US20030197595A1 - System and method for wireless control of multiple remote electronic systems - Google Patents

System and method for wireless control of multiple remote electronic systems Download PDF

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Publication number
US20030197595A1
US20030197595A1 US10351884 US35188403A US2003197595A1 US 20030197595 A1 US20030197595 A1 US 20030197595A1 US 10351884 US10351884 US 10351884 US 35188403 A US35188403 A US 35188403A US 2003197595 A1 US2003197595 A1 US 2003197595A1
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Prior art keywords
transmitter
control
wireless control
wireless
system
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Abandoned
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US10351884
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Thomas Olson
Michael Benson
Thomas Wright
Steven Geerlings
David Blaker
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Johnson Controls Technology Co
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Johnson Controls Technology Co
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G08SIGNALLING
    • G08CTRANSMISSION SYSTEMS FOR MEASURED VALUES, CONTROL OR SIMILAR SIGNALS
    • G08C17/00Arrangements for transmitting signals characterised by the use of a wireless electrical link
    • G08C17/02Arrangements for transmitting signals characterised by the use of a wireless electrical link using a radio link
    • GPHYSICS
    • G08SIGNALLING
    • G08CTRANSMISSION SYSTEMS FOR MEASURED VALUES, CONTROL OR SIMILAR SIGNALS
    • G08C2201/00Transmission systems of control signals via wireless link
    • G08C2201/30User interface
    • G08C2201/31Voice input
    • GPHYSICS
    • G08SIGNALLING
    • G08CTRANSMISSION SYSTEMS FOR MEASURED VALUES, CONTROL OR SIMILAR SIGNALS
    • G08C2201/00Transmission systems of control signals via wireless link
    • G08C2201/50Receiving or transmitting feedback, e.g. replies, status updates, acknowledgements, from the controlled devices
    • GPHYSICS
    • G08SIGNALLING
    • G08CTRANSMISSION SYSTEMS FOR MEASURED VALUES, CONTROL OR SIMILAR SIGNALS
    • G08C2201/00Transmission systems of control signals via wireless link
    • G08C2201/60Security, fault tolerance
    • G08C2201/62Rolling code
    • GPHYSICS
    • G08SIGNALLING
    • G08CTRANSMISSION SYSTEMS FOR MEASURED VALUES, CONTROL OR SIMILAR SIGNALS
    • G08C2201/00Transmission systems of control signals via wireless link
    • G08C2201/90Additional features
    • G08C2201/91Remote control based on location and proximity
    • GPHYSICS
    • G08SIGNALLING
    • G08CTRANSMISSION SYSTEMS FOR MEASURED VALUES, CONTROL OR SIMILAR SIGNALS
    • G08C2201/00Transmission systems of control signals via wireless link
    • G08C2201/90Additional features
    • G08C2201/92Universal remote control

Abstract

A transmitter for wirelessly controlling a plurality of remote electronic systems includes a memory, a transmitter circuit, and a control circuit. The memory is configured to store a plurality of control data messages, each control data message configured to control a different remote electronic system. The control circuit is configured to command the transmitter circuit to transmit a plurality of wireless control signals in response to a single event, each wireless control containing a different control data message.

Description

    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. application Ser. No. 10/127,384, filed Apr. 22, 2002, hereby incorporated by reference.[0001]
  • BACKGROUND
  • In the field of wireless control of remote electronic systems, technological advances have been developed to improve convenience, security, and functionality for the user. One example is a trainable transceiver for use with various remote electronic systems, such as security gates, garage door openers, lights, and security systems. A user trains the trainable transceiver by, for example, transmitting a signal from a remote controller in the vicinity of the trainable transceiver. The trainable transceiver learns the carrier frequency and data code of the signal and stores this code for later retransmission. In this manner, the trainable transceiver can be conveniently mounted within a vehicle interior element (e.g., visor, instrument panel, overhead console, etc.) and can be configured to operate one or more remote electronic systems. [0002]
  • Further advances are needed in the field of wireless control of remote electronic systems, particularly in the case of using automotive electronics to control remote electronic systems. As automotive manufacturers are adding increased electronic systems to the vehicle to improve convenience, comfort, and productivity, simplifying the interface and control of these electronic systems is also becoming increasingly important. [0003]
  • Navigation systems, such as the global positioning system, vehicle compass, distance sensors, and other navigation systems, are being added to vehicles to provide navigation information to the vehicle occupants. On-board navigation systems also present opportunities to improve existing electronic systems to take advantage of vehicle location data which was not previously available. [0004]
  • What is needed is an improved wireless control system and method for wireless control of a remote electronic system from a vehicle, wherein the location of the vehicle is used to improve the convenience and functionality of the wireless control system. Further, what is needed is a system and method of training a wireless control system on a vehicle for wireless control of a remote electronic system based on the location of the vehicle. Further still, what is needed is a transmitter for wirelessly controlling a plurality of remote electronic systems. Further yet, what is needed is a system and method for wireless control of a garage door opener based on the location of the wireless control system. [0005]
  • The teachings hereinbelow extend to those embodiments which fall within the scope of the appended claims, regardless of whether they accomplish one or more of the above-mentioned needs. [0006]
  • SUMMARY
  • According to an exemplary embodiment, a transmitter for wirelessly controlling a plurality of remote electronic systems includes a memory, a transmitter circuit, and a control circuit. The memory is configured to store a plurality of control data messages, each control data message configured to control a different remote electronic system. The control circuit is configured to command the transmitter circuit to transmit a plurality of wireless control signals in response to a single event, each wireless signal containing a different control data message. [0007]
  • According to another exemplary embodiment, a transmitter for wirelessly controlling a plurality of remote electronic systems is described. The transmitter comprises means for storing a plurality of control data messages, each control data message configured to control a different remote electronic system, means for transmitting a wireless control, and means for commanding the transmitter circuit to transmit a plurality of wireless control signals in response to a single event, each wireless control containing a different control data message. [0008]
