US20030234111A1 - Internal support apparatus for downhole tubular structures and method of use - Google Patents

Internal support apparatus for downhole tubular structures and method of use Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20030234111A1
US20030234111A1 US10/174,699 US17469902A US2003234111A1 US 20030234111 A1 US20030234111 A1 US 20030234111A1 US 17469902 A US17469902 A US 17469902A US 2003234111 A1 US2003234111 A1 US 2003234111A1
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
tubular structure
body
apparatus
tubular
support member
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10/174,699
Inventor
Ralph Echols
Tommie Freeman
Patrick Rice
Travis Hailey
John Yonker
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Halliburton Energy Services Inc
Original Assignee
Halliburton Energy Services Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Halliburton Energy Services Inc filed Critical Halliburton Energy Services Inc
Priority to US10/174,699 priority Critical patent/US20030234111A1/en
Assigned to HALLIBURTON ENERGY SERVICES, INC. reassignment HALLIBURTON ENERGY SERVICES, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: YONKER, JOHN H., FREEMAN, TOMMIE AUSTIN, ECHOLS, RALPH, HAILEY, TRAVIS, RICE, PATRICK W.
Publication of US20030234111A1 publication Critical patent/US20030234111A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B43/00Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells
    • E21B43/02Subsoil filtering
    • E21B43/10Setting of casings, screens, liners or the like in wells
    • E21B43/103Setting of casings, screens, liners or the like in wells of expandable casings, screens, liners, or the like
    • E21B43/108Expandable screens or liners
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B17/00Drilling rods or pipes; Flexible drill strings; Kellies; Drill collars; Sucker rods ; Cables; Casings; Tubings
    • E21B17/10Wear protectors; Centralising devices, e.g. stabilisers
    • E21B17/1014Flexible or expansible centering means, e.g. with pistons pressing against the wall of the well
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B29/00Cutting or destroying pipes, packers, plugs, or wire lines, located in boreholes or wells, e.g. cutting of damaged pipes, of windows; Deforming of pipes in boreholes or wells; Reconditioning of well casings while in the ground
    • E21B29/10Reconditioning of well casings, e.g. straightening
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B43/00Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells
    • E21B43/02Subsoil filtering
    • E21B43/08Screens or liners
    • E21B43/088Wire screens
    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21BEARTH DRILLING, e.g. DEEP DRILLING; OBTAINING OIL, GAS, WATER, SOLUBLE OR MELTABLE MATERIALS OR A SLURRY OF MINERALS FROM WELLS
    • E21B43/00Methods or apparatus for obtaining oil, gas, water, soluble or meltable materials or a slurry of minerals from wells
    • E21B43/02Subsoil filtering
    • E21B43/10Setting of casings, screens, liners or the like in wells
    • E21B43/103Setting of casings, screens, liners or the like in wells of expandable casings, screens, liners, or the like

Abstract

An internal support apparatus and method for providing support to a tubular structure that is positioned in a wellbore. The apparatus is insertable into the tubular structure to reside in close proximity with an interior surface of the tubular structure, make light contact with an interior surface of the tubular structure, or expand the tubular structure. Thereafter, the support apparatus can remain in the tubular structure indefinitely to provide support against collapse or further collapse and allow the tubular structure to remain in operation.

