US20030193905A1 - Wireless personal local area network - Google Patents

Wireless personal local area network Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US20030193905A1
US20030193905A1 US10458597 US45859703A US2003193905A1 US 20030193905 A1 US20030193905 A1 US 20030193905A1 US 10458597 US10458597 US 10458597 US 45859703 A US45859703 A US 45859703A US 2003193905 A1 US2003193905 A1 US 2003193905A1
Authority
US
Grant status
Application
Patent type
Prior art keywords
network
network device
device
radio
devices
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Abandoned
Application number
US10458597
Inventor
Ronald Mahany
Alan Bunte
Ronald Luse
Guy West
Charles Gollnick
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Avago Technologies General IP Singapore Pte Ltd
Original Assignee
Mahany Ronald L.
Bunte Alan G.
Luse Ronald E.
West Guy J.
Gollnick Charles D.
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Family has litigation

Links

Images

Classifications

    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W88/00Devices specially adapted for wireless communication networks, e.g. terminals, base stations or access point devices
    • H04W88/16Gateway arrangements
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L1/00Arrangements for detecting or preventing errors in the information received
    • H04L1/0001Systems modifying transmission characteristics according to link quality, e.g. power backoff
    • H04L1/0002Systems modifying transmission characteristics according to link quality, e.g. power backoff by adapting the transmission rate
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L1/00Arrangements for detecting or preventing errors in the information received
    • H04L1/0001Systems modifying transmission characteristics according to link quality, e.g. power backoff
    • H04L1/0023Systems modifying transmission characteristics according to link quality, e.g. power backoff characterised by the signalling
    • H04L1/0025Transmission of mode-switching indication
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L1/00Arrangements for detecting or preventing errors in the information received
    • H04L1/0001Systems modifying transmission characteristics according to link quality, e.g. power backoff
    • H04L1/0023Systems modifying transmission characteristics according to link quality, e.g. power backoff characterised by the signalling
    • H04L1/0032Without explicit signalling
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W52/00Power management, e.g. TPC [Transmission Power Control], power saving or power classes
    • H04W52/04TPC [Transmission power control]
    • H04W52/30TPC [Transmission power control] using constraints in the total amount of available transmission power
    • H04W52/34TPC management, i.e. sharing limited amount of power among users or channels or data types, e.g. cell loading
    • H04W52/343TPC management, i.e. sharing limited amount of power among users or channels or data types, e.g. cell loading taking into account loading or congestion level
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W64/00Locating users or terminals or network equipment for network management purposes, e.g. mobility management
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W88/00Devices specially adapted for wireless communication networks, e.g. terminals, base stations or access point devices
    • H04W88/02Terminal devices
    • H04W88/06Terminal devices adapted for operation in multiple networks or having at least two operational modes, e.g. multi-mode terminals
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W92/00Interfaces specially adapted for wireless communication networks
    • H04W92/02Inter-networking arrangements
    • GPHYSICS
    • G08SIGNALLING
    • G08CTRANSMISSION SYSTEMS FOR MEASURED VALUES, CONTROL OR SIMILAR SIGNALS
    • G08C2201/00Transmission systems of control signals via wireless link
    • G08C2201/20Binding and programming of remote control devices
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04LTRANSMISSION OF DIGITAL INFORMATION, e.g. TELEGRAPHIC COMMUNICATION
    • H04L69/00Application independent communication protocol aspects or techniques in packet data networks
    • H04L69/18Multi-protocol handler, e.g. single device capable of handling multiple protocols
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W28/00Network traffic or resource management
    • H04W28/02Traffic management, e.g. flow control or congestion control
    • H04W28/10Flow control between communication endpoints
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W48/00Access restriction; Network selection; Access point selection
    • H04W48/18Selecting a network or a communication service
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W52/00Power management, e.g. TPC [Transmission Power Control], power saving or power classes
    • H04W52/04TPC [Transmission power control]
    • H04W52/18TPC being performed according to specific parameters
    • H04W52/26TPC being performed according to specific parameters using transmission rate or quality of service QoS [Quality of Service]
    • H04W52/267TPC being performed according to specific parameters using transmission rate or quality of service QoS [Quality of Service] taking into account the information rate
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W52/00Power management, e.g. TPC [Transmission Power Control], power saving or power classes
    • H04W52/04TPC [Transmission power control]
    • H04W52/18TPC being performed according to specific parameters
    • H04W52/28TPC being performed according to specific parameters using user profile, e.g. mobile speed, priority or network state, e.g. standby, idle or non transmission
    • H04W52/287TPC being performed according to specific parameters using user profile, e.g. mobile speed, priority or network state, e.g. standby, idle or non transmission when the channel is in stand-by
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W52/00Power management, e.g. TPC [Transmission Power Control], power saving or power classes
    • H04W52/04TPC [Transmission power control]
    • H04W52/30TPC [Transmission power control] using constraints in the total amount of available transmission power
    • H04W52/34TPC management, i.e. sharing limited amount of power among users or channels or data types, e.g. cell loading
    • H04W52/346TPC management, i.e. sharing limited amount of power among users or channels or data types, e.g. cell loading distributing total power among users or channels
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W52/00Power management, e.g. TPC [Transmission Power Control], power saving or power classes
    • H04W52/04TPC [Transmission power control]
    • H04W52/30TPC [Transmission power control] using constraints in the total amount of available transmission power
    • H04W52/36TPC [Transmission power control] using constraints in the total amount of available transmission power with a discrete range or set of values, e.g. step size, ramping or offsets
    • H04W52/367Power values between minimum and maximum limits, e.g. dynamic range
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W52/00Power management, e.g. TPC [Transmission Power Control], power saving or power classes
    • H04W52/04TPC [Transmission power control]
    • H04W52/38TPC being performed in particular situations
    • H04W52/50TPC being performed in particular situations at the moment of starting communication in a multiple access environment
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W74/00Wireless channel access, e.g. scheduled or random access
    • H04W74/08Non-scheduled or contention based access, e.g. random access, ALOHA, CSMA [Carrier Sense Multiple Access]
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W74/00Wireless channel access, e.g. scheduled or random access
    • H04W74/08Non-scheduled or contention based access, e.g. random access, ALOHA, CSMA [Carrier Sense Multiple Access]
    • H04W74/0808Non-scheduled or contention based access, e.g. random access, ALOHA, CSMA [Carrier Sense Multiple Access] using carrier sensing, e.g. as in CSMA
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W84/00Network topologies
    • H04W84/02Hierarchically pre-organised networks, e.g. paging networks, cellular networks, WLAN [Wireless Local Area Network] or WLL [Wireless Local Loop]
    • H04W84/10Small scale networks; Flat hierarchical networks
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W84/00Network topologies
    • H04W84/02Hierarchically pre-organised networks, e.g. paging networks, cellular networks, WLAN [Wireless Local Area Network] or WLL [Wireless Local Loop]
    • H04W84/10Small scale networks; Flat hierarchical networks
    • H04W84/12WLAN [Wireless Local Area Networks]
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W84/00Network topologies
    • H04W84/18Self-organising networks, e.g. ad-hoc networks or sensor networks
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04WWIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS NETWORKS
    • H04W88/00Devices specially adapted for wireless communication networks, e.g. terminals, base stations or access point devices
    • H04W88/08Access point devices
    • H04W88/10Access point devices adapted for operation in multiple networks, e.g. multi-mode access points