  • According to another exemplary embodiment, a method for training a transmitter for a wireless control system to wirelessly control a plurality of remote electronic systems based upon a single event is described. The method includes receiving a request from a user to begin training a plurality of wireless control signals to be associated with a single event, receiving the single event, receiving a first wireless control signal having a first data code, identifying and storing the first data code on the first wireless control, associating the first wireless control with the single event, whereby the wireless control system can wirelessly control a first remote electronic system by transmitting the first data code of the first wireless control in response to the single event. The method further includes receiving a second wireless control having a second data code, identifying and storing the second data code on the second wireless control, associating the second wireless control with the single event, whereby the wireless control system can wirelessly control a second remote electronic system by transmitting the second data code of the second wireless control in response to the single event, and receiving an end training signal.[0009]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The invention will become more fully understood from the following detailed description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein like reference numerals refer to like parts, and in which: [0010]
  • FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a vehicle having a wireless control system, according to an exemplary embodiment; [0011]
  • FIG. 2 is a block diagram of a wireless control system and a remote electronic system, according to an exemplary embodiment; [0012]
  • FIG. 3 is a schematic diagram of a visor having a wireless control system mounted thereto, according to an exemplary embodiment; [0013]
  • FIG. 4 is a flowchart of a method of training the wireless control system of FIG. 2, according to an exemplary embodiment; [0014]
  • FIG. 5 is a chart of a set of data pairs stored in memory, each data pair including a heading and a corresponding distance, according to an exemplary embodiment; [0015]
  • FIG. 6 is a block diagram of a transmitter for wirelessly controlling a plurality of remote electronic systems, according to an exemplary embodiment; [0016]
  • FIG. 7 is a flowchart of a method of wireless control of remote electronic systems based on location, according to an exemplary embodiment; [0017]
  • FIG. 8 is a flowchart of the “Calculate Distance” subroutine of the method of FIG. 7, according to an exemplary embodiment; [0018]
  • FIG. 9 is a flowchart of a “Calculate Heading” subroutine of the method of FIG. 7, according to an exemplary embodiment; [0019]
  • FIG. 10 is a flowchart of a “Home Check” subroutine of the method of FIG. 7, according to an exemplary embodiment; and [0020]
  • FIG. 11 is a flowchart of a “Vector Filter” subroutine of the method of FIG. 7, according to an exemplary embodiment.[0021]
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EXEMPLARY EMBODIMENTS
  • Referring first to FIG. 1, a vehicle [0022] 10, which may be an automobile, truck, sport utility vehicle (SUV), mini-van, or other vehicle, includes a wireless control system 12. Wireless control system 12, the exemplary embodiments of which will be described hereinbelow, is illustrated mounted to an overhead console of vehicle 10. Alternatively, one or more of the elements of wireless control system 12 may be mounted to other vehicle interior elements, such as, a visor 14 or instrument panel 16. Alternatively, wireless control system 12 could be mounted to a key chain, keyfob or other handheld device.
  • Referring now to FIG. 2, wireless control system [0023] 12 is illustrated along with a remote electronic system 18 which may be any of a plurality of remote electronic systems, such as, a garage door opener, a security gate control system, security lights, home lighting fixtures or appliances, a home security system, etc. For example, remote electronic system 18 may be a garage door opener, such as the Whisper Drive® garage door opener, manufactured by the Chamberlain Group, Inc., Elmhurst, Ill. Remote electronic system 18 may also be a lighting control system using the X10 communication standard. Remote electronic system 18 includes an antenna 28 for receiving wireless signals including control data which will control remote electronic system 18. The wireless signals are preferably in the ultra-high frequency (UHF) band of the radio frequency spectrum, but may alternatively be infrared signals or other wireless signals.
  • Wireless control system [0024] 12 includes a control circuit 30 configured to control the various portions of system 12, to store data in memory, to operate preprogrammed functionality, etc. Control circuit 30 may include various types of control circuitry, digital and/or analog, and may include a microprocessor, microcontroller, application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC), or other circuitry configured to perform various input/output, control, analysis, and other functions to be described herein. Control circuit 30 is coupled to an operator input device 32 which includes one or more push button switches 34 (see FIG. 3), but may alternatively include other user input devices, such as, switches, knobs, dials, etc., or even a voice-actuated input control circuit configured to receive voice signals from a vehicle occupant and to provide such signals to control circuit 30 for control of system 12. System 12 further includes a memory 74, which may be volatile or non-volatile memory, and may include read only memory (ROM), random access memory (RAM), flash memory, and/or any other memory type.
  • Control circuit [0025] 30 is further coupled to a display 36 which includes a light-emitting diode (LED), such as, display element 38. Display 36 may alternatively include other display elements, such as a liquid crystal display (LCD), a vacuum florescent display (VFD), or other display elements.
  • Wireless control system [0026] 12 further includes an interface circuit configured to receive navigation data from one or more navigation data sources, such as a GPS receiver 48, a vehicle compass 50, a distance sensor 52, and/or other sources of navigation data, such as gyroscopes, etc. Interface circuit 46 is an electrical connector in this exemplary embodiment having pins or other conductors for receiving power and ground, and one or more navigation data signals from a vehicle power source and one or more navigation data sources, respectively, and for providing these electrical signals to control circuit 30. GPS receiver 48 is configured to receive positioning signals from GPS satellites, to generate location signals (e.g., latitude/longitude/altitude) representative of the location of wireless control system 12, and to provide these location signals to control circuit 30 via interface circuit 46. Compass 50 includes compass sensors and processing circuitry configured to receive signals from the sensors representative of the Earth's magnetic field and to provide a vehicle heading to control circuit 30. Compass 50 may use any magnetic sensing technology, such as magneto-resistive, magneto-inductive, or flux gate sensors. The vehicle heading may be provided as an octant heading (N, NE, E, SE, etc.) or in degrees relative to North, or in some other format. Distance sensor 52 may include an encoder-type sensor to measure velocity and/or position or may be another distance sensor type. In this embodiment, distance sensor 52 is a magnetic sensor coupled to the transmission and configured to detect the velocity of the vehicle. A vehicle bus interface receives the detected signals and calculates the distance traveled based on a clock pulse on the vehicle bus. Other distance and/or velocity sensor types are contemplated, such as, using GPS positioning data.
