2 is a front view of a neck band prepared in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention. The neck band contains product information and directions as on the prior art neck band of FIGS. 1 and 1A. However, it is made of a straight-tear material that has the ability of being torn manually in a straight line in the direction indicated. As used herein, a “straight-tear film” refers to a film that can be torn manually along a straight line. Typically, this occurs because it is difficult, if not impossible, to manually tear the film in the perpendicular, direction. In general, a straight-tear film propagates a tear in the film along a straight line, with the tear varying by at most only a few millimeters in the transverse direction from that line.
  • FIG. 2 shows one embodiment of an improved neck band of the present invention. As depicted, neck band 101 is the same general shape as neck bands of the prior art shown in FIGS. 1 and 1A and comprises upper portion 102 and lower portion 103 and ends 104 and 105. Die-cut notches 107 and 108 define an intermediate tab 106. When tab 106 is pulled to the left, it initiates tears shown in the drawing as lines 109 and 110 in the direction indicated. Unlike the perforations on the prior art band depicted in FIGS. 1A and 1B, the lines 109 and 110 on band 101 appear as a result of tearing in the direction of the straight-tear orientation of the film from which the band was made. When the tab 106 has been pulled completely to the left end 105, a strip of material 111 is released between the upper portion 102 of the neck band and the lower portion 103 of the neck band.
  • FIG. 3 shows the neck band 101 of FIG. 2 as applied to the neck 114 and cap 115 of the container 112, in this case a “narrow neck” salad dressing bottle. Although not shown in the drawing, the ends of the band 104 and 105 are wrapped around the neck and overlap each other on the back of the container and are secured by adhesive to one another, except as noted below. The upper portion 102 of the band is secured by adhesive to the cap 115, and the lower portion 103 of the band is secured to the neck, also by adhesive. The band 101 is designed so that the tab 106 lies below or adjacent the bottom of the cap 115 in an area of the band that is not glued to either the cap, the neck or the other end 105 of the band. When the tab is pulled, as shown in FIG. 3A, the neck band material is torn on straight lines 109 and 110 around the circumference of the neck. As a result, a piece of film 111 is removed around the circumference of the neck leaving upper portion 102 attached to the cap 115 and lower portion 103 attached to the neck 114 as shown in FIG. 3B. The separation of the film can be performed “manually” meaning that the film can be separated without having to cut or pierce the neck band, as is the case with paper. After the neck band has been separated, the cap can be twisted and removed to open the container as shown in FIG. 3C.
  • In the preferred embodiment shown in FIGS. 2, 3 and 3A though 3C, the neck band of the present invention employs a tab to separate portions of the band. The tab is formed by cutting two “V”-shaped portions 107 and 108 into the edge 104 of the neck band. When the tab is pulled, parallel tears in the neck band are commenced at the bottom of each “V.” As the user continues to pull the tab, the tears are completed around the neck band enabling separation of the middle portion from the upper and lower portions of the neck band.
  • While this is a presently preferred embodiment, other types of tabs can be employed and other forms of tear-initiating features. For example, these could include the use of slits instead of “V” slots (for example, as shown in FIG. 7A) or a single knife slit or “V” slot (for example, as shown in FIG. 7B). A tab could be formed as an extension of one end of the band rather than using slits or grooves. Other designs for tear-initiating features known to one skilled in the art can also be employed.
  • Indeed, the neck bands of the present invention can be employed without any tear-initiating feature. While such a construction would retain some of the benefits of the present invention, it would not be as easy to open, since the user would be required to employ a fingernail, knife or other instrument to initiate the tear.
  • The preferred embodiment depicted in FIGS. 2, 3 and 3A through 3C comprises a three-section neck band, i.e., opening removes a piece of material between the portions of the neck band secured to the cap and neck, respectively. This construction is preferred because of the ease of operation and because the removal of a piece of material from the neck band provides clear evidence of potential tampering. Other numbers of neck band sections can be employed depending on the number of tears initiated in the band. For example, a two-section embodiment can be utilized as shown in FIG. 7B.
  • Neck band materials suitable for use in this invention include any “straight-tear films.” Obviously, it is preferably that the materials be inexpensive, that they be easy to manufacture, attach and handle, that they form a base for high quality printing and graphics, and that they provide superior water and vapor resistance. The selection of the straight-tear film may depend on the composite of properties desired for a particular application. However, a presently preferred group of materials for use in this invention include polypropylene films or any number of other polypropylene-based monopolymers, copolymers and blends that are capable of being directionally oriented so that a straight-tear film is produced.