Abstract

A transceiver apparatus for creating a wireless personal local area network between a computer terminal and one or more peripheral devices. A separate transceiver is connected to the computer terminal and to each peripheral device. The transceivers can be connected to the terminal or peripheral device either internally or externally. A low power radio is used to communicate information between the computer terminal and peripheral devices. Different transceivers can be used for modifying the carrier frequency and power of the local area network. The microprocessor is located inside each transceiver and controls the information flow of the transceiver including the communication protocol which allows each device to know if other devices are communicating, which devices are being communicated to, and selectively address the peripheral devices. An Idle Sense communication protocol is used for information transfer between the computer terminal and the peripheral devices, increasing efficiency in power management and compensating for transmission collisions.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • The present application is a continuation of application Ser. No. 08/959,432 filed Oct. 28, 1997, now (U.S. Pat. No. ______ issued Mar. 19, 2002), which is a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 08/500,977 filed Apr. 4, 1996, (now U.S. Pat. No. 5,682,379 issued Oct. 28, 1997), which is the U.S. national stage entry of PCT Application No. PCT/US93/12628 filed Dec. 23, 1993, (published as WO94/15413 on Jul. 7, 1994). The Application No. PCT/US93/12628 claims priority to U.S. application Ser. No. 08/027,140 filed Mar. 5, 1993 (now U.S. Pat. No. 5,602,854 issued Feb. 11, 1997), and Ser. No. 07/997,693 filed Dec. 23, 1992 (now abandoned). Said application Ser. No. 08/500,977 is a continuation in part of said application Ser. No. 08/027,140, which is a continuation in part of said application Ser. No. 07/997,693, which is a continuation-in-part of application Ser. No. 07/982,292 filed Nov. 27, 1992, (now abandoned). [0001]
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • computer terminals and peripheral devices are now used in practically every aspect of life. Computer terminals come in all shapes and sizes and vary greatly in terms of function, power and speed. Additionally, the number of peripheral devices which can be attached to the computer terminals is increasing. Many peripheral devices exist such as printers, modems, graphics scanners, text scanners, code readers, magnetic card readers, external monitors, voice command interfaces, external storage devices, and so on. [0002]
  • Computer terminals and peripherals have become dramatically smaller and more portable. Personal computers and peripherals are small enough to sit on the desk at work. Smaller still are lap top computers and notebook computers. There are computer terminals which are small enough to be mounted in a vehicle such as a delivery truck or on a fork lift. Still smaller are the hand held terminals typically used for their portability features where the user can carry the computer terminal in one hand and operate it with the other. [0003]
  • Despite the reduction in computer size, the computer terminal still must physically interface with the peripheral devices. Thus, there must either be a cable running from one of the computer terminal to each device or the computer terminal must be docked with the device while the information transfer is to take place. [0004]
  • In the office or work place setting, the physical connection is typically done with cables. These cables pose several problems. If there are many peripheral devices, there must be many cables attached to the computer terminal. In addition to the eyesore created by all of the cables, the placement of the peripheral devices is limited by the length of the cable. Longer cables can be used but they are costly and do not alleviate the eyesore created by having cables running in all directions. Additionally, there may be a limited number of ports on the computer terminal thus limiting the number of peripherals that can be attached. [0005]
  • Another problem exists when there are several computer terminals which must share the same peripheral device such as a printer. All of the computers must be hardwired to the printer. As discussed above, long cables can fix this problem at least from a physical connection perspective but there still remains a protocol problem between the different computers. This problem is especially severe when the various computers are of different types such as a mixed environment of IBM's and Macintoshes. [0006]
  • In the smaller computer terminal setting, the hand-held terminals and the potables, the cabling and connection problem can be more severe and cumbersome. Peripheral devices such as printers and scanners of all types have been reduced dramatically in size to match the smallness of the computer terminals. A notebook computer operator may wish to carry the computer and a cellular phone modem in a briefcase. Similarly, an operator may wish to have a handheld computer terminal in one hand, a small portable printer attached to his belt, and a code reader in the other hand. The smallness of the computers and peripherals makes these demands possible but the required cabling makes these demands costly, inconvenient and even dangerous. [0007]
  • Physically connecting the computer terminals and peripherals severely reduces the efficiency gained by making the units smaller. An operator must somehow account for all of the devices in a system and keep them all connected. This can be very invonveient. In the notebook computer and modem example, the operator may wish to have freedom to move around with the computer but without the modem. He may, for example, wish to work in various locations on a job sight and at various times transmit or receive information via his modem. If the modem and the computer are hard wired together, he must either carry the modem with him at all time or connect it and then disconnect it each time he wishes to use the modem. Similarly, the operator of the hand held terminal, code reader and printer will have the feeling of being all tied up while using the three devices simultaneously when all three devices are connected with cables. [0008]
  • The physical connections created by cabling can be expensive because cables frequently prove to be unreliable and must be replaced frequently. In portable environments, cables are subject to frequent handling, temperature extremes, dropping and other physical trauma. It is not uncommon for the cables or the connectors for the cables on the devices to need replacing every three months or so. Additionally, all of the cabling can be dangerous. An operator who is using, holding or carrying several devices and feels all tied up is not just inconvenienced, he may be severely limited in his mobility and flexibility as he moves about the work area. This loss of mobility and flexibility directly undercuts the entire reason for having small and portable computers and peripheral devices and greatly increases the likelihood of operator injury while using the computer and peripheral devices. [0009]
  • Furthermore; as the cables wear out and break, which, as mentioned, happens frequently, there are dangers which are associated with the electrical current running through the cables. If the cable or connectors break, the current could shock the operator or create a spark which could cause a fire or even an explosion in some work environments. [0010]
  • Attempts to alleviate or eliminate these problems have been made but have not been greatly successful. One solution is to incorporate a computer terminal and all of the peripherals into one unit. However, this solution proves unsatisfactory for several reasons. For example, the incorporation of many devices into one unit greatly increases the size and weight, thus jeopardizing the portability of the unit. Furthermore, incorporating all of the functions into one unit greatly reduces and, in most cases eliminates, the flexibility of the overall system. A user may only wish to use a hand-held computer terminal at times, but at other times may also need to use a printer or occasionally a code reader. An all-incorporated unit thus becomes either overly large because it must include everything, or very limiting because it does not include everything. [0011]
  • Another solution has been to set up Local Area Networks (LAN's) utilizing various forms of RF (Radio Frequency) communication. The LAN's to date, however, have been designed for large scale wireless communications between several portable computer terminals and a host computer. Therein, the host computer, itself generally a stationary device, manages a series of stationary peripherals that, upon requests to the host, may be utilized by the portable terminals. Other large scale wireless communications have also been developed which for RF communication between several computer terminals and peripheral devices, but all proving to be ineffective as a solution. For example, these systems require the peripheral devices to remain active at all times to listen for an occasional communication. Although this requirement may be acceptable for stationary peripheral devices receiving virtually unlimited power (i.e., when plugged into an AC outlet), it proves detrimental to portable peripherals by unnecessarily draining battery power. Similarly, in such systems, the computer terminals are also required to remain active to receive an occasional communication not only from the other terminals or the host but also from the peripherals. Again, often unnecessarily, battery power is wasted. [0012]
  • In addition, such large scale systems are designed for long range RF communication and often required either a licensed frequency or must be operated using spread spectrum technology. Thus, these radios are typically cost prohibitive, prove too large for convenient use with personal computers and small peripheral devices, and require a great deal of transmission energy utilization. [0013]
  • Thus, there is a need for a radio frequency communication network that supports the use of network peripherals which solves the foregoing problems relating to power conservation and portability. [0014]
  • SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • The present invention solves many of the problems inherent The mobile network device participates as a slave to the first network pursuant to the first protocol and as a master to the second network pursuant to the second protocol, and resolves conflicts between the first and second protocols in communication systems having devices which use battery power. The present invention relates generally to local area networks and, more specifically, to a communication system for maintaining connectivity between devices on networks which have different operating parameters while limiting the power drain of battery powered devices. [0015]
  • In one embodiment of the present invention, a mobile network device has a single radio unit which is capable of participating in a first and second radio network which operate using a first and second communication protocol. The mobile network device participates as a slave to the first network pursuant to the first protocol and as a master to the second network pursuant to the second protocol, and resolves conflicts between the first and second protocols. [0016]