  • Wireless control system [0027] 12 further includes a transceiver circuit 54 including transmit and/or receive circuitry configured to communicate via antenna 56 with remote electronic system 18. Transceiver circuit 54 is configured to transmit wireless control signals having control data which will control remote electronic system 18. Transceiver circuit 54 is configured, under control from control circuit 30, to generate a carrier frequency at any of a number of frequencies in the ultra-high frequency range, preferably between 260 and 470 megahertz (MHz), wherein the control data modulated on to the carrier frequency signal may be frequency shift key (FSK) or amplitude shift key (ASK) modulated, or may use another modulation technique. The control data on the wireless control signal may be a fixed code or a rolling code or other cryptographically encoded control code suitable for use with remote electronic system 18.
  • Referring now to FIG. 3, an exemplary wireless control system [0028] 12 is illustrated coupled to a vehicle interior element, namely a visor 14. Visor 14 is of conventional construction, employing a substantially flat, durable interior surrounded by a cushioned or leather exterior. Wireless control system 12 is mounted to visor 14 by fasteners, such as, snap fasteners, barbs, screws, bosses, etc. and includes a molded plastic body 58 having three push button switches disposed therein. Each of the switches includes a respective back-lit icon 40, 42, 44. Body 58 further includes a logo 60 inscribed in or printed on body 58 and having a display element 30 disposed therewith. During training and during operation, display element 38 is selectively lit by control circuit 30 (FIG. 2) to communicate certain information to the user, such as, whether a training process was successful, whether the control system 12 is transmitting a wireless control signal, etc. The embodiment shown in FIG. 3 is merely exemplary, and alternative embodiments may take a variety of shapes and sizes, and have a variety of different elements.
  • In operation, wireless control system [0029] 12 is configured to receive one or more characteristics of an activation signal sent from an original transmitter associated with remote electronic system 18. The original transmitter is a transmitter, typically a hand-held transmitter, which is sold with remote electronic system 18 or as an after-market item, and which is configured to transmit an activation signal at a predetermined carrier frequency and having control data configured to actuate remote electronic system 18. For example, the original transmitter can be a hand-held garage door opener transmitter configured to transmit a garage door opener signal at a frequency, such as 355 megahertz (MHz), wherein the activation signal has control data, which can be a fixed code or a cryptographically-encoded code. Remote electronic system 18 is configured to open a garage door, for example, in response to receiving the activation signal from the original transmitter.
  • Wireless control system [0030] 12 is configured to receive one or more characteristics of the activation signal from the original transmitter or from another source, which characteristics can include the frequency, control data, modulation scheme, etc. In this embodiment, wireless control system 12 is configured to learn at least one characteristic of the activation signal by receiving the activation signal, determining the frequency of the activation signal, and demodulating the control data from the activation signal. Wireless control system 12 can be a Homelink® trainable transceiver system, manufactured by Johnson Controls Interiors LLC, Holland, Mich., and may be constructed according to one or more embodiments disclosed in U.S. Pat. Nos. 6,091,343, 5,854,593 or 5,708,415, which are herein incorporated by reference in their entirety. Alternatively, wireless control system 12 can receive one or more characteristics of the activation signal by other methods of learning. For example, the one or more characteristics of the activation signal can be preprogrammed into memory 74 during manufacture of wireless control system 12 or can be input via operator input device 32 (which can include a key pad, buttons, etc.). In this manner, wireless control system 12 need not actually receive the activation signal in order to receive characteristics of the activation signal. Wireless control system 12 can receive the characteristics of the signal by any of these methods and store the characteristics of the activation signal in memory 74.
  • According to one exemplary embodiment, wireless control system [0031] 12 is fixedly coupled to a vehicle interior element. This fixed coupling provides a convenient location for a trainable transmitter in vehicle 14, and further prevents an operator from losing, misplacing, dropping, or otherwise losing control of wireless control system 12. The term “fixedly coupled” refers to the characteristic that wireless control system 12 is not removable from the vehicle interior element, though it may be moved within the vehicle interior element (for example, in a sliding configuration).
  • In further operation, wireless control system [0032] 12 is configured for wireless control of remote electronic system 18 based on the location of wireless control system 12. Control circuit 30 is configured to receive navigation data from a navigation data source to determine a proximity between system 12 and system 18, and to command transceiver circuit 54 to transmit a wireless control signal based on the proximity between system 12 and system 18.
  • Several training steps can be performed by the user. Remote electronic system [0033] 18 is placed in an “auto open” mode. System 12 is also placed in an “auto open” mode. Both such mode selections can be selected using operator input devices. System 12 is trained to learn the location of remote electronic system 18, which may be defined as the location of one or more of a garage door, a security gate, a home lighting or appliance element, a home security system, the location of the home associated with remote electronic system 18, the location of antenna 28, or any other location associated with remote electronic system 18. In this exemplary embodiment, system 12 learns the location of remote electronic system 18 in one of two ways. In a first method, in which data from GPS receiver 48 is available, the user actuates one of switches 34 to change the mode of wireless control system 12 to a training mode. With system 12, and more particularly the antenna of GPS receiver 48, positioned at the location of remote electronic system 18, the user actuates one of the switches 34 to command control circuit 30 to take a location reading from GPS receiver 48 and to store this location information in memory, preferably in non-volatile memory, in order to train system 12 to learn the location of remote electronic system 18. Alternatively, in a system wherein GPS signals are not available, system 12 uses information from compass 50 and distance sensor 52 to train system 12 to learn the location of remote electronic system 18, as will now be described with reference to FIG. 4.