  • One material that has been successfully used to prepare neck bands of this invention is PRIIMAX® NA 350 film available from Avery Dennison, 7600 Auburn Road, Concord, Ohio USA. This material is a corona treated, flexible matte white opaque polyolefin (i.e., polypropylene) film having the following properties:
    Thickness 3.5 mils
    Yield 7,900 sq. in./lb.
    Opacity 88.0 maximum
    Tensile Modulus MD: 160,000 psi
    CD: 60,000 psi
    Tensile Elongation MD: 50%
    CD: 500%
    Gurley Stiffness MD: 30 mg
    (typical value)
    Dyne (print surface) Target: 45
    Minimum: 40
  • Another suitable material is “DL2” film, also available from Avery Dennison. This material is also a corona treated, flexible matte white opaque polyolefin (i.e., polypropylene) film having the following properties:
    Thickness 4.0 mils
    Yield 7,400 sq. in./lb.
    Opacity 85.0 maximum
    Tensile Modulus MD: 200,000 psi
    CD: 100,000 psi
    Tensile Elongation MD: 60%
    CD: 600%
    Gurley Stiffness MD: 65 minimum
    (typical value)
    Dyne (print surface) Target: 45
    Minimum: 40
  • Preferably, the straight-tear film is a polypropylene-based polymer film that has been directionally oriented in a single direction, usually the “machine direction.” Such materials are known to have great strength and tear-resistance. However, those properties are not exhibited in all directions. While the material is essentially tear resistant in one direction, the tear strength in the perpendicular direction is quite weak, and tearing can be accomplished manually with ease.
  • However, straight-tear films are not limited to polypropylene films that have been oriented in a single direction. Suitable straight-tear films may be formed by careful selection of polymer type, molecular weight and degree of orientation.
  • The films prepared in accordance with this invention should have sufficient thickness to produce neck bands that are successfully employed in standard label application equipment, but not so thick as to add substantially to material costs. The appropriate thickness may vary slightly depending on the specific type of polypropylene-based polymer employed. Generally, however, the thickness should be in the range of about 1.0 mil to 6.0 mil, preferably in the range of about 2.0 mil to 5.0 mil, and most preferably in the range of 2.5 mil to 4.0 mil.
  • Films suitable for use in the present invention may be employed alone or as a co-extruded composite or laminate with other layers known to those skilled in the art. Examples of composites include the PRIIMAX® NA 350 and DL2 films referenced previously.
  • The polypropylene materials of the present invention produce neck bands that are superior to those made of paper in a number of characteristics. First, neck bands of polypropylene-based films are stronger physically than paper, with the exception that they may be easily tom in a straight line in a single direction that facilitates opening. Because the bands may be easily torn for opening when intended without any perforations, they do not present the deficiencies of paper bands (either perforated or un-perforated) as previously noted. Neck bands made of polypropylene-based films also provide an improved barrier to water. Because polypropylene does not absorb water, it is impervious to changes in humidity and to deterioration from direct contact with water, such as that encountered when placing labeled containers in an ice cooler. The absence of perforations further enhances water resistance.
  • Compared to paper, polypropylene-based polymers also provide a much more attractive base for the presentation and preservation of graphics.
  • Polypropylene-based films can be prepared by any of the conventional methods known to one skilled in the art. Generally, these materials are thermoplastic. While the films are still hot, they may be stretched in the direction in which they are moving through the manufacturing process, i.e., the “machine direction.” This is illustrated, for example in FIG. 5, where the hot polypropylene-based film 150 from the extruder is passed between web rollers (not shown) moving at different speeds, i.e., the “down stream” rollers moving sufficiently faster than those “upstream,” so that the film is stretched in the “machine direction.” The stretched film can be “set” in that orientation by annealing. Thus the film has been stretched in the machine direction, but not stretched in the transverse direction. The continuous film is wound and formed into a roll for ease in delivery to customers.
  • Normally polypropylene film is stretched in both the machine direction and the transverse direction thereby enhancing the strength of the polymer in both directions. The vast majority of commercial applications require that polypropylene film be biaxially oriented. Smaller amounts of polypropylene film are manufactured where the film is stretched in only the machine direction. Preferably, films suitable for use in the present invention are stretched or oriented in only one direction. Typically that will be the machine direction for ease of manufacture. Although bi-directionally oriented films might be used in the present invention, the amount of orientation in the second direction must be relatively insignificant, i.e., so that the film may be easily torn in a straight line.