Description

    BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Technical Field of the Invention [0001]
  • The present invention relates in general to providing internal support to tubular structures in a wellbore, and more particularly to an apparatus for providing support to such tubular structures to compensate for physical weakness or damage. [0002]
  • 2. Description of Related Art [0003]
  • In a well, such as an oil and gas well, utilizing sand-control screens, the annulus between the wellbore and the sand-control screens is generally packed within a layer of gravel commonly referred to in the industry as “gravel packing” or “gravel pack.” The gravel layer (gravel pack) acts as a filter to prevent passage of formation fines (ex. sand) and other particulate into the production string. The sand-control screen provides a secondary filter to filter additional particulate and to prevent entry of the gravel pack into the production tubing. Over time, the gravel and the sand-control screens can become filled or clogged with particulate. The clogs increase resistance to fluid flow thereby creating an increasing pressure differential between the interior and exterior of the screen. This pressure differential causes increased loading on the screen that can cause it to collapse. Expanded screens, those that are inserted into position and then expanded to form the screen, are especially susceptible to collapse because of their inherent structural design. If the screen collapses, its permeability can be decreased, dramatically reducing the flow capacity of the screen. Also, the decrease in flow area caused by clogging or collapsed portions cause localized increased flow velocities. The increased flow velocity in localized regions of the screen promotes erosion and premature failure. In order to restore a well to its full production capability a collapsed screen must be removed and replaced. This requires removal and reinstallation of the entire production string in the wellbore, a time consuming and costly procedure. [0004]
  • In a related problem, portions of the production string, for example the production tubing, sand-control screens, or other components in the string, can be damaged when the formation shifts or sluffs into the wellbore. The damage can restrict flow through the production string and cause localized increased flow speeds that promote erosion. As above, repair of a damaged portion of the production string requires removal and reinstallation of the entire production string. [0005]
  • In a worse case scenario, the production string and/or sand-control screens can become stuck in the formation and cannot be removed. Such a scenario may necessitate premature abandonment of the well. [0006]
  • Therefore, there is a need to provide internal support to the damaged or weak tubular structures in the well bore, such as sand-control screens, production tubing, or other like structures. Such support should both prevent collapse of the tubular structure, and remedy collapsed tubular structures, without requiring removal and reinstallation of the tubular structure. [0007]
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The invention provides an internal support apparatus and a method of supporting tubular structures in a wellbore. Such support may eliminate the need to replace the tubular structure and allow the tubular structure to remain in operation. [0008]
  • In one embodiment, the invention encompasses an internal support apparatus for fixed installation in a tubular structure that is residing in a wellbore. The support apparatus includes an elongate body. At least one support member projects outwardly from the elongate body at least into close proximity with an interior surface of the tubular structure when the apparatus is inserted into the tubular structure. The elongate body can be tubular and can have at least one aperture for passage of fluids between an interior and an exterior of the elongate body. The support member can be at least one ridge running longitudinally on the exterior surface of the elongate tubular body. The support member can be a plurality of ridges running longitudinally on the elongate body and substantially equally spaced about the circumference of the elongate body. The support member can be wire wrapped around the elongate body, and the wire can be wrapped in a pattern to act as a filter. The support member can reside in substantially perpendicular relation to the axis of the elongate body. [0009]
  • In another embodiment the support apparatus has an elongate body and at least one support member changeable from a first position residing in substantially perpendicular relation to the axis of the elongate body to a second position residing at an acute angle to the axis of the elongate body. In the first position, a longest distance between the at least one support member and the axis of the elongate body is greater than a longest distance between the at least one support member and the axis of the elongate body in the second position. [0010]
  • In another embodiment the support apparatus has a tubular body with at least one slot running in a helical pattern about the body. The slot enables the tubular body to be extend. [0011]
  • An advantage of the invention is that physically weak or damaged tubular structures that are residing in the wellbore can be supported rather than requiring costly replacement or other remedial actions. [0012]
  • Another advantage of the invention is that, in some situations, the support device can be installed without requiring removal of the production string. [0013]
  • Another advantage of the invention is that after installation of the support apparatus, the tubular structure can be operated as normal. For example, if in normal operation the tubular structure is a conduit for fluids, fluids may continued to be flowed through the tubular structure after installation of the support apparatus. [0014]
  • Another advantage of the invention is that the devices are simple, and thus inexpensive to manufacture. [0015]
  • These and other advantages will be apparent from the accompanying drawings and detailed disclosure. [0016]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • Various objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent and more readily appreciated from the following description of the exemplary embodiments, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings of which: [0017]
  • FIGS. 1A and 1B are cross-sectional views of an exemplary support apparatus supporting a tubular structure in accordance with the present invention, the support apparatus having support ridges; [0018]
  • FIGS. 2A and 2B are cross-sectional views of another exemplary support apparatus supporting a tubular structure in accordance with the invention, the support apparatus having support ridges; [0019]
  • FIGS. 3A and 3B are cross-sectional views of another exemplary support apparatus supporting a tubular structure in accordance with the invention, the support apparatus having support bows; [0020]
  • FIGS. 4A and 4B are cross-sectional views of another exemplary support apparatus supporting a tubular structure in accordance with the invention, the support apparatus having outwardly biased support blocks; [0021]
  • FIGS. 5A and 5B are cross-sectional views of another exemplary support apparatus supporting a tubular structure in accordance with the invention, the support apparatus having a wire-wrapped support structure; [0022]
  • FIGS. 6A and 6B are partial cross-sectional side views of another exemplary support apparatus in accordance with the present invention, being inserted into a tubular structure (FIG. 6A) and expanded to support the tubular structure (FIG. 6B); [0023]
  • FIGS. 7A, 7B, and [0024] 7C are cross-sectional views in sequence depicting use of another exemplary support apparatus in accordance with the present invention, wherein FIG. 7A depicts the support apparatus being inserted into the tubular structure, FIG. 7B depicts the support apparatus is being expanded by inserting a mandrel through the support apparatus located inside of the tubular structure, and FIG. 7C depicts the support apparatus expanded to support the tubular structure;
  • FIGS. 8A and 8B and [0025] 8C are cross-sectional views in sequence depicting another exemplary internal support apparatus in accordance with the present invention, wherein FIG. 8A illustrates the support apparatus before activation and FIG. 8B illustrates the support apparatus after actuation; and 8C illustrates a selective injection tool actuating the support apparatus; and
  • FIGS. 9A and 9B are elevational views of two exemplary support plates for use with the exemplary embodiment depicted in FIGS. 8A and 8B.[0026]
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE EXEMPLARY EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION
  • Reference is now made to the drawings wherein like reference numerals denote like or similar parts throughout the Figures. [0027]