  • Referring to FIG. 4, an exemplary method of training a wireless control system on a vehicle for wireless control of a remote electronic system will now be described. At step [0034] 62, control circuit 30 identifies whether the user has requested system 12 to enter a training mode to begin training. For example, the user may hold down one, two, or more of switches 34 for a predetermined time period (e.g., 10 seconds, 20 seconds, etc.) to place control circuit 30 in a training mode, or the user may actuate a separate input device (not shown in FIG. 3) coupled to control circuit 30 (FIG. 2) to place system 12 in the training mode. Once training has begun, at step 64, control circuit 30 receives heading signals from compass 50 via interface circuit 46. Control circuit 30 records the vehicle heading in memory, wherein the vehicle heading is received from a GPS receiver or a compass. At step 66, control circuit 30 further receives distance signals representing the distance traveled by the vehicle from distance sensor 52 via interface circuit 46. The distance traveled is recorded in memory. Typically, the heading signals and distance traveled are recorded over one or more turns of vehicle 10 to provide a unique path which can be identified as a path associated with the vehicle approaching remote electronic system 18. Heading data and distance data are recorded as the vehicle makes at least one change in heading. Heading data and distance data are recorded in a set of data pairs representing a path beginning some distance from system 18 (e.g., one block, multiple blocks, one mile, several miles, etc.) and ending in the vicinity (e.g., less than a few hundred feet) of system 18.
  • Typically a vehicle operator will use between one and three routes to approach their home. The method described in FIG. 4 can be repeated for multiple routes. The operator may program some routes for which they wish to cause automatic transmission of wireless data, as will be described below, and may further choose not to program system [0035] 12 for other routes for which they do not want to cause automatic transmission of wireless signals. Preferably, training begins at a location that is far enough from the home that a unique route can be established, yet close enough to the home so that the route home is consistent over several trips home. The vehicle operator can decide whether to include the final turn into the driveway to make the route unique. If the final turn into the driveway is included, the automatic transmit function, as will be described hereinafter, will be delayed until after the car has completed its turn into the driveway.
  • When the user travels in the vehicle to the end of the training path (i.e., in the vicinity of system [0036] 18), the user stops the vehicle and presses one of switches 34 corresponding to the end of training, as indicated at step 68. Between the start and end of the training path, control circuit 30 records in memory the distance traveled on each heading during the drive to the home. Control circuit 30 will then record and save in memory one or more tables such as that shown in FIG. 5. FIG. 5 illustrates a set of predetermined heading and distance data represented as a plurality of data pairs, each data pair including a heading and a corresponding distance. For example, in the exemplary data pair shown, the heading of north is taken for a distance of 20 units (each unit representing a 20 foot increment in this exemplary embodiment, though alternative measures may be implemented), a heading of east for 30 units, and a heading of north for 10 units.
  • Having trained system [0037] 12 to identify the location of remote electronic system 18 using either GPS positioning signals or by identifying one or more paths to remote electronic system 18, or by otherwise training system 12 to learn the proximity or distance between system 12 and system 18, system 12 may then be used in its operative mode to automatically transmit wireless control data based on the proximity between system 12 and system 18. For example, when GPS positioning signals are used, during normal vehicle driving, control circuit 30 continuously monitors the location of the vehicle and, when the vehicle is within a predetermined distance (e.g., 5 miles, 1 mile, 2 blocks, etc.), control circuit 30 commands transceiver circuit 54 to transmit a wireless control signal having control data to control one or more of remote electronic systems 18. In this exemplary embodiment, the wireless control signal is transmitted automatically (i.e., without requiring the user to press a button) in two five-second bursts with a three second delay between bursts. Alternatively, the wireless control signal can be transmitted with greater or fewer numbers of bursts and with different durations and delay times.
  • In the case where vehicle compass and distance sensor data are utilized, control circuit [0038] 30 will continuously monitor heading and distance information via interface circuit 46 and will compare the heading and distance information to the sets of data pairs in memory representing one or more paths indicating when a vehicle returns to the home. When a match is identified, control circuit 30 will command transceiver 54 to transmit the wireless control signal. Preferably, a tolerance of +/−20% (or some other percentage) is provided for the distances during the comparison steps.
  • According to one exemplary embodiment, when wireless control system [0039] 12 is within a first proximity of remote electronic system 18, wireless control data is automatically transmitted in a plurality of bursts. Thereafter, wireless control system 12 monitors the proximity of system 12 to system 18 until the proximity is at a second proximity which is greater than the first proximity. After system 12 is outside the second proximity, system 12 is “reset,” such that when systems 12 and 18 are again within the first proximity, system 12 again automatically transmits the wireless control signal. Alternatively, the first and second proximities can be the same or the second proximity can be less than the first. In either event, system 12 advantageously prevents multiple retransmissions while system 12 is within the first proximity, but not having just returned home.
  • According to another exemplary embodiment, wireless control system [0040] 12 can be trained to automatically learn the pathway to remote electronic system 18. In this embodiment, system 12 continuously monitors travel vectors (i.e., distance and heading) and stores the vectors in a buffer. When system 12 detects a manual actuation of one of input devices 34 to send wireless control signals, system 12 concludes it is at or near system 18. Therefore, system 12 records a predetermined number of previous travel vectors (e.g., three, five, ten, etc.) in memory. The next time system 12 travels the same recorded travel vector pattern, system 12 automatically transmits wireless control data to actuate system 18. System 12 determines whether the same recorded travel vector pattern is traveled by waiting until a first vector of a pattern is found, then comparing the vector of the next turn to the next vector in the pattern, and so on, until all vectors in the pattern have been matched. Pattern matching and position matching (as with GPS distance data) can be used together to verify that the system works effectively. Preferably, system 12 requires the user to select this automatic training feature using one or more of input devices 34 before automatic training will take place. Multiple paths home can be recorded in this manner. Preferably, the travel path includes the turn into the driveway of the home so that automatic transmission of wireless control data can be prevented by stopping the vehicle on the street in front of the house.