  • Similarly, if the polypropylene film is employed in the neck band as a laminate or otherwise with other layers, the composite must meet the same criteria, i.e., that it is capable of being torn in a straight line.
  • Neck bands may be prepared from the polypropylene film using conventional technology. One manufacturing sequence is illustrated schematically in FIG. 5. A roll of film 150, such as that produced in the orientation process illustrated in FIG. 4, is fed to the feed table of the neck band manufacturing line. Accordingly, the film feedstock is fed in the machine oriented direction through the label manufacturing line. A typical printing line may be employed, such as a “Mark Andy/Comco, MSP 22” Proglide Flexographic Press, Press #2116D” available from Mark Andy located in St. Louis, Mo. Straight tear film 150 supplied in roll form, is threaded through the press and printed in up to nine colors in-line using ultra violet cured inks. This may include imprinting of the product identifying information and trademark and various instructions. After printing, the bands are varnished in whole or in part. Normally, certain portions of the band are not varnished, such as the portions of the band edges that will overlap one another and be affixed in that position by glue and portions of the band that may be subsequently printed with additional information, such as, product expiration date and lot number, just before the neck bands are affixed to the containers. The printed film 150 then passes through a rotary die cutting station, which cuts the band to shape and delivers the film with printed and cut neck bands for re-rolling and delivery to the label applier. As shown schematically in FIG. 5, the neck bands are printed on the film and cut so that the ends 104 and 105 of each band 101 lie in the machine-oriented direction.
  • As mentioned previously, an advantage of the neck bands of the present invention is that they may be applied to containers using existing equipment without structural modifications. In addition, the materials employed in the invention may be applied securely with cold, glue applied rather than pressure sensitive adhesive. For example, FIG. 6 depicts a top schematic view of a typical cold glue label application process. This process depicted is common to cold glue application systems available in the United States from Krones, Inc. of Franklin, Wis. or from Jagenberg, Inc. of Enfield, Conn. In the first step, adhesive is circulated along a roller at the glue station. A label pallet, which is the exact shape of the neck band being applied, is exposed to glue roller, and glue is applied to pallet. Individual neck bands 101, having been removed from film web 150, are fed from the label magazine onto the glue pallet, which applies glue to the back of the neck bands and transfers the band to gripper wheel. The gripper wheel picks up the neck band and exposes the back of the band to the surface of the bottle, which is traveling along the bottle conveyer. Bottles are then conveyed through a series of brushes to wipe the neck band down smoothly and securely.
  • Those skilled in the art will know how to design the label pallet so that it applies adhesive to the back portions of the neck bands where it is required. As previously discussed, the neck bands of the present invention do not generally contain adhesive behind the portion of the neck band 111 that will be removed upon tearing. However, it may be desirable to apply adhesive in the area between the notches 107 and 108 to hold the area adjacent the tab 106 in place to avoid unintended contact of the tab with surfaces, thereby initiating inadvertent tearing of the neck band.
  • Those skilled in the art will also appreciate that there are a number of other design options that might be employed using “straight-tear” film for a neck band. For example:
  • FIG. 7A illustrates an alternative neck band embodiment of the present invention. In this case, neck band 201 has an upper section 202 and lower section 203 and ends 204 and 205. The tear initiating feature is similar to that shown in FIG. 2, except that slits 207 and 208 are employed instead of “V”-shaped notches. A tab 206 is formed between the slits, which when pulled to the left causes straight line tearing as indicated along lines 209 and 210 resulting in separation of intermediate section 211.
  • FIG. 7B illustrates a two section neck band embodiment of the present invention. In this case, neck band 301 has an upper section 302 and a lower section 303 and ends 304 and 305. The tear initiating feature consists of a single “V”-shaped groove 306 at which a tear can be initiated utilizing the sides and bottom of the groove to initiate a tear along line 309 resulting in separation of the neck band into the upper and lower portions 302 and 303, respectively.
  • Finally, FIG. 7C illustrates a neck band embodiment similar to that shown in FIG. 2. Again, neck band 401 consists of upper portion 402 and lower portion 403 with ends 404 and 405. The tear initiating feature is similar to that in FIG. 2 and comprises tab 406 formed by “V”-shaped grooves 407 and 408. Pulling the tab to the left initiates tearing of the straight-tear film along lines 409 and 410, resulting in separation of intermediate material 411. The grooves 407 and 408 are deeper than those of the neck band in FIG. 2.
  • These and other embodiments are within the skill of the art without departing from the principles of the invention as set forth in the following claims.