  • Referring first to FIGS. 1A and 1B, a wellbore [0028] 10 of a subterranean well has a tubular structure 12 residing therein for which internal support is desired. The term tubular structure is used herein to encompass virtually any type of device within the wellbore 10 that has a tubular or substantially tubular cross-section for at least a portion of its length. The tubular structure 12 can be, for example, a fluid permeable screen for preventing intrusion of particulate into the production tubing (including an expanded screen of the same type), a portion of flow tubing (such as the production tubing), or a portion of the wellbore casing. One of ordinary skill in the art will appreciate the applicability of the apparatus and methods described herein to many other various tubular structures 12 within the wellbore 10. An internal support apparatus 14 resides in the tubular structure 12, and has been fixedly installed such that there is substantially no movement of the support apparatus 14 in relation to the tubular structure 12. Thereafter, the support apparatus 14 remains in the tubular structure 12 indefinitely to provide support against collapse or further collapse and allow the tubular structure 12 to remain in operation. Thus, for example, if the tubular structure 12 is a sand screen, fluids are produced from the well as normal (i.e. from the formation through the sand screen).
  • One exemplary internal support apparatus [0029] 14 has an elongate tubular body 16 with one or more radially outwardly projecting support ridges 20 on its exterior. The tubular body 16 can be continuous (FIGS. 1A and 1B) or can have one or more apertures 18 to allow fluid flow therethrough (FIGS. 2A and 2B). The support ridges 20 run longitudinally along at least a portion of the length of the tubular body 16. While depicted in the figures as cylindrical tubing, the tubular body 16 can be of any profile and any cross-section. Thus, for example, the cylindrical cross-section tube can be substituted by a rectangular, square, triangular, hexagonal, or other cross-section tube.
  • The number of support ridges [0030] 20 depends on the particular application and the manner of support required by the tubular structure 12, and can be a single ridge or a plurality of ridges. For example, two support ridges 20 in opposing relation on the surface of the tubular body 16 will provide support primarily to opposing portions of the tubular structure 12. Multiple ridges 20 distributed about the tubular body 16 (see FIG. 1B) will provide more even support, because the ridges will bear more evenly on the interior surface of the tubular structure 12. If more than one ridge 20 is provided, the ridges 20 can be equally spaced about the tubular body, or spaced in an irregular configuration depending the manner of support required by the tubular structure 12. Ridges 20 need not be continuous along the entire length of the tubular body 16. Also, ridges 20 need not be of rectangular section as depicted in the figures, but can be of other shapes, for example but in no means by limitation, domed, triangular, trapezoidal or otherwise.
  • In use, the internal support apparatus [0031] 14 is positioned in the interior of the tubular structure 12 to which it is providing support, and remains in place during operation of the tubular structure 12. In one exemplary embodiment, the support apparatus 14 is configured such that the ridges 20 reside in light contact with or slightly inset from the interior surface of the (undamaged) tubular structure 12. The term “light contact” is used herein to describe that the support apparatus 14 continuously or intermittently contacts the tubular structure 12 without substantially expanding the tubular structure 12. The term “slight inset” is used herein to describe that the support apparatus 14 resides in close proximity with the inner surface of the tubular structure 12, but does not make contact with the tubular structure 12. When in close proximity, the tubular structure 12 can flex inward into contact with the support apparatus 14, but does not flex enough that the tubular structure 12 is substantial damaged (ex. bend, tear or break).
  • The distance between the outermost surface of opposing ridges [0032] 20 can be equal to or slightly smaller than an interior dimension of the undamaged tubular structure 20. Thus, if the support apparatus 14 is inserted into an undamaged tubular structure 12, the ridges 20 will support against collapse of the tubular structure 12. If inserted into a collapsed or otherwise damaged tubular structure 12, the ridges 20 will expand the collapsed portion of the tubular structure 12 to approximately its original interior dimensions. The same effect can be accomplished by configuring the support apparatus 14 such that the ridges 20 reside slightly inset and not touching the inner surface of the tubular structure 12. However, if the ridges are slightly inset, the support apparatus 14 will be easier to pass into and out of the tubular structure 12. Alternately, in a collapsed or otherwise damaged tubular structure 12, the ridges 20 can be configured to lightly contact the inner surface of the damaged portion of the tubular structure 12 to support against further collapse while not substantially expanding the collapsed portion. As above, the same effect can be accomplished by configuring the support apparatus 14 such that the ridges 20 are slightly inset from the inner surface of the damaged portion. For example, the distance between the outermost surface of opposing ridges 20 is equal to or slightly smaller than an interior dimension of the damaged portion of the tubular structure 20. It may also be desirable to configure the support apparatus 14 such that the ridges 20 would partially expand a damaged portion of the tubular structure 12, but not fully expand the damaged portion to its original dimension. For example, the distance between the outermost surface of opposing ridges 20 is greater than an interior dimension of the damaged portion, but smaller than the interior dimension of an undamaged portion of the tubular structure. The distance between the outermost surfaces of opposing ridges 20 can be different between different pairs of opposing ridges 20 on the same support apparatus 14 to accommodate various internal dimensions (damaged or undamaged) of the tubular structure 12.
  • The longitudinal length of internal support apparatus [0033] 14 is preferably sized to span the portion of the tubular structure 12 requiring support. However, multiple support apparatus 14 can be joined together to span the portion of the tubular structure 12 requiring support, as is shown in FIG. 2A.
  • The leading edge of the ridges [0034] 20 can have a mandrel surface 22 sloping inward and forward towards the center line of the support apparatus 14. The mandrel surface 22 acts as a mandrel or a wedge to force the tubular structure 12 over the ridges 20 as the support apparatus 14 is inserted into the tubular structure 12. Thus, if the support apparatus 14 is configured to expand the tubular structure 12, the support apparatus 14 will more easily and smoothly pass into and expand the tubular structure 12, reducing the risk of the support apparatus 14 hanging on tubular structure 12 or causing further damage.
  • Referring now to FIGS. 3A and 3B, rather than having fixed ridges [0035] 20 as discussed with respect to the support apparatus 14 of FIGS. 1 and 2, an alternate support apparatus 70 can have radially resilient support bows 72. One end of each support bow 72 is secured to the tubular body 16, for example with a weld or fastener 74, such as a screw or bolt. The support bows 72 are semi-elliptic springs that arch radially outward from the tubular body 16, resisting but allowing radial compression inward towards the tubular body 16. As above, one or multiple bows can be arranged about the exterior tubular body 16. The number and orientation will depend on the particular support required by the tubular structure 12, as discussed above. The support apparatus 14 can be configured such that the resilient support bows 72 make light contact with the inner surface of an undamaged tubular structure 12. As can be seen in FIG. 3A, when inserted into the tubular structure 12, the resilient support bows 72 will then flex inward to accommodate and provide support to a collapsed or damaged portion of the tubular structure 12. Thus, the support apparatus 70 can be fixably installed in a damaged or undamaged tubular structure 12 and provide support during the operation of the tubular structure 12. As above, apertures 18 can be optionally be provided in the tubular body 16 to allow passage of fluid from the exterior of the tubular body 16 into the interior of the tubular body 16.
  • Referring to FIGS. 4A and 4B, an alternate embodiment of the support apparatus [0036] 76 incorporates radially movable support blocks 78 biased outward from the tubular body 16. As above, apertures 18 can optionally be provided in the tubular support body 16 to allow for flow therethrough. The support apparatus 76 has an exterior housing 80 concentric about the tubular body 16. The support blocks 78 reside between the exterior housing 80 and the tubular body 16, and extend partially out from the exterior housing 80. Springs 84 are positioned between the support blocks 78 and the tubular body 16 to bias the support blocks 78 radially outwardly. The support blocks 78 are configured to be moveable between a retracted position, with the springs 84 compressed and the support block 78 adjacent the tubular body 16, and an extended position, with the springs 84 expanded and the support block 78 radially offset from the tubular body 16. Each of the support blocks 78 has a stop flange 82 about its perimeter that is configured to abut the inner surface of the housing 80 when the support block 78 is fully extended to retain the block 78 in the housing 80. The support apparatus 12 can be configured such that the support blocks 78 bear lightly against the inner surface of the undamaged tubular structure 12. However, when the support apparatus 76 is inserted into a tubular structure 12 that has collapsed or partially collapsed, the support blocks 78 in the portion of the collapsed tubular structure 12 will be pushed radially in towards the tubular body 16, and conform to the interior shape of the collapsed tubular structure 12. The radially outward bias of the support blocks 78 then provides radial support to the collapsed or partially collapsed portion of the tubular structure 12. Thus, the support apparatus 76 can be fixably installed in a damaged or undamaged tubular structure 12 and provide support during the operation of the tubular structure 12.
  • Referring to FIGS. 5A and 5B, in another embodiment, the tubular body [0037] 16 can have a screen-type support structure 24 that functions similarly to the ridges 20 described above. The screen-type support structure can be built-up in a wire-wrapping process and with wire circumferentially or spirally wrapped along the longitudinal length of the tubular body 16 to form the support structure 24. Additionally, wire laid longitudinally beneath the circumferential or spiral wire can be used to build up the screen structure 24. The screen-type support structure 24 can be constructed to operate as a screen or filter, for example by deliberate spacing of the wire-wrap to reduce entry of particulate (such as sand and gravel) into the interior of the support apparatus 14. As above, the tubular body 16 can have apertures 18 to allow fluid passage therethrough. Also, as above, the support apparatus 14 can have a sloped mandrel surface 26 on its leading edge. However, as seen in FIG. 5A, the mandrel surface 26 need not be part of the ridges 20 (as in FIG. 1A) and can be provided on the tubular body 16 itself. A mandrel surface 26 integrated into the tubular body 16 can be used with any of the embodiments disclosed herein. The support apparatus 14 can be configured to reside in light contact with the undamaged tubular structure 12, in light contact with a damaged portion of the tubular structure 12, slightly inset from the undamaged or damaged portion of the tubular structure 12, or to expand a damaged portion of the tubular structure 12.
  • The internal support apparatus [0038] 14 can be configured to seal or substantially seal with the tubular structure 12 at one or more points along its length. As can be seen in FIG. 5A, support apparatus 14 can be provided with a seal 28 positioned to substantially continuously abut the inner diameter of the tubular structure 12 and seal or substantially seal against passage of fluid or particulate from below the seal 28 into the annular space between the support apparatus 14 and the interior surface of tubular support structure 12. Seal 28 is provided in the rear portion of mandrel 24, but can be provided at any point along the support apparatus 14 that would place the seal in a position to seal against the interior surface of tubular structure 12. An additional seal 30 can be provided on the support apparatus 14 to abut and seal or substantially seal against another portion of the interior of the tubular structure 12. Provided that flow from below seal 28 and above seal 30 is prevented, the support apparatus 14 will isolate an interval of the tubular structure 12 between the seals, so that only flow from between the seals can pass through the internal support apparatus 14. The support apparatus 14 may, for example, be configured to filter particulate, as described above, and to use seals to isolate a portion of a ruptured tubular structure 12 so that flow entering the rupture will be filtered through the support apparatus 14. In another example, the internal support apparatus 14 may be configured without apertures, thus isolating a damaged portion of the tubular structure 12 with seals will minimize intrusion of fluid from a damaged portion. Although such seals 28 and 30 are only discussed with respect to support apparatus 14 having a screen-type support structure 24, similar seals can be provided on any of the exemplary embodiments described herein.
  • While each of the embodiments described herein can be fixed relative to the tubular structure [0039] 12 frictionally, FIG. 5A depicts the support apparatus 14 supported from a tubing hanger 32 that engages the wellbore, directly or indirectly, to fix the support apparatus 14 relative to the tubular structure. The tubing hanger 32 can be configured to seal against the inner diameter of the wellbore 10 or casing in the wellbore 10. Support apparatus 14 can join to the hanger 32 to secure the position of the support apparatus 14 relative to the tubular structure 12. Each of the exemplary embodiments described herein can be supported from a tubing hanger 32 in a similar manner.
  • FIGS. 6A and 6B depict another exemplary internal support apparatus [0040] 34 in axially extended and radially contracted mode respectively. The support apparatus 34 is tubular and has a helical slot 36 along at least a portion of its length. The helical slot 36 allows the support apparatus 34 to be extended axially, and as it extends axially, to contract radially in a manner similar to axially stretching a coil spring. Thus, unextended (FIG. 6B) the support apparatus 34 can be configured to provide support to the tubular structure 12, but when extended axially, the support apparatus 34 can pass easily into and out of the tubular structure 12. Also, when axially extended, the reduced outer dimension of the radially contacted support apparatus 34 aids in navigating bends and other restricted diameter portions of the wellbore 10. Also as above, apertures 18 can optionally be provided in the support apparatus 34 to allow fluid to flow through therethrough. An anchoring mechanism 38, for example slips or a dog-type anchoring mechanism, can be provided at one or both ends of the support apparatus 34 to engage the interior of the tubular structure 12 or other element in the wellbore 10.
  • In use, the internal support apparatus [0041] 34 is contracted radially by axially extending the apparatus 34 with a setting tool 40 (FIG. 6A). Setting tool 40 is a tool that grips the support apparatus 34 about the portion having helical slots 36 and that is actuable to extend, thus extending the portion of the support apparatus 34 having helical slots 36. The setting tool 40 can also be actuable to retract. For example, a hydraulic setting tool 40 can incorporate a piston and rod assembly, wherein hydraulic fluid supplied from a reservoir and electric pumps contained in or about the setting tool 40 or from the surface, is used to extend and/or retract the rod. An electric setting tool 40 can use electric motors together with a screw mechanism or gear train to extend and retract the rod. An example of a tool that can be used as the setting tool 40 is the Downhole Power Unit available from Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.
  • The setting tool [0042] 40 is operated to engage the support apparatus 34 about the portion having helical slots 36, and extended to axially extend and radially contract the support apparatus 34. Once axially extended, the support apparatus 34 can then be tripped into the well and positioned in the tubular structure 12 at the area for which support is desired. Thereafter, the setting tool 40 is contracted and removed (FIG. 6B), thereby axially contracting and radially expanding the support apparatus 34 until the support apparatus 34 reaches its unextended position or contacts the interior of the tubular structure 12. The anchoring mechanism 38 can be set to engage the tubular structure 12 and secure the position of the support apparatus 34 in a manner known in the art, for example through manipulation of the tubing string or hydraulically. In an exemplary embodiment where the anchoring mechanism 38 is slips, the slips are configured to engage the tubular structure 12 when the support apparatus 34 is expanded. The slips at each end of the support apparatus 34 are oppositely oriented such that when the support apparatus 34 is expanded and the slips contact with the tubular structure 12, the slips at a forward end of the support apparatus 34 will engage the tubular structure 12 and prevent forward movement of the support apparatus 34, and slips at a rearward end of the support apparatus 34 will engage the tubular structure 12 and prevent rearward movement of the support apparatus 34.
  • The support apparatus [0043] 34 can be configured to make light contact with the inner surface of the undamaged tubular structure 12 or be slightly inset from the inner surface of the undamaged tubular structure 12 when fully expanded (i.e. axially contracted). Thus, if the tubular structure 12 is collapsed or otherwise damaged, the support apparatus 34 can be fully expanded to expand the damaged portion of the tubular structure 12 back to substantially its original interior dimensions. The support apparatus 34 can also be partially expanded to partially expand the damaged tubular structure 12. It is important to note here that, if not substantially plastically deformed when axially extended, the support apparatus 34 will tend to spring back from an extended, radially contracted state to its original retracted, radially expanded state without assistance from the setting tool 40. However, if a portion of the tubular structure 12 is collapsed the support apparatus 34 may not be able to overcome and expand the damaged portion of the tubular structure 12 on its own. In such a case, the support apparatus 34 may, by its own tendency to retract and radially expand, fully expand into contact with undamaged areas of the tubular structure 12 and partially expand into contact with the damaged areas of the tubular structure 12, thereby conforming to the inner contours of the tubular structure 12. Alternately, the setting tool 40 can be powered to retract and radially expand the support apparatus 34 to overcome and expand the damaged portion of the tubular structure 12. If the support apparatus 34 is axially extended enough to plastically deform, it will not completely spring back to its original retracted state, and the setting tool 40 can be powered to retract and radially expand the support apparatus 34.
  • Alternately, the support apparatus [0044] 34 can be configured to make light contact with or be slightly inset from the inner surface of a collapsed or damaged portion of the tubular structure 12 when fully expanded to support against further collapse while not substantially expanding the collapsed portion. It may also be desirable to configure the support apparatus 34 such that when expanded it would partially expand a damaged portion of the tubular structure 12, but not fully expand the damaged portion to its original dimensions.
  • In any configuration, whether inset, lightly contacting, or expanding the tubular structure [0045] 12, the support apparatus 34 can be fixably installed in a damaged or undamaged tubular structure 12 and provide support during the operation of the tubular structure 12.
  • FIGS. 7A, 7B and [0046] 7C depict another exemplary internal support apparatus 42. The support apparatus 42 is a tubular body having an outer diameter smaller than the inner diameter of the tubular structure 12 (FIG. 7A). The support apparatus 42 has a plurality of apertures 18. The apertures 18 can be slot-shaped, longitudinally oriented, and arranged in an overlapping pattern about the support apparatus 42, though other shapes may be used in this invention. The apertures 18 expand thus enabling the support apparatus 42 to be plastically deformed into an expanded state (FIG. 7C) in a manner similar to expanding an expandable sand-control screen. The number and size of apertures 18 and the wall thickness of the support apparatus 42 can be optimized to provide strength to the support apparatus 42 when expanded. Once positioned in the tubular structure 12, the support apparatus 42 can be anchored at one or both ends to the borehole 10, for example by joining with a tubing hanger 32, or to the tubular structure 12 itself. A mandrel expansion tool 44, similar to existing tools used to expand expandable sand-control screens, can be forced through the support apparatus 42 to expand the diameter of the support apparatus 42 into light contact with or slightly inset from the interior surface of the undamaged tubular structure 12. As such, the support apparatus 42 will provide support the tubular structure 12. Additionally, if the tubular structure 12 is collapsed or otherwise damaged, the mandrel expansion tool 44 will expand the damaged portion of the tubular structure 12. Thus, the support apparatus 42 can be fixably installed in a damaged or undamaged tubular structure 12 and provide support during the operation of the tubular structure 12.
  • FIGS. 8A and 8B depict another exemplary internal support apparatus [0047] 46. The support apparatus 46 has a tubular body portion 48 carrying a plurality of support plates 50. As seen in FIG. 9A, the support plates 50 can be elliptical and have an elliptical opening 52 that receives the body portion 48. The minor axis A1 of the elliptical opening 52 is sized to closely receive the body portion 48, while the major axis A2 of the elliptical opening 52 is sized to allow the support plates 50 to tilt on the body portion 48 about the minor axis A1 as shown in FIG. 8A. The outer dimension of the support plates 50 is greatest along the major axis A2, and smaller along the minor axis A1 such that with the support plates 50 in a tilted position a distance measured along the major axis A2 and perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the tubular body 48 is less than the inner diameter of the undamaged tubular structure 12 and when support plates 50 are disposed substantially perpendicular (“upright”) to the axis of the body portion 48, the support plates 50 will effectively increase the outside dimension of support apparatus 46 to provide support to the tubular structure 12. The length of minor axis A1 of the support plates 50 is less than the inner diameter of the undamaged tubular structure 12. The major axis A2 of the support plates 50 may be slightly smaller than the inner diameter of the tubular structure 12, so that when moved from a tilted position to an upright position, the support plates 50 make light contact with the inner surface of the undamaged tubular structure 12. Alternately, the major axis A2 of the support plates 50 may be equal to or slightly larger than the inner diameter of the tubular structure 12 to slightly expand the tubular structure 12 when actuated from a tilted to an upright position. The support plates 50 can be other shapes than the elliptical shape shown in FIG. 9A, for example, a flat sided oval as in FIG. 9B, rectangular, or other shape.
  • The support plates [0048] 50 are spaced on the body portion 48 by a plurality of slide rings 54 sized to coaxially receive and slide on the body portion 48. Slide rings 54 each accommodate a lock-ring 56 that is biased inward against the body portion 48, and body portion 48 has corresponding lock-ring grooves 58. With the support plates 50 in a tilted position (FIG. 8A), the slide rings 54 freely slide on the body portion 48. However, the lock-ring grooves 58 are spaced such that if the respective lock-ring 56 of two or more slide rings 54 locks into adjacent lock-ring grooves 58, the slide rings 54 will be spaced to support the support plates 50 substantially perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the body portion 48 (FIG. 8B).
  • The body portion [0049] 48 has a hydraulic chamber 60 that receives and seals with the slide ring 54 at one end of the support plate 50 stack. A hydraulic passage 62 in body portion 48 feeds the hydraulic chamber 60. The hydraulic passage 62 can receive pressure, for example, from the interior of the support apparatus 12 with a selective injection tool 64 (FIG. 8C) that is insertable into the inner diameter of the support apparatus 46, seals 66 around passage 62, and communicates pressurized hydraulic fluid into the passage 62. An example of a device suitable for use as a selective injection tool 64 is the Selective Injection Packer available from Halliburton Energy Services, Inc.
  • The support plates [0050] 50 and slide rings 54 are bounded at one end by the hydraulic chamber 60 and at the other by a stop member 68 affixed to the body portion 48. As pressure is supplied to the hydraulic chamber 60, the end-most slide ring 54 is forced axially towards the support plates 50 and other slide rings 54. The support plate 50 adjacent the stop member 68, bears against the stop member 68, and the support plates 50 and slide rings 54 are forced together forcing the support plates 50 into substantially perpendicular relation with the body portion 48. The lock-rings 56 of the slide rings 54 snap into their respective lock-ring grooves 58 and lock the slide rings 54 into position on the body portion 48, thus locking the support plates 50 in substantially perpendicular relation to the body portion 48.
  • In use, the support plates [0051] 50 are arranged in the tilted position and tripped into the well and positioned in the tubular structure 12. Once in position, the hydraulic chamber 60 is pressurized (for example, with the selective injection tool 64), forcing the slide rings 54 and support plates 50 to tightly stack against the stop member 68 and forcing support plates 50 into substantially perpendicular relation with the body portion 48. When tightly stacked, the lock-rings 56 snap into corresponding lock-ring grooves 58 and lock the slide rings 54 in place and the support plates 50 in position to support the tubular structure 12. Thus, the support apparatus 46 can be fixably installed in a damaged or undamaged tubular structure 12 and provide support during the operation of the tubular structure 12.
  • Although several exemplary embodiments of the methods and systems of the invention have been illustrated in the accompanying drawings and described in the foregoing description, it will be understood by those skilled in the art that the invention is not limited to the embodiments disclosed, but is capable of numerous rearrangements, modifications and substations without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the following claims. [0052]

Claims (52)

We claim:
1. An internal support apparatus for fixed installation in a tubular structure that is residing in a wellbore, comprising:
an elongate body;
at least one support member along a length of the elongate body and projecting outward therefrom, wherein the at least one support member projects at least into close proximity with an interior surface of the tubular structure when the apparatus is inserted into the tubular structure.
2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the elongate body is tubular, and further comprising at least one aperture in the elongate body for passage of fluids between an interior and an exterior of the elongate body.
3. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the at least one support member is at least one ridge running longitudinally on the elongate body.
4. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the at least one support member is a plurality of ridges running longitudinally on the elongate body and substantially equally spaced about the circumference of the elongate body.
5. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the at least one support member is wire wrapped around the elongate body.
6. The apparatus of claim 5 wherein the wire is wrapped in a pattern to act as a filter.
7. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the at least one support member is residing in substantially perpendicular relation to the axis of the elongate body.
8. The apparatus of claim 7 wherein the at least one support member is changeable from a first position residing in substantially perpendicular relation to the axis of the elongate body to a second position residing at an acute angle to the axis of the elongate body; and
wherein in the first position, a longest distance between the at least one support member and the axis of the elongate body is greater than a longest distance between the at least one support member and the axis of the elongate body in the second position.
9. The apparatus of claim 7 wherein the at least one support member tilts about a tilt axis perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the elongate body from a first position residing in substantially perpendicular relation to the longitudinal axis of the elongate body to a second position residing at an acute angle to the longitudinal axis of the elongate body; and
wherein a dimension of the at least one support member measured along the tilt axis is smaller than a dimension of the at least one support member measured perpendicular to the tilt axis.
10. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the at least one support member has a sloping surface on one end adapted to expand the tubular structure about the internal support apparatus as the internal support apparatus is inserted into the tubular structure.
11. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the elongate body has a sloping surface on one end adapted to expand the tubular structure about the internal support apparatus as the internal support apparatus is inserted into the tubular structure.
12. The apparatus of claim 1 further comprising at least one seal for substantially sealing the elongate body to the tubular structure.
13. The apparatus of claim 12 wherein the at least one seal is at least two seals spaced apart to seal an interval of the tubular structure.
14. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the tubular structure is at least partially collapsed, and wherein the at least one support member projects at least into light contact with an interior surface of a collapsed portion of the tubular structure.
15. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the tubular structure is at least partially collapsed, and wherein the at least one support member projects radially past an interior surface of a collapsed portion of the tubular structure such that the collapsed portion must expand to receive the support apparatus.
16. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the at least one support member projects at least into light contact with an interior surface of the tubular structure.
17. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the tubular structure is affixed to the wellbore.
18. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein the at least one support member is movable parallel to a radius of the tubular body, and wherein the at least one support member is biased radially outward.
19. An apparatus for insertion into a tubular structure that is residing in a wellbore, comprising:
a tubular body having at least one slot running in a helical pattern about the body, wherein the slot is adapted to allow the tubular body to be extended axially, and extending the tubular body axially from a first position to a second position contracts the tubular body radially.
20. The apparatus of claim 19 wherein in a second position, a largest dimension of the body measured perpendicular to the axis of the body is less than a smallest internal dimension of the tubular structure measured perpendicular to the axis of the tubular structure.
21. The apparatus of claim 19 wherein the body has apertures allowing fluid flow between an exterior of the body and an interior of the body.
22. The apparatus of claim 19 wherein the body is configured such that when residing in the tubular structure, the body in a first position makes light contact with an interior surface of the tubular structure.
23. The apparatus of claim 19 wherein the body is configured such that when residing in the tubular structure, the body in a first position expands the tubular structure.
24. The apparatus of claim 19 wherein the body is configured such that when residing in a collapsed portion of the tubular structure, the body in a first position expands the collapsed portion of the tubular structure.
25. The apparatus of claim 19 wherein the body is configured such that in a second position the body passes freely through the tubular structure.
26. The apparatus of claim 19 wherein the body is configured such that when residing in the tubular structure, the body in a first position is inset from an interior surface of the tubular structure.
27. The apparatus of claim 19 further comprising slips at an end of the body configured to engage an interior surface of the tubular structure when the body is in a first position.
28. A device for internally supporting a tubular structure positioned in a well bore, comprising:
an elongate tubular body having apertures that allow fluid communication between an exterior of the tubular body and an interior of the tubular body; and
a wire wrapped mesh about the exterior of the elongate tubular body;
wherein the device is configured such that when residing in the tubular structure, the device is positioned at least in close proximity with an interior surface of the tubular structure.
29. The device of claim 28 wherein the wire wrapped mesh comprises a wire wrapped circumferentially about the exterior of the elongate tubular body.
30. The device of claim 28 wherein the wire wrapped mesh is configured to filter against passage of sand into the interior of the elongate tubular body.
31. The device of claim 28 wherein the elongate tubular body has at least one seal adapted to substantially seal against the tubular structure.
32. The device of claim 28 wherein the elongate tubular body has at least two seals residing in spaced relation and adapted to substantially seal against the tubular structure.
33. The device of claim 28 wherein an end of the elongate tubular body has an inwardly sloping surface configured to act as a mandrel.
34. The device of claim 28 wherein the device makes light contact with an interior surface of the tubular structure.
35. A device for internal support of a tubular structure, comprising:
an elongate body; and
at least one support member changeable from a first position residing in substantially perpendicular relation to the axis of the elongate body to a second position residing at an acute angle to the axis of the elongate body; and
wherein in the first position, a longest distance measured perpendicular to the axis of the elongate body and between the at least one support member and the axis of the elongate body is greater than in the second position.
36. The device of claim 35 wherein in the second position the longest distance is less than a smallest internal dimension of the tubular structure.
37. The device of claim 35 wherein a height of the at least one support member is greater than a width of the at least one support member.
38. The device of claim 35 wherein the at least one support member is configured to make light contact with an interior surface of the tubular structure when in the first position.
39. The device of claim 35 wherein the at least one support member is configured to pass freely through the interior of the tubular structure when in the second position.
40. An internal support apparatus insertable into a tubular structure that is residing in a wellbore, the support apparatus comprising:
an elongate body; and
at least one support member movable between a radially retracted position and a radially extended position;
wherein the at least one support member is biased to the radially extended position.
41. The apparatus of claim 40 wherein the at least one support member is a semi-elliptic spring.
42. The apparatus of claim 40 wherein the at least one support member is biased to the radially extended position by at least one spring.
43. The apparatus of claim 40 configured such that when residing in the tubular structure the at least one support member in a radially extended position makes light contact with an interior surface of the tubular structure.
44. The apparatus of claim 40 wherein when residing in a tubular structure with at least a portion of the tubular structure collapsed, the at least one support member in a radially extended position makes light contact with a substantially uncollapsed portion of the tubular structure.
45. The apparatus of claim 44 wherein the at least one support member in a radially retracted position makes light contact with the collapsed portion of the tubular structure.
46. A method of providing support to a tubular structure that is residing in a wellbore, the method comprising:
inserting a tubular body having a plurality of apertures spaced thereabout into the tubular structure;
fixing the tubular body in the borehole; and
moving a mandrel through the tubular body thereby expanding the tubular body into light contact with a interior surface of the tubular structure.
47. The method of claim 46 wherein the tubular structure is at least partially collapsed, and wherein the step of moving a mandrel through the tubular body further comprises expanding at least the collapsed portion of the tubular structure.
48. The method of claim 46 wherein the apertures are slots.
49. A method for providing support to a tubular structure that is residing in a well, the method comprising:
inserting an elongate body having at least one support member into the tubular structure such that the at least one support member resides at least in close proximity with an interior surface of the tubular structure; and
producing fluids from the well through the tubular structure.
50. The method of claim 49 wherein the tubular structure is at least partially collapsed and wherein inserting an elongate body into the tubular structure comprises expanding the collapsed portion of the tubular structure.
51. The method of claim 49 wherein the support member resides in light contact with an interior surface of the tubular structure.
52. The method of claim 49 further comprising anchoring the elongate body in the wellbore.
US10/174,699 2002-06-19 2002-06-19 Internal support apparatus for downhole tubular structures and method of use Abandoned US20030234111A1 (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/174,699 US20030234111A1 (en) 2002-06-19 2002-06-19 Internal support apparatus for downhole tubular structures and method of use