  • Referring now to FIGS. [0041] 7-11, a method of wireless control of a remote electronic system based on location will be described, according to another exemplary embodiment. The method can be operable in software and/or hardware on system 12 in any of its various embodiments. At step 200, the “Calculate Heading” subroutine is called. Referring to FIG. 9, at step 202, every ⅛th second, the current heading of the vehicle is detected. At step 204, if the heading byte loaded is the first point of a heading vector, a heading average is set equal to the heading byte at step 206, a FirstPoint flag is set at step 208, and the method proceeds to step 210. At step 204, if the loaded heading is not the first point of a heading vector, the method proceeds to step 210.
  • At step [0042] 210, the change in heading is calculated by subtracting the average heading from the recently loaded heading. At step 212, if the heading change is positive, a new heading average is calculated at step 214 according to the following equation:
  • Heading Average=(7*HeadingAverage+(HeadingAverage+HeadingDelta))/8
  • At step [0043] 216, if the change in heading is less than 7 and not equal to 0, the heading average is incremented at step 218 and the subroutine returns at step 220. If the change in heading is greater than 7 or equal to 0, the heading average is not incremented, and the subroutine returns at step 220.
  • At step [0044] 212, if the heading change is not positive, the absolute value of the heading data is taken at step 222, and the heading average is calculated at step 224 using the same equation as step 214. After step 224, at step 226, if the heading delta is less than 7 and not equal to 0, the heading average is decremented at step 228, and the subroutine ends at step 220. At step 226, if the change in heading is greater than 7 or equal to 0, the method proceeds to step 220 to return to the main routine.
  • Referring again to FIG. 7, upon return of the “Calculate Heading” subroutine, the main routine calls the “Calculate Distance” subroutine at step [0045] 230. Referring to FIG. 8, at step 232, if the distance is the first distance point of a new vector, the distance accumulator is cleared at step 234, and a flag is set at step 236 to indicate that the distance of a new vector is being calculated. The method then proceeds to step 238. If the distance calculation is not at the beginning of a new vector at step 232, the method proceeds to step 238. At step 238, the distance is calculated as the sum of the previous distance accumulator (which is 0 in the case of a new vector) and the latest change in distance. At step 240, the subroutine returns to the main routine.
  • Referring again to FIG. 7, after the “Calculate Distance” subroutine at step [0046] 230, the main routine calls the “Vector Filter” subroutine at step 242. Referring to FIG. 11, at step 244, the absolute value of the change in heading is stored. If a new turn is detected at step 246, if the change in heading is greater than four units at step 248, the method proceeds to step 250. If the change in heading is not greater than four units, then the distance accumulator is saved as a temporary distance at step 251. At step 250, if the distance accumulator minus the temporary distance is greater than a predetermined distance tolerance, a pattern is stored at a pattern store routine 252 and the heading average is stored, the new turn flag and real turn flags are cleared, and the heading change is reset to a default heading tolerance at step 254. The method then returns at step 256 to the main routine.
  • Returning to step [0047] 246, if a new turn is not detected, the method proceeds to step 258 to determine if the recent change in heading is greater than a predetermined heading change. If not, a real turn flag is cleared and a heading change is reset to a default heading tolerance at step 260, and the method returns at step 256.
  • If the recent change in heading is greater than the predetermined heading change at step [0048] 258, a real turn accumulator is incremented and a heading change accumulator is decremented at step 262. At step 264, if the real turn accumulator is greater than two, a new turn flag is set and a start new vector flag is set at step 266. Subsequently, at step 268, the driving pattern of the vehicle is stored and the distance accumulator is stored, and the method returns to the main routine at step 256.
  • At step [0049] 264, if the real turn accumulator is not greater than two, the method returns to the main subroutine at step 256.
  • Referring again to FIG. 7, after the “Vector Filter” subroutine is executed in step [0050] 242, a “Home Check” subroutine is executed at step 270. Referring to FIG. 10, at step 272, if the system is configured for automatic transmission, the method proceeds to step 274 to see if the proximity of the system to the remote electronic system has been programmed. If so, the method proceeds to calculate the distance in latitude (step 276) and longitude (step 270) between the wireless control system and the remote electronic system. At step 280, if the systems are within a predetermined proximity, the “Transmit Start” flag is set at step 282 and the subroutine returns at step 284.
  • Referring to FIG. 7, if the vehicle is within the predetermined proximity of the home in step [0051] 286, the method proceeds to step 288 to determine whether the vehicle has been outside of a hysteresis range. If so, the “Open Only” command is transmitted at step 290 and the hysteresis range is reset at step 292. At step 294, the main routine is exited.
  • As can be seen, in the “Calculate Heading” subroutine of FIG. 9, the heading data is averaged using a weighted, running average. The current heading is compared to the heading average, and if the car has been traveling straight for some distance, there will be little difference between them. If, however, the car is in the process of turning, there will be a significant difference, and if the difference is past a predetermined threshold, then a new turn is considered to be taking place. Once the current heading matched the “Heading Average”, then the Heading Average is stored as the heading for the new vector, and the distance accumulator is reset to 0. The distance accumulator continues to increment from this point until a new turn has taken place. As soon as this new turn is detected, the value of the distance accumulator is stored as the distance value for the vector. Because this is how the vectors are stored, the heading data gets stored before the distance data. After each vector is stored, it can be compared to the pattern to see if it is one of the vectors leading to the residence. In other set of routines would control the comparison process. [0052]
    Functions
    void VectorFilter(void);
    // This routine filters the heading and distance information and determines
    when to store each into the vector
    void Calculate_Heading(void);
    // Handles the heading average and controls how the current heading is
    added or subtracted from the average
    void Calculate_Distance(void);
    //Handles the Distance accumulator. Speed data is added every time
    data is taken when a new vector is started. This gets stored as the distance
    void Transmit(void);
    //Controls the 5 second Homelink Transmission (Not Flowcharted)
    void ButtonCheck(void); (Not Flowcharted)
    // Polls the button and checks for a press
    void HomeCheck(void);
    // Checks to see if the we are at home yet
    Variables
    U16 Newturn :1; //This flag is set when a valid turn is detected and is
    cleared when the turn has stabilized
    U16 StartnewVector :1; // Set when a valid turn is detected and the
    distanceAccumulator is cleared out. If this flag is set,
    it is then cleared
    U16 FirstPoint :1;  //If this flag is set then its the first angle
    that is stored, and the current data gets stored as the
    HeadingAverage
    U08 Heading ; //The Heading data for the current Vector
    U16 Distance ; //The Distance data for the current Vector
    U08 DistanceTol; //The Distance value used to ensure a valid turn has
    been completed
    U08 DftHeadingTol; // The initial heading tolerance used before filtering
    U08 DftHeadingChange;
    U08 HeadingChange; //The Angle value used to determine that a turn
    has taken place
    U08 HeadingByte =0; // Current 1/8th second Heading data
    U08 HeadingAverage =0; // Current running average of the heading
    U08 HeadingDelta =0; //The difference taken by subtracting the
    HeadingAverage from the HeadingByte
    U32 DistAccumulator; //Contains the summation of the speed every 1/8th
    second for the current vector
    U16 DistanceVar; // Current 1/8th second speed
    U08 RealTurn; // Checks to see if an actual turn has occurred. Is incremented
    upon consecutive samples of the HeadingByte that are
    significantly different from the HeadingAverage.
    int PatternNum =0; // Controls which Pattern is currently being used
    int VectorNum =0; // Controls which Vector is currently being used
    U16 TempDistance; //This contains the distance driven, after making a valid turn,
    before the data is stable. This is compared to a constant, and
    when it is greater than the constant, the Heading information
    will be stored for that vector and a new vector will begin
    int TransmitCount =0; // Flags to control wireless control system to ensure that
    it only transmits for 5 seconds
    int TransmitStart =0;
    float Lat; //1/8th second Latitude data
    float Long; //1/8th second Longitude data
    float HomeLat =0; // Latitude in the driveway of the residence where the
    system will be used
    float HomeLong =0; // Longitude in the driveway of the residence where the
    system will be used
    int HomeTrained =0; // Flag indicating whether the system has been trained to
    a specific Lat/Long yet
    int HomeEnable =0; // Once this flag is set, then the product is free to transmit when
    its within tolerance of the Home Lat/Long
    float LatTol; // The tolerance that controls how far away from the Home
    Lat/Long the system will transmit
    float LongTol; // The tolerance that controls how far away from the Home
    Lat/Long the system will transmit
    double Latdiff; // Contains the absolute value of the difference between the
    Home Lat and the current Lat
    double Longdiff; // Contains the absolute value of the difference between the
    Home Long and the current Long
  • According to one exemplary embodiment, system [0053] 12 is configured for automatic transmission of wireless control signals as described in any one of the exemplary embodiments hereinabove, and is further configured to command transceiver circuit 54 to transmit the wireless control signal in response to actuation of one of switches 34. Thus, the vehicle driver has the option of relying on location-based, automatic transmission and/or manual transmission of wireless control signals.
  • Wireless control system [0054] 12 may be preprogrammed (e.g., during manufacture, at the dealership, etc.) with sufficient control data to operate one or more of remote electronic systems 18, or system 12 may employ a learning operation, wherein system 12 is trainable by learning the carrier frequency, data code, and/or modulation scheme on a received wireless signal. In this embodiment, transceiver 54 is configured to receive a wireless signal, for example from a hand-held remote transmitter suitable for use with one or more remote electronic systems 18. Control circuit 30 is configured to identify a data code on the received wireless signal and to store the data code in memory, wherein the wireless control signal to be transmitted by system 12 in response to automatic or manual transmission includes the stored data code. An exemplary trainable transceiver is described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,699,054, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference.
  • A further feature which may be implemented in any of the exemplary embodiments herein is a feature of sending two or more wireless control signals simultaneously or in sequence, each wireless control signal having control data for a different remote electronic system [0055] 18. For example, as a vehicle driver approaches the home, the driver may wish to open a security gate, open a garage door, turn on lights in the home, and disable a home security system, and the driver may wish to perform all these functions within a short period of time or in response to a single actuation of one of switches 34. According to one embodiment, the method of FIG. 4 includes a step wherein system 12 receives an indication from the user as to which of a plurality of wireless control signals are to be transmitted based on a single event (e.g., the location of the vehicle or based on actuation of one of switches 34). Thus, the user can select one or more wireless control signals which will automatically transmit when the vehicle is within a predetermined distance of the home (as determined by GPS signals or the predetermined heading/distance patterns).
  • Preferably, system [0056] 12 is configured to allow the user to select one or more wireless control signals to be transmitted automatically when the vehicle is in the vicinity of the house and one or more wireless control signals which are to be transmitted manually, i.e., in response to actuation of one or more of switches 34, each of the wireless control signals having different control data which will control a different remote electronic system 18. In one exemplary configuration, the user may wish to control a set of security lights and the garage door automatically, but the security date to open manually. In another configuration, the user may want the security light to be automatically turned on and the garage door to be manually operated. The training as to which of the wireless control signals are to be manually transmitted and which are to be automatically transmitted may be provided after step 62 in the method of FIG. 4, before step 68, or during a separate training operation.