Claims (20)

1. A neck band for a container with a neck and a removable closure for the neck, the neck band comprising: a straight-tear film that can be manually torn in circumferential manner around the neck of the bottle when positioned on the bottle.
2. The neck band of claim 1 wherein the straight-tear film is a polypropylene film that has been oriented substantially in a single direction.
3. The neck band of claim 2, which also includes a tear-initiating feature to facilitate the separation of the neck band around the circumference of the bottle.
4. The neck band of claim 3 wherein the tear-initiating feature is a pull tab.
5. The neck band of claim 4 wherein the tear-initiating feature enables the removal of a portion of the neck band.
6. The neck band of claim 5 wherein the tear-initiating feature enables the separation of the neck band into an upper portion and a lower portion without the removal of a portion of the neck band.
7. The neck band of claim 2 wherein the polypropylene-based material is selected from the group consisting of PRIIMAX® NA 350 and DL2 films
8. The neck band of claim 7 wherein the polypropylene-based material has a thickness between about 1.0 to 6.0 mil.
9. A container comprising:
a bottle having a neck and a mouth at the outer axial end of the neck;
a removable closure at the mouth for opening and closing the container, said closure having an annular skirt;
a neck band encircling and attached to both the neck and the removable closure, said neck band comprising a straight-tear film that can be manually torn in a circumferential manner around the neck of the bottle when positioned on the bottle.
10. The container of claim 9 wherein the straight-tear film is a polypropylene film that has been oriented substantially in a single direction.
11. The neck band of claim 10 which also includes a tear-initiating feature to facilitate the separation of the neck band around the circumference of the bottle.
12. The neck band of claim 11 wherein the tear-initiating feature is a pull tab.
13. The neck band of claim 11 wherein the tear-initiating feature enables the removal of a portion of the neck band.
14. The neck band of claim 11 wherein the tear-initiating feature enables the separation of the neck band into an upper portion and a lower portion without the removal of a portion of the neck band.
15. The neck band of claim 10 wherein the polypropylene-based material is machine-direction oriented only.
16. The neck band of claim 15 wherein the polypropylene-based material has a thickness between about 1.0 mil and 6.0 mil.
17. The neck band of claim 10 wherein the removable closure is a twist cap.
18. A method of making a neck band for use on a container with a neck and a removable closure on the neck comprising:
feeding a directionally oriented polypropylene-based material to a printing machine so that a neck band is printed on the material in a manner so that the material has its direction of weakness in a circumferential manner around the neck of the bottle when positioned on the bottle;
die cutting the neck bands imprinted on the directionally oriented material.
19. The method of claim 16 which also includes varnishing the neck bands.
20. The method of claim 16 which also includes rolling the material after printing and die cutting.
US10/841,714 2003-05-06 2004-05-06 Neck band using straight-tear film Abandoned US20050103789A1 (en)