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10/174,699 US20030234111A1 (en) 2002-06-19 2002-06-19 Internal support apparatus for downhole tubular structures and method of use
AU2003243654A AU2003243654A1 (en) 2002-06-19 2003-06-18 Internal support apparatus for downhole tubular structures
PCT/US2003/019362 WO2004001182A2 (en) 2002-06-19 2003-06-18 Internal support apparatus for downhole tubular structures

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20030234111A1 true US20030234111A1 (en) 2003-12-25

Family

ID=29733658

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10/174,699 Abandoned US20030234111A1 (en) 2002-06-19 2002-06-19 Internal support apparatus for downhole tubular structures and method of use

Country Status (3)

Country Link
US (1) US20030234111A1 (en)
AU (1) AU2003243654A1 (en)
WO (1) WO2004001182A2 (en)

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20040177972A1 (en) * 2003-03-12 2004-09-16 Hackworth Matthew R Collapse resistant expandables for use in wellbore environments
US20090294118A1 (en) * 2008-05-29 2009-12-03 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Method and apparatus for use in a wellbore
US20100006279A1 (en) * 2006-04-28 2010-01-14 Ruben Martinez Intervention Tool with Operational Parameter Sensors
US20100175895A1 (en) * 2007-06-26 2010-07-15 Paul David Metcalfe Permeability Modification
WO2013126193A1 (en) * 2012-02-23 2013-08-29 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Enhanced expandable tubing run through production tubing and into open hole
US9074466B2 (en) 2011-04-26 2015-07-07 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Controlled production and injection
US20150204168A1 (en) * 2013-01-08 2015-07-23 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc Expandable Screen Completion Tool
US20150354994A1 (en) * 2013-01-17 2015-12-10 Snecma Device for measuring the internal profile of a hollow shaft
US9359846B2 (en) 2009-12-23 2016-06-07 Schlumberger Technology Company Hydraulic deployment of a well isolation mechanism

Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2743743A (en) * 1948-01-22 1956-05-01 Charles I Galloup Leak detecting and sealing device
US3191677A (en) * 1963-04-29 1965-06-29 Myron M Kinley Method and apparatus for setting liners in tubing
US5014779A (en) * 1988-11-22 1991-05-14 Meling Konstantin V Device for expanding pipes
US5083608A (en) * 1988-11-22 1992-01-28 Abdrakhmanov Gabdrashit S Arrangement for patching off troublesome zones in a well
US5785120A (en) * 1996-11-14 1998-07-28 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Tubular patch
US5909773A (en) * 1993-05-25 1999-06-08 Pall Corporation Method of repairing a damaged well
US5957195A (en) * 1996-11-14 1999-09-28 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Wellbore tool stroke indicator system and tubular patch
US6253850B1 (en) * 1999-02-24 2001-07-03 Shell Oil Company Selective zonal isolation within a slotted liner
US6527049B2 (en) * 1998-12-22 2003-03-04 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Apparatus and method for isolating a section of tubing

Family Cites Families (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2046870A (en) * 1934-05-08 1936-07-07 Clasen Anthony Method of repairing wells having corroded sand points
US3482629A (en) * 1968-06-20 1969-12-09 Shell Oil Co Method for the sand control of a well
US3818734A (en) * 1973-05-23 1974-06-25 J Bateman Casing expanding mandrel
US4770336A (en) * 1986-03-17 1988-09-13 Howard Smith Screen Company Well screen centralizer and method for constructing centralizer and for joining of well screens
US5107927A (en) * 1991-04-29 1992-04-28 Otis Engineering Corporation Orienting tool for slant/horizontal completions
US5709503A (en) * 1994-10-21 1998-01-20 M.J. Clancy & Sons Limited Method and apparatus for restoring a pipe or tunnel
WO2002010551A1 (en) * 2000-07-28 2002-02-07 Enventure Global Technology Liner hanger with slip joint sealing members and method of use