  • In another embodiment of the present invention, a mobile network device has a first radio transceiver for communicating with a main radio network and a second radio transceiver for communicating with a radio subnetwork. The mobile network device participates as a slave to the main radio network and participates as a master to the radio subnetwork. [0017]
  • In a further embodiment of the present invention, a mobile network device has a single radio unit capable of participating in a first and a second radio network. The first and second radio networks operate using a first and second communication protocol, respectively. The mobile network device participates as a slave to the first network pursuant to the first protocol and as a master to the second network pursuant to the second protocol, enters a state of low power consumption when not communicating with either the first or second network. [0018]
  • In another embodiment of the present invention, an RF local area network contains a first network device which uses battery power to transmit data to a second network device. In order to conserve power, the second network device determines a range value between the first and second network devices and transmits that value to the first network device so that the first network device can identify an appropriate, and potentially lower, data rate for subsequent transmission of data. The first network device may also consider its own battery parameters along with the received range value and identify an appropriate power level as well as data rate for subsequent transmissions. [0019]
  • In another similar embodiment, the second network device determines the range value between the first and second network devices and, based on the range value, indicates to the first network device an appropriate, and potentially lower, data rate for subsequent data transmission to the second network device. The second network device may also consider battery parameter information received from the first network device and use that information along with the range value to indicate to the first network device an appropriate power level, as well as data rate, for subsequent transmissions by the first network device. [0020]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • FIG. 1[0021] a illustrates a warehouse environment incorporating a communication network which maintains communication connectivity between the various network devices according to the present invention.
  • FIG. 1[0022] b illustrates other features of the present invention in the use of a mobile vehicle and an associated microLAN network which is capable of detaching from the main communication network when moving out of range of the main network to perform a service, and reattaching to the main network when moving within range to automatically report on the services rendered.
  • FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic illustration of the use of a microLAN supporting roaming data collection by an operator according to the present invention. [0023]
  • FIG. 3 is a block diagram illustrating the functionality of RF transceivers built in accordance with the present invention. [0024]
  • FIG. 4 is a diagrammatic illustration of an alternate embodiment of the personal microLAN shown in FIG. 2. [0025]
  • FIG. 5 is a block diagram illustrating a channel access algorithm used by microLAN slave devices in according to the present invention. [0026]
  • FIG. 6[0027] a is a timing diagram of the protocol used according to the present invention illustrating a typical communication exchange between a microLAN master device having virtually unlimited power resources and a microLAN slave device.
  • FIG. 6[0028] b is a timing diagram of the protocol used according to the present invention illustrating a typical communication exchange between a microLAN master device having limited power resources and a microLAN slave device.
  • FIG. 6[0029] c is also a timing diagram of the protocol used which illustrates a scenario wherein the microLAN master device fails to service microLAN slave devices.
  • FIG. 7 is a timing diagram illustrating the microLAN master device's servicing of both the high powered main communication network and the low powered microLAN subnetwork, with a single or plural radio transceivers, in accordance with the present invention. [0030]
  • FIGS. 8 and 9 are block diagrams illustrating additional power saving features according to the present invention wherein ranging and battery parameters are used to optimally select the appropriate data rate and power level of subsequent transmissions. [0031]
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • FIG. 1[0032] a illustrates a warehouse environment incorporating a communication network which maintains communication connectivity between the various network devices according to the present invention. Specifically, a worker utilizes a computer terminal 7 and a code reader 9 to collect data such as identifying numbers or codes on warehoused goods, such as the box 10. As the numbers and codes are collected, they are forwarded through the network to a host computer 11 for storage and cross-referencing. In addition, the host computer 11 may, for example, forward cross-referenced information relating to the collected numbers or codes back through the network for display on the terminal 7 or for printing on a printer 13. Similarly, the collected may be printed from the computer terminal 7 directly to the printer 13. Other exemplary communication pathways supported by the present invention include messages exchanged between the computer terminal 7 and other computer terminals (not shown) or the host computer 11.
  • Many of the devices found in the illustrative network are battery powered and therefore must conservatively utilize their radio transceivers. For example, the hand-held computer terminal [0033] 7 receives its power from either an enclosed battery or a forklift battery (not shown) via a docking station within the forklift 14. Similarly, the code reader 9 operates on portable battery power as may the printer 13. The arrangement of the communication network, communication protocols used, and data rate and power level adjustments help to optimize battery conservation without substantially degrading network performance.
  • The overall communication network of the present invention is arranged into two functional groups: 1) a main communication network; and 2) a microLAN network. The main communication network in the illustrated warehouse embodiment includes a hard-wired backbone LAN [0034] 19 and base stations 15 and 17. A host computer 11 and any other non-mobile network device located in the vicinity of the backbone LAN 19 can be directly attached to the backbone LAN 19. However, mobile devices and remotely located devices must maintain connectivity to the backbone LAN 19 through either a single base station such as the base station 15, or through a multi-hop network of base stations such as is illustrated by the base stations 15 and 17. The base stations 15 and 17 contain a higher power transmitter, and provide coverage over the entire warehouse floor. Although a single base station may be sufficient, if the warehouse is too large or contains interfering physical barriers, the multi-hop plurality of base stations 17 may be necessary. Otherwise, the backbone LAN 19 must be extended to connect all of the base stations 17 directly to provide sufficient radio coverage. Through the main communication network, relatively stable, long range wireless and hard-wired communication is maintained.
  • Network devices that are mobile or remote (i.e., cannot be directly connected to the backbone LAN [0035] 19) are fitted with RF transceivers. To guarantee that such a network device will be able to directly communicate with at least one of the base stations 15 and 17, the fitted transceiver is selected to yield approximately the same transmission power as do the base stations 15 and 17. However, not all mobile or remote network devices require a direct RF link to the base stations 15 and 17, and some may not require any link at all. Instead, communication is generally localized to a small area and, as such, only requires relatively lower power, short range transceivers. The devices which participate in the localized, short range communication, form what is termed herein a “microLAN”. For example, the interaction between peripheral devices such as the printer 13, modem 23, and code reader 9 with the terminal 7 provide a justification for a microLAN configuration.
  • For example, the printer [0036] 13 may be located in a dock with the sole assignment of printing out forms based on the code information gathered from boxes delivered to the dock. In such an example, only when the forklift 14 enters the dock area should the printer 13 begin printing the collected code information. Within the dock area, communicating via the base stations 15 and 17 with the required high powered transceivers is avoided by establishing a microLAN on the dock. Specifically, instead of the high powered transceivers for communicating with the main communication network, the printer 13 is fitted with a low power microLAN transceiver for short range communication directly to the computer terminal 7 in the forklift 14. The computer terminal 7 is also fitted with a transceiver capable of direct, low power communication with the printer 13. Thus, when within microLAN radio range of the printer 13, the computer terminal 7 transmits the code information at a relatively low power level to the printer 13. While in range (whether printing or not), the computer terminal 7 and printer 13 together participate in a low power, microLAN network.
  • In the previous example, no communication was necessary between the microLAN devices and the main network. However, other microLAN configurations require at least some access to the main network. For example, because of battery constraints, the code reader [0037] 9 is also fitted with a microLAN transceiver. Whenever the code reader 9 is used, collected code signals and counterpart information are not directly exchanged with the host computer 11 via the main network. Instead, in the illustrated example, the computer terminal 7 is configured to be able to communicate not only within the microLAN but also through the main communication network. This is accomplished by fitting the computer terminal 7 with a transceiver(s) capable of communicating on both networks (see discussion related to FIG. 3 below). Thus, to reach the host computer 11, the code reader 9 first transmits to the computer terminal 7 via the microLAN, i.e., through the microLAN transceivers in each device. Upon receipt of the data, the computer terminal 7 relays the information to one of the base stations 15 and 17 for forwarding to the host 11. Communication from the host 11 to the code reader 9 is accomplished via the same pathway.
  • It is also possible for any two devices in the microLAN network to communicate to each other. For example, the modem [0038] 23 could receive data and directly transmit it to the printer 13 for printing. Similarly, the code reader 9 might choose to directly communicate code signals to other network devices via the modem 23.
  • In an alternate configuration, a microLAN base station [0039] 21 is provided which may be directly connected to the backbone LAN 19 (as shown) or indirectly connected via the base stations 15 and 17. The microLAN base station 21 is positioned in the vicinity of a other microLAN network devices and thereafter becomes a participant. Thus, microLAN communication flowing to or from the main communication network avoids high power radio transmissions altogether. However, it can be appreciated that a stationary microLAN base station may not always be an option when all of the microLAN participants are mobile. In such cases, a high power transmission to reach the main communication network may be required.
  • As briefly described above, in any microLAN, the participating devices (“microLAN devices”) need not all possess the transceiver capability to reach the main communication network. However, at least one microLAN device needs to have that capability to maintain overall network connectivity. [0040]
  • FIG. 1[0041] b illustrates other features of the present invention in the use of a mobile vehicle and an associated microLAN network which is capable of detaching from the main communication network when moving out of range of the main network to perform a service, and reattaching to the main network when moving within range to automatically report on the services rendered. In particular, like the forklift 14 of FIG. 1a, a delivery truck 33 provides a focal point for microLAN access. Within the truck 33, a storage terminal 31 is docked so as to draw power from the truck 33's battery supply. The storage terminal 31 is configured with a microLAN transceiver. Similarly, a computer terminal 7 also configured as a microLAN device may either be docked or ported. Because of greater battery access and because of the amount of data to transfer, the storage terminal 31 is also configured to communicate with the main communication network.
  • Prior to making a delivery, the truck enters a docking area for loading. As goods are loaded into the truck, the driver enters information regarding each loaded good into the storage terminal [0042] 31 via either the terminal 7 or the code reader 9 (FIG. 1a) using the microLAN network communications. This loading might also be accomplished automatically as the forklift 14 comes into range of the delivery truck 31, joins the microLAN network, and transmits the previously collected data as described above in relation to FIG. 1a. In addition, as information regarding a good is received and stored, the storage device might also request further information regarding any or all of the goods via the microLAN's link to the host computer 11 through the main communication network. Specifically, the microLAN base station 21 if located on the dock could provide a direct low power microLAN connection to the backbone LAN 19 and to the host computer 11. Otherwise, because of the normal data flow pathway and because of its greatest access to available power, the storage terminal 31 is configured with a transceiver capable of communicating with the main communication network via the base stations 15 and 17. When fully loaded and prior to leaving the dock, the storage device 31 communicates via the microLAN to the printer 13 to generate a printout of information relating to the loaded goods. In addition, the information is transmitted via the microLAN to the modem 23 for relay to a given destination site. Upon reaching the destination, the storage terminal 31 detects and participates in the microLAN of the delivery site dock. As goods specific goods are unloaded, they are scanned for delivery verification, preventing delivery of unwanted goods. The driver is also informed if goods that should have been delivered are still in the truck. As this process takes place, a report might also be generated via a microLAN printer on the destination dock for signature. Similarly, a microLAN modem on the destination dock might relay the delivery information back to the host computer 11 for billing information.
  • Similarly, if the truck [0043] 33 is used for service purposes, the truck 33 leaves the dock in the morning with the addresses and directions of the service destinations, technical manuals, and service notes which have been selectively downloaded from the host computer via the main network and microLAN to the storage terminal 31. Upon pulling out of range of the microLAN network in the dock, the storage terminal 31 and the computer terminal 7 automatically form an independent, detached microLAN. At each service address, the driver collects information using the terminal 7 either as the data is collected if within microLAN transmission range of the storage terminal 31, or as soon as the terminal 7 comes within range. Through the detached microLAN network such information is available on the computer terminal. Upon returning to the dock, as soon as the independent microLAN formed between the storage terminal 31 and the computer terminal 7 come within microLAN range of the microLAN devices on the dock, the detached microLAN automatically merges with the dock's microLAN (becomes “attached”), and the storage terminal 31 automatically transfers the service information to the host computer 11 which uses the information for billing and in formulating the service destinations which will be automatically downloaded the next day.
  • FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic illustration of another embodiment using a microLAN to supporting roaming data collection by an operator according to the present invention. As an operator [0044] 61 roams the warehouse floor he carries with him a microLAN comprising the terminal 7, code reader 9 and a portable printer 58. The operator collect information regarding goods, such as the box 10, with the code reader 9 and the terminal 7. If the power resources are equal, the terminal 7 may be designated to also communicate with the main communication network. Specifically, corresponding information to the code data must be retrieved from the host computer 11, collected code information and retrieved corresponding information needs to be displayed on the terminal 7, and, after viewing for verification, the information needs to be printed on the printer 58. Because of this data flow requirement, the computer terminal 7 is selected as the microLAN device which must also carry the responsibility of communicating with the main communication network.
  • If during collection, the operator decides to power down the computer terminal [0045] 7 because it is not needed, the microLAN network becomes detached from the main communication network. Although it might be possible for the detached microLAN to function, all communication with the host computer 11 through the main communication network is placed in a queue awaiting reattachment. As soon as the detached microLAN comes within range of an attached microLAN device, i.e., a device attached to the main network, the queued communications are relayed to the host.
  • To avoid detachment when the terminal [0046] 7 is powered down, the code reader 9 may be designated as a backup to the terminal 7 for performing the higher power communication to the main communication network. As described in more detail below in reference to FIG. 6c regarding the idle sense protocol, whenever the code reader 9 determines that the terminal 7 has stopped providing access to the main communication network, the code reader 9 will take over the role if it is next in line to perform the backup service. Thereafter, when the computer terminal 7 is powered up, it monitors the microLAN channel, requests and regains from the code reader 9 the role of providing an interface with the main computer network. This, however, does not restrict the code reader 9 from accessing the main computer network although the reader 9 may choose to use the computer terminal 7 for power conservation reasons.
  • In addition, if the computer terminal [0047] 7 reaches a predetermined low battery threshold level, the terminal 7 will attempt to pass the burden of providing main network access to other microLAN backup devices. If no backup device exists in the current microLAN, the computer terminal 7 may refuse all high power transmissions to the main communication network. Alternatively, the computer terminal 7 may either refuse predetermined select types of requests, or prompt the operator before performing any transmission to the main network. However, the computer terminal 7 may still listen to the communications from the main communication network and inform microLAN members of waiting messages.
  • FIG. 3 is a block diagram illustrating the functionality of RF transceivers built in accordance with the present invention. Although preferably plugging into PCMCIA slots of the computer terminals and peripherals, the transceiver [0048] 110 may also be built-in or externally attached via available serial, parallel or ethernet connectors for example. Although the transceivers used by potential microLAN master devices may vary from those used by microLAN slave devices (as detailed below), they all contain the illustrated functional blocks.
  • In particular, the transceiver [0049] 110 contains a radio unit 112 which attaches to an attached antenna 113. The radio unit 112 used in microLAN slave devices need only provide reliable low power transmissions, and are designed to conserve cost, weight and size. Potential microLAN master devices not only require the ability to communicate with microLAN slave devices, but also require higher power radios to also communicate with the main network. Thus, potential microLAN master devices and other non-microLAN slave devices might contain two radio units 112 (or two transceivers 110)—one serving the main network and the other serving the microLAN network—else only contain a single radio unit to service both networks.
  • In embodiments where cost and additional weight is not an issue, a dual radio unit configuration for potential microLAN master devices provides several advantages. For example, simultaneous transceiver operation is possible by choosing a different operating band for each radio. In such embodiments, a 2.4 GHZ radio is included for main network communication while a 27 MHz radio supports the microLAN network. MicroLAN slave devices receive only the 27 MHz radio, while the non-potential microLAN participants from the main network are fitted with only the 2.4 GHz radios. Potential microLAN master devices receive both radios. The low power 27 MHz microLAN radio is capable of reliably transferring information at a range of approximately 40 to 100 feet asynchronously at 19.2K BPS. An additional benefit of using the 27 MHz frequency is that it is an unlicensed frequency band. The 2.4 GHz radio provides sufficient power (up to 1 Watt) to communicate with other main network devices. Many different frequency choices could also be made such as the 900 MHz band, etc. [0050]
  • In embodiments where cost and additional weight are at issue, a single radio unit configuration is used for potential microLAN master devices. Specifically, in such embodiments, a dual mode 2.4 GHz radio supports both the microLAN and main networks. In a microLAN mode, the 2.4 GHz radio operates at a low power level (sub-milliwatt) to support microLAN communication at relatively close distances (20-30 feet). In a high power (up to 1 Watt) or main mode, the 2.4 GHz radio provides relatively long distance communication connectivity with the main network. Although all network devices might be fitted with such a dual mode radio, only microLAN master devices use both modes. MicroLAN slave devices would only use the low power mode while all other main network devices would use only the high power mode. Because of this, to save cost, microLAN slave devices are fitted with a single mode radio operating in the microLAN mode. Non-microLAN participants are also fitted with a single mode (main mode) radio unit for cost savings. [0051]
  • Connected between the radio unit [0052] 112 and an interface 110, a microprocessor 120 controls the information flow between through the transceiver 110. Specifically, the interface 115 connects the transceiver 110 to a selected computer terminal, a peripheral device or other network device. Many different interfaces 115 are used and the choice will depend upon the connection port of the device to which the transceiver 110 will be attached. Virtually any type of interface 110 could be adapted for use with the transceiver 110 of the present invention. Common industry interface standards include RS-232, RS-422, RS-485, 10BASE2 Ethernet, 10BASE5 Ethernet, 10BASE-T Ethernet, fiber optics, IBM 4/16 Token Ring, V.11, V.24, V.35, Apple Localtalk and telephone interfaces. In addition, via the interface 115, the microprocessor 120 maintains a radio independent, interface protocol with the attached network device, isolating the attached device from the variations in radios being used.
  • The microprocessor [0053] 120 also controls the radio unit 112 to accommodate communication with the either the main network (for main mode radios), the microLAN (for microLAN radios), or both (for dual mode radios). More specifically, in a main mode transceiver, the microprocessor 120 utilizes a main protocol to communicate with the main network. Similarly, in a microLAN mode transceiver, the microprocessor 120 operates pursuant to a microLAN protocol to communicate in the microLAN network. In the dual mode transceiver, the microprocessor 120 manages the use of and potential conflicts between both the main and microLAN protocols. Detail regarding the main and microLAN protocols can be found in reference to FIGS. 6-9 below.
  • In addition, as directed by the corresponding communication protocol, the microprocessor [0054] 120 controls the power consumption of the radio 112, itself and the interface 115 for power conservation. This is accomplished in two ways. First, the microLAN and main protocols are designed to provide for a low power mode or sleep mode during periods when no communication involving the subject transmitter is desired as described below in relation to FIGS. 6-7. Second, both protocols are designed to adapt in both data rate and transmission power based on power supply (i.e., battery) parameters and range information as described in reference to FIGS. 8-9.
  • In order to insure that the proper device is receiving the information transmitted, each device is assigned a unique address. Specifically, the transceiver [0055] 110 can either have a unique address of its own or can use the unique address of the device to which it is attached. The unique address of the transceiver can either be one selected by the operator or system designer or one which is permanently assigned at the factory such as an IEEE address. The address 121 of the particular transceiver 110 is stored with the microprocessor 120.
  • In the illustrated embodiments of FIGS. [0056] 1-2, the microLAN master device is shown as being either a microLAN base station or a mobile or portable computer terminal. From a data flow viewpoint in considering the fastest access through the network, such choices for the microLAN master devices appear optimal. However, any microLAN device might be assigned the role of the master, even those that do not seem to provide an optimal data flow pathway but may provide for optimal battery usage. For example, in the personal microLAN network of FIG. 2, because of the support from the belt 59, the printer might contain the greatest battery capacity of the personal microLAN devices. As such, the printer might be designated the microLAN master device and be fitted with either a dual mode radio or two radios as master devices require. The printer, or other microLAN slave devices, might also be fitted with such required radios to serve only as a microLAN master backup. If the battery power on the actual microLAN master, i.e., the hand-held terminal 7 (FIG. 2), drops below a preset threshold, the backup master takes over.
  • FIG. 4 is a drawing which illustrates an embodiment of the personal microLAN shown in FIG. 2 which designates a printer as the microLAN master device. Specifically, in a personal microLAN network [0057] 165, a computer terminal 170 is strapped to the forearm of the operator. A code reader 171 straps to the back of the hand of the user and is triggered by pressing a button 173 with the thumb. Because of their relatively low battery energy, the computer terminal 170 and code reader 171 are designated microLAN slave devices and each contain a microLAN transceiver having a broadcast range of two meters or less. Because of its greater battery energy, the printer 172 contains a dual mode radio and is designated the microLAN master device.
  • FIG. 5 is a block diagram illustrating a channel access algorithm used by microLAN slave devices in according to the present invention. At a block [0058] 181, when a slave device has a message to send, it waits for an idle sense message to be received from the microLAN master device at a block 183. When an idle sense message is received, the slave device executes a back-off protocol at a block 187 by in an attempt to avoid collisions with other slave devices waiting to transmit. Basically, instead of permitting every slave device from repeatedly transmitting immediately after an idle sense message is received, each waiting slave is required to first wait for a pseudo-random time period before attempting a transmission. The pseudo-random back-off time period is generated and the waiting takes place at a block 187. At a block 189, the channel is sensed to determine whether it is clear for transmission. If not, a branch is made back to the block 183 to attempt a transmission upon receipt of the next idle sense message. If the channel is still clear, at a block 191, a relatively small “request to send” type packet is transmitted indicating the desire to send a message. If no responsive “clear to send” type message is received from the master device, the slave device assumes that a collision occurred at a block 193 and branches back to the block 183 to try again. If the “clear to send” message is received, the slave device transmits the message at a block 195.
  • Several alternate channel access strategies have been developed for carrier sense multiple access (CSMA) systems and include 1-persistent, non-persistent and p-persistent. Such strategies or variations thereof could easily be adapted to work with the present invention. [0059]
  • FIG. 6[0060] a is a timing diagram of the protocol used according to the present invention illustrating a typical communication exchange between a microLAN master device having virtually unlimited power resources and a microLAN slave device. Time line 201 represents communication activity by the microLAN master device while time line 203 represents the corresponding activity by the microLAN slave device. The master periodically transmits an idle sense message 205 indicating that it is available for communication or that it has data for transmission to a slave device. Because the master has virtually unlimited power resources, it “stays awake” for the entire time period 207 between the idle sense messages 205. In other words, the master does not enter a power conserving mode during the time periods 207.
  • The slave device uses a binding protocol (discussed below with regard to FIG. 6[0061] c) to synchronize to the master device so that the slave may enter a power conserving mode and still monitor the idle sense messages of the master to determine if the master requires servicing. For example, referring to FIG. 6a, the slave device monitors an idle sense message of the master during a time period 209, determines that no servicing is required, and enters a power conserving mode during the time period 211. The slave then activates during a time period 213 to monitor the next idle sense message of the master. Again, the slave determines that no servicing is required and enters a power conserving mode during a time period 215. When the slave activates again during a time period 217 to monitor the next idle sense message, it determines from a “request to send” type message from the master that the master has data for transmission to the slave. The slave responds by sending a “clear to send” type message during the time period 217 and stays activated in order to receive transmission of the data. The master is thus able to transmit the data to the slave during a time period 219. Once the data is received by the slave at the end of the time period 221, the slave again enters a power conserving mode during a time period 223 and activates again during the time period 225 to monitor the next idle sense message.
  • Alternatively, the slave may have data for transfer to the master. If so, the slave indicates as such to the master by transmitting a message during the time period [0062] 217 and then executes a backoff algorithm to determine how long it must wait before transmitting the data. The slave determines from the backoff algorithm that it-must wait the time period 227 before transmitting the data during the time period 221. The slave devices use the backoff algorithm in an attempt to avoid the collision of data with that from other slave devices which are also trying to communicate with the master. The backoff algorithm is discussed more fully above in reference to FIG. 5.
  • The idle sense messages of the master may also aid in scheduling communication between two slave devices. For example, if a first slave device has data for transfer to a second slave device, the first slave sends a message to the master during the time period [0063] 209 requesting communication with the second slave. The master then broadcasts the request during the next idle sense message. Because the second slave is monitoring the idle sense message, the second slave receives the request and stays activated at the end of the idle sense message in order to receive the communication. Likewise, because the first slave is also monitoring the idle sense message, it too receives the request and stays activated during the time period 215 to send the communication.
  • FIG. 6[0064] b is a timing diagram of the protocol used according to the present invention illustrating a typical communication exchange between a microLAN master having limited power resources and a microLAN slave device. This exchange is similar to that illustrated in FIG. 6a except that, because it has limited power resources, the master enters a power conserving mode. Before transmitting an idle sense message, the master listens to determine if the channel is idle. If the channel is idle, the master transmits an idle sense message 205 and then waits a time period 231 to determine if any devices desire communication. If no communication is desired, the master enters a power conserving mode during a time period 233 before activating again to listen to the channel. If the channel is not idle, the master does not send the idle sense message and enters a power saving mode for a time period 235 before activating again to listen to the channel.
  • Communication between the master and slave devices is the same as that discussed above in reference to FIG. 6[0065] a except that, after sending or receiving data during the time period 219, the master device enters a power conserving mode during the time period 237.
  • FIG. 6[0066] c is also a timing diagram of the protocol used which illustrates a scenario wherein the microLAN master device fails to service microLAN slave devices. The master device periodically sends an idle sense message 205, waits a time period 231, and enters a power conserving mode during a time period 233 as discussed above in reference to FIG. 6b. Similarly, the slave device monitors the idle sense messages during time periods 209 and 213 and enters a power conserving mode during time periods 211 and 215. For some reason, however, the master stops transmitting idle sense messages. Such a situation may occur, for example, if the master device is portable and is carried outside the range of the slave's radio. During a time period 241, the slave unsuccessfully attempts to monitor an idle sense message. The slave then goes to sleep for a time period 243 and activates to attempt to monitor a next idle sense message during a time period 245, but is again unsuccessful.
  • The slave device thereafter initiates a binding protocol to attempt to regain synchronization with the master. While two time periods ([0067] 241 and 245) are shown, the slave may initiate such a protocol after any number of unsuccessful attempts to locate an idle sense message. With this protocol, the slave stays active for a time period 247, which is equal to the time period from one idle sense message to the next, in an attempt to locate a next idle sense message. If the slave is again unsuccessful, it may stay active until it locates an idle sense message from the master, or, if power consumption is a concern, the slave may enter a power conserving mode at the end of the time period 247 and activate at a later time to monitor for an idle sense message.
  • In the event the master device remains outside the range of the slave devices in the microLAN network for a period long enough such that communication is hindered, one of the slave devices may take over the functionality of the master device. Such a situation is useful when the slave devices need to communicate with each other in the absence of the master. Preferably, such a backup device has the ability to communicate with devices on the main communication network. If the original master returns, it listens to the channel to determine idle sense messages from the backup, indicates to the backup that it has returned and then begins idle sense transmissions when it reestablishes dominance over the microLAN network. [0068]
  • FIG. 7 is a timing diagram illustrating the microLAN master device's servicing of both the high powered main communication network and the low powered microLAN subnetwork, with a single or plural radio transceivers, in accordance with present invention. Block [0069] 251 represents typical communication activity of the master device. Line 253 illustrates the master's communication with a base station on the main communication network while line 255 illustrates the master's communication with a slave device on the microLAN network. Lines 257 and 259 illustrate corresponding communication by the base station and slave device, respectively.
  • The base station periodically broadcasts HELLO messages [0070] 261 indicating that it is available for communication. The master device monitors the HELLO messages during a time period 263, and, upon determining that the base does not need servicing, enters a power conserving mode during a time period 265. The master then activates for a time period to monitor the next HELLO message from the base. If the master has data to send to the base, it transmits the data during a time period 271. Likewise, if the base has data to send to the master, the base transmits the data during a time period 269. Once the data is received or sent by the master, it may again enter a power conserving mode. While HELLO message protocol is discussed, a number of communication protocols may be used for communication between the base and the master device. As may be appreciated, the microLAN master device acts as a slave to base stations in the main communication network.
  • Generally, the communication exchange between the master and the slave is similar to that described above in reference to FIG. 6[0071] b. Block 273, however, illustrates a situation where the master encounters a communication conflict, i.e., it has data to send to or receive from the slave on the subnetwork at the same time it will monitor the main network for HELLO messages from the base. If the master has two radio transceivers, the master can service both networks. If, however, the master only has one radio transceiver, the master chooses to service one network based on network priority considerations. For example, in block 273, it may be desirable to service the slave because of the presence of data rather than monitor the main network for HELLO messages from the base. On the other hand, in block 275, it may be more desirable to monitor the main network for HELLO messages rather than transmit an idle sense message on the subnetwork.
  • FIGS. 8 and 9 are block diagrams illustrating additional power saving features according to the present invention, wherein ranging and battery parameters are used to optimally select the appropriate data rate and power level for subsequent transmissions. Specifically, even though network devices such as the computer terminal [0072] 7 in FIGS. 1-2 have the capability of performing high power transmissions, because of battery power concerns, the such devices are configured to utilize minimum transmission energy. For example if By adjusting either the power level and the data rate based. Adjustments are made based on ranging information and on battery parameters. Similarly, within the microLAN network, even though lower power transceivers are used, battery conservation issues also justify the use such data rate and power adjustments. This process is described in more detail below in reference to FIGS. 8 and 9.
  • More specifically, FIG. 8 is a block diagram which illustrates a protocol [0073] 301 used by a destination microLAN device and a corresponding protocol 303 used by a source microLAN device to adjust the data rate and possibly the power level for future transmission between the two devices. At a block 311, upon receiving a transmission from a source device, the destination device identifies a range value at a block 313. In a low cost embodiment, the range value is identified by considering the received signal strength indications (RSSI) of the incoming transmission. Although RSSI circuitry might be placed in all microLAN radios, the added expense may require that only microLAN master devices receive the circuitry. This would mean that only microLAN master devices would perform the function of the destination device. Other ranging values might also be calculated using more expensive techniques such as adding GPS (Global Position Service) circuitry to both radios. In such an embodiment, the range value transmitted at the block 313 would consist of the GPS position of the destination microLAN device. Finally, after identifying the range value at the block 313, the destination device subsequently transmits the range value to the slave device from which the transmission was received.
  • Upon receipt of the range value from the destination device at a block [0074] 321, the source microLAN device evaluates its battery parameters to identify a subsequent data rate for transmission at a block 323. If range value indicates that the destination microLAN device is very near, the source microLAN device selects a faster data rate. When the range value indicates a distant master, the source device selects a slower rate. In this way, even without adjusting the power level, the total energy dissipated can be controlled to utilize only that necessary to carry out the transmission. However, if constraints are placed on the maximum or minimum data rates, the transmission power may also need to be modified. For example, to further minimize the complexity associated with a fully random range of data rate values, a standard range and set of several data rates may be used. Under such a scenario, a transmission power adjustment might also need to supplement the data rate adjustment. Similarly, any adjustment of power must take into consideration maximum and minimum operable levels. Data rate adjustment may supplement such limitations. Any attempted modification of the power and data rate might take into consideration any available battery parameters such as those that might indicate a normal or current battery capacity, the drain on the battery under normal conditions and during transmission, or the fact that the battery is currently being charged. The latter parameter proves to be very significant in that when the battery is being charged, the microLAN slave device has access to a much greater power source for transmission, which may justify the highest power transmission and possibly the slowest data rate under certain circumstances.
  • Finally, at a block [0075] 325, an indication of the identified data rate is transmitted back to the destination device so that future transmissions may take place at the newly selected rate. The indication of data rate may be explicit in that a message is transmitted designating the specific rate. Alternately, the data rate may be transferee implicitly in that the new rate is chose and used by the source, requiring the destination to adapt to the change. This might also be done using a predefined header for synchronization.
  • FIG. 9 illustrates an alternate embodiment for carrying out the data rate and possibly power level adjustment. At a block [0076] 351 upon binding and possibly periodically, the source microLAN device sends an indication of its current battery parameters to the destination microLAN device. This indication may be each of the parameters or may be an averaged indication of all of the parameters together. At a block 355, upon receipt, the destination microLAN device 355 stores the battery parameters (or indication). Finally, at a block 358, upon receiving a transmission from the source device, based on range determinations and the stored battery parameters, the destination terminal identifies the subsequent data rate (and possibly power level). Thereafter, the new data rate and power level are communicated to the source device for either explicitly or implicitly for future transmissions.
  • Moreover, it will be apparent to one skilled in the art having read the foregoing that various modifications and variations of this communication system according to the present invention are possible and is intended to include all those which are covered by the appended claims. [0077]