Priority Applications (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US46843503P true 2003-05-06 2003-05-06
US10/841,714 US20050103789A1 (en) 2003-05-06 2004-05-06 Neck band using straight-tear film

Applications Claiming Priority (2)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/841,714 US20050103789A1 (en) 2003-05-06 2004-05-06 Neck band using straight-tear film
US11/371,976 US20060225320A1 (en) 2003-05-06 2006-03-08 Closure element utilizing uniaxial oriented film

Related Child Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US11/371,976 Continuation-In-Part US20060225320A1 (en) 2003-05-06 2006-03-08 Closure element utilizing uniaxial oriented film

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20050103789A1 true US20050103789A1 (en) 2005-05-19

Family

ID=33435180

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/841,714 Abandoned US20050103789A1 (en) 2003-05-06 2004-05-06 Neck band using straight-tear film

Country Status (4)

Country Link
US (1) US20050103789A1 (en)
CA (1) CA2524696A1 (en)
MX (1) MXPA05011848A (en)
WO (1) WO2004099008A2 (en)

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20060225320A1 (en) * 2003-05-06 2006-10-12 Dregalla Michael E Closure element utilizing uniaxial oriented film
WO2007067953A2 (en) * 2005-12-09 2007-06-14 U.S. Smokeless Tobacco Company Tamper evident label
US20080073240A1 (en) * 2006-09-26 2008-03-27 Cadbury Adams Usa Llc. Rupturable blister package
US20090021026A1 (en) * 2007-07-17 2009-01-22 Gregory Brian Collier Tamper evident band for a food container
WO2010034583A1 (en) * 2008-09-24 2010-04-01 British American Tobacco (Investments) Limited Label and container
US9216850B2 (en) 2006-09-26 2015-12-22 Intercontinental Great Brands Llc Rupturable substrate

Citations (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3861282A (en) * 1973-04-11 1975-01-21 Daimler Benz Ag Heating and ventilating installation for a motor vehicle
US3873018A (en) * 1973-02-20 1975-03-25 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Easily rupturable band of tape
US3984005A (en) * 1974-10-15 1976-10-05 Owens-Illinois, Inc. Decorative neckband label for a bottle
US4000824A (en) * 1975-07-24 1977-01-04 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Tape closures
US4018640A (en) * 1974-10-15 1977-04-19 Owens-Illinois, Inc. Decorative neckband label for a bottle
US4390104A (en) * 1981-08-19 1983-06-28 U.S. Clinical Products, Inc. Flexible plastic sterile closure system for containers
US4633648A (en) * 1985-05-06 1987-01-06 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Container closure seal and method of making
US4758456A (en) * 1987-03-18 1988-07-19 Morgan Adhesives Company Bottle seal
US4781294A (en) * 1986-10-08 1988-11-01 Warner-Lambert Company Tear oriented package
US4931327A (en) * 1989-06-14 1990-06-05 Mobil Oil Corporation White opaque opp film for tamper evident package
US4972953A (en) * 1989-06-14 1990-11-27 Ivy Hill Corporation Tamper-evident packaging, method of making same and intermediate therein
US5849419A (en) * 1993-07-16 1998-12-15 Avery Dennison Corporation Uniaxially oriented label film with compatibilizer
US5996849A (en) * 1996-10-16 1999-12-07 Lipton, Inc. Tamper evident dispensing closure
US6322864B1 (en) * 1996-12-10 2001-11-27 Sleever International Company Sleeve-type envelope of heat-shrinkable plastic material for packaging at least one item
US6376058B1 (en) * 1999-12-21 2002-04-23 Avery Dennison Corporation Polypropylene based compositions and films and labels formed therefrom
US6383590B1 (en) * 1999-11-24 2002-05-07 Four Pillars Enterprise Co., Ltd. Tear-along structure of a sheet material
US6390676B1 (en) * 2001-05-15 2002-05-21 Honeywell International Inc. Reclosable package using straight tear film and process for manufacture
US20050167026A1 (en) * 2003-12-30 2005-08-04 Dronzek Peter J. Directional tearing polymeric labels for clean removability

Family Cites Families (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
FR2566368B2 (en) * 1983-11-15 1987-02-06 Vittel Eaux Min Method and apparatus for laying handles or stiffening elements on a tubular sheath

