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US20040045054A1 - Cotton event pv-ghbk04(531) and compositions and methods for detection thereof - Google Patents

Cotton event pv-ghbk04(531) and compositions and methods for detection thereof Download PDF

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US20040045054A1
US20040045054A1 US10416877 US41687703A US2004045054A1 US 20040045054 A1 US20040045054 A1 US 20040045054A1 US 10416877 US10416877 US 10416877 US 41687703 A US41687703 A US 41687703A US 2004045054 A1 US2004045054 A1 US 2004045054A1
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dna
sequence
id
seq
cotton
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Kim Beazley
Jeanna Hillyard
Shengzhi Pang
James Roberts
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Monsanto Technology LLC
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Monsanto Technology LLC
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01HNEW PLANTS OR PROCESSES FOR OBTAINING THEM; PLANT REPRODUCTION BY TISSUE CULTURE TECHNIQUES
    • A01H5/00Flowering plants, i.e. angiosperms
    • A01H5/10Seeds, e.g. gramineae leguminosae, brassicaceae
    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C12BIOCHEMISTRY; BEER; SPIRITS; WINE; VINEGAR; MICROBIOLOGY; ENZYMOLOGY; MUTATION OR GENETIC ENGINEERING
    • C12NMICROORGANISMS OR ENZYMES; COMPOSITIONS THEREOF; PROPAGATING, PRESERVING OR MAINTAINING MICROORGANISMS; MUTATION OR GENETIC ENGINEERING; CULTURE MEDIA
    • C12N15/00Mutation or genetic engineering; DNA or RNA concerning genetic engineering, vectors, e.g. plasmids, or their isolation, preparation or purification; Use of hosts therefor
    • C12N15/09Recombinant DNA-technology
    • C12N15/63Introduction of foreign genetic material using vectors; Vectors; Use of hosts therefor; Regulation of expression
    • C12N15/79Vectors or expression systems specially adapted for eukaryotic hosts
    • C12N15/82Vectors or expression systems specially adapted for eukaryotic hosts for plant cells, e.g. plant artificial chromosomes (PACs)
    • C12N15/8241Phenotypically and genetically modified plants via recombinant DNA technology
    • C12N15/8261Phenotypically and genetically modified plants via recombinant DNA technology with agronomic (input) traits, e.g. crop yield
    • C12N15/8271Phenotypically and genetically modified plants via recombinant DNA technology with agronomic (input) traits, e.g. crop yield for stress resistance, e.g. heavy metal resistance
    • C12N15/8279Phenotypically and genetically modified plants via recombinant DNA technology with agronomic (input) traits, e.g. crop yield for stress resistance, e.g. heavy metal resistance for biotic stress resistance, pathogen resistance, disease resistance
    • C12N15/8286Phenotypically and genetically modified plants via recombinant DNA technology with agronomic (input) traits, e.g. crop yield for stress resistance, e.g. heavy metal resistance for biotic stress resistance, pathogen resistance, disease resistance for insect resistance
    • Y02A40/162
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S435/00Chemistry: molecular biology and microbiology
    • Y10S435/975Kit

Abstract

The present invention provides assays for detecting the presence of the 531 cotton event nucleic acid sequences in a biological sample based on the DNA sequence of the recombinant construct inserted into the cotton genome and of genomic sequences flanking the insertion site in a cotton genome.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application claims the benefit of priority to U.S. Provisional Application Serial No. 60/252,124 filed on Nov. 20, 2000.
  • FIELD OF THE INVENTION
  • [0002]
    The present invention relates to the field of plant molecular biology, more specifically the invention relates to cotton event 531, and to assays for detecting the presence of cotton event 531 in a sample.
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • [0003]
    This invention relates to the lepidopteran resistant cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) plant 531 is and to the detection of the transgene/genomic insertion regions in cotton plant 531 and progeny thereof. The present invention relates to the field of plant molecular biology, more specifically the invention relates to identification of nucleic acids from the transgenic cotton event 531, preferably to assays for detecting the presence of cotton event 531 in a sample and compositions thereof.
  • [0004]
    Cotton is an important fiber crop in many areas of the world. The methods of biotechnology have been applied to cotton for improvement of the agronomic traits and the quality of the product. The method of introducing transgenes into cotton plants is demonstrated in U.S. Pat. No. 5,004,863. One such agronomic trait important in cotton production is resistance to lepidopteran insect damage. This trait has been introduced into cotton plants and is a successful product now used in cotton production. The expression of foreign genes in plants is known to be influenced by their chromosomal position, perhaps due to chromatin structure (e.g., heterochromatin) or the proximity of transcriptional regulation elements (e.g., enhancers) close to the integration site (Weising et al., Ann. Rev. Genet 22:421-477, 1988). For this reason, it is often necessary to screen a large number of events in order to identify an event characterized by optimal expression of a introduced gene of interest. For example, it has been observed in plants and in other organisms that there may be a wide variation in levels of expression of one or more exogenously introduced genes among events. There may also be differences in spatial or temporal patterns of expression, for example, differences in the relative expression of a transgene in various plant tissues, that may not correspond to the patterns expected from transcriptional regulatory elements present in the introduced gene construct For this reason, it is common to produce hundreds to thousands of different events and screen those events for a single event that exhibits the desired transgene expression levels and patterns for commercial purposes. An event that exhibits such desired levels or patterns of transgene expression is useful for introgressing the transgene into other genetic backgrounds by sexual outcrossing using conventional breeding methods. Progeny of such crosses maintain the transgene expression characteristics of the original transformant. This strategy is used to ensure reliable gene expression in a number of varieties that are well adapted to local growing conditions.
  • [0005]
    It would be advantageous to be able to detect the presence of a particular event in order to determine whether progeny of a sexual cross contain a transgene of interest. In addition, a method for detecting a particular event would be helpful for complying with regulations requiring the pre-market approval and labeling of foods derived from recombinant crop plants, for example. It is possible to detect the presence of a transgene by any well known nucleic acid detection method such as nucleic acid amplification techniques or nucleic acid hybridization using nucleic acid probes. These detection methods generally focus on frequently used genetic elements, such as promoters, terminators, marker genes, etc. As a result, such methods may not be useful for discriminating between different events, particularly those produced using the same, similar, or substantially related nucleic acid constructs unless the sequence of chromosomal DNA adjacent to the inserted DNA (“flanking DNA”) is known. An event-specific thermal amplification assay is discussed, for example, by Windels et al. (Med. Fac. Landbouww, Univ. Gent 64/5b: 459-462, 1999), who identified glyphosate tolerant soybean event 40-3-2 using a primer set spanning the junction between the inserted heterologous DNA and flanking chromosomal DNA, specifically one primer that included sequence from the insert and a second primer that included sequence from flanking DNA, to produce an amplicon which proved to be diagnostic for the event.
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • [0006]
    According to an aspect of the invention, compositions and methods are provided for detecting the presence of various transgene/genomic insertion regions from a cotton plant designated PV-GHBK04, also known herein as cotton event 531. DNA sequences are provided that comprise at least one junction sequence of 531 identified as SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 32, and complements thereof; wherein a junction sequence spans the junction between heterologous DNA inserted into the genome and the DNA from the cotton cell flanking the insertion site and is diagnostic for the event.
  • [0007]
    This invention relates to the seeds and to the progeny of cotton event 531, and to methods for detecting nucleic acids contained within and produced by the event 531 in a biological or commercial sample.
  • [0008]
    According to another aspect of the invention, methods of producing a lepidopteran resistant cotton plant are provided that comprise the steps of: (a) sexually crossing a first parental cotton line comprising cotton event 531 DNA that exhibits a trait which confers resistance to one or more lepidopteran insect species upon the event, with a second parental cotton line that does not exhibit lepidopteran insect resistance, thereby producing a plurality of progeny plants; and (b) selecting a progeny plant that exhibits resistance to one or more lepidopteran insect species. The methods are useful for introgressing the lepidopteran resistance trait into different genetic backgrounds. Such methods may optionally comprise a further step of back-crossing the progeny plant to the second parental cotton line to produce a cotton plant that is also lepidopteran resistant.
  • [0009]
    According to another aspect of the invention, the DNA sequences that comprise at least 11 or more contiguous nucleotides of the DNA sequence of SEQ ID NO: SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 32, SEQ ID NO: 12, SEQ ID NO: 13, SEQ ID NO: 17, SEQ ID NO: 18, SEQ ID NO: 19, SEQ ID NO: 20, SEQ ID NO: 21, SEQ ID NO: 22, SEQ ID NO: 23, SEQ ID NO: 24, SEQ ID NO: 25, SEQ ID NO: 26, SEQ ID NO: 27, SEQ ID NO: 28 and complements thereof for use as DNA primers in DNA amplification methods. The amplicons produced using these primers are diagnostic for cotton event 531 .
  • [0010]
    The amplicons produced by said DNA primers are an aspect of the invention.
  • [0011]
    According to another aspect of the invention, methods of detecting the presence of DNA corresponding to the cotton event 531 event in a sample are provided. Such methods comprise: (a) contacting the sample comprising DNA with a primer set that, when used in a nucleic acid amplification reaction with DNA from cotton event 531, produces an amplicon that is diagnostic for cotton event 531 nucleic acids in a sample; (b) performing a nucleic acid amplification reaction, thereby producing the amplicon; and (c) detecting the amplicon.
  • [0012]
    According to another aspect of the invention, methods of detecting the presence of a DNA corresponding to the 531 event in a sample, such methods comprising: (a) contacting the sample comprising DNA with a probe that hybridizes under stringent hybridization conditions with DNA from cotton event 531 (i.e., does not hybridize to nucleic acid sequences which are other than DNA from cotton event 531 ) and does not hybridize under the stringent hybridization conditions with a control cotton plant (non-531 DNA); (b) subjecting the sample and probe to stringent hybridization conditions; and (c) detecting hybridization of the probe to the DNA.
  • [0013]
    The foregoing and other aspects of the invention will become more apparent from the following detailed description and accompanying drawings.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0014]
    [0014]FIG. 1 is a schematic representation of the inserted heterologous DNA in cotton event 531 representing the arrangement of the DNA inserted at a single genome locus and containing (i) A, at the indicated 3′ end a cassette comprising a full length functional inserted DNA sequence from plasmid PV-GHBK04 including an nptII coding sequence and a cry1A coding sequence, and at the indicated 5′ end a partial cry1A coding sequence and 7S 3′ termination sequence inverted with reference to the sequence within the full length functional inserted DNA sequence; and (ii) B, a partial 7S 3′ sequence which is not physically linked to the cotton event 531 ; wherein vertical serrated lines indicate junctions between heterologous inserted DNA and plant genomic DNA, arrows within the genetic elements imply the direction of transcription orientation, and triangles represent the border region of T-DNA sequences.
  • [0015]
    [0015]FIG. 2 illustrates the results of thermal amplification analysis of the 5′ and 3′ insert to plant junctions of the full length functional inserted DNA in cotton event 531, performed on genomic DNA isolated from cotton event 531 seed tissue by pairing an insert and a flanking sequence primer specific to the 5′-end of the insert (Panel A, Primers C and D, respectively) or the 3′-end of the insert (Panel B, Primers A and B, respectively); Lanes 2, 3 and 4 contain the product generated from cotton event 531 genomic DNA template, control reactions containing no template DNA (Lane 6), and Coker 312 non-transgenic control DNA (Lane 5); the location of the primers used in the analyses appear as small arrows below the illustration of the inserted DNA below the panels; triangles represent the T-DNA sequence.
  • [0016]
    [0016]FIG. 3 illustrates the results of thermal amplification analysis of a portion of the 7S 3′ sequence in cotton event 531, performed on genomic DNA isolated from cotton event 531 seed tissue by pairing an insert and a flanking sequence primer specific to the 5′-end of the insert (Panel A, Primers E and F, respectively) or the 3′-end of the insert (Panel B, Primers G and H. respectively); primers are denoted as small arrows below the diagram of the inserted DNA below the panels; Lanes 2, 3 and 4 contain the product generated from genomic DNA template of cotton event 531 ; control reactions containing no template (Lane 6), and Coker 312 non-transgenic control DNA (Lane 5); triangle represents T-DNA sequence.
  • DESCRIPTION OF THE SEQUENCES
  • [0017]
    SEQ ID NO: 1 corresponds to a junction sequence which is diagnostic for the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the full length primary functional inserted DNA sequence in cotton event 531.
  • [0018]
    SEQ ID NO: 2 corresponds to a junction sequence which is diagnostic for the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end of the partial cry1Ac DNA coding sequence inserted in cotton event 531.
  • [0019]
    SEQ ID NO: 3 corresponds to a junction sequence which is diagnostic for the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end of the full length primary functional inserted DNA sequence in cotton event 531.
  • [0020]
    SEQ ID NO: 4 corresponds to a junction sequence which is diagnostic for the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the partial 7S 3′ plant transcription termination and polyadenylation sequence inserted into the genome in cotton event 531.
  • [0021]
    SEQ ID NO: 5 corresponds to the sequence of the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end of the partial cry1Ac DNA coding sequence inserted in cotton event 531.
  • [0022]
    SEQ ID NO: 6 corresponds to the cotton genome DNA sequence which is adjacent to and flanking the 5′ end of the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end of the partial cry1Ac DNA coding sequence inserted in cotton event 531.
  • [0023]
    SEQ ID NO: 7 corresponds to cotton genome DNA sequence which is adjacent to and flanking the 5′ end of the full length primary functional inserted DNA sequence in cotton event 531.
  • [0024]
    SEQ ID NO: 8 corresponds to the DNA sequence of the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end of the full length primary functional inserted DNA in cotton event 531.
  • [0025]
    SEQ ID NO: 9 corresponds to the cotton genome sequence adjacent to and flanking the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the partial 7S 3′ plant transcription termination and polyadenylation sequence inserted into the genome in cotton event 531.
  • [0026]
    SEQ ID NO: 10 corresponds to DNA sequence of the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the full length primary functional inserted DNA in cotton event 531.
  • [0027]
    SEQ ID NO: 11 corresponds to the cotton genome DNA sequence adjacent to and flanking the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the full length primary functional inserted DNA in cotton event 531.
  • [0028]
    SEQ ID NO: 12 corresponds to a primer sequence complementary to a part of the cotton genomic DNA sequence identified as flanking the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the full length primary functional inserted DNA sequence in cotton event 531, and produces amplicon diagnostic for cotton event 531 DNA in a sample when paired with a primer corresponding to the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 13 and cotton event 531 template DNA.
  • [0029]
    SEQ ID NO: 13 corresponds to a primer sequence complementary to a part of the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end sequence of the full length primary functional DNA inserted into the cotton genome in cotton event 531, and produces an amplicon diagnostic for cotton event 531 DNA in a sample when paired with a primer corresponding to the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 12 and cotton event 531 template DNA.
  • [0030]
    SEQ ID NO: 14 corresponds to a sequence diagnostic for cotton event 531 DNA in a biological sample.
  • [0031]
    SEQ ID NO: 15 corresponds to a sequence diagnostic for cotton event 531 DNA in a biological sample.
  • [0032]
    SEQ ID NO: 16 corresponds to a sequence diagnostic for cotton event 531 DNA in a biological sample.
  • [0033]
    SEQ ID NO: 17 corresponds to Primer A, a sequence which is or is complementary to a sequence within the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the full length functional inserted DNA in event 531.
  • [0034]
    SEQ ID NO: 18 corresponds to Primer B, a sequence which is or is complementary to a sequence within the 3′ end flanking cotton genome sequence near the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the full length functional inserted DNA in event 531.
  • [0035]
    SEQ ID NO: 19 corresponds to Primer C, a sequence which is or is complementary to a sequence within the sequence in event 531 which is arbitrarily assigned as the 5′ end of the inserted sequence linked to the full length functional inserted DNA.
  • [0036]
    SEQ ID NO: 20 corresponds to Primer D, a sequence which is or is complementary to a sequence within a part of the 5′ end flanking cotton genome sequence near the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end of the partial cry1A coding sequence, which is linked 5′ to the full length functional inserted DNA in event 531.
  • [0037]
    SEQ ID NO: 21 corresponds to Primer E, a sequence which is or is complementary to the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the partial 7S 3′ sequence inserted into the cotton genome in event 531.
  • [0038]
    SEQ ID NO: 22 corresponds to Primer F, a sequence which is or is complementary to a part of the 5′ end flanking cotton genome sequence near the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end of the partial 7S 3′ sequence inserted into the cotton genome in event 531.
  • [0039]
    SEQ ID NO: 23 corresponds to Primer G, a sequence which is or is complementary to the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end of the partial 7S 3′ sequence inserted into the cotton genome in event 531.
  • [0040]
    SEQ ID NO: 24 corresponds to Primer H, a sequence which is or is complementary to a part of the 3′ end flanking cotton genome sequence near the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the partial 7S 3′ sequence inserted into the cotton genome in event 531.
  • [0041]
    SEQ ID NO: 25 corresponds to Primer I, a sequence which is or is complementary to a part of the 5′ end flanking cotton genome sequence near the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end of the partial cry1A coding sequence inserted into the genome of cotton event 531.
  • [0042]
    SEQ ID NO: 26 corresponds to Primer J, a sequence which is or is complementary to a part of the 3′ end flanking cotton genome sequence near the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the full length functional inserted DNA in cotton event 531.
  • [0043]
    SEQ ID NO: 27 corresponds to Primer K, a sequence which is or is complementary to a sequence within the 5′ flanking cotton genome sequence near the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end of the partial 7S 3′ sequence present in event 531.
  • [0044]
    SEQ ID NO: 28 corresponds to Primer L, a sequence which is or is complementary to a sequence within the 3′ flanking cotton genome sequence near the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the partial 7S 3′ sequence present in event 531.
  • [0045]
    SEQ ID NO: 29 corresponds to an amplicon sequence produced using primers corresponding to SEQ ID NO: 27 and SEQ ID NO: 28 together with native cotton template DNA.
  • [0046]
    SEQ ID NO: 30 corresponds to an amplicon sequence produced using primers corresponding to SEQ ID NO: 25 and SEQ ID NO: 26 together with native cotton template DNA.
  • [0047]
    SEQ ID NO: 31 corresponds to the nucleotide sequence of a part of the cotton genome flanking the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end of the partial 7S 3′ DNA sequence inserted into the cotton genome in event 531.
  • [0048]
    SEQ ID NO: 32 corresponds to a sequence which is diagnostic for the presence of event 531 DNA in a biological sample, nucleotides 1-10 corresponding to the first 10 cotton genome nucleotides adjacent to and flanking the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end of the partial 7S 3′ sequence inserted into the genome in event 531, nucleotides 11-20 corresponding to the first ten nucleotides within the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end of the partial 7S 3′ sequence inserted into the genome in event 531.
  • [0049]
    SEQ ID NO: 33 corresponds to the partial 7S 3′ sequence inserted present in event 531, along with a part of the 5and 3′ cotton genome flanking sequences.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS
  • [0050]
    The following definitions and methods are provided to better define the present invention and to guide those of ordinary skill in the art in the practice of the present invention. Unless otherwise noted, terms are to be understood according to conventional usage by those of ordinary skill in the relevant art. Definitions of common terms in molecular biology may also be found in Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th edition, Springer-Verlag: New York, 1991; and Lewin, Genes V, Oxford University Press: New York, 1994. The nomenclature for DNA bases as set forth at 37 CFR § 1.822 is used.
  • [0051]
    As used herein, the term “biological sample”, or “sample”, is intended to include nucleic acids, polynucleotides, DNA, RNA, tRNA, cDNA, and the like in a composition or fixed to a substrate which enables the sample to be subjected to molecular probe analysis or thermal amplification using oligonucleotide probes and/or primers.
  • [0052]
    As used herein, the term “cotton” means Gossypium hirsutum and includes all plant varieties that can be bred with cotton, including wild cotton species.
  • [0053]
    As used herein, the term “comprising” means “including but not limited to”.
  • [0054]
    A transgenic “event” is produced by transformation of plant cells with heterologous DNA, i.e., a nucleic acid construct that includes a transgene of interest, regeneration of a population of plants resulting from the insertion of the transgene into the genome of the plant, and selection of a particular plant characterized by insertion into a particular genome location. The term “event” refers to the original transformant and progeny of the transformant that include the heterologous DNA. The term “event” also refers to progeny produced by a sexual outcross between the transformant and another variety that include the heterologous DNA. Even after repeated back-crossing to a recurrent parent, the inserted DNA and flanking DNA from the transformed parent is present in the progeny of the cross at the same chromosomal location. The term “event” also refers to DNA from the original transformant comprising the inserted DNA and flanking genomic sequence immediately adjacent to the inserted DNA that would be expected to be transferred to a progeny that receives inserted DNA including the transgene of interest as the result of a sexual cross of one parental line that includes the inserted DNA (e.g., the original transformant and progeny resulting from selfing) and a parental line that does not contain the inserted DNA.
  • [0055]
    It is also to be understood that two different transgenic plants can also be mated to produce offspring that contain two independently segregating added, exogenous genes. Selfing of appropriate progeny can produce plants that are homozygous for both added, exogenous genes. Back-crossing to a parental plant and out-crossing with a non-transgenic plant are also contemplated, as is vegetative propagation. Descriptions of other breeding methods that are commonly used for different traits and crops can be found in one of several references, e.g., Fehr, in Breeding Methods for Cultivar Development, Wilcox J. ed., American Society of Agronomy, Madison Wis. (1987). Backcross breeding has been used to transfer genes for a simply inherited, highly heritable trait into a desirable homozygous cultivar, inbred line, or elite germplasm which is the recurrent parent. The source of the trait to be transferred is called the donor parent. The resulting plant is expected to have the attributes of the recurrent parent (e.g., cultivar) and the desirable trait transferred from the donor parent. After the initial cross, individuals possessing the phenotype of the donor parent are selected and repeatedly crossed (backcrossed) to the recurrent parent. The resulting parent is expected to have the attributes of the recurrent parent (e.g., cultivar) and the desirable trait transferred from the donor parent.
  • [0056]
    A “probe” is an isolated nucleic acid to which is attached a conventional detectable label or reporter molecule, e.g., a radioactive isotope, ligand, chemiluminescent agent, or enzyme. Such a probe is complementary to a strand of a target nucleic acid, in the case of the present invention, to a strand of genomic DNA from cotton event 531 whether from a cotton plant or from a sample that includes DNA from the event. Probes according to the present invention include not only deoxyribonucleic or ribonucleic acids but also polyamides and other probe materials that bind specifically to a target DNA sequence and can be used to detect the presence of that target DNA sequence.
  • [0057]
    “Primers” are isolated nucleic acids that are annealed to a complementary target DNA strand by nucleic acid hybridization to form a hybrid between the primer and the target DNA strand, and then extended along the target DNA strand by a polymerase, e.g., a DNA polymerase. Primer pairs of the present invention refer to their use for amplification of a target nucleic acid sequence, e.g., by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or other conventional nucleic-acid amplification methods.
  • [0058]
    Probes and primers are generally about 11 nucleotides or more in length, preferably 18 nucleotides or more, more preferably 24 nucleotides or more, and most preferably 30 nucleotides or more. Such probes and primers hybridize specifically to a target sequence under high stringency hybridization conditions. Preferably, probes and primers according to the present invention have complete sequence similarity with the target sequence, although probes differing from the target sequence and that retain the ability to hybridize to target sequences may be designed by conventional methods. Primers and probes are often interchangeable, and so primers may be used as probes and probes may be used as primers where effective. One skilled in the art would know how and when to use a probe as a primer and how and when to use a primer as a probe.
  • [0059]
    Methods for preparing and using probes and primers are described, for example, in Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual, 2nd ed., vol. 1-3, ed. Sambrook et al., Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y., 1989 (hereinafter, “Sambrook et al., 1989”); Current Protocols in Molecular Biology, ed. Ausubel et al., Greene Publishing and Wiley-Interscience, New York, 1992 (with periodic updates) (hereinafter, “Ausubel et al., 1992”); and Innis et al., PCR Protocols: A Guide to Methods and Applications, Academic Press: San Diego, 1990. Thermal amplification primers can be derived from a known sequence, for example, by using computer programs intended for that purpose such as Primer (Version 0.5, © 1991, Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, Mass.).
  • [0060]
    Primers and probes based on the flanking DNA and inserted heterologous sequences disclosed herein can be used to confirm (and, if necessary, to correct) the disclosed sequences by conventional methods, e.g., by re-cloning and sequencing such flanking DNA and inserted sequences.
  • [0061]
    The nucleic acid probes and primers of the present invention hybridize under stringent conditions to a target DNA sequence. Any conventional nucleic acid hybridization or amplification method can be used to identify the presence of DNA from a transgenic event in a sample. Nucleic acid molecules or fragments thereof are capable of specifically hybridizing to other nucleic acid molecules under certain circumstances. As used herein, two nucleic acid molecules are said to be capable of specifically hybridizing to one another if the two molecules are capable of forming an anti-parallel, double-stranded nucleic acid structure. A nucleic acid molecule is said to be the “complement” of another nucleic acid molecule if they exhibit complete complementarity. As used herein, molecules are said to exhibit “complete complementarity” when every nucleotide of one of the molecules is complementary to a nucleotide of the other. Two molecules are said to be “minimally complementary” if they can hybridize to one another with sufficient stability to permit them to remain annealed to one another under at least conventional “low-stringency” conditions. Similarly, the molecules are said to be “complementary” if they can hybridize to one another with sufficient stability to permit them to remain annealed to one another under conventional “high-stringency” conditions. Conventional stringency conditions are described by Sambrook et al., 1989, and by Haymes et al., In: Nucleic Acid Hybridization, A Practical Approach, IRL Press, Washington, D.C. (1985), Departures from complete complementarity are therefore permissible, as long as such departures do not completely preclude the capacity of the molecules to form a double-stranded structure. In order for a nucleic acid molecule to serve as a primer or probe it need only be sufficiently complementary in sequence to be able to form a stable double-stranded structure under the particular solvent and salt concentrations employed.
  • [0062]
    As used herein, a substantially homologous sequence is a nucleic acid sequence that will specifically hybridize to the complement of the nucleic acid sequence to which it is being compared under high stringency conditions. Appropriate stringency conditions which promote DNA hybridization, for example, 6.0×sodium chloride/sodium citrate (SSC) at about 45° C., followed by a wash of 2.0×SSC at 50° C., are known to those skilled in the art or can be found in Current Protocols in Molecular Biology, John Wiley & Sons, N.Y. (1989), 6.3.1-6.3.6. For example, the salt concentration in the wash step can be selected from a low stringency of about 2.0×SSC at 50° C. to a high stringency of about 0.2×SSC at 50° C. In addition, the temperature in the wash step can be increased from low stringency conditions at room temperature, about 22° C., to high stringency conditions at about 65° C. Both temperature and salt may be varied, or either the temperature or the salt concentration may be held constant while the other variable is changed. In a preferred embodiment, a nucleic acid of the present invention will specifically hybridize to one or more of the nucleic acid molecules set forth in SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, and SEQ ID NO: 32 or complements thereof or fragments of either under moderately stringent conditions, for example at about 2.0×SSC and about 65° C. In a particularly preferred embodiment, a nucleic acid of the present invention will specifically hybridize to one or more of the nucleic acid molecules set forth in SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, and SEQ ID NO: 32 or complements or fragments of either under high stringency conditions. In one aspect of the present invention, a preferred marker nucleic acid molecule of the present invention has the nucleic acid sequence set forth SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 32, SEQ ID NO: 14, SEQ ID NO: 15, SEQ ID NO: 16, and SEQ ID NO: 21 or complements thereof or fragments of either. In another aspect of the present invention, a preferred diagnostic marker nucleic acid molecule of the present invention shares between from about 80% to about 100% or from about 90% to about 100% sequence identity with the nucleic acid sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 1, 2, 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 32, SEQ ID NO: 14, SEQ ID NO: 15, SEQ ID NO: 16, and SEQ ID NO: 21 or complement thereof or fiagments of either. In a further aspect of the present invention, a preferred marker nucleic acid molecule of the present invention shares between from about 95% to about 100% sequence identity with the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 32, SEQ ID NO: 14, SEQ ID NO: 15, SEQ ID NO: 16, and SEQ ID NO: 21 or complements thereof or fragments of either. SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 32, SEQ ID NO: 14, SEQ ID NO: 15, SEQ ID NO: 16, and SEQ ID NO: 21 and complements thereof may be used as markers in plant breeding methods to identify the progeny of genetic crosses similar to the methods described for simple sequence repeat DNA marker analysis, in “DNA markers: Protocols, applications, and overviews: (1997) 173-185, Cregan, et al., eds., Wiley-Liss NY; all of which is herein incorporated by reference in its' entirely. The hybridization of the probe to the target DNA molecule can be detected by any number of methods known to those skilled in the art, these can include, but are not limited to, fluorescent tags, radioactive tags, antibody based tags, and chemiluminescent tags.
  • [0063]
    Regarding the amplification of a target nucleic acid sequence (e.g., by a thermal amplification means) using a particular amplification primer pair, “stringent conditions” are conditions that permit the primer pair to hybridize only to the target nucleic-acid sequence to which a primer having the corresponding wild-type sequence (or its complement) would bind and preferably to produce a unique amplification product, the amplicon, in a DNA thermal amplification reaction.
  • [0064]
    The term “specific for (a target sequence)” indicates that a probe or primer hybridizes under stringent hybridization conditions only to the target sequence in a sample comprising the target sequence.
  • [0065]
    As used herein, an “isolated” nucleic acid is one that has been substantially separated or purified away from other nucleic acid sequences in the cell of the organism in which the nucleic acid naturally occurs, i.e., other chromosomal and extrachromosomal DNA and RNA, by conventional nucleic acid-purification methods. The term also embraces recombinant nucleic acids and chemically synthesized nucleic acids.
  • [0066]
    As used herein, “transformation” refers to the transfer of a nucleic acid fragment into the genome of a host organism such as a host plant, resulting in genetically stable inheritance. Host plants containing the transformed nucleic acid fragments are referred to as “transgenic plants”.
  • [0067]
    As used herein, the term “diagnostic” refers to the fact that, for the purposes of identifying nucleic acid sequences as those contained within or derived from cotton event 531, any one or more of the novel DNA sequences set forth herein comprise the cotton genome flanking sequences adjacent to and linked to the arbitrarily assigned ends of the inserted heterologous DNA sequences are necessary and sufficient as being descriptive as a distinguishing characteristic of the event 531 genome, so long as the sequence comprises at least a part of one of the ends of the inserted heterologous DNA sequence or the cotton genome sequence flanking or adjacent to one of these ends and includes at least the two nucleotides, the di-nucleotide, comprising the point at which the cotton genome sequence and the inserted heterologous DNA sequence are linked together by a phosphodiester bond. It is well known in the art that a sequence which is diagnostic for a particular event, such as those disclosed herein for event 531, which is not present in a particular sample containing nucleic acids, is indicative that the sample does not contain the diagnostic sequence and therefore the nucleic acids in the sample are not or were not derived from and have not been contained within the genome of is cotton event 531 . In addition, additional novel and diagnostic sequences are present within cotton event 531 DNA as exemplified herein selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 32, SEQ ID NO: 14, SEQ ID NO: 15, SEQ ID NO: 16, and SEQ ID NO: 21 and complements thereof.
  • [0068]
    As used herein, “amplified DNA” or “amplicon” refers to the product of nucleic-acid amplification of a target nucleic acid sequence that is part of a nucleic acid template. For example, to determine whether the cotton plant resulting from a sexual cross contains transgenic event genomic DNA from the cotton plant of the present invention, DNA extracted from a cotton plant tissue sample may be subjected to nucleic acid amplification method using a primer pair that includes a first primer derived from sequences in the genome of the plant which are adjacent to one end of the inserted heterologous DNA sequence, and a second primer derived from sequences within the inserted heterologous DNA sequence, to produce an amplicon that is diagnostic for the presence of the event DNA. The amplicon is of a length and has a sequence that is also diagnostic for the event. The amplicon contains at least the dinucleotide sequence comprising the two nucleotides forming the link between one end of the inserted heterologous DNA and the first nucleotide within the native genome DNA sequence which is immediately adjacent to the end of the inserted heterologous DNA sequence as well as the combined sequences of the first and the second primers. The amplicon may range in length from about five hundred nucleotide base pairs, to about three hundred nucleotide base pairs, to about two hundred nucleotide base pairs, to about fifty nucleotide base pairs, to about the combined length of the primer pairs plus one nucleotide base pair. Alternatively, a primer pair can be derived from flanking sequence within the cotton plant genome sequences linked to both ends of the inserted heterologous DNA sequence so as to produce an amplicon that includes the entire insert nucleotide sequence. A member of a primer pair which is derived from the plant genomic sequence may be located a distance from either end of the inserted DNA sequence, and this distance can range from one nucleotide base pair up to about twenty thousand nucleotide base pairs. In addition, and particular to cotton event 531, are sequences which are diagnostic for the event selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 32, SEQ ID NO: 14, SEQ ID NO: 15, SEQ ID NO: 16, and SEQ ID NO: 21. The use of the term “amplicon” specifically excludes primer dimers that may be formed in the DNA thermal amplification reaction.
  • [0069]
    Nucleic-acid amplification can be accomplished by any of the various nucleic-acid amplification methods known in the art, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A variety of amplification methods are known in the art and are described, inter alia, in U.S. Pat. Nos. 4,683,195 and 4,683,202 and in PCR Protocols: A Guide to Methods and Applications, ed. Innis et al., Academic Press, San Diego, 1990. Thermal amplification methods have been developed to amplify up to 22 kb of genomic DNA and up to 42 kb of bacteriophage DNA (Cheng et al., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91:5695-5699, 1994). These methods as well as other methods known in the art of DNA amplification may be used in the practice of the present invention. The sequence of the heterologous DNA insert or flanking sequence from cotton event 531 can be verified (and corrected if necessary) by amplifying such sequences from the event using primers derived from the sequences provided herein followed by standard DNA sequencing of the amplification products.
  • [0070]
    The amplicon produced by these methods may be detected by a plurality of techniques. One such method is Genetic Bit Analysis (Nikiforov, et al. Nucleic Acid Res. 22:4167-4175, 1994) in which an oligonucleotide is designed which overlaps both the adjacent flanking genomic DNA sequence and the inserted DNA sequence. The oligonucleotide is immobilized in wells of a microwell plate. Following thermal amplification of the region of interest (using a first primer complementary to a part of the inserted sequence and second primer complimentary to a part of the adjacent flanking genomic sequence), a single-stranded amplicon can be used to hybridize to the immobilized oligonucleotide and serve as a template for a single base extension reaction using a DNA polymerase and labelled ddNTPs specific for the expected next base, as determined by fluorescent or immunological based detection methods. A positive signal indicates the presence of the insert/flanking sequence in the sample and is diagnostic for the presence of the event 531 nucleic acid.
  • [0071]
    Another method for detecting the amplicon diagnostic for the event 531 nucleic acid in a sample is the Pyrosequencing technique as described by Winge (Innov. Pharma. Tech. 00:18-24, 2000). In this method an oligonucleotide is designed that overlaps the adjacent genomic DNA and insert DNA junction. The oligonucleotide is hybridized to a single-stranded amplicon from the region of interest (amplicon produced using a first primer complimentary to a sequence within the inserted heterologous DNA sequence and a second primer complimentary to a sequence within the flanking genomic sequence) and incubated in the presence of a DNA polymerase, ATP, sulfurylase, luciferase, apyrase, adenosine 5′ phosphosulfate and luciferin. dNTPs are added individually and incorporation results in the production of photons of light which are detected and measured, and which is diagnostic for the event 531 nucleic acid sequence in a sample.
  • [0072]
    Fluorescence Polarization as described by Chen, et al., (Genome Res. 9:492-498, 1999) is a method useful for detecting the diagnostic amplicon of the present invention. Using this method, an oligonucleotide is designed which overlaps the junction of the genomic flanking sequence and inserted DNA sequence. The oligonucleotide is hybridized to a single-stranded thermal amplification product from the region of interest (using a first primer complementary to a part of the inserted heterologous DNA sequence and a second primer complimentary to a part of the genomic DNA sequence flanking the proximal terminal end of the inserted heterologous DNA sequence) and incubated in the presence of a DNA polymerase and a ddNTP labeled with a fluorophore which emits a particular wavelength of light (emission spectrum) upon excitation with light of a wavelength different from the emission spectrum (excitation spectrum). Single base extension results in incorporation of the fluorphore labeled ddNTP. Incorporation can be measured as a change in fluorescence polarization using a fluorimeter. A change in fluorescence polarization indicates the presence of the transgene insert/flanking sequence within the amplicon due to successful amplification, hybridization, and single base extension, and is diagnostic for the event 531 nucleic acid in a sample.
  • [0073]
    Taqman® (PE Applied Biosystems, Foster City, Calif.) is described as a method of detecting and quantifying the presence of a DNA sequence and sufficiently described in the instructions provided by the manufacturer. Briefly, a FRET (fluorescence resonance emissions tagged) oligonucleotide probe is designed which overlaps the junction at which the reference cotton genomic DNA sequence flanking one end of the inserted heterologous DNA sequence and the end of the inserted heterologous DNA most proximal to the reference cotton genomic DNA sequence are linked. The FRET probe and thermal amplification primers (a first primer complementary to a part of the inserted heterologous DNA sequence and a second primer complementary to a part of the adjacent or flanking cotton genomic DNA sequence) are cycled in the presence of a thermostable polymerase and dNTPs. Hybridization of the FRET probe results in cleavage and release of the fluorescent moiety away from the quenching moiety on the FRET probe. A fluorescent signal indicates the presence of the flanking/transgene insert sequence due to successful amplification and hybridization, and is diagnostic for the presence of the event 531 nucleotide sequence in a sample.
  • [0074]
    Molecular Beacons have been described for use in sequence detection as described in Tyangi, et al. (Nature Biotech.14:303-308, 1996) Briefly, a FRET oligonucleotide probe is designed that overlaps the flanking genomic and insert DNA junction. The unique structure of the FRET probe results in a probe exhibiting a secondary structure that maintains the fluorescent and quenching moieties in close proximity. The FRET probe and thermal amplification primers (one primer in the insert DNA sequence and one in the flanking genomic sequence) are cycled in the presence of a thermostable polymerase and dNTPs. Following successful thermal amplification of the amplicon diagnostic for the event 531 DNA sequence, hybridization of the FRET probe to the target sequence results in the removal of the probe secondary structure and spatial separation of the fluorescent and quenching moieties. A fluorescent signal results. A fluorescent signal indicates the presence of the flanking/transgene insert sequence due to successful amplification and hybridization, and is diagnostic for the event 531 nucleic acid in a sample.
  • [0075]
    Ligase chain reaction is also contemplated as being diagnostic for the event 531 nucleic acids in a sample.
  • [0076]
    All of the above methods can be modified to determine the zygosity of a particular sample of nucleic acids derived from a single source. For example, a cotton event 531 plant which is homozygous for the event 531 allele contains within its genome two copies of the event 531 allele characteristic of and diagnostic for the cotton event 531 genome, and thus when selfed would breed true. Alternatively, a cotton event 531 homozygous plant can be crossed with another variety of cotton, and the result of that cross would be plants that were heterozygous for the event 531 allele. Methods are envisioned in which one skilled in the art could determine the zygosity of a particular plant with reference to the event 531 allele. This method requires at least three oligonucleotide sequences as set forth herein. For example, a heterozygosity assay comprising a thermal amplification reaction comprising event 531 nucleic acid sequences in a sample as the template and Primer K (SEQ ID NO: 27) and Primer L (SEQ ID NO: 28) described herein would produce an amplicon of about 443 base pairs in length, which is diagnostic for the presence of event 531 DNA in a sample. However, the same primers would also produce an amplicon of about 209 base pairs in length, which is diagnostic for the presence of cotton DNA other than event 531 in a sample. Therefore, in a biological sample comprising cotton genomic DNA, the production of only the larger of the two sequences would indicate that the cotton plant source genome would contain only event 531 DNA. Similarly, observation of only the smaller amplicon would indicate the presence of only cotton DNA other than event 531 in the sample. However, a heterozygote plant comprising one allele corresponding to event 531, and a separate allele corresponding to native cotton genomic DNA would produce both amnplicons. Many other variations on this theme are obvious to the skilled artisan now that the novel diagnostic sequences are disclosed herein.
  • [0077]
    Herein, the inventors have determined as judged by molecular characterization that cotton event 531 contains a primary functional insert containing a significant portion of the transformation plasmid, PV-GHBK04. A second nonfunctional insertion, includes a right border initiation event that continues up to and is linked with the 7S 3′ transcriptional termination sequence and 3′ of the Cry1A coding sequence within the primary functional insertion. A third insertion which is unlinked to the first two, i.e. does not segregate true with the first and second inserted DNA segments, consists of a part of the 7S 3′ plant transcriptional termination and polyadenylation sequence. These three segments are detectable and diagnostic for the event 531 nucleic acid sequences in a sample, in particular in plants which have been selfed since the origination of the 531 event. However, upon introgression of the 531 insecticidal activity into other gerinplasms by crossing with other than the Coker 312 parental variety, the third segment fails to breed true and so may not produce amplicons which, as taught herein, are diagnostic for the 531 event. It should be noted that the absence of particular amplicons associated with this particular segment should not be diagnostic of a cotton plant other than the cotton plant event 531 in a sample.
  • [0078]
    The inventors herein describe the molecular analyses that have been performed on transgenic cotton event 531 to further define the ends of the T-DNA insertions and identify the cotton genomic DNA flanking the T-DNA insertions. Genome walking studies combined with nucleotide sequencing has resulted in the identification of the DNA sequences at the arbitrarily assigned 5′ and 3′ ends of the primary functional insert, as well as cotton genomic DNA flanking the 5′ and 3′ ends of the T-DNA insertions in the transgenic cotton event 531 . The second, nonfunctional, T-DNA insertion, containing a portion of the cry1A coding region, is located at the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end (7S 3′ portion) of the primary insert.
  • [0079]
    The inventors therefore disclose herein the analysis of the genome architecture of the inserted sequence and flanking cotton genomic DNA sequences in transgenic cotton event 531 including about 309 nucleotides of cotton genomic DNA flanking the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end of the insertion and about 211 base pairs of cotton genomic DNA flanking the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the insertion event in cotton event 53. In addition, a second inserted sequence containing a part of the 3′ coding region for a Cry1A nucleic acid sequence is present in proximity to the arbitrarily assigned 5′-end (7S 3′ portion) of the primary insert, thus defining a complex arrangement of these genetic elements derived from the transformation plasmid PV-GHBK04 at a single point of insertion in the genome of the transgenic cotton event 531, notwithstanding the third sequence comprising the portion of a 7S 3′ end sequence at an unlinked single point of insertion in the cotton genome. The second inserted sequence is effectively an inverted repeat of the terminal coding sequence for the Cry1Ac protein and associated 7S 3′ termination sequence within the fit length primary functional inserted DNA sequence in event 531 . The physical organization of the inserted sequences is set forth in FIG. 1 herein.
  • [0080]
    A method for producing a cotton plant that is resistant to lepidopteran insect infestation may be conducted with the following steps: 1) sexually crossing a first cotton plant grown from the cotton seed event 531 comprising a DNA molecule selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 14, SEQ ID NO: 15, SEQ ID NO: 16, and SEQ ID NO: 21 that confers resistance to lepidopteran insect infestation, and a second cotton plant that lacks the resistance to lepidopteran insect infestation, thereby producing a plurality of first progeny plants;
  • [0081]
    2) selecting a first progeny plant that is resistant to lepidopteran insect infestation; 3) selfing said first progeny plant, thereby producing a plurality of second progeny plants; and 4) selecting from said second progeny plants a plant resistant to lepidopteran insect infestation. The first progeny plant that is resistant to lepidopteran insect infestation or the second progeny plant that is resistant to lepidopteran insect infestation may be backcrossed to the second cotton plant or a third cotton plant and a cotton plant that is resistant to lepidopteran insect damage infestation be produced.
  • [0082]
    DNA detection kits can be developed using the compositions disclosed herein and the methods well known in the art of DNA detection. The kits are usefull for identification of cotton event 531 DNA in a sample and can be applied to methods for breeding cotton plants containing 531 DNA. The kits contain one or more DNA sequences comprising at least 11 contiguous nucleotides homologous or complementary to sequences selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 5, SEQ ID NO: 6, SEQ ID NO: 7, SEQ ID NO: 8, SEQ ID NO: 9, SEQ ID NO: 10, SEQ ID NO: 11, SEQ ID NO: 12, SEQ ID NO: 13, SEQ ID NO: 14, SEQ ID NO: 15, SEQ ID NO: 16, SEQ ID NO: 17, SEQ ID NO: 18, SEQ ID NO: 19, SEQ ID NO: 20, SEQ ID NO: 21, SEQ ID NO: 22, SEQ ID NO: 23, SEQ ID NO: 24, SEQ ID NO: 25, SEQ ID NO: 26, SEQ ID NO: 27, SEQ ID NO: 28, SEQ ID NO: 29, SEQ ID NO: 30, SEQ ID NO: 31, SEQ ID NO: 32, SEQ ID NO: 33 and complements thereof, these DNA sequences can be used in DNA amplification reactions or as probes in a DNA hybridization method.
  • [0083]
    In addition to the above discussed procedures, practitioners are familiar with the standard resource materials which describe specific conditions and procedures for the construction, manipulation and isolation of macromolecules (e.g., DNA molecules, plasmids, etc.), generation of recombinant organisms and the screening and isolating of clones (see, for example, Sambrook et al., Molecular Cloning: A Laboratory Manual, Cold Spring Harbor Press, 1989; Mailga et al., Methods in Plant Molecular Biology, Cold Spring Harbor Press, 1995; Birren et al., Genome Analysis: Analyzing DNA, 1, Cold Spring Harbor, N.Y., 1997).
  • [0084]
    The following examples are included to demonstrate examples of certain preferred embodiments of the invention. It should be appreciated by those of skill in the art that the techniques disclosed in the examples that follow represent approaches the inventors have found function well in the practice of the invention, and thus can be considered to constitute examples of preferred modes for its practice. However, those of skill in the art should, in light of the present disclosure, appreciate that many changes can be made in the specific embodiments that are disclosed and still obtain a like or similar result without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.
  • EXAMPLES
  • [0085]
    Cotton, Gossypium hirsutum, has been genetically modified to resist lepidopteran pests, which have a negative impact on cotton production. This was accomplished by the insertion of a DNA cassette which encodes the insecticidal Cry1Ac protein from Bacillus thuringiensis into the genome of cotton cultivar Coker 312. This transformation resulted in three separate insertions into the cotton genome. The primary, full length functional inserted DNA sequence responsible for expressing the Cry1Ac protein in cotton event 531 comprises among other linked elements, a promotor, cry1Ac coding region, and termination sequence. A second insert comprises a partial cry1Ac coding region and termination sequence. The third insert comprises only a partial termination sequence. Cotton genome flanks the 5′ and 3′ ends of all three inserts. Therefore, six unique cotton genome/insert junctions were created as a result of the transformation process. These inserted DNA sequences are illustrated in FIG. 1 herein.
  • [0086]
    Molecular analyses were performed on cotton event 531 to define the ends of the transgene DNA insertions and identify the cotton genomic DNA flanking the transgene DNA inserts. Genome walking studies combined with nucleotide sequencing provided the DNA sequences of five of the said cotton genome/insert junctions.
  • [0087]
    The complex arrangement of genetic elements, derived from the transformation plasmid PV-GHBK04 in cotton event 531 provides novel nucleic acid sequences at the 5′ and 3′ cotton genome/insert junctions at each of three sites of insertions. These novel nucleic acid sequences are useful for detecting DNA from cotton event 531 in a sample using various methods well known in the art. The following provides non-limiting examples of how a skilled artisan might use these novel nucleic acid sequences to detect cotton event 531 in a sample.
  • Example 1
  • [0088]
    Cotton Genomic DNA Isolation.
  • [0089]
    DNA from cotton event 531 was extracted from seed tissue. DNA was extracted from both seed and leaf tissues from the control substance (non-transgenic cotton seed and leaf tissue). DNA from seed was isolated by processing the seed to a fine powder using a commercially available blender. Approximately 2 grams of the processed seed was transferred to a 50 ml conical tube, and ˜16 ml of CTAB extraction buffer [1.5% (w:w) CTAB, 75 mM Tris-HCl pH 8.0, 100 mM EDTA pH 8.0, 1.05 M NaCl, and 0.75% (w:w) PVP (MW 40,000)] was added to the processed seed. The samples were incubated at 65° C. for approximately 30 minutes with intermittent mixing and then allowed to cool to room temperature. An equal volume (˜16 ml) of room temperature chloroform:isoamyl alcohol (24:1 (v/v)) or chloroform was added to the samples. The suspension was mixed by inversion, and the two phases separated by centrifugation at ˜16,000×g for 5 minutes. The aqueous (top) layer was removed using a transfer pipet and placed into a clean 50 ml conical tube. Approximately {fraction (1/10)} volume (˜1.6 ml) of 10% CTAB buffer [10% (w:w) CTAB and 0.7 M NaCl] was added to the aqueous phase, which was then mixed by inversion. The samples were centrifuged at ˜16,000×g for 5 minutes to separate the phases. The aqueous (upper) phase was removed, mixed with an equal volume (˜15 ml) of CTAB precipitation buffer [1% (w:w) CTAB, 50 mM Tris pH 8.0, and 10 mM EDTA pH 8.0] and allowed to stand at room temperature for approximately 1 hour. The samples were centrifuged at ˜10,000×g to pellet the DNA, the supernatant was decanted, and the pellet was dissolved in approximately 2 ml of high salt TE [10mM Tris-HCl pH 8.0, 10 mM EDTA pH 8.0, and 1 M NaCl] by incubating at 37° C. with gentle swirling for approximately 2 hours. Centrifugation was performed at ˜23,000×g to pellet any remaining impurities. The supernatant was removed, placed into a clean 15 ml tube, and approximately {fraction (1/10)} volume (˜150 μl) of 3M NaOAc, pH 5.2, and 2 volumes (˜4 ml relative to the supernatant) of chilled 100% ethanol were added to precipitate the DNA. The precipitated DNA was spooled into a microfuge tube containing approximately 1 ml of 70% ethanol. The DNA was pelleted in a microfuge at maximum speed (14,000 rpm) for 5 minutes, dried, and re-dissolved in TE, pH 8.0 in a 4° C. refrigerator overnight.
  • [0090]
    The non-transgenic cotton genomic DNA used as a control was isolated from leaf tissue that was frozen in liquid nitrogen and ground into a fine powder using a mortar and pestle. Approximately 1 g of the ground leaf tissue was transferred to a 13 ml centrifuge tube and 6 ml of extraction buffer [2.5 ml DNA extraction buffer (350 mM sorbitol, 100 mM Tris pH 7.5, 5 mM EDTA, 0.38% (w/v) sodium bisulfite), 2.5 ml nuclei lysis buffer (200 mM Tris pH 7.5, 50 mM EDTA, 2 M NaCl, 2% (w/v) CTAB), and 1 ml Sarkosyl (5% (w/v) solution)] was added. The samples were incubated at 65° C. for approximately 30 minutes with intermittent mixing. Four and a half milliliters of chloroform:isoamyl alcohol (24:1 (v/v)) at room temperature was added to the samples. The suspension was mixed for 2 to 3 minutes, and the two phases separated by centrifugation for 15 minutes at ˜2,000×g at 4° C. The aqueous (top) layer was removed using a transfer pipet and placed into a 13 ml centrifuge tube. Five milliliters of 100% isopropanol were added, and the tubes were mixed by inversion to precipitate the DNA. The precipitated DNA was spooled into a microfuge tube containing 500 1 of 70% ethanol. The DNA was pelleted in a microfuge at maximum speed (14,000 rpm) for 2 minutes. The DNA was dried and dissolved in TE buffer in a 4° C. refrigerator overnight.
  • Example 2
  • [0091]
    Identification of Unique Insert-Cotton Genome Junctions in Cotton Event 531.
  • [0092]
    The DNA sequences of five cotton genome/insert junctions were identified using the PCR-based Universal GenomeWalker Kit™ as per the manufacturer's protocol followed by nucleotide sequencing of the PCR products. PCR assays were developed using one primer complementary to cotton genomic DNA and another primer complementary to inserted transgene DNA.
  • [0093]
    Identification of Diagnostic Insert-Cotton Genome Junctions within the Primary Full Length and Functional Inserted DNA Sequence:
  • [0094]
    For example, a first primer, Primer D (SEQ ID NO: 20), designed to hybridize to the genome sequence flanking the 5′ end partial cry1Ac coding sequence was paired with a second primer, Primer C (SEQ ID NO: 19) designed to hybridize to the inserted sequence within the inserted partial cry1Ac coding sequence, and a third primer, Primer A (SEQ ID NO: 17) designed to hybridize to a sequence within the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the full length primary functional inserted DNA sequence was paired with a fourth primer, Primer B (SEQ ID NO: 18) designed to hybridize to the genome sequence flanking the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the full length primary functional inserted DNA sequence.
  • [0095]
    The PCR assays were performed using 10-100 ng of cotton event 531 genomic DNA template in a 50 μl reaction volume containing a final concentration of 1.1 mM Mg2+, 0.4 μM of each primer, 200 μM each dNTP, and 2.5 units of Taq DNA polymerase. The reactions for the PCR assays were performed under the following cycling conditions: 1 cycle at 94° C. for 3 minutes; 38 cycles of 94° C. for 30 seconds, 60° C. for 30 seconds, 72° C. for 90 seconds; 1 cycle at 72° C. for 10 minutes. The PCR products were separated using agarose gel electrophoresis, visualized by ethidium bromide staining, excised from the gel, and subjected to DNA sequencing using dye-terminator chemistry to confirm the sequences.
  • [0096]
    As expected, the control reactions without template DNA and Coker 312 non-transgenic negative control DNA did not generate a PCR product. The cotton event 531 samples generated the expected size PCR products of about 1411 bp (SEQ ID NO: 15) for the 5′ flanking sequence and about 589 bp (SEQ ID NO: 14) for the 3′ flanking sequence. Therefore, the novel nucleic acid sequences at the junction of inserted DNA and cotton genomic DNA in cotton event 531 are useful for detecting DNA derived from cotton event 531 in a sample. The amplicon products were sequenced to determine the precise sequence of the flanking sequence-insert junctions. The sequence of SEQ ID NO: 15 is comprised of a part of the 5′ end flanking cotton genome sequence (SEQ ID NO: 6) upstream or 5′ to the 5′ end of the partial cry1Ac coding sequence fragment, SEQ ID NO: 6 being physically linked at its 3′ end to the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end of the inserted partial cry1Ac coding sequence (SEQ ID NO: 5). The last ten nucleotides set forth in SEQ ID NO: 6 and the first ten nucleotides set forth in SEQ ID NO: 5 correspond to SEQ ID NO: 2 which is a sequence diagnostic for the event 531 DNA in a sample. Specifically, a sequence of at least eleven nucleotides in length selected from the sequences in SEQ ID NO: 15 which comprises at least the di-nucleotide in SEQ ID NO: 2 from position 10 through position 11 and complements thereof are diagnostic for the cotton event 531 nucleic acid sequences in a sample. In addition the sequence of SEQ ID NO: 14 is comprised of a part of the 3′ end flanking cotton genome sequence (SEQ ID NO: 11) downstream or 3′ to the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the primary full length and functional inserted DNA sequence in event 531, SEQ ID NO: 11 being physically linked at its 5′ end to the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the primary full length and functional inserted DNA sequence in event 531 (SEQ ID NO: 10). The last ten nucleotides of SEQ ID NO: 10 and the first ten nucleotides of SEQ ID NO: 11 comprise a 20 mer nucleotide sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 1 which is diagnostic for the event 531 DNA in a sample. Specifically, a sequence of at least eleven nucleotides in length selected from the sequences in SEQ ID NO: 14 which comprises at least the di-nucleotide in SEQ ID NO: 1 from position 10 through position 11, and complements thereof, are diagnostic for the cotton event 531 nucleic acid sequences in a biological sample.
  • [0097]
    Thermal amplification assays were also developed to determine the 5′ end flanking sequence corresponding to the termination sequence-genome junction within the full length functional inserted sequence. The DNA sequence within the termination sequence of the 7S 3′ termination sequence linked to the full length cry1Ac coding sequence inserted into Coker 312 resulting in the event 531 genome was determined, along with sequence beyond the termination sequence and out into the flanking sequence region. The resulting sequence consists of the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 16, and is comprised of sequences set forth in SEQ ID NO: 7 (flanking cotton genome sequence 5′ to, upstream of, or adjacent to the inserted DNA sequence) and SEQ ID NO: 8 (7S 3′ inserted DNA sequence within the primary full length and functional inserted DNA sequence). The 20 mer sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 3 comprising the junction of SEQ ID NO: 7 and SEQ ID NO: 8 is diagnostic for the event 531. Specifically, a sequence of at least eleven nucleotides in length selected from the sequences in SEQ ID NO: 16 which comprises at least the di-nucleotide in SEQ ID NO: 3 from position 10 through position 11, and complements thereof, are diagnostic for the cotton event 531 nucleic acid sequences in a biological sample.
  • [0098]
    Identification of Diagnostic Insert-Cotton Genome Junctions within the Partial 7S 3′ Inserted Sequence:
  • [0099]
    Primers E (SEQ ID NO: 21) and F (SEQ ID NO: 22) were designed to amplify a sequence comprising the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end of the partial 7S 3′ sequence inserted into the cotton genome linked to the cotton flanking genome sequence 5′ to the inserted sequence. An amplicon comprising a diagnostic sequence as set forth in SEQ ID NO: 32 is obtained when these primers, as a primer pair or primer set, are used in a thermal amplification reaction along with cotton event 531 template DNA in a sample. A sequence comprising at least eleven nucleotides in length selected from the sequences as set forth in SEQ ID NO.32 and which contain at least the di-nucleotide in SEQ ID NO: 32 from position 10 through position 11, and complements thereof, are diagnostic for the cotton event 531 nucleic acid sequences in a biological sample.
  • [0100]
    Primers G (SEQ ID NO: 23) and H (SEQ ID NO: 24) were designed to amplify a sequence comprising the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the partial 7S 3′ sequence inserted into the cotton genome linked to the cotton flanking genome sequence 3′ to the inserted sequence. The 5′ and 3′ genomic DNA sequences flanking the second insert containing a portion of the 7S 3′ genetic element were identified using one primer designed to the 5′ or 3′ genomic DNA sequence flanking the insertion (Primers F and H, respectively), paired with a second primer in the insertion (Primers E and G, respectively). The PCR analyses were conducted using 100 ng of genomic DNA template in a 50 μl reaction volume containing a final concentration of 1.5 mM Mg2+, 0.2 μM of each primer, 200 μM each dNTP, and 1 unit of Taq DNA polymerase. The reactions were performed under the following cycling conditions: 1 cycle at 94° C. for 3 minutes; 38 cycles of 94° C. for 30 seconds, 60° C. for 30 seconds, 72° C. for 1.5 minutes; 1 cycle at 72° C. for 10 minutes. The PCR products were separated on 1.0% agarose gels and visualized by ethidium bromide staining. The PCR products generated from cotton event 531 DNA were excised from the gel, and subjected to DNA sequencing using dye-terminator chemistry to conform the sequences.
  • [0101]
    An amplicon comprising a diagnostic sequence as set forth in SEQ ID NO: 4 is obtained when these primers, as a primer pair or primer set, are use in a thermal amplification reaction along with cotton event 531 template DNA in a sample. A sequence comprising at least eleven nucleotides in length selected from the sequences as set forth in SEQ ID NO: 4 and which contain at least the di-nucleotide in SEQ ID NO: 4 from position 10 through position 11, and complements thereof, are diagnostic for the cotton event 531 nucleic acid sequences in a biological sample.
  • Example 3
  • [0102]
    Identification of the Native Cotton Genome Sequences into which Heterologous DNA Sequences were Inserted to Form Cotton Event 531 and Heterozygosity Assays Developed Therefrom.
  • [0103]
    Amplicons useful for determining the heterozygosity or homozygosity of the cotton genome with reference to event 531 are required in order to determine conclusively whether a particular line of cotton comprises event 531 sequences or otherwise.
  • [0104]
    Primers for use in detecting the native cotton genomic DNA sequence in a sample were designed which, when used with a template cotton genome DNA comprising DNA derived from other than an event 531 source, produce an amplicon which is diagnostic for at least one allele present in the template which is representative of native cotton genomic DNA uninterrupted by the inserted DNA found in event 531. For example, a primer pair consisting of Primer I (SEQ ID NO: 25) which is or is complementary to cotton genome sequences within a part of the genome flanking the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end of the partial cry1Ac coding sequence in event 531, and Primer J (SEQ ID NO: 26) which is or is complementary to cotton genome sequences within a part of the genome flanking the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the primary full length and functional inserted DNA in event 531, when used together in a thermal amplification reaction with cotton template DNA other than event 531 DNA produce an amplicon comprising 374 base pairs in length, one strand of which corresponds to the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 30, and which is diagnostic for the presence of a DNA sequence in a biological sample derived from a cotton genome other than event 531. PCR analyses of the functional insert site were performed using a primer specific to the genomic DNA sequence flanking the 5′-end of the insertion in the forward direction (Primer I), paired with a second primer specific to the genomic DNA sequence is flanking the 3′-end of the insertion (Primer J). The PCR analyses were conducted using 20 ng of genomic DNA template in a 50 μl reaction volume containing a final concentration of 1.5 mM Mg2+, 0.4 μM of each primer, 200 μM each dNTP, and 2.5 units of Taq DNA polymerase. The reactions were performed under the following cycling conditions: 94° C. for 3 minutes; 38 cycles at 94° C. for 30 seconds, 60° C. for 30 seconds, 72° C. for 1.0 minute; 1 cycle at 72° C. for 10 minutes. The PCR products were separated on a 1.5-2.0% agarose gel and visualized by ethidium bromide staining. Following electrophoresis, PCR products generated from Coker 312 non-transgenic DNA were excised from the gel and sequenced using dye-terminator chemistry.
  • [0105]
    Primers for use in detecting the native cotton genomic DNA sequence in a sample were designed which, when used with a template cotton genome DNA comprising DNA derived form other than an event 531 source, produce an amplicon which is diagnostic for at least one allele present in the template which is representative of native cotton genomic DNA uninterrupted by the inserted DNA found in event 531. For example, a primer pair consisting of Primer K (SEQ ID NO: 27) which is or is complementary to cotton genome sequence within a part of the genome flanking the arbitrarily assigned 5′ end of the partial 7S 3′ sequence inserted in event 531, and Primer L (SEQ ID NO: 28) which is or is complementary to cotton genome sequences within a part of the genome flanking the arbitrarily assigned 3′ end of the partial 7S 3′ sequence inserted into event 531, when used together in a thermal amplification reaction with cotton template DNA other than event 531 DNA produce an amplicon comprising 209 base pairs in length, one strand of which corresponds to the sequence set forth in SEQ ID NO: 29, and which is diagnostic for the presence of a DNA sequence in a biological sample derived from a cotton genome other than event 531. An amplicon spanning the insertion site of the partial 7S 3′ sequence was generated from Coker 312 non-transgenic DNA. The insertion site was amplified from Coker 312 using one primer specific to the genomic DNA sequence identified 5′ of the insert DNA (Primer K) and a second primer specific to the genomic DNA sequence identified 3′ of the inserted DNA (Primer L). The PCR analyses were conducted using 20 ng of genomic DNA template in a 50 μl reaction volume containing a final concentration of 1.5 mM Mg2+, 0.4 μM of each primer, 200 μM each dNTP, and 2.5 units of Taq DNA polymerase. The reactions were performed under the following cycling conditions: 94° C. for 3 minutes; 38 cycles at 94° C. for 30 seconds, 60° C. for 30 seconds, 72° C. for 1.0 minutes; 1 cycle at 72° C. for 10 minutes. The PCR products were separated on a 2.0% agarose gel and visualized by ethidium bromide staining. Following electrophoresis, PCR products generated from Coker 312 non-transgenic DNA were excised from the gel and sequenced using dye-terminator chemistry.
  • [0106]
    Those of skill in the art, in light of these examples, should appreciate that many changes can be made to the foregoing assays to detect DNA derived from cotton event 531 in a sample. For example, a primer set comprising one primer complementary to cotton genome DNA and another primer complementary to sequences within the insert are envisioned. Furthermore, any of various hybridization assays described earlier using DNA probes complementary to said novel nucleic acid sequences located at transgene/genome junctions are envisioned as well.
  • 1 33 1 20 DNA Artificial Sequence Artificial Sequence 1 gcgtttctgg ttataatata 20 2 20 DNA Artificial Sequence Artificial Sequence 2 tgacccactt agcagagaag 20 3 20 DNA Artificial Sequence Artificial Sequence 3 gagtgtgtaa caaacactga 20 4 20 DNA Artificial Sequence Artificial Sequence 4 aatacactca cctgccgaat 20 5 1104 DNA Artificial Sequence Artificial Sequence 5 agcagagaag aagtggaggg acaaacgtga gaaactcgaa tgggaaacta acatcgttta 60 caaggaggcc aaagagtccg tggatgcttt gttcgtgaac tcccaatatg atcagttgca 120 agccgacacc aacatcgcca tgatccacgc cgcagacaaa cgtgtgcaca gcattcgtga 180 ggcttacttg cctgagttgt ccgtgatccc tggtgtgaac gctgccatct tcgaggaact 240 tgagggacgt atctttaccg cattctcctt gtacgatgcc agaaacgtca tcaagaacgg 300 tgacttcaac aatggcctca gctgctggaa tgtgaaaggt catgtggacg tggaggaaca 360 gaacaatcag cgttccgtcc tggttgtgcc tgagtgggaa gctgaagtgt cccaagaggt 420 tagagtctgt ccaggtagag gctacattct ccgtgtgacc gcttacaagg agggatacgg 480 tgagggttgc gtgaccatcc acgagatcga gaacaacacc gacgagctta agttctccaa 540 ctgcgtcgag gaagaaatct atcccaacaa caccgttact tgcaacgact acactgtgaa 600 tcaggaagag tacggaggtg cctacactag ccgtaacaga ggttacaacg aagctccttc 660 cgttcctgct gactatgcct ccgtgtacga ggagaaatcc tacacagatg gcagacgtga 720 gaacccttgc gagttcaaca gaggttacag ggactacaca ccacttccag ttggctatgt 780 taccaaggag cttgagtact ttcctgagac cgacaaagtg tggatcgaga tcggtgaaac 840 cgagggaacc ttcatcgtgg acagcgtgga gcttctcttg atggaggaat aatgagatct 900 agaggcctga attcgagctc ggtacccggg gatcccgtcc tttgtcttca attttgaggg 960 ctttttactg aataagtatg tagtactaaa atgtatgctg taatagctca tagtgagcga 1020 ggaaagtatc gggctattta actatgactt gagctccatc tatgaataaa taaatcagca 1080 tatgatgctt ttgttttgtg tact 1104 6 309 DNA Gossypium hirsutum Unsure (1)..(309) A cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) genome sequence flanking 5′ partial cry1Ac insert 6 aagcaagttt caaacccaga attgaacatt gaattccttc ccactcgatc aaccaataac 60 atacttggtt tatatatata taaatgagtc ccctattcta tttcctccat tccccccccc 120 ctccccggta cggatgagta ggcctactct ttttttcata gttgtttttt agccgattta 180 agagatgaaa attcagacaa tgcaataggg aaggtcattg atgtacacca aagagaaacc 240 ccaatcataa aagtatatgc gacaaaacgc gttgaaatta aaaaccaatg ccaccccact 300 gacccactt 309 7 391 DNA Gossypium hirsutum Unsure (1)..(391) A cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) genome sequence flanking 5′ end of full length primary, functional insert sequence. 7 aaatcgttcg tctgacttgg gtataggggc gaaagactaa tcgaaccgtc tagtagctgg 60 ttccctccga agtttccctc aggatagctg gagcccttag cgagttctat cgggtaaagc 120 caatgattag aggcatcggg ggcgcaacgc cctcgaccta ttctcaaact ttaaataggt 180 aggacggcgc ggctgcttcg ttgagccgcg ccacggaatc gagagctcca agtgggccat 240 ttttggtaag cagaactggc gatgcgggat gaaccggaag ccgggttacg gtgcccaact 300 gcgcgctaac ctagaaccca caaagggtgt tggtcgatta agacagcagg acggtggtca 360 tggaagtcga aatccgctaa ggagtgtgta a 391 8 242 DNA Artificial Sequence Artificial Sequence 8 caaacactga tagtttaaac tgaaggcggg aaacgacaat ctgatcccag cttgcatgcc 60 tgcaggtcaa ttcaatattg tggcaggaca ttgctacatg atacctctta gaattgttta 120 gacttcagat cgatcttgtc agtctgaaag acccaaaaac aaatgcaatt tcttttctgg 180 tagaccgtga caatttgtct aagatgtatc tgatttaatg ccttttgtat ataatacact 240 ca 242 9 356 DNA Gossypium hirsutum Unsure (1)..(356) cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) genome flanking 3′ partial terminaton sequence of the insert 9 cctgccgaat caactagccc cgaaaatgga tggcgcttaa gcgcgcgacc tatacccggc 60 cgtcggggca agggccaggc cccgatgagt aggagggcgc ggcggtcgcc gcaaaacccg 120 gggcgcgagc ccgggcggag cggccgtcgg tgcagatctt ggtggtagta gcaaatattc 180 aaatgagaac tttgaaggcc gaagagggga aaggttccat gtgaacggca cttgcacatg 240 ggttagtcga tcctaagaga cgggggaagc ccgtccgaca gcgcgtccag cgcgagcttc 300 gaaagggaat cgggttaaaa ttcctgaacc gggacgcggc ggctgacggc aacgtt 356 10 378 DNA Artificial Sequence Artificial Sequence 10 cccctcaaat gtcaataggt gcgcccctca tctgtcagca ctctgcccct caagtgtcaa 60 ggatcgcgcc cctcatctgt cagtagtcgc gcccctcaag tgtcaatacc gcagggcact 120 tatccccagg cttgtccaca tcatctgtgg gaaactcgcg taaaatcagg cgttttcgcc 180 gatttgcgag gctggccagc tccacgtcgc cggccgaaat cgagcctgcc cctcatctgt 240 caacgccgcg ccgggtgagt cggcccctca agtgtcaacg tccgcccctc atctgtcagt 300 gagggccaag ttttccgcga ggtatccaca acgccggcgg ccgcggtgtc tcgcacacgg 360 cttcgacggc gtttctgg 378 11 211 DNA Gossypium hirsutum Unsure (1)..(211) A cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) genome sequence flanking 3′ primary functional insert 11 ttataatata cacatatata atttatcact gtatattctt gcagagaaca atcacgaggc 60 attggcccct ccattttttt aaaaaaaatt tgatctgata gagaaaagaa agaaagaaaa 120 agaagaatat tagtgacctt tcaatggtga aaaatcaaaa aaaaatctca tttaatgata 180 aacaaaatgt caaacagtct gacagctcct g 211 12 26 DNA Artificial Sequence Synthetic Oligonucleotide 12 gccaatgcct cgtgattgtt ctctgc 26 13 26 DNA Artificial Sequence Synthetic Oligonucleotide 13 gatttgcgag gctggccagc tccacg 26 14 589 DNA Artificial Sequence Artificial Sequence 14 cccctcaaat gtcaataggt gcgcccctca tctgtcagca ctctgcccct caagtgtcaa 60 ggatcgcgcc cctcatctgt cagtagtcgc gcccctcaag tgtcaatacc gcagggcact 120 tatccccagg cttgtccaca tcatctgtgg gaaactcgcg taaaatcagg cgttttcgcc 180 gatttgcgag gctggccagc tccacgtcgc cggccgaaat cgagcctgcc cctcatctgt 240 caacgccgcg ccgggtgagt cggcccctca agtgtcaacg tccgcccctc atctgtcagt 300 gagggccaag ttttccgcga ggtatccaca acgccggcgg ccgcggtgtc tcgcacacgg 360 cttcgacggc gtttctggtt ataatataca catatataat ttatcactgt atattcttgc 420 agagaacaat cacgaggcat tggcccctcc atttttttaa aaaaaatttg atctgataga 480 gaaaagaaag aaagaaaaag aagaatatta gtgacctttc aatggtgaaa aatcaaaaaa 540 aaatctcatt taatgataaa caaaatgtca aacagtctga cagctcctg 589 15 1413 DNA Artificial Sequence Artificial Sequence 15 aagcaagttt caaacccaga attgaacatt gaattccttc ccactcgatc aaccaataac 60 atacttggtt tatatatata taaatgagtc ccctattcta tttcctccat tccccccccc 120 ctccccggta cggatgagta ggcctactct ttttttcata gttgtttttt agccgattta 180 agagatgaaa attcagacaa tgcaataggg aaggtcattg atgtacacca aagagaaacc 240 ccaatcataa aagtatatgc gacaaaacgc gttgaaatta aaaaccaatg ccaccccact 300 gacccactta gcagagaaga agtggaggga caaacgtgag aaactcgaat gggaaactaa 360 catcgtttac aaggaggcca aagagtccgt ggatgctttg ttcgtgaact cccaatatga 420 tcagttgcaa gccgacacca acatcgccat gatccacgcc gcagacaaac gtgtgcacag 480 cattcgtgag gcttacttgc ctgagttgtc cgtgatccct ggtgtgaacg ctgccatctt 540 cgaggaactt gagggacgta tctttaccgc attctccttg tacgatgcca gaaacgtcat 600 caagaacggt gacttcaaca atggcctcag ctgctggaat gtgaaaggtc atgtggacgt 660 ggaggaacag aacaatcagc gttccgtcct ggttgtgcct gagtgggaag ctgaagtgtc 720 ccaagaggtt agagtctgtc caggtagagg ctacattctc cgtgtgaccg cttacaagga 780 gggatacggt gagggttgcg tgaccatcca cgagatcgag aacaacaccg acgagcttaa 840 gttctccaac tgcgtcgagg aagaaatcta tcccaacaac accgttactt gcaacgacta 900 cactgtgaat caggaagagt acggaggtgc ctacactagc cgtaacagag gttacaacga 960 agctccttcc gttcctgctg actatgcctc cgtgtacgag gagaaatcct acacagatgg 1020 cagacgtgag aacccttgcg agttcaacag aggttacagg gactacacac cacttccagt 1080 tggctatgtt accaaggagc ttgagtactt tcctgagacc gacaaagtgt ggatcgagat 1140 cggtgaaacc gagggaacct tcatcgtgga cagcgtggag cttctcttga tggaggaata 1200 atgagatcta gaggcctgaa ttcgagctcg gtacccgggg atcccgtcct ttgtcttcaa 1260 ttttgagggc tttttactga ataagtatgt agtactaaaa tgtatgctgt aatagctcat 1320 agtgagcgag gaaagtatcg ggctatttaa ctatgacttg agctccatct atgaataaat 1380 aaatcagcat atgatgcttt tgttttgtgt act 1413 16 989 DNA Artificial Sequence Artificial Sequence 16 aaatcgttcg tctgacttgg gtataggggc gaaagactaa tcgaaccgtc tagtagctgg 60 ttccctccga agtttccctc aggatagctg gagcccttag cgagttctat cgggtaaagc 120 caatgattag aggcatcggg ggcgcaacgc cctcgaccta ttctcaaact ttaaataggt 180 aggacggcgc ggctgcttcg ttgagccgcg ccacggaatc gagagctcca agtgggccat 240 ttttggtaag cagaactggc gatgcgggat gaaccggaag ccgggttacg gtgcccaact 300 gcgcgctaac ctagaaccca caaagggtgt tggtcgatta agacagcagg acggtggtca 360 tggaagtcga aatccgctaa ggagtgtgta acaaacactg atagtttaaa ctgaaggcgg 420 gaaacgacaa tctgatccca gcttgcatgc ctgcaggtca attcaatatt gtggcaggac 480 attgctacat gatacctctt agaattgttt agacttcaga tcgatcttgt cagtctgaaa 540 gacccaaaaa caaatgcaat ttcttttctg gtagaccgtg acaatttgtc taagatgtat 600 ctgatttaat gccttttgta tataatacac tcacctgccg aatcaactag ccccgaaaat 660 ggatggcgct taagcgcgcg acctataccc ggccgtcggg gcaagggcca ggccccgatg 720 agtaggaggg cgcggcggtc gccgcaaaac ccggggcgcg agcccgggcg gagcggccgt 780 cggtgcagat cttggtggta gtagcaaata ttcaaatgag aactttgaag gccgaagagg 840 ggaaaggttc catgtgaacg gcacttgcac atgggttagt cgatcctaag agacggggga 900 agcccgtccg acagcgcgtc cagcgcgagc ttcgaaaggg aatcgggtta aaattcctga 960 accgggacgc ggcggctgac ggcaacgtt 989 17 27 DNA Artificial Sequence Synthetic Oligonucleotide - Primer A 17 tggacagccc ctcaaatgtc aataggt 27 18 27 DNA Artificial Sequence Synthetic Oligonucleotide - Primer B 18 aaatattgaa actcatgcag gagctgt 27 19 28 DNA Artificial Sequence Synthetic Oligonucleotide - Primer C 19 ttcagcatat ttatacgtgc caagtgcc 28 20 24 DNA Artificial Sequence Synthetic Oligonucleotide - Primer D 20 tccgagactc ctagtacctc aact 24 21 28 DNA Artificial Sequence Synthetic Oligonucleotide - Primer E 21 ggcattaaat cagatacatc ttagacaa 28 22 23 DNA Artificial Sequence Synthetic Oligonucleotide - Primer F 22 ggttcgagtg agagcatgcc tgt 23 23 27 DNA Artificial Sequence Synthetic Oligonucleotide - Primer G 23 aaacactgat agtttaaact gaaggcg 27 24 22 DNA Artificial Sequence Synthetic Oligonucleotide - Primer H 24 gcttcagatg tctccggact cc 22 25 27 DNA Artificial Sequence Synthetic Oligonucleotide - Primer I 25 tagccgattt aagagatgaa aattcag 27 26 28 DNA Artificial Sequence Synthetic Oligonucleotide - Primer J 26 caccattgaa aggtcactaa tattcttc 28 27 24 DNA Artificial Sequence Synthetic Oligonucleotide - Primer L 27 tttggtaagc agaactggcg atgc 24 28 24 DNA Artificial Sequence Synthetic Oligonucleotide 28 taggtcgcgc gcttaagcgc catc 24 29 209 DNA Gossypium hirsutum Unsure (1)..(209) an amplicon sequence produced using SEQ ID NOS 27 and 28 29 tttggtaaga cgaactggcg atgcgggatg aaccggaagc cgggttacgg tgcccaactg 60 cgcgctaacc tagaacccac aaagggtgtt ggtcgattaa gacagcagga cggtggtcat 120 ggaagtcgaa atccgctaag gagtgtgtaa caactcacct gccgaatcaa ctagccccga 180 aaatggatgg cgcttaagcg cgcgaccta 209 30 374 DNA Artificial Sequence Artificial Sequence 30 tagccgattt aagagatgaa aattcagaca atgcaatagg gaaggtcatt gatgtacacc 60 aaagagaaac cccaatcata aaagtatatg cgacaaaacg cgttgaaatt aaaaaccaat 120 gccaccccac tgacccactt agctcttctt ttttaccaac aataaattta tatgtgttgg 180 taaaaggtca cacgacacga caacatcatc aattatacat tttggttata atatacacat 240 atataattta tcactgtata ttcttgcaga gaacaatcac gaggcattgg cccctccatt 300 tttttaaaaa aaatttgatc tgatagagaa aagaaagaaa gaaaaagaag aatattagtg 360 acctttcaat ggtg 374 31 491 DNA Gossypium hirsutum Unsure (1)..(491) Part of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) genome nucleotide sequence flanking 5′ end of the partial 7S 3′ DNA sequence 31 ggttcgagtg agagcatgcc tgtcgggacc cgaaagatgg tgaactatgc ctgagcgggg 60 cgaagccaga ggaaactctg gtggaggccc gcagcgatac tgacgtgcaa atcgttcgtc 120 tgacttgggt ataggggcga aagactaatc gaaccgtcta gtagctggtt ccctccgaag 180 tttccctcag gatagctgga gcccttagcg agttctatcg ggtaaagcca atgattagag 240 gcatcggggg cgcaacgccc tcgacctatt ctcaaacttt aaataggtag gacggcgcgg 300 ctgcttcgtt gagccgcgcc acggaatcga gagctccaag tgggccattt ttggtaagca 360 gaactggcga tgcgggatga accggaagcc gggttacggt gcccaactgc gcgctaacct 420 agaacccaca aagggtgttg gtcgattaag acagcaggac ggtggtcatg gaagtcgaaa 480 tccgctaagg a 491 32 20 DNA Artificial Sequence Artificial Sequence 32 gagtgtgtaa caaacactga 20 33 1121 DNA Artificial Sequence Artificial Sequence 33 ggttcgagtg agagcatgcc tgtcgggacc cgaaagatgg tgaactatgc ctgagcgggg 60 cgaagccaga ggaaactctg gtggaggccc gcagcgatac tgacgtgcaa atcgttcgtc 120 tgacttgggt ataggggcga aagactaatc gaaccgtcta gtagctggtt ccctccgaag 180 tttccctcag gatagctgga gcccttagcg agttctatcg ggtaaagcca atgattagag 240 gcatcggggg cgcaacgccc tcgacctatt ctcaaacttt aaataggtag gacggcgcgg 300 ctgcttcgtt gagccgcgcc acggaatcga gagctccaag tgggccattt ttggtaagca 360 gaactggcga tgcgggatga accggaagcc gggttacggt gcccaactgc gcgctaacct 420 agaacccaca aagggtgttg gtcgattaag acagcaggac ggtggtcatg gaagtcgaaa 480 tccgctaagg agtgtgtaac aaacactgat agtttaaact gaaggcggga aacgacaatc 540 tgatcccagc ttgcatgcct gcaggtcaat tcaatattgt ggcaggacat tgctacatga 600 tacctcttag aattgtttag acttcagatc gatcttgtca gtctgaaaga cccaaaaaca 660 aatgcaattt cttttctggt agaccgtgac aatttgtcta agatgtatct gatttaatgc 720 cttttgtata taatacactc acctgccgaa tcaactagcc ccgaaaatgg atggcgctta 780 agcgcgcgac ctatacccgg ccgtcggggc aagggccagg ccccgatgag taggagggcg 840 cggcggtcgc cgcaaaaccc ggggcgcgag cccgggcgga gcggccgtcg gtgcagatct 900 tggtggtagt agcaaatatt caaatgagaa ctttgaaggc cgaagagggg aaaggttcca 960 tgtgaacggc acttgcacat gggttagtcg atcctaagag acgggggaag cccgtccgac 1020 agcgcgtcca gcgcgagctt cgaaagggaa tcgggttaaa attcctgaac cgggacgcgg 1080 cggctgacgg caacgttagg gagtccggag acatctgaag c 1121

Claims (15)

  1. 1. An isolated polynucleotide comprising the sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 13, SEQ ID NO: 14, SEQ ID NO: 15, SEQ ID NO: 16, SEQ ID NO: 21, SEQ ID NO: 29, SEQ ID NO: 30, SEQ ID NO: 32, SEQ ID NO: 33, and complements thereof.
  2. 2. A first and a second polynucleotide primer which function together in the presence of template cotton plant event 531 DNA in a sample to produce an amplicon diagnostic for the cotton plant event 531, said first and second polynucleotide primers being selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 32, SEQ ID NO: 12, SEQ ID NO: 13, SEQ ID NO: 17, SEQ ID NO: 18, SEQ ID NO: 19, SEQ ID NO: 20, SEQ ID NO: 21, SEQ ID NO: 22, SEQ ID NO: 23, SEQ ID NO: 24, SEQ ID NO: 25, SEQ ID NO: 26, SEQ ID NO: 27, SEQ ID NO: 28, and complements thereof.
  3. 3. The first and second polynucleotide primers of claim 2 wherein said first polynucleotide primer comprises SEQ ID NO: 19 and said second polynucleotide primer comprises SEQ ID NO: 20, and wherein said amplicon comprises SEQ ID NO: 2.
  4. 4. The first and second polynucleotide primers of claim 2 wherein said first polynucleotide primer is selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 13 and SEQ ID NO: 17 and said second polynucleotide primer is selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 12 and SEQ ID NO: 18, and wherein said amplicon comprises SEQ ID NO: 1.
  5. 5. The first and second polynucleotide primers of claim 2 wherein said first polynucleotide primer is selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 22, SEQ ID NO: 23, and SEQ ID NO: 27 and said second polynucleotide primer is selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 21, SEQ ID NO: 24 and SEQ ID NO: 28, and wherein said amplicon comprises a polynucleotide sequence selected from SEQ ID NO: 32 and SEQ ID NO: 4.
  6. 6. The first and second polynucleotide primers of claim 2 wherein said first polynucleotide primer is the complement of a cotton plant genome DNA flanking the point of insertion of a heterologous DNA sequence inserted into the cotton plant genome, and said second polynucleotide primer is the complement of a part of the heterologous DNA sequence inserted into the cotton plant genome, and wherein said amplicon is diagnostic for said event 531.
  7. 7. A method of detecting the presence of cotton plant event 531 DNA in a sample comprising the steps of:
    a) contacting said sample with a first polynucleotide primer and a second polynucleotide primer which function together in the presence of template cotton plant event 531 DNA in a sample to produce an amplicon diagnostic for the cotton plant event 531;
    b) performing a nucleic acid amplification reaction, thereby producing said amplicon; and
    c) detecting said amplicon.
  8. 8. The method of claim 7 wherein said first and second polynucleotide primers are selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 32, SEQ ID NO: 12, SEQ ID NO: 13, SEQ ID NO: 17, SEQ ID NO: 18, SEQ ID NO: 19, SEQ ID NO: 20, SEQ ID NO: 21, SEQ ID NO: 22, SEQ ID NO: 23, SEQ ID NO: 24, SEQ ID NO: 25, SEQ ID NO: 26, SEQ ID NO: 27, SEQ ID NO: 28, and complements thereof.
  9. 9. The method of claim 7 wherein said amplicon comprises a nucleotide sequence comprising at least 11 consecutive nucleotides selected fro mteh group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 32, and complements thereof.
  10. 10. An isolated polynucleotide molecule comprising the amplicon produced by the method of claim 7.
  11. 11. A nucleic acid detection kit for use in identifying the presence of cotton plant event 531 nucleic acids in a sample comprising:
    a) a probe which is or is complementary to a part of the heterologous DNA sequence present in the genome of cotton plant event 531, said probe comprising at least 11 or more consecutive nucleotides, said consecutive nucleotides being selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 32, and complements thereof,
    b) reagents necessary for detecting the binding of said probe to the heterologous DNA sequence inserted into the genome of cotton plant event 531; and
    c) instructions for use; packaged together in said kit.
  12. 12. A method of detecting cotton plant event 531 DNA in a sample comprising
    a) contacting the sample with a polynucleotide probe that binds under stringent conditions with said DNA;
    b) subjecting the sample and probe to said stringent conditions; and
    c) detecting the binding of the probe to said DNA.
  13. 13. An isolated nucleic acid comprising a di-nucleotide linking a heterologous DNA molecule to the cotton plant genome in cotton plant event 531 comprising a sequence of 11 consecutive nucleotides selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 32, and complements thereof.
  14. 14. A method of detecting the presence of a DNA molecule corresponding to a DNA sequence in cotton plant event 531 or homozygous or heterozygous progeny thereof in a sample, the method comprising:
    a) contacting the sample with a probe that does not bind under stringent conditions with DNA from a cotton plant other than said event;
    b) subjecting the probe and sample to stringent conditions; and
    c) detecting the binding of the probe to said DNA molecule.
  15. 15. A method of determining the zygosity of a cotton plant genome comprising a polynucleotide sequence selected from the group consisting of SEQ ID NO: 1, SEQ ID NO: 2, SEQ ID NO: 3, SEQ ID NO: 4, SEQ ID NO: 32, and complements thereof, said method comprising the steps of:
    a) contacting a sample comprising DNA obtained from said cotton plant with a first and a second nucleotide primer that, when used in a nucleic acid amplification reaction with a first template comprising cotton plant event 531 DNA, produces a first amplicon that is diagnostic for cotton plant event 531;
    b) performing a nucleic acid amplification reaction with said first and second nucleotide primers and said first template, thereby producing said first amplicon;
    c) detecting said first amplicon;
    d) contacting said sample with a first and a third nucleotide primer that, when used in a nucleic acid amplification reaction with a second template comprising cotton plant DNA other than event 531 DNA, produces a second amplicon that is diagnostic for other than cotton plant event 531;
    e) performing a nucleic acid amplification reaction with said first and third nucleotide primers and said second template, thereby producing said second amplicon; and
    f) detecting said second amplicon,
    wherein detection of said second amplicon is diagnostic for the zygosity of said cotton plant genome.
US10416877 2000-11-20 2001-11-20 Cotton event pv-ghbk04(531) and compositions and methods for detection thereof Abandoned US20040045054A1 (en)

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US20050257297A1 (en) * 2004-08-05 2005-11-17 Oakley Stephen R Acala ULTIMA EF cultivar plant and seed
US20050257296A1 (en) * 2005-02-15 2005-11-17 Oakley Stephen R Hammer cotton cultivar plant and seed
US20060156444A1 (en) * 2006-03-14 2006-07-13 Curtis Williams Cotton cultivar 04Y341
US20080155707A1 (en) * 2006-12-22 2008-06-26 Monsanto Technology, L.L.C. Cotton variety stx0502rf
US20090055951A1 (en) * 2007-08-20 2009-02-26 Robert Mcgowen Cotton variety 04w019
US20090055952A1 (en) * 2007-08-20 2009-02-26 Albert Santos Cotton variety 05x460
US20090055949A1 (en) * 2007-08-20 2009-02-26 Curtis Williams Cotton variety 03y062
US20090055954A1 (en) * 2007-08-20 2009-02-26 Cynthia Green Cotton variety 05z629
US20090055948A1 (en) * 2007-08-20 2009-02-26 Curtis Williams Cotton variety 03y056
US7619144B2 (en) 2007-08-17 2009-11-17 Bayer Cropscience Ag Cotton variety 02T15
US7622650B2 (en) 2006-12-22 2009-11-24 Bayer Cropscience Lp Cotton variety ST 5283RF
US7622652B2 (en) 2006-12-22 2009-11-24 Bayer Cropscience Lp Cotton variety ST 5327B2RF
US7622656B2 (en) 2007-08-20 2009-11-24 Bayer Cropscience Ag Cotton variety 05Y063
US7622653B2 (en) 2007-08-20 2009-11-24 Bayer Cropscience Ag Cotton variety 03Y047
US7622651B2 (en) 2006-12-22 2009-11-24 Bayer Cropscience Lp Cotton variety ST 4427B2RF
US7709704B2 (en) 2007-08-20 2010-05-04 Bayer Cropscience Ag Cotton variety 04T048

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US20050257297A1 (en) * 2004-08-05 2005-11-17 Oakley Stephen R Acala ULTIMA EF cultivar plant and seed
US7312383B2 (en) 2004-08-05 2007-12-25 Bayer Cropscience Gmbh Acala ULTIMA EF cultivar plant and seed
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US7247773B2 (en) 2005-02-15 2007-07-24 Bayer Cropscience Gmbh Hammer cotton cultivar plant and seed
US20060156444A1 (en) * 2006-03-14 2006-07-13 Curtis Williams Cotton cultivar 04Y341
US7626093B2 (en) 2006-03-14 2009-12-01 Bayer Cropscience Ag Cotton cultivar 04Y341
US20080155707A1 (en) * 2006-12-22 2008-06-26 Monsanto Technology, L.L.C. Cotton variety stx0502rf
US7622651B2 (en) 2006-12-22 2009-11-24 Bayer Cropscience Lp Cotton variety ST 4427B2RF
US7622649B2 (en) 2006-12-22 2009-11-24 Bayer Cropscience Lp Cotton variety STX0502RF
US7622652B2 (en) 2006-12-22 2009-11-24 Bayer Cropscience Lp Cotton variety ST 5327B2RF
US7622650B2 (en) 2006-12-22 2009-11-24 Bayer Cropscience Lp Cotton variety ST 5283RF
US7619144B2 (en) 2007-08-17 2009-11-17 Bayer Cropscience Ag Cotton variety 02T15
US7619145B2 (en) 2007-08-20 2009-11-17 Bayer Cropscience Ag Cotton variety 03Y056
US20090055948A1 (en) * 2007-08-20 2009-02-26 Curtis Williams Cotton variety 03y056
US20090055954A1 (en) * 2007-08-20 2009-02-26 Cynthia Green Cotton variety 05z629
US7622657B2 (en) 2007-08-20 2009-11-24 Bayer Cropscience Ag Cotton variety 05Z629
US20090055949A1 (en) * 2007-08-20 2009-02-26 Curtis Williams Cotton variety 03y062
US7622656B2 (en) 2007-08-20 2009-11-24 Bayer Cropscience Ag Cotton variety 05Y063
US7622653B2 (en) 2007-08-20 2009-11-24 Bayer Cropscience Ag Cotton variety 03Y047
US20090055952A1 (en) * 2007-08-20 2009-02-26 Albert Santos Cotton variety 05x460
US7622654B2 (en) 2007-08-20 2009-11-24 Bayer Cropscience Ag Cotton variety 03Y062
US7622655B2 (en) 2007-08-20 2009-11-24 Bayer Cropscience Ag Cotton variety 04W019
US20090055951A1 (en) * 2007-08-20 2009-02-26 Robert Mcgowen Cotton variety 04w019
US7626097B2 (en) 2007-08-20 2009-12-01 Bayer Cropscience Ag Cotton variety 05X460
US7709704B2 (en) 2007-08-20 2010-05-04 Bayer Cropscience Ag Cotton variety 04T048

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