  • According to one exemplary embodiment, the different wireless control signals will be transmitted in the order in which they were selected during training. [0057]
  • Referring now to FIG. 6, a transmitter or transceiver [0058] 70 for wirelessly controlling a plurality of remote electronic systems is illustrated, wherein the transmitter is configured to transmit a plurality of wireless control signals in response to a single event. Transmitter 70 includes a control circuit 72 similar to control circuit 30. Transmitter 70 further includes a memory 74, which may be a volatile or non-volatile memory, and may include read only memory (ROM), random access memory (RAM), flash memory, or other memory types. Transmitter 70 further includes a transmitter circuit 76 which may alternatively include receive circuitry, wherein transmitter circuit 76 is configured to transmit wireless control signals to one or more of remote electronic systems 18 (FIG. 2). According to an alternative embodiment, transmitter circuit 76 may include multiple transmitter circuits to enable the simultaneous transmission of multiple signals to multiple remote electronic systems 18. Transmitter 70 may be a hand-held transmitter, or may be mounted to a vehicle interior element. Transmitter 70 includes a memory 74 configured to store a plurality of control data, each control data configured to control a different remote electronic system. Transmitter 70 may further include an operator input device 78 and a display 80, which may have a similar configuration to operator input device 32 and display 36 in the embodiment of FIG. 2. The following feature of transmitting multiple wireless signals may be provided in the simplified transmitter of FIG. 6 or may alternatively be provided in system 12 in any of its various embodiments.
  • In operation, control circuit [0059] 72 is configured to command transmitter circuit 76 to transmit a plurality of wireless control signals over antenna 82 in response to a single event. Each wireless control signal contains a different control data message, each control data message being retrieved from memory 74. The wireless control signals may be radio frequency, infrared, or other wireless signals. The single event may be the operator actuation of operator input device 78 by a vehicle occupant. Alternatively, or in addition, control circuit 72 may be configured to receive navigation data and to determine a distance between the transmitter and the remote electronic system 18, in which case the single event can be the control circuit 72 determining that the transmitter 70 is within a predetermined distance of remote electronic system 18.
  • Control circuit [0060] 72 is user-programmable such that the switch in operator input device 78 causes transmitter circuit 76 to send a first wireless control signal (e.g., to turn on security lights, open a security gate, etc.) and the control circuit 72 automatically sends a second wireless control signal different than the first wireless control signal (e.g., to lift a garage door) when control circuit 72 determines that transmitter 70 is within a predetermined distance of remote electronic system 18. Further still, one switch within operator input device 78 may cause transmitter circuit 76 to send a first wireless control signal and a second switch within operator input 78 may cause transmitter 76 to send multiple control signals, wherein the multiple wireless control signals are transmitted simultaneously or in sequence.
  • In an exemplary embodiment wherein system [0061] 12 or transmitter 70 sends a plurality of different wireless control signals in response to actuation of one switch, one of the wireless control signals can be transmitted for a first predetermined time period (e.g., 1 to 2 seconds), then the second wireless control signals can be transmitted for a predetermined time period, (e.g., 1 to 2 seconds) and the cycle of transmissions can be repeated until the switch is released.
  • The features of the exemplary embodiments herein are particularly useful with garage door opener systems which can be programmed in an “up only” mode, wherein the garage door will open when a wireless control signal is received, but if the garage door is already open, the garage door will not close, but will remain open. A second mode is that in which receipt of a wireless control signal will cause a garage door opener to close if open and open if closed, and stop if in the process of closing or opening. Thus, system [0062] 12 or transmitter 70 can be configured to transmit a unique message which will place the garage door opener into the first mode, without requiring the user to manually switch the mode of the garage door opener from the second mode to the first mode.
  • Utilizing the feature of an “up only” mode, in an alternative embodiment of system [0063] 12, transceiver circuit 54 is configured to transmit a wireless control signal having control data which will control a garage door opener to open if the garage door is closed and to remain open if the garage door is already open when the wireless control signal is received. During training in this or any other embodiments, the location of system 12 can be recorded from GPS satellites 48 during the training operation. Thus, control circuit 30 is configured to record the location of the wireless control system 12 in response to actuation of operator input device 32.
  • In some situations, a garage door opener will not be configurable for “up only” operation. In these situations, an auxiliary wireless transmitter can be used. The auxiliary wireless transmitter is disposed in the vicinity of the garage door opener (e.g., coupled to the garage wall, ceiling, or a mounting bracket) and includes a housing, a receiver, a control circuit, a garage door state sensor, and an interface circuit. The garage door state sensor is configured to detect whether the garage door is open or closed. For example, a mercury switch is coupled to the garage door which changes state based on whether the switch (or door) is vertical (garage door open) or horizontal (garage door closed). The switch includes an interface circuit configured to transmit the switch state over a wired or wireless connection to the auxiliary wireless transmitter. The auxiliary wireless transmitter is configured to receive the switch state and wireless control data from system [0064] 12 indicating an “up only” command. If the garage door is closed, the auxiliary wireless transmitter will send an “open door” command via an interface circuit having a wired or wireless communication link to the garage door opener to open the garage door. The receiver, control circuit, and interface circuit are all coupled to and preferably at least partially recessed in the housing. The interface circuit is configured to provide the “open door” command from within the housing to the existing garage door opener outside the housing. If the garage door is already open, the auxiliary wireless transmitter will not send a command to the garage door opener. In this embodiment, the auxiliary wireless transmitter and garage door state sensor act as a kit which provides “up-only” functionality to an existing garage door opener.
  • According to an alternative exemplary embodiment wherein system [0065] 12 or transmitter 70 sends a plurality of different wireless control signals in response to actuation of one switch and transmitter 70 further includes receive circuitry, one of the wireless control signals can be transmitted for a first predetermined time period until a status or confirmation signal is received from a first remote electronic device, then the second of the wireless control signals can be transmitted until a status or confirmation signal is received from a second remote electronic device. A cycle of transmission followed by awaiting a status or confirmation signal can continue until a status or confirmation signal has been received for each remote electronic system or until a predetermined time or number failures has occurred.
  • While the exemplary embodiments illustrated in the FIGS. and described above are presently preferred, it should be understood that these embodiments are offered by way of example only. For example, alternative embodiments may be suitable for use in the commercial market, wherein office lights or security systems or parking garage doors are controlled. Further, navigation data can take many forms other than GPS data, compass data, and distance traveled data. Accordingly, the present invention is not limited to a particular embodiment, but extends to various modifications that nevertheless fall within the scope of the appended claims. [0066]

Claims (23)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1. A transmitter for wirelessly controlling a plurality of remote electronic systems, comprising:
    a memory configured to store a plurality of control data messages, each control data message configured to control a different remote electronic system;
    a transmitter circuit; and
    a control circuit configured to command the transmitter circuit to transmit a plurality of wireless control signals in response to a single event, each wireless control signal containing a different control data message.
  2. 2. The transmitter of claim 1, further comprising an operator input device, wherein the single event comprises the actuation of the operator input device by a vehicle occupant.
  3. 3. The transmitter of claim 1, wherein the control circuit is configured to receive navigation data and to determine a proximity between the transmitter and the remote electronic systems, wherein the single event comprises the control circuit determining that the transmitter is within a predetermined proximity of the remote electronic system.
  4. 4. The transmitter of claim 3, further comprising an operator-actuatable switch coupled to the control circuit, wherein the control circuit is user-programmable such that the switch causes the transmitter to send a first wireless control signal having a first control data message and the control circuit automatically sends a second wireless control signal having a second control data message different than the first control data message when the control circuit determines that the transmitter is within a predetermined proximity of the remote electronic system.
  5. 5. The transmitter of claim 1, further comprising a vehicle interior element coupled to the transmitter circuit and the control circuit, wherein the transmitter is configured for mounting in a vehicle interior.
  6. 6. The transmitter of claim 5, wherein the vehicle interior element is an overhead console, a visor, or an instrument panel.
  7. 7. The transmitter of claim 1, wherein the control circuit is configured to be programmed by the user as to which of the wireless control signals are to be transmitted in response to the single event.
  8. 8. The transmitter of claim 1, further comprising a plurality of operator-actuatable switches coupled to the control circuit, wherein the control circuit is user-programmable such that a first of the switches causes the transmitter to send a first wireless control signal and a second of the switches causes the transmitter to send second and third wireless control signals simultaneously or in sequence.
  9. 9. The transmitter of claim 1, wherein the transmitter circuit is configured to transmit the plurality of wireless control signals in the radio frequency range.
  10. 10. A transmitter for wirelessly controlling a plurality of remote electronic systems, comprising:
    means for storing a plurality of control data messages, each control data message configured to control a different remote electronic system;
    means for transmitting a wireless signal; and
    means for commanding the transmitter circuit to transmit a plurality of wireless control signals in response to a single event, each wireless control signal containing a different control data message.
  11. 11. The transmitter of claim 10, wherein the single event is reception of a signal indicative that the transmitter is within a predetermined proximity of at least one of the plurality of remote electronic systems.
  12. 12. The transmitter of claim 11, further comprising a means for commanding the transmitter to send a first wireless control signal having a first control data message, receive a location signal indicative that the transmitter is within a predetermined proximity of the remote electronic system, and sending a second wireless control signal having a second control data message different than the first control data message based on receipt of the location signal.
  13. 13. The transmitter of claim 10, further comprising a vehicle interior element coupled to the transmitter, wherein the transmitter is configured for mounting in a vehicle interior.
  14. 14. The transmitter of claim 13, wherein the vehicle interior element is an overhead console, a visor, or an instrument panel.
  15. 15. The transmitter of claim 14, further comprising means for receiving operator input, wherein the single event is the reception of the operator input from a vehicle occupant.
  16. 16. The transmitter of claim 10, further including means for the user to program which of the wireless control signals are to be transmitted in response to the single event.
  17. 17. The transmitter of claim 10, further comprising a plurality of operator-actuatable switches coupled to the transmitter, wherein the transmitter is user-programmable such that a first of the switches causes the transmitter to send a first wireless control signal and a second of the switches causes the transmitter to send second and third wireless control signals simultaneously or in sequence.
  18. 18. The transmitter of claim 10, wherein the means for transmitting a wireless signal is configured to transmit the plurality of wireless control signals in the radio frequency range.
  19. 19. A method for training a transmitter for a wireless control system to wirelessly control a plurality of remote electronic systems based upon a single event, comprising:
    receiving a request from a user to begin training a plurality of wireless control signals to be associated with a single event;
    receiving the single event;
    receiving a first wireless control signal having a first data code;
    identifying and storing the first data code on the first wireless control;
    associating the first wireless control with the single event, whereby the wireless control system can wirelessly control a first remote electronic system by transmitting the first data code of the first wireless control in response to the single event;
    receiving a second wireless control having a second data code;
    identifying and storing the second data code on the second wireless control;
    associating the second wireless control with the single event, whereby the wireless control system can wirelessly control a second remote electronic system by transmitting the second data code of the second wireless control in response to the single event; and
    receiving an end training signal.
  20. 20. The method of claim 19, further including storing the first and second data code in memory.
  21. 21. The method of claim 19, wherein the request to begin training is received via a pushbutton.
  22. 22. The method of claim 19, further comprising receiving an indication from the user as to which of a plurality of wireless control signals is to be transmitted based on the location of the vehicle.
  23. 23. The method of claim 19, wherein the wireless controls are within in the radio frequency range.
US10351884 2002-04-22 2003-01-27 System and method for wireless control of multiple remote electronic systems Abandoned US20030197595A1 (en)

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EP20040705641 EP1590779B1 (en) 2003-01-27 2004-01-27 System and method for wireless control of multiple remote electronic systems
US11602152 US8049595B2 (en) 2002-04-22 2006-11-20 System and method for wireless control of multiple remote electronic systems

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US8049595B2 (en) 2011-11-01 grant
WO2004068772A3 (en) 2004-11-04 application
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US20070063814A1 (en) 2007-03-22 application

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