Patent Citations (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3873018A (en) * 1973-02-20 1975-03-25 Minnesota Mining & Mfg Easily rupturable band of tape
US3861282A (en) * 1973-04-11 1975-01-21 Daimler Benz Ag Heating and ventilating installation for a motor vehicle
US3984005A (en) * 1974-10-15 1976-10-05 Owens-Illinois, Inc. Decorative neckband label for a bottle
US4018640A (en) * 1974-10-15 1977-04-19 Owens-Illinois, Inc. Decorative neckband label for a bottle
US4000824A (en) * 1975-07-24 1977-01-04 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Tape closures
US4390104A (en) * 1981-08-19 1983-06-28 U.S. Clinical Products, Inc. Flexible plastic sterile closure system for containers
US4633648A (en) * 1985-05-06 1987-01-06 Minnesota Mining And Manufacturing Company Container closure seal and method of making
US4781294A (en) * 1986-10-08 1988-11-01 Warner-Lambert Company Tear oriented package
US4758456A (en) * 1987-03-18 1988-07-19 Morgan Adhesives Company Bottle seal
US4972953A (en) * 1989-06-14 1990-11-27 Ivy Hill Corporation Tamper-evident packaging, method of making same and intermediate therein
US4931327A (en) * 1989-06-14 1990-06-05 Mobil Oil Corporation White opaque opp film for tamper evident package
US5849419A (en) * 1993-07-16 1998-12-15 Avery Dennison Corporation Uniaxially oriented label film with compatibilizer
US5996849A (en) * 1996-10-16 1999-12-07 Lipton, Inc. Tamper evident dispensing closure
US6322864B1 (en) * 1996-12-10 2001-11-27 Sleever International Company Sleeve-type envelope of heat-shrinkable plastic material for packaging at least one item
US6383590B1 (en) * 1999-11-24 2002-05-07 Four Pillars Enterprise Co., Ltd. Tear-along structure of a sheet material
US6376058B1 (en) * 1999-12-21 2002-04-23 Avery Dennison Corporation Polypropylene based compositions and films and labels formed therefrom
US6390676B1 (en) * 2001-05-15 2002-05-21 Honeywell International Inc. Reclosable package using straight tear film and process for manufacture
US20050167026A1 (en) * 2003-12-30 2005-08-04 Dronzek Peter J. Directional tearing polymeric labels for clean removability

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20060225320A1 (en) * 2003-05-06 2006-10-12 Dregalla Michael E Closure element utilizing uniaxial oriented film
WO2007067953A2 (en) * 2005-12-09 2007-06-14 U.S. Smokeless Tobacco Company Tamper evident label
US20070130811A1 (en) * 2005-12-09 2007-06-14 U.S. Smokeless Tobacco Company Tamper evident label
WO2007067953A3 (en) * 2005-12-09 2008-02-14 Us Smokeless Tobacco Co Tamper evident label
US20080073240A1 (en) * 2006-09-26 2008-03-27 Cadbury Adams Usa Llc. Rupturable blister package
US9169052B2 (en) 2006-09-26 2015-10-27 Intercontinental Great Brands Llc Rupturable blister package
US9216850B2 (en) 2006-09-26 2015-12-22 Intercontinental Great Brands Llc Rupturable substrate
US10220996B2 (en) 2006-09-26 2019-03-05 Intercontinental Great Brands Llc Rupturable substrate
US20090021026A1 (en) * 2007-07-17 2009-01-22 Gregory Brian Collier Tamper evident band for a food container
WO2010034583A1 (en) * 2008-09-24 2010-04-01 British American Tobacco (Investments) Limited Label and container

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
WO2004099008A3 (en) 2005-09-15
MXPA05011848A (en) 2006-05-25
WO2004099008A2 (en) 2004-11-18
CA2524696A1 (en) 2004-11-18

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3289386A (en) Method of making labeled package
US5829789A (en) Primary label with removable self-adhesive labels
EP0633555B1 (en) Label for packaged products
US5585193A (en) Machine-direction oriented label films and die-cut labels prepared therefrom
US6517243B2 (en) Bag with reusable built-in closure tab
US5465842A (en) Composite endless form for making flexible, windowed, form, fill and seal bags
AU2003270420B8 (en) Multi-layer flexible package with removable section
AU718906B2 (en) Self-adhesive labels
EP0232054B1 (en) Labels and manufacture thereof
US7811404B2 (en) Applying adhesive labels to products and product containers
US6544615B2 (en) Adhesive security tape for detecting unauthorized broaching of a package
US4048736A (en) Laminated composite sheet packaging material
US6413604B1 (en) Multiple layer labels and methods
US4961986A (en) Sealing member for a container
CA1334955C (en) Tamper-evident sealing system for envelope and method of making same
US8814430B2 (en) Food package having opening feature
US4826213A (en) Adhesive material for preventing reuse
US2307406A (en) Method of applying sealing strips
US6767604B2 (en) Package with attached resealable cover and method of making same
US5544770A (en) Tamper evident seal and system
US5907944A (en) Food packaging enclosing removable prize
AU2007309154B2 (en) Reclosable packages for confectionery products
US5292018A (en) Tamper evident seal and system
CA1077758A (en) Flexible envelopes
US5771664A (en) Label for bags with wire loop closures

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: RENAISSANCE MARK, INC., KENTUCKY

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:O'HARA, MR. WAYNE JOHN;REEL/FRAME:016827/0958

Effective date: 20051104

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION