US20050102101A1 - System and method for calculating a navigation route based on non-contiguous cartographic map databases - Google Patents

System and method for calculating a navigation route based on non-contiguous cartographic map databases Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20050102101A1
US20050102101A1 US11/003,313 US331304A US2005102101A1 US 20050102101 A1 US20050102101 A1 US 20050102101A1 US 331304 A US331304 A US 331304A US 2005102101 A1 US2005102101 A1 US 2005102101A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
map
navigation
map database
server
databases
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US11/003,313
Inventor
Darin Beesley
Michael Childs
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Garmin Ltd
Original Assignee
Garmin Ltd
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Priority to US10/015,153 priority Critical patent/US6574554B1/en
Priority to US42365803A priority
Application filed by Garmin Ltd filed Critical Garmin Ltd
Priority to US11/003,313 priority patent/US20050102101A1/en
Publication of US20050102101A1 publication Critical patent/US20050102101A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01CMEASURING DISTANCES, LEVELS OR BEARINGS; SURVEYING; NAVIGATION; GYROSCOPIC INSTRUMENTS; PHOTOGRAMMETRY OR VIDEOGRAMMETRY
    • G01C21/00Navigation; Navigational instruments not provided for in preceding groups
    • G01C21/26Navigation; Navigational instruments not provided for in preceding groups specially adapted for navigation in a road network
    • G01C21/34Route searching; Route guidance
    • G01C21/3446Details of route searching algorithms, e.g. Dijkstra, A*, arc-flags, using precalculated routes
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01CMEASURING DISTANCES, LEVELS OR BEARINGS; SURVEYING; NAVIGATION; GYROSCOPIC INSTRUMENTS; PHOTOGRAMMETRY OR VIDEOGRAMMETRY
    • G01C21/00Navigation; Navigational instruments not provided for in preceding groups
    • G01C21/26Navigation; Navigational instruments not provided for in preceding groups specially adapted for navigation in a road network
    • G01C21/28Navigation; Navigational instruments not provided for in preceding groups specially adapted for navigation in a road network with correlation of data from several navigational instruments
    • G01C21/30Map- or contour-matching
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01CMEASURING DISTANCES, LEVELS OR BEARINGS; SURVEYING; NAVIGATION; GYROSCOPIC INSTRUMENTS; PHOTOGRAMMETRY OR VIDEOGRAMMETRY
    • G01C21/00Navigation; Navigational instruments not provided for in preceding groups
    • G01C21/26Navigation; Navigational instruments not provided for in preceding groups specially adapted for navigation in a road network
    • G01C21/34Route searching; Route guidance

Abstract

A method and apparatus are provided for calculating potential paths between source and destination locations. First and second map databases are provided that are indicative of roadway networks for geographic regions bounded by region edges and containing source and destination locations. The first and second map databases are non-adjacent, non-contiguous such that the region edges of the first map database are separate and distinct from region edges of the second map database. Potential paths are calculated through the roadway network of the first map database up to a node or segment at which each potential path intersects a region edge of the first map database, thereby defining a node/edge coordinate. A transition location is obtained in the second map database that geographically corresponds to the node/edge coordinate at which a given potential path intersected the region edge of the first map database. The calculation continues from the transition location through the roadway network of the second map database. The method and apparatus may include organizing the map databases into a map hierarchy to define tiers for the map databases. The calculation process searches potential paths utilizing the tier-one map databases until each potential path intersects a map edge of the tier-one map databases. Thereafter, the search through potential paths continues automatically based on the lower tier map databases.

Description

    RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • The present application is a continuation and claims priority benefit, with regard to all common subject matter, of an earlier-filed U.S. patent application titled “SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR CALCULATING A NAVIGATION ROUTE BASED ON NON-CONTIGUOUS CARTOGRAPHIC MAP DATABASES”, Ser. No. 10/423,658, filed Aug. 11, 2003, which is a continuation and claims priority benefit, with regard to all common subject matter, of an earlier-filed U.S. patent application titled “SYSTEM AND METHOD FOR CALCULATING A NAVIGATION ROUTE BASED ON NON-CONTIGUOUS CARTOGRAPHIC MAP DATABASES”, Ser. No. 10/015,153, filed Dec. 11, 2001, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,574,554. The identified earlier-filed applications are hereby incorporated into the present application.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • Certain embodiments of the present invention generally relate to systems and methods for calculating navigation routes based on map databases indicative of overlapping, non-contiguous geographic regions. Certain embodiments of the present invention generally relate to navigation systems and methods that utilize roadway map databases organized in different tiers or levels of a map hierarchy.
  • Route planning systems are well known in the field of navigational instruments. Route planning systems in general calculate one or more paths through a network of roads between source and destination locations. The path(s) planned by the system may be based on one or more criteria, such as shortest distance, shortest time, user preferences and the like. Several algorithms are known for performing route planning, with such algorithms calculating the route from the source or destination location or from both simultaneously. Conventional planning algorithms operate based on a predefined stored map database, which includes data indicative of a geographic region containing the source and destination locations.
  • In general, each map database corresponds to a particular geographic region, such as a city, a county, a state, a country, a continent, etc. Each map database contains data indicative of features within the associated geographic region with varied levels of specificity concerning the features. For example, each map database includes data indicative of nodes representing intersections between roadways and data indicative of segments representative of roadway portions extending between nodes. In general, map databases representing smaller geographic regions (e.g. cities) contain more detailed feature information (county roads, city streets, restaurants, and the like), while map databases representing larger geographic regions (e.g. states and countries) contain less detailed feature information (e.g. interstates, state highways, gas stations, hotels, rest stops, and the like). The feature information stored within each map database may include geographic coordinates (i.e. altitude, longitude and latitude) among other things. Each map database is bound by a geographic region perimeter or boundary.
  • Conventional methods for route planning depend on the capabilities of system resources, such as processor speed and the amount and speed of memory. To reduce the amount of memory needed, route planning or navigation devices typically do not store a detailed map of a large geographic area, such as North America. Instead, the memory for the route planning or navigation device is initially loaded with a detailed map (e.g. a map database containing detailed feature information for a small geographic region) only for a select geographic region, such as a particular city in which the user travels. When the user wishes to chart a path across a particular city, the user enters the source and destination locations in the particular city. The route planning or navigation device uses the detailed map database for the corresponding city map to plan a route between the source and destination locations. Both the source and destination locations are within the boundaries of the detailed map (i.e. within the particular city).
  • The route planning or navigation device may instead be loaded with a less detailed “base” map (e.g. map database containing general feature information for a large geographic region), such as the United States. When the user wishes to chart a path between cities, across the country, etc., the user first selects or loads the base map and then enters the source and destination locations. The route planning and navigation device accesses and plans a route through the base map. Hence, for long trips, the route planning and navigation device only utilizes the base map and thus is only able to offer limited information regarding the details of a planned route.
  • Due to memory constraints, the base map database includes less detailed feature information and may lack feature information surrounding the source and destination locations of interest to the user. The user may desire detailed feature information present only in a detailed map database, such as street information for source and destination cities. In general, each map database is stored on a separate CD. The route planning and navigation device typically only accesses a single CD at any given time since the user can only load one CD at a time. Heretofore, the user could only chart routes through one detailed map database or through one base map database at any particular time, namely when the appropriate CD was loaded.
  • For example, when planning a trip between Kansas City and Denver, the user would load a CD into the route planning device containing only the base map database that would encompass both cities. The user would then enter source and destination coordinates within the base map database. If the user desired detailed street information for Kansas City, for example, directions to Arrowhead Stadium, conventional navigation devices were unable to provide such information while simultaneously providing a route between cities since the street information was only on detailed map databases, while only the base map database could be used to provide routing. Instead, the user was required to remove the CD containing the base map database and load a CD containing a detailed map database for Kansas City. The user then entered a source location, such as along interstate 70 on the west side of town, and a destination location for Arrowhead Stadium. Similarly, if the user desired detailed street information for Denver, the prior CD containing the Kansas City street map must be removed and a separate CD containing a detailed street map for Denver must be loaded. Source and destination locations would again need to be entered by the user for the Denver area. In the foregoing example, conventional navigation devices require the user to load three separate CDs and to perform three separate source and destination data entry procedures.
  • Presently, cartographic information is charted or mapped by data suppliers as large cartographic data blocks. A single cartographic data block may include detailed maps for multiple adjoining metropolitan areas and/or detailed maps for large geographic areas and the like. A cartographic data block is typically divided by the data supplier, by the manufacturer of the routing devices or by the service provider into smaller map databases having a size more conducive to storage on, or wireless transmission to, a navigation or route planning device. By way of example only, a large block of cartographic data may constitute a detailed map of the metropolitan corridor for the East coast between Washington, D.C. and Boston. The cartographic data block may be divided into a first map database for the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, a second map database for the Baltimore metropolitan area, a third map database for the Philadelphia metropolitan area, and so on. The map databases for Washington, D.C. and Baltimore may include matching roadway/boundary longitude and latitude coordinates since the map databases were “cut” from a common cartographic data block or “fabric”. However, each map database would nonetheless be provided as a separate map, such as on a separate CD. Accordingly, users would be required to switch CDs and perform independent routing operations based on discrete, separate map databases.
  • Today, numerous data suppliers map and chart roadway networks independent of one another. Typically, cartographic data from one supplier does not match cartographic data from a different supplier. Hence, when cartographic data blocks from different suppliers are divided into map databases, the map databases from different suppliers do not match, even though the map databases may be for common or overlapping geographic areas. For example, cartographic data for a map of Washington, D.C. from one data supplier will include geographic coordinates for the U.S. Capital that may differ (albeit slightly) from geographic coordinates in a second data supplier's cartographic data for the U.S. Capital. Similarly, the first supplier's cartographic data for downtown Washington, D.C. may include coordinates for Highways 50 and 66 that differ (albeit slightly) from coordinates for the same highways in a second supplier's cartographic data.
  • Conventional navigation and route planning devices must separately and independently access and operate on individual map databases even if multiple map databases are simultaneously loaded or accessible. The navigation and route planning devices are only able to calculate paths between sources and destinations in a single map database. Conventional route planning devices are unable to plan routes between source and destination locations that are located in different map databases.
  • A need exists for improved navigation and route planning devices capable of automatically calculating potential paths between a single source location and a single destination location based on any and all available map databases, regardless of whether the map databases 1) are contiguous or non-contiguous with one another, 2) are “cut” from common or different cartographic data blocks, or 3) are obtained from the same or different data suppliers. A need further exists for a navigation device capable of accessing multiple map databases to plan a single route.
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • Certain embodiments of the present invention relate to a method for providing a navigation route between source and destination locations. The method includes providing first and second map databases indicative of roadway networks for geographic regions bounded by region edges. The first and second map databases each contain one of the source and destination locations. The first and second map databases are not contiguous with one another inasmuch as the region edges of the first and second map databases are separate and distinct from one another. The method further includes calculating potential paths through the roadway network of the first map database and identifying a node/edge coordinate at which each potential path intersects a region edge of the first map database. For each potential path, a transition location is identified in the second map database that geographically corresponds to the node/edge coordinate where the associated potential path intersects the region edge of the first map database. The method may further include searching the second map database for roads within a search perimeter surrounding the node/edge coordinate to obtain each transition location. The method continues by calculating potential paths from each transition location through the roadway network of the second map database. After a number of potential paths between the source and destination locations are analyzed, a navigation route is selected.
  • Optionally, the method may include organizing at least first and second map databases into first and second map tiers based on certain criteria, such as the data supplier of the first and second map databases and/or an amount of detailed feature information held in the map databases concerning corresponding geographic regions. Once the first and second map databases are organized into tiers, the planning method begins performing the first calculating step based on map databases in the first map tier. As potential paths intersect the boundary of the first map database, the planning method performs the obtaining and second calculating steps based on map databases in the second map tier.
  • Optionally, the first map database may contain a low level detailed map of the geographic region surrounding the source, the second map database may contain a high level base map of the geographic region encompassing both the first map database and a third map database that contains a low level detailed map of the geographic region surrounding the destination location. The first and third map databases may be non-overlapping and non-contiguous, or may be overlapping yet have other characteristics that cause them to be classified in different map tiers. Alternatively, the first map database may represent a detailed map of one metropolitan area and the second map database may represent a base map of a larger geographic region encompassing a portion of the first metropolitan area.
  • In another embodiment, a method is provided for calculating a navigation route between first and second points based on map databases organized in a map hierarchy. The method involves providing a number of map databases indicative of an equal number of roadway networks for geographic regions, with each map database having map edges. The method includes organizing the map databases into a map hierarchy by assigning at least one map database to a first level of the map hierarchy to define at least one tier-one map database and by assigning at least one map database to a second level of the map hierarchy to define at least one tier-two map database. The method also includes utilizing the tier-one map databases to plan potential paths from one of the first and second points until each potential path intersects the map edge of an outer tier-one map database; and thereafter, automatically continuing planning of each potential path based on the tier-two map databases.
  • The navigation route calculation method is capable of utilizing a variety of map databases. For example, the map databases may include first and second tier-one map databases that correspond to non-overlapping first and second geographic regions that surround the first and second points, respectively. Optionally, the map databases may include a tier N map database for a geographic region that contains the first point, but not the second point, and a tier N+M map database for a geographic region that contains both the first and second points. As another example, the map databases may include first and second tier N map databases for a geographic region that contains the first and second points, respectively, and a tier N+M map database for a geographic region partially overlapping the geographic regions associated with the first and second map databases, where the geographic region defined by data in the tier N+M map database excludes the first and second points. As yet another example, the map databases may include first and second tier N map databases containing detailed maps of areas surrounding the first and second points, respectively, and a tier N+M map database containing a base map overlapping both of the detailed maps, where the base map includes the first and second points.
  • The navigation route calculating method transitions from one map database to another, during a route planning search, each time a potential path intersects a boundary of a map database. To effect a transition from a current map database, the method first searches other map databases at the present tier, (e.g., assigned to the same tier as the current map database). The map databases at the present tier are searched for a point in a respective roadway network corresponding to the point at which potential path intersected the boundary of the current map database. If no map database is identified in the present tier, then the search is repeated for map databases at other tiers.
  • When searching map databases at a common tier, once potential paths intersect the map edge of a first tier-one map database, the calculation method determines whether a second tier-one map database exists that has a map edge that joins the map edge of the first tier-one map database. If no other tier-one map database has a map edge joining the first tier-one map database, then a local search is performed to identify a translation location in a tier-two map database. The local search is based on a location, at which the potential path intersects the map edge of the tier-one map database. The translation location represents a starting point within a tier-two map database from which the route planning operation continues along potential paths.
  • The calculating method may include identifying, in the tier-one map databases, a tier-one coordinate indicative of a point at which the potential path intersects the map edge and searching a geographic region for at least one of the tier-two map databases for a tier-two coordinate corresponding to the tier-one coordinate. Alternatively, the identifying step may include identifying, in the tier-two map databases, a road having a generally common direction of travel as the potential path at or near the point of intersection of the potential path with the map edge of the tier-one map database.
  • In an alternative embodiment, a navigation system is provided that includes memory storing map databases indicative of roadway networks in respective geographic regions surrounded by region edges. The map databases include first and second map databases. The geographic regions contain first and second navigation points. The first and second map databases correspond to geographic regions having separate and distinct non-adjacent region edges. The navigation system includes a planner calculating a path between the first and second navigation points based on roadway network information in both of the first and second map databases. The planner switches the search from potential paths defined in the first map database to potential paths defined in the second data each time the planner progresses along a potential path to a point at which the potential path intersects a region edge of the first map database. A display is provided to illustrate the final potential path generated by the planner. The system is operable with a compilation of map databases 1) that are contiguous, 2) that are not contiguous, 3) that overlap one another, 4) that are cut from common or different cartographic data blocks, and 5) that are obtained from different or common sources.
  • Optionally, the first and second map databases may be non-overlapping and the memory may store or have access to a third map database which at least partially overlaps the first and second map databases. When three map databases are employed in this manner, the navigation system jumps directly from the first map database to the third map database and then directly from the third map database to the second map database during the route planning operation as potential paths intersect map edges. Alternatively, when the first and second map databases do not overlap one another yet overlap a third map database, the navigation system may perform bi-directional route planning operations from the first and second map databases and jump to the third map database when the potential paths reach the edges of the first and second map databases.
  • The system may be equipped with a module that organizes the map databases into a mapping hierarchy by assigning the first map database to a first level to define a tier one map database and by assigning the second map database to a second level to define a tier-two map database.
  • In accordance with another embodiment, a hand-held portable navigation device is provided that includes memory storing map databases indicative of roadway networks and respective geographic regions surrounded by region edges. The map databases include first and second map databases that correspond to geographic regions having separate and distinct non-adjacent region edges. The geographic regions contain the first and second navigation points. The navigation device also includes a processor which calculates a path between the first and second navigation points based on roadway network information in both the first and second map databases. The processor moves, during a path-planning operation, from potential paths based on the first map database to potential paths based on the second map database and vice versa each time the potential path intersects a region edge for a map database. A display is provided to illustrate the final potential path generated by the processor.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a block diagram of a navigation device formed in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a front view of a navigation device formed in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a block diagram of a navigation device formed in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a navigation system formed in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates a cartographic data block utilized in connection with certain embodiments of the present invention.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates an exemplary map database utilized in connection with certain embodiments of the present invention.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates an exemplary map tier organization used in connection with certain embodiments of the present invention.
  • FIG. 8 graphically illustrates a potential path planning operation carried out in connection with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 9 graphically illustrates a transition point calculation operation carried out in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 10 illustrates a flow chart setting forth a planning sequence followed in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • FIG. 11 illustrates a flow chart setting for a transition sequence followed in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention.
  • The foregoing summary, as well as the following detailed description of certain embodiments of the present invention, will be better understood when read in conjunction with the appended drawings. It should be understood, however, that the present invention is not limited to the precise arrangements and instrumentality shown in the attached drawings.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • FIG. 1 illustrates a system 10 formed in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention. The system 10 includes at least one processor 12 for carrying out various processing operations discussed below in more detail. The processor 12 is connected to a cartographic database 14, memory 16, a display 18, a keyboard 20, and a buffer 22. Optionally, more than one processor 12 may be included. The cartographic database 14 may store data indicative of a roadway network (in full or in part) used in connection with embodiments of the present invention. The memory 16, while illustrated as a single block, may comprise multiple discrete memory locations and/or discs for storing various types of routines and data utilized and/or generated by embodiments of the present invention. The buffer 22 represents a memory storage area that may be within memory 16 or separate therefrom. Buffer 22 is used to temporarily store data and/or routines used in connection with embodiments of the present invention. The display 18 displays information to the user in an audio and/or video format. The keyboard 20 permits the user to input information, instructions and the like to the processor 12 during operation.
  • By way of example only, initial operations may be carried out by an operator of the system 10, utilizing the keyboard 20 for controlling the processor 12 in the selection of parameters, defining map databases to be developed and/or accessed, and the like.
  • The map database(s) stored in the cartographic database 14, memory 16, and/or buffer 22 may include data indicative of features associated with a roadway network and/or a geographic area. The data may represent points, lines, areas, coordinates (longitude, latitude and altitude), or otherwise. For instance, portions of a highway, river or boundary (e.g., a state or country boundary), trails and the like may be represented by linear features stored in the map database. In addition, cities, towns, neighborhoods, communities and the like may be represented by point features within the map database. Also, parks, lakes, points of interest and the like may be represented by area features. Prior to storage, various common features may be identified for cartographic data and such common features may be classified based upon predefined hierarchies. For example, interstate highways may be defined and/or organized as one feature class, state highways and roads may be defined as a second feature class, and county roads may be defined as a third feature class. Features other than roads, such as rivers and waterways, may also be classified. As a further example, geographic boundaries (e.g., state and county lines) may be assigned one or more different feature classes.
  • FIG. 2 illustrates a portable electronic device 30 formed in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention. The electronic device 30 is oriented along a vertical axis (as illustrated) or horizontal axis when held by a user. The portable electronic device 30 includes a housing 32 having a face plate 34 and sidewalls and a back wall (not shown). The portable electronic device 30 further includes an antenna 36 mounted at one corner of the housing 32. The face plate 34 is substantially rectangular in shape. The face plate 34 securely frames the display screen 38 and houses the control panel 40. The control panel 40 includes several push button-type keys 42 that afford the user control over the portable electronic device 30.
  • Optionally, a directional toggle pad 44 may be included within the control panel 40. In one application, such as when utilizing the portable electronic device 30 within a global positioning system, the toggle pad 44 affords the ability to scan through a large map of a geographic area, all or a portion of which is stored in memory of the portable electronic device 30. The portable electronic device 30 then displays portions of the scanned map on the display screen 38. The display screen 38 also illustrates planned potential paths through geographic areas between source and destination locations. Optionally, the control panel 40 may include a speaker/microphone combination, designated by reference numeral 46, to afford communication between the operator and a remote destination.
  • The display screen 38 may be located below the control panel 40 (when oriented along a vertical axis) to afford easy data entry by the user. When vertically oriented, the display screen 38 is controlled to orient data upon the display screen 38 such that side 48 of the display screen 38 represents the top of the data to be displayed, while side 50 of the display screen 38 represents the bottom. Thus, the data is preferably displayed from the top 48 to the bottom 50 of the display screen 38.
  • FIG. 3 illustrates a block diagram for an electronic circuit of the portable electronic device 30 formed in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention. The electronic circuit includes a processor 52 that communicates via the control panel 40 through line 41. The processor 52 communicates via line 39 with the display screen 38. The electronic circuit further includes a memory 54 that is accessed by the processor 52 via line 53. The antenna 36 is connected to the processor 52 via a cellular transmitter/receiver 37 and a GPS receiver 35. The electronic circuitry of the portable electronic device 30 is powered by a power supply (not shown) housed within the device or connected thereto. A microphone 33 and a speaker 31 are also connected to, and communicate with, the processor 52.
  • The housing 32 of the portable electronic device 30 houses the processor 52, memory 54, display 38 and key pad 40. The display screen 38 and control panel 40 are accessible at the exterior of the housing. In one embodiment, the portable electronic device 30 is utilized in conjunction with a global positioning system for acquiring signals transmitted from satellites in geosynchronous orbit. In such an embodiment, the processor 52 includes means for calculating, by triangulation, the position of the portable electronic device 30. In such an embodiment, an image file indicative of a selected map is held in memory 54. In accordance with one embodiment, the image file held in memory 54 comprises spatial data indices according to a map database defining a geographic area of interest.
  • An operator of the portable electronic device 30 controls the processor 52 through use of control panel 40 to display map images on the display screen 38. Utilizing the control panel 40, the operator selects various zoom levels, corresponding to layers of the map database for a particular geographic region desired to be displayed on the display screen 38. Data indicative of the map to be displayed is accessed from the memory 54 according to the inputs by the user using the control panel 40. When performing a potential path planning operation, the operator enters a source location and a destination location, such as by entering addresses, geographic coordinates, well-known buildings or sites, and the like. The processor 52 accesses map databases stored in memory 54 to calculate a suggested potential path.
  • FIG. 4 illustrates a navigation and routing system 70 formed in accordance with an alternative embodiment of the present invention. The system 70 includes one or more mobile units 72 capable of performing navigation and/or routing functions, a server 74 and an intervening network 76. The mobile units 72 may each include some or all of the structure and/or functionality of the portable electronic device 30. The server 74 may perform a majority of the navigation and potential path planning operations and transmit results and limited geographic data to the mobile units 72. Alternatively, the server 74 may simply perform minor management operations. The server 74 communicates with the mobile units 72 through communications links 78 and 80 and the network 76 which may constitute the internet, a wireless communications network supported by ground-based towers and/or satellites, and the like. The mobile units 72 may receive map databases, coordinate information, and the like over communications links 78 and 80 from the network 76.
  • FIG. 5 illustrates a cartographic data block 100 including data indicative of a large geographic region bounded by edges 101. The exemplary cartographic data block 100 includes data representative of the continental United States and may be stored on the server 74. The cartographic data block 100 may include detailed feature data indicating the interstates, state highways, country roads, etc. in the United States, heretofore referred to as a roadway network.
  • The cartographic data block 100 is divisible into exemplary base map databases 102, each of which includes data indicative of a selected smaller geographic region surrounded by a region edge 104. In the example of FIG. 5, each map database 102 includes data indicative of the geographic region associated with a corresponding state bounded by the state border. One or more map databases 102 are stored in memory 16 or 54. Optionally, the map databases 102 may be transmitted upon request or periodically to mobile units 72 over communications links 78 and 80, and network 76.
  • FIG. 6 illustrates an exemplary detailed map database 110 including data indicative of a geographic region for the St. Louis metropolitan area within region edges 114. The map database 110 is associated with a corresponding edge table 112 storing coordinates associated with the geographic locations at which selected roads intersect region edges 114 of the map database 110. In the example of FIG. 6, the edge table 112 stores coordinates for the points at which interstate 70, interstate 55 and other roads intersects the region edges 114 of the map database 110. A plurality of map databases 110 may be constructed from the cartographic data block 100 by dividing the cartographic data block 100 into adjacent sections having joining region edges 114 and storing, among other things, an edge table 112 for each map database 110.
  • It is understood that cartographic data blocks 100 may be provided from separate and independent data suppliers or vendors. Each separate data supplier or vendor may construct the data within respective cartographic data blocks 100 by independently mapping the roadway network. Hence, the geographic information for a particular feature may slightly differ between cartographic data blocks 100 from different suppliers. For example, the precise coordinates of interstate 70 across the Midwest may slightly differ in cartographic data blocks 100 from different suppliers or vendors.
  • The map databases 110 are organized or classified in accordance with a map hierarchy. In general, each map database 110 is assigned to a tier or level of the map hierarchy. The map hierarchy may include an unlimited number of tiers or levels. Each map tier or level may include more than one map database, but need not include any map databases. For example, one navigation device may store (or access over the network 76) map databases in map tiers #1 to #7, while a second navigation device may store (or access over the network 76) map databases only in map tiers #1, #4 and #5. A single navigation device should assign a particular map database to only one map tier, although different navigation devices may store or have access to the same map database. A particular map database may be assigned to one map tier in connection with a first navigation device and a different map tier in connection with a second navigation device. The map tiers may be organized based on a variety of criteria, such as accuracy of the data content, popularity, quantity of roadway features (restaurants, gas stations, etc.), feature sets (vacation points of interest, business points of interest, etc.), supplier of the data, operator preference, and the like.
  • FIG. 7 illustrates examples of various map databases that may be organized into a map hierarchy and stored in a mobile unit 72, server 74, navigation device 30, memory 54, memory 16 and the like. The exemplary map databases include a base map database 120 storing data indicative of a large geographic area. The base map database 120 may store a limited amount of detailed feature information about the corresponding geographic area. For example, the base map database 120 may store only data indicative of the interstate highway system throughout Missouri and Illinois. Detailed map databases 122 and 124 are organized into a map hierarchy. The exemplary detailed map databases 122 and 124 correspond to selected metropolitan areas, such as the Kansas City metropolitan area and the Chicago metropolitan area. The base map database 120 and the detailed map databases 122 and 124 may have been obtained from the same or different cartographic data blocks and/or from the same or different data suppliers. The example of FIG. 7 corresponds to a potential path planning operation in which a user may desire to plan a potential path between a specific address in Kansas City and a specific address in Chicago.
  • FIG. 8 illustrates a map tier organization 141 in which map databases are arranged in bounded boxes and are assigned an order of in priority based on numerous criteria, such as accuracy of the data content, popularity, quantity of roadway features (restaurants, gas stations, etc.), feature sets (vacation points of interest, business points of interest, etc.), supplier of the data, operator preference, and the like. In the example of FIG. 8, low priority map databases 140 and 145 are assigned to a map tier #2 and high priority map databases 142 and 143 are assigned to a map tier #1. The map databases 140 and 145 include a source location 146, while the map databases 140 and 142 include the destination location 144. The map database 143 is located adjacent to the map database 142 along a common border 129 (e.g., a joining map edge). The map database 145 is oriented along an axis that differs from the longitudinal axis of the map databases 140, 142, and 143 which extend generally parallel to one another. The map database 145 partially overlaps the map database 143. The map databases may have various shapes, sizes and orientations.
  • The map databases 140, 142, 143 and 145 store data indicative of a roadway network, only a portion of which is illustrated in FIG. 8. The portion of the roadway network that is illustrated in FIG. 8 includes potential paths 131, 133, 135, and 137, along with source and destination locations 146 and 144. The potential paths 133 and 135 (as illustrated in dash lines) are entirely stored within the map database 140 and partially stored in map databases 142 and 145. Potential path 131 is stored within the map databases 140 and 142, while the potential path 137 is stored within the map databases 140 and 145. A portion of potential path 135 is also stored within map database 143.
  • While not illustrated in detail, it is understood that the potential paths 131, 133, 135 and 137 may be each formed from multiple segments and nodes. Segments represent portions of the roadway extending between intersections in the roadway. Nodes represent intersections between roadways. A potential path may represent a roadway segment extending from one node to the next adjacent node. A potential path may also represent a series of adjoining roadway segments extending from one node through a series of intermediate nodes adjacent to one another. FIG. 8 is discussed in more detail below in connection with FIG. 11.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates a map tier organization 150 including a base map database 152 assigned to a map tier #2 and detailed map databases 154 and 156 assigned to a map tier #1. A source location 158 and a destination location 160 are provided within the detailed map databases 154 and 156, respectively. The base map database 152 does not include either the source or destination locations 158 and 160. The base map database 152 contains only features within region edges 161-164, while the detailed map databases 154 and 156 include features for geographic areas within region edges 171-174 and 181-184, respectively. During operation, the route planning procedure initially searches one or both of detailed map databases 154 and 156 for potential paths between source and destination locations 158 and 160. When each potential path intersects the edges 174 and 182 (or any other region edges 171-173, 181 and 183-184) of the respective detailed map databases 154 and 156, the potential path planning operation attempts to continue following each potential path by switching to the base map database 152.
  • The map databases in the example of FIG. 9 are characterized as “base” and “detailed” to illustrate that map databases may be assigned to different tiers within the map tier organization 150 based, among other things, upon an amount of detailed information stored in each map database for a corresponding roadway network. For instance, the “base” map databases may store data only identifying larger highways, such as interstates and state highways, but not county roads or streets. In contrast, the detailed map databases may store much more detailed information regarding the roadway network, including information such as streets, street names, points of interest, and the like.
  • FIG. 10 illustrates a flow chart of a procedure carried out in accordance with at least one embodiment of the present invention. The user enters source and destination locations at step 200. Thereafter, the navigation device accesses or loads a map database in a selected map tier (step 201) of a stored map tier organization 141 or 150. Optionally, the order of steps 200 and 201 may be reversed in that one or more map databases may be first accessed or loaded before the source and destination locations are entered. The accessed map database is hereafter referred to as the “loaded map database”. The map tier organization 141 or 150 may be stored in the navigation device, memory 16, memory 54 or on the server 74. Accessing a map database may involve moving some or a portion of the map database to a section of memory in the navigation device readily accessible by the processor. Alternatively, mobile units 72 need not actually store the map database. Instead, the mobile units 72 may simply notify the server 74 that a particular map database is to be used. Thereafter, the server 74 may transmit some or all of the data from the map database to the mobile unit 72 as needed. Alternatively, the server 72 may perform the routing process upon the map database and simply provide status and result information to the mobile units 72.
  • The criteria for the selecting the initial map tier may vary. By way of example only, the selected map tier may represent maps having a greatest amount of detail at one or both of the source and destination locations, or may represent maps selected by the operator. Alternatively, the initially selected map tier may represent maps associated with a particular data supplier, such as a supplier offering the majority of the map databases for the navigation device or alternatively, the data supplier offering the most accurate map databases for one or both of the regions corresponding to the source and destination locations.
  • Once a map database for a selected map tier is loaded at step 201, the navigation device (or server 74) begins calculating potential paths between the source and destination locations at step 202 in accordance with any of several known routing algorithms, such as an A-star algorithm, a shortest distance algorithm and the like. Optionally, the routing algorithm may calculate potential paths simultaneously in opposite directions (bidirectionally) from both the source and destination locations. Alternatively, the routing algorithm may calculate the path from either of the source and destination locations.
  • The routing algorithm involves several iterative steps. Each iteration through the routing algorithm involves analyzing and updating the best (e.g., least costly) node to be considered or explored (hereafter the “current best node”). By way of example only, the analysis may involve expanding node adjacencies for the current best node (e.g., adding the nodes that are adjacent to the current best node to the list of nodes to be explored). The analysis may also involve calculating a cost associated with each newly added node. When implementing an A-star algorithm, the cost is based on a known cost from the source and an estimated cost to the destination. Once the node adjacencies and associated costs are added to the node exploration list, a new current best node is calculated. For example, the new current best node may represent the node having the lowest cost associated therewith. Once a new current best node is identified, flow passes to step 204. During each iteration through the routing algorithm, flow passes to step 204 where the navigation device determines whether the current best node intersects an edge of the loaded map database. For example, at step 204, a nodal record for the current best node may be analyzed to determine whether an edge marker is present. An edge marker would indicate that the current best node intersects the region edge of the loaded map database. If the current best node does not intersect the loaded map database edge, then the loaded map database should contain “adjacency” data indicative of the nodes that are adjacent to the current best node (“node adjacencies”). Accordingly, when the decision at step 204 is negative, flow passes to step 206, at which the loaded map database is accessed and the nodes adjacent to the current best node are added to the list of nodes to be explored. At step 206, the routing algorithm calculates a cost associated with each newly added node. The costs represent the known cost between the source and node, and the estimated cost between the node and the destination.
  • Alternatively, when the current best node represents an edge node, the loaded map database would not contain the node adjacencies for the current best node. Accordingly, flow passes from step 204 to step 210 to begin a sequence of steps to identify a new map database that contains the node adjacency information for the current best node picked at step 202.
  • At step 210, the navigation device determines whether the selected map tier includes any additional map databases that adjoin or fit together with the presently loaded map database along the appropriate region edge (e.g., the region edge intersected by the current best node or segment leading to the current best mode). By way of example, the navigation device may, at step 210, search a stored table of map adjacencies identifying which map databases join one another at each region edge. Alternatively, the navigation device may, at step 210, simply access every map database within the presently selected map tier and search the edge tables (if present) associated with each map database to locate a matching node in an adjoining map database. When the navigation device determines at step 210 that the selected map tier includes a map database adjoining the presently loaded map database along the edge intersecting the potential path, flow passes to step 212.
  • At step 212, the newly selected map database is loaded and the matching node from the newly loaded map database is added to the list of nodes to be explored by the routing algorithm at step 202. The matching node may be identified from an edge table. As explained above, map databases are considered to adjoin or be adjacent one another when they have a common region edge within a single map tier. Adjacent databases may be assigned edge tables defining coordinates for nodes and/or segments crossing the division between the map databases at matching geographic coordinates (e.g., longitude, latitude and altitude). Accordingly, when created, an edge table stores a one-to-one correlation between common nodes and/or segments along a region edge between adjacent map databases.
  • If, at step 210, the navigation device determines that the selected map tier has no additional map databases that join the presently loaded map database, flow passes along path 214 to step 216. At step 216, the navigation device selects the next ordered map tier and analyzes map databases associated with the newly selected map tier. At step 218, the navigation device determines whether the new map tier includes map databases that overlap the node or segment intersecting the edge of the prior map database (hereafter a “node/edge intersection”). If none of the map databases in the new map tier overlap the node/edge intersection of the old map database, flow passes along path 222 to decision block 221. At decision block 221, it is determined whether more map tiers exist and if so flow returns to path 214 and the navigation device increments the map tier at step 216. Steps 216, 218 and 221 are repeated until the navigation device determines at step 218 that the newly selected map tier includes a map database that overlaps the node/edge intersection point identified in step 204.
  • Next, processing passes along path 220 to step 224, at which the navigation device searches the map databases at the newly selected map tier for roadway information (e.g., nodes and/or segments) overlapping, or located within a predefined perimeter around the coordinates of the node/edge intersection point. The search carried out at step 224 may initially identify multiple nodes that intersect or are located within a predefined perimeter surrounding the coordinates of the node/edge intersection point. When more than one node is initially identified at step 224, the navigation device selects a preferred one of the available nodes based on the direction of travel at the node/edge intersection point and the direction(s) of travel afforded by the available nodes in the new map database within the predefined perimeter. Once a new node is identified in at least one new map database, flow passes back along path 226 to step 212, where the new map database is loaded or accessed and the new node is added to the list of nodes to be explored. Next, flow passes to step 202, at which a new current best node for exploration is analyzed.
  • Ultimately, flow passes along path 205 from step 202 when the complete route is planned or when it is determined that no path exists. At step 228, the suggested route, if any, between the source and destination locations is displayed from the multiple map databases accessed in steps 201 and 212.
  • Next, the processing sequence of FIG. 10 will be explained in connection with an example based on the map tier organization 150 in FIG. 9 and a bidirectional search. The navigation device accesses or stores the map tier organization 150. The user enters a source location 158 and a destination location 160 (step 200). The navigation device is set to initially analyze map databases in map tier #1, such as detailed map databases 154 and 156. The navigation device accesses the detailed map databases 154 and 156 at step 201 and, at step 202, begins calculating potential paths through the detailed map databases 154 and 156 bidirectionally. While only potential paths 190 and 192 are illustrated in FIG. 9, it is understood that the routing algorithm operating at step 202 is exploring other potential paths through detailed map databases 154 and 156 in parallel with potential paths 190 and 192. The calculation at steps 202 and 204 continues until potential paths 190 and 192 intersect the region edges 174 and 182, respectively, at node/edge intersection points 191 and 193. At step 204, when the navigation device determines that the potential paths 190 and 192 have intersected region edges 174 and 182, respectively, the navigation device next searches the tier #1 map databases in the map tier organization 150 for adjacent map databases (step 210). In the example of FIG. 9, no other map database exists at map tier #1 in the map tier organization 150 that joins either of region edges 174 and 182. Hence, flow passes from step 210 along path 214 to step 216, at which the navigation device selects map tier #2.
  • At step 218, the base map database 152 at tier #2 is identified to include region boundaries 162 and 164 that overlap the node/edge intersection points 191 and 193. Thus, flow passes along path 220 to step 224 at which transition locations in the base map database 152 is identified that correspond to the node/edge intersection points 191 and 192. Once the transition locations are identified, flow passes along path 226 back to step 212 at which the base map database 152 is accessed and used at step 202 to continue exploring the potential path 194. Also, at step 212, the node(s) identified in step 224 is/are added to the list of nodes to be explored. Again, while only potential path 194 is illustrated in FIG. 9, it is understood that the routing algorithm operates at step 202 in parallel to explore other potential paths through base map database 152.
  • When the route planning procedure is complete, the navigation device displays the suggested route to the operator by displaying a portion of the roadway network information from each of the base and detailed map databases 150, 154 and 156.
  • While the foregoing example is explained with respect to bi-directional searching from the source and destination locations 158 and 160, such bi-directional operation is not necessary. Instead, the routing algorithm may only calculate potential paths from one of the source and destination locations 158 and 160. If processing begins at the source location 158, the detailed map database 154 will be loaded or accessed first followed by the base map database 152. The detailed map database 156 would then be accessed after reaching the edge 164 of the base map database. The detailed map database 156 may be assigned to a map tier other than map tier #1, if the planner calculates the potential path from the source location 158 to the destination location 160.
  • In the example of FIG. 9, the potential path 194 includes roadway sections 195 and 196 that are located close to, but not identically overlapping with, corresponding roadway portions 197 and 198 of the potential paths 190 and 192, respectively, even though roadway sections 195 and 196 and roadway portions 197 and 198 constitute the same roads. This discrepancy may arise when different map databases do not include the same coordinates for a particular road. Instead, the roadway sections 195 and 196 may be assigned coordinates in the base map database 152 that differ by a few feet from the coordinates of the roadway portions 197 and 198 in the detailed map databases 154 and 156.
  • FIG. 11 illustrates the processing sequence carried out in accordance with one embodiment of the present invention for performing a transition between two overlapping, non-contiguous map databases, such as map databases in different map tiers or map databases in a common map tier but are not adjacent one another, nor an edge table establish a one-to-one edge node correspondence therebetween. The steps set forth in FIG. 11 are carried out by the navigation device when performing the operation at step 224 to locate a new map database having a node corresponding to the node/edge intersection coordinates of the most recently processed map database. The processing sequence set forth in FIG. 11 is described in connection with the map tier organization 141 set forth in FIG. 8 and a one-way search from the destination location 144 to source location 146.
  • The navigation device initially calculates potential path 131 from the destination location 144 to the edge 139 of the map database 142. The point of intersection between the potential path 131 and the edge 139 is designated as the node/edge intersection point 149. At step 218 in FIG. 10, the navigation device determines that, in the map tier organization 141, the map tier #2 includes map database 140 that overlaps the node/edge intersection point 149. Thereafter, flow passes to FIG. 11.
  • Beginning at step 302 in FIG. 11, the navigation device initially obtains the map database 140 to be searched, the node/edge intersection point 149 and the search perimeter 147. In the example of FIG. 8, the search perimeter 147 is designated by a circle surrounding the node/edge intersection point 149. The search perimeter 147 need not be circular, but instead may be oval, square, rectangular, or otherwise depending upon the search algorithm, the type of search being conducted, the geographic features being searched, the data format being searched and the like. The search perimeter 147 may vary in size depending upon factors, such as the number of roads being searched, the amount of data available, the speed with which the results are desired, the processing power available, and the like. In addition, the search perimeter 147 size may be varied based upon the difference between map tiers of the prior and new map databases. For instance, in the example of FIG. 8, the transition is between map tier #1 and map tier #2. Hence, the search perimeter 147 may be relatively small. If the map database transition is between map databases were more divergent map tiers (e.g., map tier #1 and map tier #7), the size of the search perimeter 147 may be increased or decreased accordingly.
  • Once the map database 140, node/edge intersection point 149 and search perimeter 147 are obtained at step 302, processing passes to step 304, at which the navigation device identifies, in map database 140, the coordinate data for nodes N1 and N2 near the node/edge intersection point 149. In the example of FIG. 8, the navigation device effectively locates coordinate data for potential paths 133 and 135 associated with nodes N1 and N2 since both are within the search perimeter 147. At step 306, the navigation device selects one of potential paths 133 and 135 based upon other criteria, such as the closest road, the direction of travel along the roads and the like. For example, potential path 135 has a direction of travel that is generally in a northern and southern direction, while the direction of travel at the node/edge intersection point 149 along potential path 131 is generally in an eastern direction. At step 306, the navigation device selects potential path 133 since the direction of travel of potential path 133 is most closely associated with that of potential path 131 at the node/edge intersection point 149.
  • Next, flow passes to step 308 at which the navigation device determines whether additional map databases are available at the selected map tier. In the example of FIG. 8, only database 145 is also included at map tier #2. Thus, flow passes along path 310 to step 312 at which the navigation device accesses the next map database 145 at the current map tier #2. Thereafter, steps 302-306 are repeated until no further map databases were available at the selected map tier. The navigation device then selects the most suitable map database at map tier #2 and continues the potential path planning operation based on the selected map database at step 201 (FIG. 10). Upon completion, the display illustrates portions of the roadway network from map databases 140 and 142, but not from map databases 143 and 145.
  • In the foregoing examples, tier-one and tier-two map databases are discussed. However, any number of tiers may be used and the processing of sequences FIGS. 10 and 11 may be carried out on any tier, namely tier N, and stepped up to any other tier, namely tier N+M, where N and M are integers.
  • Optionally, steps 216 and 218 of FIG. 10 may be modified to enable repeated searches through the map tiers. Hence, once all of the map tiers are indexed through, the map tier index is reset to the highest priority map tier. For instance, the selected map tier used at steps 202-210 may be a low priority map database, such as tier #6. When processing passes to steps 216 and 218, even lower tier maps will be searched, such as tier #7 or lower. However, the lowest tier may not include any map databases that overlap the edge/node intersection point. In this alternative embodiment, if the process advances through all of the map tiers at steps 216 and 218 without locating a map database that overlaps the edge/node intersection, then the map tier index is reset to the highest map tier, such as map tier #1.
  • In accordance with the foregoing, a navigation system, method and device are provided that permit routing between overlapping, non-adjacent, non-contiguous maps, such as between base maps and detailed maps, between maps of equal detail but from different sources, between maps cut from different cartographic data blocks or between maps cut from a common cartographic data block, but lacking edge tables. The process set forth in FIGS. 10 and 11 provide a facility to transfer routing control automatically through a mapping hierarchy between different map databases to permit a navigation device to calculate potential paths between source and destination locations located in different map databases. The routing process detects the edge of a detailed map area and, when no other detailed map areas exist that are adjacent thereto along the corresponding edge, the process transfers control down through a mapping hierarchy to lower tiered maps until locating one or more map databases that are capable of supporting the route planning procedure.
  • Certain embodiments enable route planning to be carried out without separately and interchangeably loading detailed maps for a large geographic area or detailed maps for several adjacent geographic areas. Certain embodiments enable route planning to be carried out based on a single source and destination entered by the user, while drawing upon multiple map databases provided from multiple sources, such as different data suppliers. The detailed maps associated with the map databases need not line up, nor be seamless with one another, to still be automatically accessible within a single final or complete route planning operation. Hence, certain embodiments provide the ability to combine maps that were not built together or cut from a common cartographic data block or “fiber”, yet are equally useful with one another.
  • Optionally, the server 76 may simply transmit map databases for requested geographic regions to the mobile units 72, after which the mobile units 72 carry out all necessary processing to perform navigation and routing operations. Alternatively, the mobile units 72 need not store the map databases. Instead, the server 74 may maintain the map databases and carry out navigation and routing calculations based upon requests received from the mobile unit 72. For example, the user may enter source and destination locations for a desired routing operation. The source and destination coordinates are transmitted from the mobile unit 72 through the communications links 78 and 80 and network 76 to the server 74 which calculates the desired route and returns such information to the mobile unit 72. In this alternative embodiment, the mobile unit 72 need not store large cartographic data blocks or map databases that would otherwise be needed to calculate and plan a route.
  • While particular elements, embodiments and applications of the present invention have been shown and described, it will be understood, of course, that the invention is not limited thereto since modifications may be made by those skilled in the art, particularly in light of the foregoing teachings. It is therefore contemplated by the appended claims to cover such modifications as incorporate those features which come within the spirit and scope of the invention.

Claims (31)

1. A navigation system, comprising:
a portable navigation device for navigating between first and second navigation points, the device including a display for displaying a route between the first and second navigation points; and
a server for calculating the route, the server including—
a memory storing map databases indicative of roadway networks in respective geographic regions surrounded by region edges, the geographic regions containing the first and second navigation points, and
a planner calculating paths between the first and second navigation points based on roadway network information in the map databases.
2. The system as set forth in claim 1, wherein the map databases include first and second map databases.
3. The system as set forth in claim 2, wherein the first and second map databases correspond to geographic regions having separate and distinct non-adjacent region edges.
4. The system as set forth in claim 2, wherein the first and second navigation points are based on roadway network information in both of the first and second map databases.
5. The system as set forth in claim 2, wherein the planner switches from calculations based on the first map database to calculations based on the second map database once the planner calculates at least one path through the first map database to a node at which the path intersects a region edge of the first map database.
6. The system as set forth in claim 1, further including a network for providing communications between the device and the server.
7. The system as set forth in claim 6, wherein the network is the Internet.
8. The system as set forth in claim 6, wherein the network is a wireless communications network.
9. The system as set forth in claim 1, the device further including—
a global positioning system (GPS) receiver for receiving signals transmitted from a plurality of GPS satellites; and
a processor for calculating, by triangulation, a position of the device using the signals.
10. The system as set forth in claim 9, wherein the processor determines the first navigation point using the signals and a user provides the second navigation point using an input.
11. The system as set forth in claim 1, wherein the device transmits the first and second navigation points to the server over a communications link and the server transmits the route to the device over the link.
12. The system as set forth in claim 11, wherein the server also transmits a map displaying the route to the device over the link.
13. A navigation system, comprising:
a portable navigation device for navigating between first and second navigation points, the device including a display for displaying a route between the first and second navigation points; and
a server for calculating the route, the server including—
a memory storing first and second map databases indicative of roadway networks in respective geographic regions surrounded by region edges, the geographic regions containing the first and second navigation points, the first and second map databases corresponding to geographic regions having separate and distinct non-adjacent region edges, and
a planner calculating paths between the first and second navigation points based on roadway network information in both of the first and second map databases, the planner switching from calculations based on the first map database to calculations based on the second map database once the planner calculates at least one path through the first map database to a node at which the path intersects a region edge of the first map database.
14. The system as set forth in claim 13, further including a network for providing communications between the device and the server.
15. The system as set forth in claim 14, wherein the network is the Internet.
16. The system as set forth in claim 14, wherein the network is a wireless communications network.
17. The system as set forth in claim 13, the device further including—
a global positioning system (GPS) receiver for receiving signals transmitted from a plurality of GPS satellites; and
a processor for calculating, by triangulation, a position of the device using the signals.
18. The system as set forth in claim 17, wherein the processor determines the first navigation point using the signals and a user provides the second navigation point using an input.
19. The system as set forth in claim 13, wherein the device transmits the first and second navigation points to the server over a wireless communications network and the server transmits the route to the device over the network.
20. The system as set forth in claim 19, wherein the server also transmits a map displaying the route to the device over the network.
21. A navigation system, comprising:
a portable navigation device for navigating between first and second navigation points, the device including—
a global positioning system (GPS) receiver for receiving signals transmitted from a plurality of GPS satellites,
a processor for calculating, by triangulation, the first navigation point using the signals,
an input for receiving indication of the second navigation point from a user, and
a display for displaying a route between the first and second navigation points; and
a server for receiving the first and second navigation points from the device over a wireless communications network, calculating the route between the first and second navigation points, and transmitting the route to the device over the network, the server including—
a memory for storing first and second map databases indicative of roadway networks in respective geographic regions surrounded by region edges, the geographic regions containing the first and second navigation points, the first and second map databases corresponding to geographic regions having separate and distinct non-adjacent region edges, and
a planner for calculating paths between the first and second navigation points based on roadway network information in both of the first and second map databases, the planner switching from calculations based on the first map database to calculations based on the second map database once the planner calculates at least one path through the first map database to a node at which the path intersects a region edge of the first map database.
22. The system as set forth in claim 21, wherein the server also transmits a map displaying the route to the device over the network.
23. A navigation server for calculating a route between first and second navigation points and transmitting the route to a portable navigation device for navigating the route, the server comprising:
a memory storing first and second map databases indicative of roadway networks in respective geographic regions surrounded by region edges, the geographic regions containing the first and second navigation points, the first and second map databases corresponding to geographic regions having separate and distinct non-adjacent region edges; and
a planner calculating paths between the first and second navigation points based on roadway network information in both of the first and second map databases, the planner switching from calculations based on the first map database to calculations based on the second map database once the planner calculates at least one path through the first map database to a node at which the path intersects a region edge of the first map database.
24. The server as set forth in claim 23, wherein the server transmits the route to the device over a wireless communications network.
25. The server as set forth in claim 23, wherein the server receives the first and second navigation points from the device over a wireless communications network.
26. The server as set forth in claim 23, wherein the device includes—
a global positioning system (GPS) receiver for receiving signals transmitted from a plurality of GPS satellites;
a processor for calculating, by triangulation, the first navigation point using the signals;
an input for receiving the second navigation point from a user; and
a display for displaying the route.
27. The server as set forth in claim 26, wherein the server also transmits to the device a map displaying the route.
28. A portable navigation device for navigating a route between first and second navigation points, the device comprising:
a global positioning system (GPS) receiver for receiving signals transmitted from a plurality of GPS satellites;
a processor for calculating, by triangulation, the first navigation point using the signals;
an input for receiving indication of the second navigation point from a user;
a display for displaying the route between the first and second navigation points; and
a transceiver for receiving the route from a server.
29. The device as set forth in claim 28, wherein the server receives the first and second navigation points from the device over a wireless communications network, calculates the route between the first and second navigation points, and transmits the route to the device over the network.
30. The device as set forth in claim 28, wherein the server includes—
a memory for storing first and second map databases indicative of roadway networks in respective geographic regions surrounded by region edges, the geographic regions containing the first and second navigation points, the first and second map databases corresponding to geographic regions having separate and distinct non-adjacent region edges; and
a planner for calculating paths between the first and second navigation points based on roadway network information in both of the first and second map databases, the planner switching from calculations based on the first map database to calculations based on the second map database once the planner calculates at least one path through the first map database to a node at which the path intersects a region edge of the first map database.
31. The device as set forth in claim 28, wherein the server also transmits to the device a map displaying the route.
US11/003,313 2001-12-11 2004-12-03 System and method for calculating a navigation route based on non-contiguous cartographic map databases Abandoned US20050102101A1 (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/015,153 US6574554B1 (en) 2001-12-11 2001-12-11 System and method for calculating a navigation route based on non-contiguous cartographic map databases
US42365803A true 2003-08-11 2003-08-11
US11/003,313 US20050102101A1 (en) 2001-12-11 2004-12-03 System and method for calculating a navigation route based on non-contiguous cartographic map databases

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US11/003,313 US20050102101A1 (en) 2001-12-11 2004-12-03 System and method for calculating a navigation route based on non-contiguous cartographic map databases

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US42365803A Continuation 2003-08-11 2003-08-11

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20050102101A1 true US20050102101A1 (en) 2005-05-12

Family

ID=21769787

Family Applications (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/015,153 Active US6574554B1 (en) 2001-12-11 2001-12-11 System and method for calculating a navigation route based on non-contiguous cartographic map databases
US11/003,313 Abandoned US20050102101A1 (en) 2001-12-11 2004-12-03 System and method for calculating a navigation route based on non-contiguous cartographic map databases

Family Applications Before (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/015,153 Active US6574554B1 (en) 2001-12-11 2001-12-11 System and method for calculating a navigation route based on non-contiguous cartographic map databases

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (2) US6574554B1 (en)

Cited By (42)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20060178819A1 (en) * 2005-02-04 2006-08-10 Microsoft Corporation Efficient navigation routing system and method
US20070184850A1 (en) * 2004-07-22 2007-08-09 Jurgen Hupp Apparatus and Method for Determining a Current Position of a Mobile Device
US20080051989A1 (en) * 2006-08-25 2008-02-28 Microsoft Corporation Filtering of data layered on mapping applications
US7576754B1 (en) 2005-10-27 2009-08-18 Google Inc. System and method for identifying bounds of a geographical area
US7595725B1 (en) * 2005-10-27 2009-09-29 Google Inc. System and method for identifying geographical areas that significantly overlap a map view
US20090319556A1 (en) * 2008-06-20 2009-12-24 Christopher Richard Stolte Methods and systems of automatically geocoding a dataset for visual analysis
US20100152999A1 (en) * 2005-09-23 2010-06-17 Mona Singh System And Method For Selecting And Presenting A Route To A User
US20100151840A1 (en) * 2008-12-17 2010-06-17 Frederic Bauchot Generating alerts based on predicted wireless connection losses
US20100153001A1 (en) * 2008-12-17 2010-06-17 Frederic Bauchot Generating optimal itineraries based on network connectivity
US20100161214A1 (en) * 2006-04-14 2010-06-24 Mona Singh System And Method For Presenting A Computed Route
US20100262359A1 (en) * 2009-04-14 2010-10-14 Masaki Motoyama Route search method and apparatus for navigation system utilizing map data of XML format
US20100287207A1 (en) * 2009-05-08 2010-11-11 Masaki Motoyama Spatial indexing method and apparatus for navigation system for indexing and retrieval of XML map data
US20110040479A1 (en) * 2008-04-28 2011-02-17 Navitime Japan Co., Ltd. Route guidance system, route search server, route guidance method, and terminal
US20110090081A1 (en) * 2009-10-21 2011-04-21 Qualcomm Incorporated Mapping wireless signals with motion sensors
US7983949B1 (en) 2005-10-27 2011-07-19 Google Inc. System and method for selecting targeted information for serving with a map view
US20110282579A1 (en) * 2009-01-26 2011-11-17 Navitime Japan Co., Ltd. System which mediates providing of map information, server which mediates providing of map information, and method for providing map information
US20120036229A1 (en) * 2009-04-23 2012-02-09 Navitime Japan Co., Ltd. Route guiding system, route search server, route guiding mediation server and route guiding method
US20120246177A1 (en) * 2008-07-14 2012-09-27 Google Inc. Content item selection
US8620532B2 (en) 2009-03-25 2013-12-31 Waldeck Technology, Llc Passive crowd-sourced map updates and alternate route recommendations
WO2014008066A1 (en) * 2012-07-06 2014-01-09 Navico Holding As Export user data from defined region
US20140013284A1 (en) * 2012-07-06 2014-01-09 Navico, Inc. Cursor Assist Mode
US8730264B1 (en) * 2011-09-26 2014-05-20 Google Inc. Determining when image elements intersect
US9122366B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-09-01 Navico Holding As Residue indicators
US9142206B2 (en) 2011-07-14 2015-09-22 Navico Holding As System for interchangeable mounting options for a sonar transducer
US9182486B2 (en) 2011-12-07 2015-11-10 Navico Holding As Sonar rendering systems and associated methods
US9182239B2 (en) 2012-11-06 2015-11-10 Navico Holding As Displaying laylines
US9223022B2 (en) 2009-07-14 2015-12-29 Navico Holding As Linear and circular downscan imaging sonar
US9244168B2 (en) 2012-07-06 2016-01-26 Navico Holding As Sonar system using frequency bursts
US9268020B2 (en) 2012-02-10 2016-02-23 Navico Holding As Sonar assembly for reduced interference
US9298079B2 (en) 2012-07-06 2016-03-29 Navico Holding As Sonar preview mode
US9348028B2 (en) 2012-07-06 2016-05-24 Navico Holding As Sonar module using multiple receiving elements
US9361693B2 (en) 2012-07-06 2016-06-07 Navico Holding As Adjusting parameters of marine electronics data
US9442636B2 (en) 2012-07-06 2016-09-13 Navico Holding As Quick split mode
US9439411B2 (en) 2013-08-21 2016-09-13 Navico Holding As Fishing statistics display
US9507562B2 (en) 2013-08-21 2016-11-29 Navico Holding As Using voice recognition for recording events
US9541643B2 (en) 2009-07-14 2017-01-10 Navico Holding As Downscan imaging sonar
US9720084B2 (en) 2014-07-14 2017-08-01 Navico Holding As Depth display using sonar data
US9829321B2 (en) 2014-09-24 2017-11-28 Navico Holding As Forward depth display
US9836129B2 (en) 2015-08-06 2017-12-05 Navico Holding As Using motion sensing for controlling a display
US9909891B2 (en) 2013-08-14 2018-03-06 Navico Holding As Display of routes to be travelled by a marine vessel
US10151829B2 (en) 2016-02-23 2018-12-11 Navico Holding As Systems and associated methods for producing sonar image overlay
US10290124B2 (en) 2013-10-09 2019-05-14 Navico Holding As Sonar depth display

Families Citing this family (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6574554B1 (en) * 2001-12-11 2003-06-03 Garmin Ltd. System and method for calculating a navigation route based on non-contiguous cartographic map databases
US6704645B1 (en) * 2001-12-11 2004-03-09 Garmin Ltd. System and method for estimating impedance time through a road network
US6581003B1 (en) * 2001-12-20 2003-06-17 Garmin Ltd. Systems and methods for a navigational device with forced layer switching based on memory constraints
US6975940B1 (en) 2001-12-21 2005-12-13 Garmin Ltd. Systems, functional data, and methods for generating a route
US7184886B1 (en) * 2001-12-21 2007-02-27 Garmin Ltd. Navigation system, method and device with detour algorithm
US20040006425A1 (en) * 2002-07-03 2004-01-08 Terragraphix, Inc. System for communicating and associating information with a geographic location
US20040034467A1 (en) * 2002-08-09 2004-02-19 Paul Sampedro System and method for determining and employing road network traffic status
US7474960B1 (en) 2002-12-30 2009-01-06 Mapquest, Inc. Presenting a travel route
US20040243307A1 (en) * 2003-06-02 2004-12-02 Pieter Geelen Personal GPS navigation device
TWI255347B (en) * 2004-11-26 2006-05-21 Mitac Int Corp Device and method of a global positioning system (GPS)
KR100663405B1 (en) * 2005-06-03 2007-01-02 엘지전자 주식회사 International Path Auto Searching Method and Apparatus
US20070050128A1 (en) * 2005-08-31 2007-03-01 Garmin Ltd., A Cayman Islands Corporation Method and system for off-board navigation with a portable device
US7925320B2 (en) 2006-03-06 2011-04-12 Garmin Switzerland Gmbh Electronic device mount
US20110178704A1 (en) * 2008-12-08 2011-07-21 Micro-Star International Co., Ltd. Navigation device capable of adding path to navigation plan independently
EP3436780A1 (en) * 2016-03-31 2019-02-06 HERE Global B.V. Definition of one or more gateways for linking navigation data sets representing maps of at least partially overlapping geographic regions

Citations (92)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3660812A (en) * 1970-05-01 1972-05-02 Sumitomo Electric Industries Road traffic control system
US3883847A (en) * 1974-03-28 1975-05-13 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Uniform decoding of minimum-redundancy codes
US4827419A (en) * 1986-09-22 1989-05-02 Lasertrak Corporation Portable navigational planning device
US4926336A (en) * 1987-12-28 1990-05-15 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Route searching system of navigation apparatus
US4937753A (en) * 1987-12-28 1990-06-26 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Route end node series preparing system of navigation apparatus
US5208593A (en) * 1991-07-30 1993-05-04 Lsi Logic Corporation Method and structure for decoding Huffman codes using leading ones detection
US5343399A (en) * 1992-07-23 1994-08-30 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Vehicle navigation system
US5410486A (en) * 1992-07-20 1995-04-25 Toyota Jidosha K.K. Navigation system for guiding vehicle by voice
US5452217A (en) * 1992-07-20 1995-09-19 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Navigation system for guiding vehicle orally
US5452212A (en) * 1992-08-19 1995-09-19 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Navigation system for vehicle
US5506578A (en) * 1992-07-23 1996-04-09 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Volume control of aural guidance of vehicle route guidance apparatus
US5528248A (en) * 1994-08-19 1996-06-18 Trimble Navigation, Ltd. Personal digital location assistant including a memory cartridge, a GPS smart antenna and a personal computing device
US5537323A (en) * 1991-10-29 1996-07-16 U.S. Philips Corporation Navigation device vehicle comprising the device
US5546107A (en) * 1994-04-05 1996-08-13 Etak, Inc. Automatic chain-based conflation of digital maps
US5638279A (en) * 1992-08-19 1997-06-10 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Vehicle navigation system and navigation method
US5729109A (en) * 1995-07-19 1998-03-17 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Navigation system and intersection guidance method
US5729458A (en) * 1995-12-29 1998-03-17 Etak, Inc. Cost zones
US5739772A (en) * 1995-08-25 1998-04-14 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Navigation system for vehicles
US5793631A (en) * 1992-08-19 1998-08-11 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Voice route-guidance system and method having a function for judging approachment to a decision point
US5809447A (en) * 1995-04-04 1998-09-15 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Voice navigation by sequential phrase readout
US5874905A (en) * 1995-08-25 1999-02-23 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Navigation system for vehicles
US5878368A (en) * 1996-09-13 1999-03-02 Magellan Dis, Inc. Navigation system with user definable cost values
US5893081A (en) * 1996-11-25 1999-04-06 Etak, Inc. Using multiple levels of costs for a pathfinding computation
US5902349A (en) * 1995-12-28 1999-05-11 Alpine Electronics, Inc. Navigation apparatus
US5938721A (en) * 1996-10-24 1999-08-17 Trimble Navigation Limited Position based personal digital assistant
US5946962A (en) * 1996-07-03 1999-09-07 Exedy Corporation Method for manufacturing a turbine shell
US5951622A (en) * 1996-10-22 1999-09-14 Xanavi Informatics Corporation Navigation system drawing recommended route upon different scale display map
US5953722A (en) * 1996-10-25 1999-09-14 Navigation Technologies Corporation Method and system for forming and using geographic data
US6021406A (en) * 1997-11-14 2000-02-01 Etak, Inc. Method for storing map data in a database using space filling curves and a method of searching the database to find objects in a given area and to find objects nearest to a location
US6023655A (en) * 1996-12-16 2000-02-08 Xanavi Informatics Corporation Map database apparatus
US6038559A (en) * 1998-03-16 2000-03-14 Navigation Technologies Corporation Segment aggregation in a geographic database and methods for use thereof in a navigation application
US6047280A (en) * 1996-10-25 2000-04-04 Navigation Technologies Corporation Interface layer for navigation system
US6052645A (en) * 1997-07-17 2000-04-18 Toyota Jodosha Kabushiki Kaisha Map data distribution system and map data acquisition device suitable for such system
US6061003A (en) * 1997-07-17 2000-05-09 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Map acquisition system, map acquisition unit, and navigation apparatus equipped with a map acquisition unit
US6061630A (en) * 1996-12-20 2000-05-09 U.S. Philips Corporation Navigation system and method for guiding a road vehicle
US6073076A (en) * 1998-03-27 2000-06-06 Navigation Technologies Corporation Memory management for navigation system
US6088652A (en) * 1996-03-29 2000-07-11 Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd. Navigation device
US6112200A (en) * 1998-03-16 2000-08-29 Navigation Technologies Corporation Interleaving of data types in a geographic database and methods for application
US6121900A (en) * 1997-08-11 2000-09-19 Alpine Electronics, Inc. Method of displaying maps for a car navigation unit
US6121314A (en) * 1991-05-20 2000-09-19 Novartis Ag Pharmaceutical composition
US6169956B1 (en) * 1997-02-28 2001-01-02 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Vehicle navigation system providing for determination of a point on the border of a map stored in memory on the basis of a destination remote from the area covered by the map
US6172641B1 (en) * 1998-04-09 2001-01-09 Magellan Dis, Inc. Navigation system with audible route guidance instructions
US6182010B1 (en) * 1999-01-28 2001-01-30 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for displaying real-time visual information on an automobile pervasive computing client
US6192314B1 (en) * 1998-03-25 2001-02-20 Navigation Technologies Corp. Method and system for route calculation in a navigation application
US6199013B1 (en) * 1997-07-15 2001-03-06 Navigation Technologies Corp. Maneuver generation program and method
US6199045B1 (en) * 1996-08-15 2001-03-06 Spatial Adventures, Inc. Method and apparatus for providing position-related information to mobile recipients
US6202024B1 (en) * 1998-03-23 2001-03-13 Kabushikikaisha Equos Research Communicatory navigation system
US6202026B1 (en) * 1997-08-07 2001-03-13 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Map display device and a recording medium
US6219457B1 (en) * 1998-05-26 2001-04-17 Silicon Graphics, Inc. Method and system for decoding data encoded in a variable length code word
US6249740B1 (en) * 1998-01-21 2001-06-19 Kabushikikaisha Equos Research Communications navigation system, and navigation base apparatus and vehicle navigation apparatus both used in the navigation system
US6259988B1 (en) * 1998-07-20 2001-07-10 Lockheed Martin Corporation Real-time mission adaptable route planner
US6263277B1 (en) * 2000-08-07 2001-07-17 Alpine Electronics, Inc. Route searching method
US6266615B1 (en) * 1999-09-27 2001-07-24 Televigation, Inc. Method and system for an interactive and real-time distributed navigation system
US6336073B1 (en) * 1999-07-29 2002-01-01 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Information terminal device and method for route guidance
US6381535B1 (en) * 1997-04-08 2002-04-30 Webraska Mobile Technologies Interactive process for use as a navigational aid and device for its implementation
US6393149B2 (en) * 1998-09-17 2002-05-21 Navigation Technologies Corp. Method and system for compressing data and a geographic database formed therewith and methods for use thereof in a navigation application program
US6405123B1 (en) * 1999-12-21 2002-06-11 Televigation, Inc. Method and system for an efficient operating environment in a real-time navigation system
US6411899B2 (en) * 1996-10-24 2002-06-25 Trimble Navigation Ltd. Position based personal digital assistant
US20020091527A1 (en) * 2001-01-08 2002-07-11 Shyue-Chin Shiau Distributed speech recognition server system for mobile internet/intranet communication
US20020102988A1 (en) * 2001-01-26 2002-08-01 International Business Machines Corporation Wireless communication system and method for sorting location related information
US20020120753A1 (en) * 2000-12-27 2002-08-29 Isaac Levanon Optimized image delivery over limited bandwidth communication channels
US6505123B1 (en) * 2000-07-24 2003-01-07 Weatherbank, Inc. Interactive weather advisory system
US6504496B1 (en) * 2001-04-10 2003-01-07 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Systems and methods for decoding compressed data
US20030006918A1 (en) * 2001-04-04 2003-01-09 Honeywell International, Inc. Canonical huffman encoded data decompression algorithm
US20030006913A1 (en) * 2001-07-03 2003-01-09 Joyce Dennis P. Location-based content delivery
US20030013483A1 (en) * 2001-07-06 2003-01-16 Ausems Michiel R. User interface for handheld communication device
US6510379B1 (en) * 1999-11-22 2003-01-21 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Method and apparatus for automatically generating pedestrian route guide text and recording medium
US6512525B1 (en) * 1995-08-07 2003-01-28 Apple Computer, Inc. Multiple personas for mobile devices
US20030045998A1 (en) * 2001-08-30 2003-03-06 Medl Thomas E. Navigation devices, systems, and methods for determining location, position, and/or orientation information based on movement data generated by a movement detector
US20030045301A1 (en) * 2001-08-30 2003-03-06 Wollrab Lee M. Family calendar notification and tracking
US6532152B1 (en) * 1998-11-16 2003-03-11 Intermec Ip Corp. Ruggedized hand held computer
US6532417B2 (en) * 2000-03-03 2003-03-11 Pioneer Corporation Navigation system, navigation information providing server, and navigation server
US20030048599A1 (en) * 2001-09-10 2003-03-13 Martin Cindy L. Small computing device having a light source
US6535743B1 (en) * 1998-07-29 2003-03-18 Minorplanet Systems Usa, Inc. System and method for providing directions using a communication network
US20030069899A1 (en) * 2001-10-04 2003-04-10 International Business Machines Corporation Method, system, and program for providing personal preference information when scheduling events
US6563440B1 (en) * 2001-10-19 2003-05-13 Nokia Corporation Apparatus and method for decoding Huffman codes using leading one/zero string length detection
US6574554B1 (en) * 2001-12-11 2003-06-03 Garmin Ltd. System and method for calculating a navigation route based on non-contiguous cartographic map databases
US6574553B1 (en) * 2001-12-11 2003-06-03 Garmin Ltd. System and method for calculating a navigation route based on adjacent cartographic map databases
US20030105845A1 (en) * 1999-10-29 2003-06-05 Rene Leermakers System for broadcasting software applications and portable data communications device for use in such a system
US20030131059A1 (en) * 2002-01-08 2003-07-10 International Business Machines Corporation Method, system, and program for providing information on scheduled events to wireless devices
US20030131023A1 (en) * 2002-01-08 2003-07-10 International Business Machines Corporation Method, system, and program for providing information on users of wireless devices in a database to a personal information manager
US6594666B1 (en) * 2000-09-25 2003-07-15 Oracle International Corp. Location aware application development framework
US20030139150A1 (en) * 2001-12-07 2003-07-24 Rodriguez Robert Michael Portable navigation and communication systems
US6675093B1 (en) * 2001-12-21 2004-01-06 Garmin Ltd. Systems, functional data, and methods for generating a route
US6704645B1 (en) * 2001-12-11 2004-03-09 Garmin Ltd. System and method for estimating impedance time through a road network
US6775612B1 (en) * 2001-12-20 2004-08-10 Garmin Ltd. Navigation PDA and method with optimal antenna placement
US6839624B1 (en) * 2001-12-20 2005-01-04 Garmin Ltd. System and method for compressing data
US6845322B1 (en) * 2003-07-15 2005-01-18 Televigation, Inc. Method and system for distributed navigation
US6847890B1 (en) * 2001-12-21 2005-01-25 Garmin Ltd. Guidance with feature accounting for insignificant roads
US6847889B2 (en) * 2000-08-18 2005-01-25 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Navigation system using wireless communication network and route guidance method thereof
US6850842B2 (en) * 2001-10-31 2005-02-01 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Navigation system for providing real-time traffic information and traffic information processing method by the same
US6892135B1 (en) * 2001-12-21 2005-05-10 Garmin Ltd. Navigation system, method and device with automatic next turn page

Family Cites Families (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6122593A (en) * 1999-08-03 2000-09-19 Navigation Technologies Corporation Method and system for providing a preview of a route calculated with a navigation system

Patent Citations (99)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3660812A (en) * 1970-05-01 1972-05-02 Sumitomo Electric Industries Road traffic control system
US3883847A (en) * 1974-03-28 1975-05-13 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Uniform decoding of minimum-redundancy codes
US4827419A (en) * 1986-09-22 1989-05-02 Lasertrak Corporation Portable navigational planning device
US4926336A (en) * 1987-12-28 1990-05-15 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Route searching system of navigation apparatus
US4937753A (en) * 1987-12-28 1990-06-26 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Route end node series preparing system of navigation apparatus
US6121314A (en) * 1991-05-20 2000-09-19 Novartis Ag Pharmaceutical composition
US5208593A (en) * 1991-07-30 1993-05-04 Lsi Logic Corporation Method and structure for decoding Huffman codes using leading ones detection
US5537323A (en) * 1991-10-29 1996-07-16 U.S. Philips Corporation Navigation device vehicle comprising the device
US5410486A (en) * 1992-07-20 1995-04-25 Toyota Jidosha K.K. Navigation system for guiding vehicle by voice
US5452217A (en) * 1992-07-20 1995-09-19 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Navigation system for guiding vehicle orally
US5506578A (en) * 1992-07-23 1996-04-09 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Volume control of aural guidance of vehicle route guidance apparatus
US5343399A (en) * 1992-07-23 1994-08-30 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Vehicle navigation system
US5452212A (en) * 1992-08-19 1995-09-19 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Navigation system for vehicle
US5638279A (en) * 1992-08-19 1997-06-10 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Vehicle navigation system and navigation method
US5793631A (en) * 1992-08-19 1998-08-11 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Voice route-guidance system and method having a function for judging approachment to a decision point
US5546107A (en) * 1994-04-05 1996-08-13 Etak, Inc. Automatic chain-based conflation of digital maps
US5528248A (en) * 1994-08-19 1996-06-18 Trimble Navigation, Ltd. Personal digital location assistant including a memory cartridge, a GPS smart antenna and a personal computing device
US5809447A (en) * 1995-04-04 1998-09-15 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Voice navigation by sequential phrase readout
US5729109A (en) * 1995-07-19 1998-03-17 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Navigation system and intersection guidance method
US6512525B1 (en) * 1995-08-07 2003-01-28 Apple Computer, Inc. Multiple personas for mobile devices
US5739772A (en) * 1995-08-25 1998-04-14 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Navigation system for vehicles
US5874905A (en) * 1995-08-25 1999-02-23 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Navigation system for vehicles
US5902349A (en) * 1995-12-28 1999-05-11 Alpine Electronics, Inc. Navigation apparatus
US5729458A (en) * 1995-12-29 1998-03-17 Etak, Inc. Cost zones
US6088652A (en) * 1996-03-29 2000-07-11 Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd. Navigation device
US5946962A (en) * 1996-07-03 1999-09-07 Exedy Corporation Method for manufacturing a turbine shell
US6199045B1 (en) * 1996-08-15 2001-03-06 Spatial Adventures, Inc. Method and apparatus for providing position-related information to mobile recipients
US5878368A (en) * 1996-09-13 1999-03-02 Magellan Dis, Inc. Navigation system with user definable cost values
US5951622A (en) * 1996-10-22 1999-09-14 Xanavi Informatics Corporation Navigation system drawing recommended route upon different scale display map
US6411899B2 (en) * 1996-10-24 2002-06-25 Trimble Navigation Ltd. Position based personal digital assistant
US5938721A (en) * 1996-10-24 1999-08-17 Trimble Navigation Limited Position based personal digital assistant
US6266612B1 (en) * 1996-10-24 2001-07-24 Trimble Navigation Limited Position based personal digital assistant
US5953722A (en) * 1996-10-25 1999-09-14 Navigation Technologies Corporation Method and system for forming and using geographic data
US6047280A (en) * 1996-10-25 2000-04-04 Navigation Technologies Corporation Interface layer for navigation system
US5893081A (en) * 1996-11-25 1999-04-06 Etak, Inc. Using multiple levels of costs for a pathfinding computation
US6023655A (en) * 1996-12-16 2000-02-08 Xanavi Informatics Corporation Map database apparatus
US6061630A (en) * 1996-12-20 2000-05-09 U.S. Philips Corporation Navigation system and method for guiding a road vehicle
US6169956B1 (en) * 1997-02-28 2001-01-02 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Vehicle navigation system providing for determination of a point on the border of a map stored in memory on the basis of a destination remote from the area covered by the map
US6381535B1 (en) * 1997-04-08 2002-04-30 Webraska Mobile Technologies Interactive process for use as a navigational aid and device for its implementation
US6199013B1 (en) * 1997-07-15 2001-03-06 Navigation Technologies Corp. Maneuver generation program and method
US6052645A (en) * 1997-07-17 2000-04-18 Toyota Jodosha Kabushiki Kaisha Map data distribution system and map data acquisition device suitable for such system
US6061003A (en) * 1997-07-17 2000-05-09 Toyota Jidosha Kabushiki Kaisha Map acquisition system, map acquisition unit, and navigation apparatus equipped with a map acquisition unit
US6202026B1 (en) * 1997-08-07 2001-03-13 Aisin Aw Co., Ltd. Map display device and a recording medium
US6121900A (en) * 1997-08-11 2000-09-19 Alpine Electronics, Inc. Method of displaying maps for a car navigation unit
US6021406A (en) * 1997-11-14 2000-02-01 Etak, Inc. Method for storing map data in a database using space filling curves and a method of searching the database to find objects in a given area and to find objects nearest to a location
US6249740B1 (en) * 1998-01-21 2001-06-19 Kabushikikaisha Equos Research Communications navigation system, and navigation base apparatus and vehicle navigation apparatus both used in the navigation system
US6038559A (en) * 1998-03-16 2000-03-14 Navigation Technologies Corporation Segment aggregation in a geographic database and methods for use thereof in a navigation application
US6112200A (en) * 1998-03-16 2000-08-29 Navigation Technologies Corporation Interleaving of data types in a geographic database and methods for application
US6202024B1 (en) * 1998-03-23 2001-03-13 Kabushikikaisha Equos Research Communicatory navigation system
US6263276B1 (en) * 1998-03-23 2001-07-17 Kabushikikaisha Equos Research Communicatory navigation system
US6192314B1 (en) * 1998-03-25 2001-02-20 Navigation Technologies Corp. Method and system for route calculation in a navigation application
US6073076A (en) * 1998-03-27 2000-06-06 Navigation Technologies Corporation Memory management for navigation system
US6172641B1 (en) * 1998-04-09 2001-01-09 Magellan Dis, Inc. Navigation system with audible route guidance instructions
US6219457B1 (en) * 1998-05-26 2001-04-17 Silicon Graphics, Inc. Method and system for decoding data encoded in a variable length code word
US6259988B1 (en) * 1998-07-20 2001-07-10 Lockheed Martin Corporation Real-time mission adaptable route planner
US6535743B1 (en) * 1998-07-29 2003-03-18 Minorplanet Systems Usa, Inc. System and method for providing directions using a communication network
US6393149B2 (en) * 1998-09-17 2002-05-21 Navigation Technologies Corp. Method and system for compressing data and a geographic database formed therewith and methods for use thereof in a navigation application program
US6532152B1 (en) * 1998-11-16 2003-03-11 Intermec Ip Corp. Ruggedized hand held computer
US6182010B1 (en) * 1999-01-28 2001-01-30 International Business Machines Corporation Method and apparatus for displaying real-time visual information on an automobile pervasive computing client
US6336073B1 (en) * 1999-07-29 2002-01-01 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Information terminal device and method for route guidance
US6401035B2 (en) * 1999-09-27 2002-06-04 Televigation, Inc. Method and system for a real-time distributed navigation system
US6266615B1 (en) * 1999-09-27 2001-07-24 Televigation, Inc. Method and system for an interactive and real-time distributed navigation system
US20030105845A1 (en) * 1999-10-29 2003-06-05 Rene Leermakers System for broadcasting software applications and portable data communications device for use in such a system
US6510379B1 (en) * 1999-11-22 2003-01-21 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Method and apparatus for automatically generating pedestrian route guide text and recording medium
US6405123B1 (en) * 1999-12-21 2002-06-11 Televigation, Inc. Method and system for an efficient operating environment in a real-time navigation system
US6532417B2 (en) * 2000-03-03 2003-03-11 Pioneer Corporation Navigation system, navigation information providing server, and navigation server
US6505123B1 (en) * 2000-07-24 2003-01-07 Weatherbank, Inc. Interactive weather advisory system
US6263277B1 (en) * 2000-08-07 2001-07-17 Alpine Electronics, Inc. Route searching method
US6847889B2 (en) * 2000-08-18 2005-01-25 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Navigation system using wireless communication network and route guidance method thereof
US6594666B1 (en) * 2000-09-25 2003-07-15 Oracle International Corp. Location aware application development framework
US20020120753A1 (en) * 2000-12-27 2002-08-29 Isaac Levanon Optimized image delivery over limited bandwidth communication channels
US20020091527A1 (en) * 2001-01-08 2002-07-11 Shyue-Chin Shiau Distributed speech recognition server system for mobile internet/intranet communication
US20020102988A1 (en) * 2001-01-26 2002-08-01 International Business Machines Corporation Wireless communication system and method for sorting location related information
US20030006918A1 (en) * 2001-04-04 2003-01-09 Honeywell International, Inc. Canonical huffman encoded data decompression algorithm
US6504496B1 (en) * 2001-04-10 2003-01-07 Cirrus Logic, Inc. Systems and methods for decoding compressed data
US20030006913A1 (en) * 2001-07-03 2003-01-09 Joyce Dennis P. Location-based content delivery
US20030013483A1 (en) * 2001-07-06 2003-01-16 Ausems Michiel R. User interface for handheld communication device
US20030045301A1 (en) * 2001-08-30 2003-03-06 Wollrab Lee M. Family calendar notification and tracking
US20030045998A1 (en) * 2001-08-30 2003-03-06 Medl Thomas E. Navigation devices, systems, and methods for determining location, position, and/or orientation information based on movement data generated by a movement detector
US20030048599A1 (en) * 2001-09-10 2003-03-13 Martin Cindy L. Small computing device having a light source
US20030069899A1 (en) * 2001-10-04 2003-04-10 International Business Machines Corporation Method, system, and program for providing personal preference information when scheduling events
US6563440B1 (en) * 2001-10-19 2003-05-13 Nokia Corporation Apparatus and method for decoding Huffman codes using leading one/zero string length detection
US6850842B2 (en) * 2001-10-31 2005-02-01 Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. Navigation system for providing real-time traffic information and traffic information processing method by the same
US20030139150A1 (en) * 2001-12-07 2003-07-24 Rodriguez Robert Michael Portable navigation and communication systems
US6708112B1 (en) * 2001-12-11 2004-03-16 Garmin Ltd System and method for calculating a navigation route based on adjacent cartographic map databases
US6574554B1 (en) * 2001-12-11 2003-06-03 Garmin Ltd. System and method for calculating a navigation route based on non-contiguous cartographic map databases
US6574553B1 (en) * 2001-12-11 2003-06-03 Garmin Ltd. System and method for calculating a navigation route based on adjacent cartographic map databases
US6856893B2 (en) * 2001-12-11 2005-02-15 Garmin Ltd. System and method for estimating impedance time through a road network
US6704645B1 (en) * 2001-12-11 2004-03-09 Garmin Ltd. System and method for estimating impedance time through a road network
US6775612B1 (en) * 2001-12-20 2004-08-10 Garmin Ltd. Navigation PDA and method with optimal antenna placement
US6839624B1 (en) * 2001-12-20 2005-01-04 Garmin Ltd. System and method for compressing data
US6898520B2 (en) * 2001-12-20 2005-05-24 Garmin Ltd. Systems and methods for a navigational device with forced layer switching based on memory constraints
US6892135B1 (en) * 2001-12-21 2005-05-10 Garmin Ltd. Navigation system, method and device with automatic next turn page
US6856900B1 (en) * 2001-12-21 2005-02-15 Garmin Ltd. Systems, functional data, and methods for generating a route
US6675093B1 (en) * 2001-12-21 2004-01-06 Garmin Ltd. Systems, functional data, and methods for generating a route
US6847890B1 (en) * 2001-12-21 2005-01-25 Garmin Ltd. Guidance with feature accounting for insignificant roads
US20030131023A1 (en) * 2002-01-08 2003-07-10 International Business Machines Corporation Method, system, and program for providing information on users of wireless devices in a database to a personal information manager
US20030131059A1 (en) * 2002-01-08 2003-07-10 International Business Machines Corporation Method, system, and program for providing information on scheduled events to wireless devices
US6845322B1 (en) * 2003-07-15 2005-01-18 Televigation, Inc. Method and system for distributed navigation