Claims (9)

    What is claimed is:
  1. 1) A communication system comprising:
    a first radio network operating using a first communication protocol;
    a second radio network operating using a second communication protocol;
    a mobile network device having a single radio unit capable of participating in both the first and second radio networks;
    the mobile network device participating as a slave device to the first radio network pursuant to the first communication protocol while participating as a master device to the second radio network pursuant to the second communication protocol; and
    the mobile network device resolving conflicts between the first and second communication protocols.
  2. 2) A communication system comprising:
    a main radio network;
    a radio subnetwork;
    a mobile network device having a first radio transceiver for communicating with the main radio network and a second radio transceiver for communicating with the radio subnetwork;
    the mobile network device participating as a slave device to the main radio network while participating as a master device to the radio subnetwork.
  3. 3) A communication system comprising:
    a first radio network operating using a first communication protocol;
    a second radio network operating using a second communication protocol;
    a mobile network device having a single radio unit capable of participating in both the first and second radio networks;
    the mobile network device participating as a slave device to the first radio network pursuant to the first communication protocol while participating as a master device to the second radio network pursuant to the second communication protocol; and
    the mobile network device entering a state of low power consumption when not communicating with either the first or the second radio network.
  4. 4) A communication system comprising:
    a first radio network comprising a first plurality of network devices;
    a second radio network comprising a second plurality of network devices;
    a mobile network device configured to participate as a member of both the first and second pluralities of network devices;
    when within range of one of the second plurality of network devices, the mobile network device participates as a master device in the second radio network; and
    when within range of one of the first plurality of network devices, the mobile network device participates as a slave device in the first radio network.
    the second plurality of network devices entering a state of low power consumption when communication with the mobile network device is not available.
  5. 5) A communication system comprising:
    a first radio network comprising a first plurality of network devices;
    a second radio network comprising a second plurality of network devices;
    a mobile network device configured to participate as a member of both the first and second pluralities of network devices;
    when within range of one of the second plurality of network devices, the mobile network device participates as a master device in the second radio network; and
    when within range of one of the first plurality of network devices, the mobile network device participates as a slave device in the first radio network.
  6. 6) An RF local area network comprising:
    a first network device, the first network device transmitting using battery power;
    a second network device;
    means within the second network device for identifying a range value indicative of the distance between the first and second network devices;
    the second network device responsive to the identifying means by transmitting the range value to the first network device; and
    the first network device, upon receipt of the range value, identifying an appropriate data rate for subsequent transmission to the second network device.
  7. 7) An RF local area network comprising:
    a first network device, the first network device transmitting using battery power;
    a second network device;
    means within the second network device for identifying a range value indicative of the distance between the first and second network devices;
    the second network device responsive to the identifying means by indicating to the first network device an appropriate rate for subsequent data transmission to the second network device.
  8. 8) An RF local area network comprising:
    a first network device;
    a battery power supply disposed for powering the first network device, the battery power supply having battery parameter information;
    a second network device;
    means within the second network device for identifying a range value indicative of the distance between the first and second network devices;
    the second network device responsive to the identifying means by sending the range value to the first network device;
    means within the first network device for identifying the battery parameter information; and
    the first network device, based on the received range value and battery parameter information, identifying an appropriate data rate and power level for subsequent transmission to the second network device.
  9. 9) An RF local area network comprising:
    a first network device;
    a battery power supply disposed for powering the first network device, the battery power supply having battery parameter information;
    a second network device;
    means within the second network device for identifying a range value indicative of the distance between the first and second network devices;
    the first network device transmitting battery parameter information to the second network device; and
    the second network device, based on the range value and received battery parameter information, indicating to the first network device an appropriate rate and power level for subsequent data transmission.
US10458597 1992-11-27 2003-06-10 Wireless personal local area network Abandoned US20030193905A1 (en)