Patent Citations (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2743743A (en) * 1948-01-22 1956-05-01 Charles I Galloup Leak detecting and sealing device
US3191677A (en) * 1963-04-29 1965-06-29 Myron M Kinley Method and apparatus for setting liners in tubing
US5014779A (en) * 1988-11-22 1991-05-14 Meling Konstantin V Device for expanding pipes
US5083608A (en) * 1988-11-22 1992-01-28 Abdrakhmanov Gabdrashit S Arrangement for patching off troublesome zones in a well
US5909773A (en) * 1993-05-25 1999-06-08 Pall Corporation Method of repairing a damaged well
US5785120A (en) * 1996-11-14 1998-07-28 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Tubular patch
US5957195A (en) * 1996-11-14 1999-09-28 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Wellbore tool stroke indicator system and tubular patch
US6527049B2 (en) * 1998-12-22 2003-03-04 Weatherford/Lamb, Inc. Apparatus and method for isolating a section of tubing
US6253850B1 (en) * 1999-02-24 2001-07-03 Shell Oil Company Selective zonal isolation within a slotted liner

Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7191842B2 (en) * 2003-03-12 2007-03-20 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Collapse resistant expandables for use in wellbore environments
US20040177972A1 (en) * 2003-03-12 2004-09-16 Hackworth Matthew R Collapse resistant expandables for use in wellbore environments
US8220541B2 (en) * 2006-04-28 2012-07-17 Schlumberger Technology Corporation Intervention tool with operational parameter sensors
US20100006279A1 (en) * 2006-04-28 2010-01-14 Ruben Martinez Intervention Tool with Operational Parameter Sensors
US8555985B2 (en) 2007-06-26 2013-10-15 Paul David Metcalfe Permeability modification
US20100186969A1 (en) * 2007-06-26 2010-07-29 Paul David Metcalfe Downhole Apparatus
EP2292893A3 (en) * 2007-06-26 2011-05-18 Paul David Metcalfe Permeability modification
US8479810B2 (en) 2007-06-26 2013-07-09 Paul David Metcalfe Downhole apparatus
US20100175895A1 (en) * 2007-06-26 2010-07-15 Paul David Metcalfe Permeability Modification
US7779924B2 (en) 2008-05-29 2010-08-24 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Method and apparatus for use in a wellbore
US20090294118A1 (en) * 2008-05-29 2009-12-03 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Method and apparatus for use in a wellbore
US9359846B2 (en) 2009-12-23 2016-06-07 Schlumberger Technology Company Hydraulic deployment of a well isolation mechanism
US9341049B2 (en) 2011-04-26 2016-05-17 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Controlled production and injection
US9074466B2 (en) 2011-04-26 2015-07-07 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Controlled production and injection
US8776899B2 (en) 2012-02-23 2014-07-15 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Flow control devices on expandable tubing run through production tubing and into open hole
US9169724B2 (en) 2012-02-23 2015-10-27 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Expandable conical tubing run through production tubing and into open hole
US9464511B2 (en) 2012-02-23 2016-10-11 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Expandable tubing run through production tubing and into open hole
US9212542B2 (en) 2012-02-23 2015-12-15 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Expandable tubing run through production tubing and into open hole
US9322249B2 (en) 2012-02-23 2016-04-26 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Enhanced expandable tubing run through production tubing and into open hole
WO2013126193A1 (en) * 2012-02-23 2013-08-29 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Enhanced expandable tubing run through production tubing and into open hole
US9399902B2 (en) * 2013-01-08 2016-07-26 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc. Expandable screen completion tool
US20150204168A1 (en) * 2013-01-08 2015-07-23 Halliburton Energy Services, Inc Expandable Screen Completion Tool
US20150354994A1 (en) * 2013-01-17 2015-12-10 Snecma Device for measuring the internal profile of a hollow shaft
US9797757B2 (en) * 2013-01-17 2017-10-24 Snecma Device for measuring the internal profile of a hollow shaft

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
AU2003243654A8 (en) 2004-01-06
WO2004001182A3 (en) 2004-02-26
WO2004001182A2 (en) 2003-12-31
AU2003243654A1 (en) 2004-01-06

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6854522B2 (en) Annular isolators for expandable tubulars in wellbores
AU766855B2 (en) Profile formation
CA2280003C (en) Downhole packer
US7275601B2 (en) Radial expansion of tubular members
EP0862681B1 (en) Downhole apparatus and method for expanding a tubing
US7363690B2 (en) Method and apparatus for forming a mono-diameter wellbore casing
US7172021B2 (en) Liner hanger with sliding sleeve valve
US20060027371A1 (en) Apparatus and method
US6648071B2 (en) Apparatus comprising expandable bistable tubulars and methods for their use in wellbores
CA2406490C (en) Technique utilizing an insertion guide within a wellbore
AU784431B2 (en) Expandable packer isolation system
RU2103482C1 (en) Method for creating bore-hole in underground formation
US7441606B2 (en) Expandable fluted liner hanger and packer system
AU2004201970B2 (en) Packer with metal sealing element
CA2479960C (en) Method for installing an expandable coiled tubing patch
US7325602B2 (en) Method and apparatus for forming a mono-diameter wellbore casing
US6550539B2 (en) Tie back and method for use with expandable tubulars
US7231985B2 (en) Radial expansion of tubular members
US7712529B2 (en) Sand control screen assembly and method for use of same
US6655459B2 (en) Completion apparatus and methods for use in wellbores
US9528352B2 (en) Extrusion-resistant seals for expandable tubular assembly
US6752216B2 (en) Expandable packer, and method for seating an expandable packer
US20060065403A1 (en) Bottom plug for forming a mono diameter wellbore casing
US7828068B2 (en) System and method for thermal change compensation in an annular isolator
US20110005779A1 (en) Composite downhole tool with reduced slip volume

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: HALLIBURTON ENERGY SERVICES, INC., TEXAS

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:ECHOLS, RALPH;FREEMAN, TOMMIE AUSTIN;RICE, PATRICK W.;AND OTHERS;REEL/FRAME:012995/0204;SIGNING DATES FROM 20020607 TO 20020617

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

Free format text: ABANDONED -- FAILURE TO RESPOND TO AN OFFICE ACTION