Cited By (76)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20070184850A1 (en) * 2004-07-22 2007-08-09 Jurgen Hupp Apparatus and Method for Determining a Current Position of a Mobile Device
US7783302B2 (en) * 2004-07-22 2010-08-24 Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft Zur Foerderung Der Angewandten Forschung E.V. Apparatus and method for determining a current position of a mobile device
US7869946B2 (en) * 2005-02-04 2011-01-11 Microsoft Corporation Efficient navigation routing system and method
US20060178819A1 (en) * 2005-02-04 2006-08-10 Microsoft Corporation Efficient navigation routing system and method
US9366542B2 (en) 2005-09-23 2016-06-14 Scenera Technologies, Llc System and method for selecting and presenting a route to a user
US7991544B2 (en) * 2005-09-23 2011-08-02 Scenera Technologies, Llc System and method for selecting and presenting a route to a user
US20100152999A1 (en) * 2005-09-23 2010-06-17 Mona Singh System And Method For Selecting And Presenting A Route To A User
US8589064B2 (en) 2005-09-23 2013-11-19 Scenera Technologies, Llc System and method for selecting and presenting a route to a user
US7983949B1 (en) 2005-10-27 2011-07-19 Google Inc. System and method for selecting targeted information for serving with a map view
US7576754B1 (en) 2005-10-27 2009-08-18 Google Inc. System and method for identifying bounds of a geographical area
US7595725B1 (en) * 2005-10-27 2009-09-29 Google Inc. System and method for identifying geographical areas that significantly overlap a map view
US7991548B2 (en) 2006-04-14 2011-08-02 Scenera Technologies, Llc System and method for presenting a computed route
US9228850B2 (en) 2006-04-14 2016-01-05 Scenera Technologies, Llc System and method for presenting a computed route
US20100161214A1 (en) * 2006-04-14 2010-06-24 Mona Singh System And Method For Presenting A Computed Route
US20110172908A1 (en) * 2006-04-14 2011-07-14 Mona Singh System And Method For Presenting A Computed Route
US8577598B2 (en) 2006-04-14 2013-11-05 Scenera Technologies, Llc System and method for presenting a computed route
US20080051989A1 (en) * 2006-08-25 2008-02-28 Microsoft Corporation Filtering of data layered on mapping applications
US8200432B2 (en) * 2008-04-28 2012-06-12 Navitime Japan Co., Ltd. Route guidance system, route search server, route guidance method, and terminal
US20110040479A1 (en) * 2008-04-28 2011-02-17 Navitime Japan Co., Ltd. Route guidance system, route search server, route guidance method, and terminal
US20090319556A1 (en) * 2008-06-20 2009-12-24 Christopher Richard Stolte Methods and systems of automatically geocoding a dataset for visual analysis
US8306971B2 (en) * 2008-06-20 2012-11-06 Tableau Software, Inc. Methods and systems of automatically geocoding a dataset for visual analysis
US20120246177A1 (en) * 2008-07-14 2012-09-27 Google Inc. Content item selection
US9098590B2 (en) * 2008-07-14 2015-08-04 Google Inc. Content item selection
US9109897B2 (en) 2008-12-17 2015-08-18 International Business Machines Corporation Generating optimal itineraries based on network connectivity
US8948738B2 (en) 2008-12-17 2015-02-03 International Business Machines Corporation Generating alerts based on predicted wireless connection losses
US20100153001A1 (en) * 2008-12-17 2010-06-17 Frederic Bauchot Generating optimal itineraries based on network connectivity
US20100151840A1 (en) * 2008-12-17 2010-06-17 Frederic Bauchot Generating alerts based on predicted wireless connection losses
US8352175B2 (en) * 2008-12-17 2013-01-08 International Business Machines Corporation Generating optimal itineraries based on network connectivity
US9103677B2 (en) 2008-12-17 2015-08-11 International Business Machines Corporation Generating optimal itineraries based on network connectivity
US20110282579A1 (en) * 2009-01-26 2011-11-17 Navitime Japan Co., Ltd. System which mediates providing of map information, server which mediates providing of map information, and method for providing map information
US8359159B2 (en) * 2009-01-26 2013-01-22 Navitime Japan Co., Ltd. System which mediates providing of map information, server which mediates providing of map information, and method for providing map information
US8620532B2 (en) 2009-03-25 2013-12-31 Waldeck Technology, Llc Passive crowd-sourced map updates and alternate route recommendations
US9410814B2 (en) 2009-03-25 2016-08-09 Waldeck Technology, Llc Passive crowd-sourced map updates and alternate route recommendations
US9140566B1 (en) 2009-03-25 2015-09-22 Waldeck Technology, Llc Passive crowd-sourced map updates and alternative route recommendations
US20100262359A1 (en) * 2009-04-14 2010-10-14 Masaki Motoyama Route search method and apparatus for navigation system utilizing map data of XML format
US8150620B2 (en) * 2009-04-14 2012-04-03 Alpine Electronics, Inc. Route search method and apparatus for navigation system utilizing map data of XML format
US20120036229A1 (en) * 2009-04-23 2012-02-09 Navitime Japan Co., Ltd. Route guiding system, route search server, route guiding mediation server and route guiding method
US8532925B2 (en) * 2009-05-08 2013-09-10 Alpine Electronics, Inc. Spatial indexing method and apparatus for navigation system for indexing and retrieval of XML map data
US20100287207A1 (en) * 2009-05-08 2010-11-11 Masaki Motoyama Spatial indexing method and apparatus for navigation system for indexing and retrieval of XML map data
US9223022B2 (en) 2009-07-14 2015-12-29 Navico Holding As Linear and circular downscan imaging sonar
US9541643B2 (en) 2009-07-14 2017-01-10 Navico Holding As Downscan imaging sonar
US10024961B2 (en) 2009-07-14 2018-07-17 Navico Holding As Sonar imaging techniques for objects in an underwater environment
US8633817B2 (en) 2009-10-21 2014-01-21 Qualcomm Incorporated Mapping wireless signals with motion sensors
US20110090081A1 (en) * 2009-10-21 2011-04-21 Qualcomm Incorporated Mapping wireless signals with motion sensors
US9142206B2 (en) 2011-07-14 2015-09-22 Navico Holding As System for interchangeable mounting options for a sonar transducer
US8730264B1 (en) * 2011-09-26 2014-05-20 Google Inc. Determining when image elements intersect
US10247823B2 (en) 2011-12-07 2019-04-02 Navico Holding As Sonar rendering systems and associated methods
US9182486B2 (en) 2011-12-07 2015-11-10 Navico Holding As Sonar rendering systems and associated methods
US9268020B2 (en) 2012-02-10 2016-02-23 Navico Holding As Sonar assembly for reduced interference
US9298079B2 (en) 2012-07-06 2016-03-29 Navico Holding As Sonar preview mode
US9348028B2 (en) 2012-07-06 2016-05-24 Navico Holding As Sonar module using multiple receiving elements
US9354312B2 (en) 2012-07-06 2016-05-31 Navico Holding As Sonar system using frequency bursts
US9244168B2 (en) 2012-07-06 2016-01-26 Navico Holding As Sonar system using frequency bursts
US20140013284A1 (en) * 2012-07-06 2014-01-09 Navico, Inc. Cursor Assist Mode
WO2014008066A1 (en) * 2012-07-06 2014-01-09 Navico Holding As Export user data from defined region
US9442636B2 (en) 2012-07-06 2016-09-13 Navico Holding As Quick split mode
US9846038B2 (en) 2012-07-06 2017-12-19 Navico Holding As Export user data from defined region
US9495065B2 (en) * 2012-07-06 2016-11-15 Navico Holding As Cursor assist mode
US9361693B2 (en) 2012-07-06 2016-06-07 Navico Holding As Adjusting parameters of marine electronics data
US9182239B2 (en) 2012-11-06 2015-11-10 Navico Holding As Displaying laylines
US9482537B2 (en) 2012-11-06 2016-11-01 Navico Holding As Displaying laylines
US9122366B2 (en) 2013-03-15 2015-09-01 Navico Holding As Residue indicators
US9909891B2 (en) 2013-08-14 2018-03-06 Navico Holding As Display of routes to be travelled by a marine vessel
US9572335B2 (en) 2013-08-21 2017-02-21 Navico Holding As Video recording system and methods
US9615562B2 (en) 2013-08-21 2017-04-11 Navico Holding As Analyzing marine trip data
US9992987B2 (en) 2013-08-21 2018-06-12 Navico Holding As Fishing data sharing and display
US10251382B2 (en) 2013-08-21 2019-04-09 Navico Holding As Wearable device for fishing
US9439411B2 (en) 2013-08-21 2016-09-13 Navico Holding As Fishing statistics display
US9596839B2 (en) 2013-08-21 2017-03-21 Navico Holding As Motion capture while fishing
US9507562B2 (en) 2013-08-21 2016-11-29 Navico Holding As Using voice recognition for recording events
US10290124B2 (en) 2013-10-09 2019-05-14 Navico Holding As Sonar depth display
US9720084B2 (en) 2014-07-14 2017-08-01 Navico Holding As Depth display using sonar data
US9829321B2 (en) 2014-09-24 2017-11-28 Navico Holding As Forward depth display
US10114470B2 (en) 2015-08-06 2018-10-30 Navico Holdings As Using motion sensing for controlling a display
US9836129B2 (en) 2015-08-06 2017-12-05 Navico Holding As Using motion sensing for controlling a display
US10151829B2 (en) 2016-02-23 2018-12-11 Navico Holding As Systems and associated methods for producing sonar image overlay

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
US6574554B1 (en) 2003-06-03

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6249742B1 (en) Method and system for providing a preview of a route calculated with a navigation system
JP4198513B2 (en) Map information processing apparatus, the map information processing system, the position information display device, the methods, the programs, and a recording medium storing the programs
JP4353677B2 (en) Geographic database and its use method and system includes data indicating the radio coverage
US6904360B2 (en) Template-based map distribution system
JP5030411B2 (en) Method of operating a navigation system for reporting the impact of the updated portion of the geographic database
CN101699546B (en) Map information updating device and map information updating method
EP1365212B1 (en) System and method for storing geographic data on a physical storage medium
EP1521058B1 (en) Guiding device, system and method
JP4409431B2 (en) Navigation method, a navigation apparatus, and a computer program
US6622090B2 (en) Enhanced inertial measurement unit/global positioning system mapping and navigation process
US6199015B1 (en) Map-based navigation system with overlays
JP4111883B2 (en) Poi information display method, and a navigation system
US7856315B2 (en) Method and system for enabling an off board navigation solution
AU657604B2 (en) Method and apparatus for tracking vehicle location
US20090248758A1 (en) Map update data supplying apparatus, version table, map data updating system, and map update data supplying method
JP4460816B2 (en) Navigation system in accordance with the distributed computing architecture
US6941220B2 (en) Apparatus and method for vehicle navigation
US8352185B2 (en) Method, navigation device, and server for determining a location in a digital map database
US8560228B2 (en) System for displaying points of interest
US5944768A (en) Navigation system
EP1043567B1 (en) Map database
US6615130B2 (en) Real time vehicle guidance and traffic forecasting system
EP1530026B1 (en) Traffic-condition notifying device, system and method
US6937936B2 (en) Navigation system
US6041281A (en) Information guidance system based on structure configuration map

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: EXPRESSLY ABANDONED -- DURING EXAMINATION