Priority Applications (6)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US98229292 true 1992-11-27 1992-11-27
US99769392 true 1992-12-23 1992-12-23
US08500977 US5682379A (en) 1993-12-23 1993-12-23 Wireless personal local area network
US08959432 US6359872B1 (en) 1997-10-28 1997-10-28 Wireless personal local area network
US10101436 US20030128685A1 (en) 1992-11-27 2002-03-19 Wireless personal local area network
US10458597 US20030193905A1 (en) 1992-11-27 2003-06-10 Wireless personal local area network

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US10458597 US20030193905A1 (en) 1992-11-27 2003-06-10 Wireless personal local area network

Related Parent Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10101436 Continuation US20030128685A1 (en) 1992-11-27 2002-03-19 Wireless personal local area network

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US20030193905A1 true true US20030193905A1 (en) 2003-10-16

Family

ID=25502049

Family Applications (9)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US08959432 Expired - Fee Related US6359872B1 (en) 1997-10-28 1997-10-28 Wireless personal local area network
US10101436 Abandoned US20030128685A1 (en) 1992-11-27 2002-03-19 Wireless personal local area network
US10458597 Abandoned US20030193905A1 (en) 1992-11-27 2003-06-10 Wireless personal local area network
US10692959 Abandoned US20040090945A1 (en) 1992-11-27 2003-10-24 Wireless personal local area network
US11419565 Abandoned US20060227739A1 (en) 1989-01-31 2006-05-22 Wireless personal local area network
US11419576 Abandoned US20060209777A1 (en) 1990-05-25 2006-05-22 Wireless personal local area network
US11419598 Abandoned US20060215591A1 (en) 1990-05-25 2006-05-22 Wireless personal local area network
US12541703 Abandoned US20090303920A1 (en) 1992-11-27 2009-08-14 Wireless personal local area network
US12541670 Abandoned US20090296677A1 (en) 1992-11-27 2009-08-14 Wireless personal local area network

Family Applications Before (2)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US08959432 Expired - Fee Related US6359872B1 (en) 1997-10-28 1997-10-28 Wireless personal local area network
US10101436 Abandoned US20030128685A1 (en) 1992-11-27 2002-03-19 Wireless personal local area network

Family Applications After (6)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US10692959 Abandoned US20040090945A1 (en) 1992-11-27 2003-10-24 Wireless personal local area network
US11419565 Abandoned US20060227739A1 (en) 1989-01-31 2006-05-22 Wireless personal local area network
US11419576 Abandoned US20060209777A1 (en) 1990-05-25 2006-05-22 Wireless personal local area network
US11419598 Abandoned US20060215591A1 (en) 1990-05-25 2006-05-22 Wireless personal local area network
US12541703 Abandoned US20090303920A1 (en) 1992-11-27 2009-08-14 Wireless personal local area network
US12541670 Abandoned US20090296677A1 (en) 1992-11-27 2009-08-14 Wireless personal local area network

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (9) US6359872B1 (en)

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20040038717A1 (en) * 1992-03-18 2004-02-26 Mahany Ronald L. Transaction control system including portable data terminal and mobile customer service station
US20060129850A1 (en) * 2004-12-15 2006-06-15 Microsoft Corporation Ultra wide band power save
EP1672468A2 (en) * 2004-12-15 2006-06-21 Microsoft Corporation Power management for ultra wide band (uwb) devices
US20070191001A1 (en) * 2006-02-11 2007-08-16 Radioframe Networks, Inc. Using standard cellular handsets with a general access network
US20070189254A1 (en) * 2006-02-11 2007-08-16 Radioframe Networks, Inc. General access network controller bypass to facilitate use of standard cellular handsets with a general access network

Families Citing this family (152)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US6389010B1 (en) * 1995-10-05 2002-05-14 Intermec Ip Corp. Hierarchical data collection network supporting packetized voice communications among wireless terminals and telephones
US8509260B2 (en) 1993-08-31 2013-08-13 Broadcom Corporation Modular, portable data processing terminal for use in a communication network
US7885242B2 (en) * 1993-12-23 2011-02-08 Broadcom Corp. Enhanced mobility and address resolution in a wireless premises based network
US6749122B1 (en) * 1990-05-25 2004-06-15 Broadcom Corporation Multi-level hierarchial radio-frequency system communication system
US7558557B1 (en) * 1991-11-12 2009-07-07 Broadcom Corporation Low-power messaging in a network supporting roaming terminals
US7415548B2 (en) * 1991-05-13 2008-08-19 Broadcom Corporation Communication network having a plurality of bridging nodes which transmits a polling message with backward learning technique to determine communication pathway
US6374311B1 (en) * 1991-10-01 2002-04-16 Intermec Ip Corp. Communication network having a plurality of bridging nodes which transmit a beacon to terminal nodes in power saving state that it has messages awaiting delivery
US7917145B2 (en) * 1992-11-02 2011-03-29 Broadcom Corporation Radio frequency local area network
DE69233608T2 (en) 1991-10-01 2007-03-01 Broadcom Corp., Irvine Local radio frequency network
US6359872B1 (en) * 1997-10-28 2002-03-19 Intermec Ip Corp. Wireless personal local area network
US6496499B1 (en) * 1998-12-23 2002-12-17 Spectralink Corporation Control system and associated method for coordinating isochronous devices accessing a wireless network
US8176520B1 (en) * 2000-01-28 2012-05-08 Rockwell Collins, Inc. Communication system and method for a mobile platform
US6446118B1 (en) * 2000-02-29 2002-09-03 Designtech International, Inc. E-mail notification device
US20010054060A1 (en) * 2000-06-16 2001-12-20 Fillebrown Lisa A. Personal wireless network
US8386557B2 (en) * 2000-06-16 2013-02-26 Enfora, Inc. Method for supporting a personal wireless network
KR20020001348A (en) * 2000-06-28 2002-01-09 윤종용 Headset for hearing the digital audio data through a given wireless link of short-range mobile radio system
US8265637B2 (en) * 2000-08-02 2012-09-11 Atc Technologies, Llc Systems and methods for modifying antenna radiation patterns of peripheral base stations of a terrestrial network to allow reduced interference
US6807165B2 (en) 2000-11-08 2004-10-19 Meshnetworks, Inc. Time division protocol for an ad-hoc, peer-to-peer radio network having coordinating channel access to shared parallel data channels with separate reservation channel
US7151769B2 (en) * 2001-03-22 2006-12-19 Meshnetworks, Inc. Prioritized-routing for an ad-hoc, peer-to-peer, mobile radio access system based on battery-power levels and type of service
US7072650B2 (en) * 2000-11-13 2006-07-04 Meshnetworks, Inc. Ad hoc peer-to-peer mobile radio access system interfaced to the PSTN and cellular networks
US20030119480A1 (en) * 2001-02-26 2003-06-26 Jahangir Mohammed Apparatus and method for provisioning an unlicensed wireless communications base station for operation within a licensed wireless communications system
US7308263B2 (en) * 2001-02-26 2007-12-11 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Apparatus for supporting the handover of a telecommunication session between a licensed wireless system and an unlicensed wireless system
US6583675B2 (en) * 2001-03-20 2003-06-24 Broadcom Corporation Apparatus and method for phase lock loop gain control using unit current sources
US7206294B2 (en) 2001-08-15 2007-04-17 Meshnetworks, Inc. Movable access points and repeaters for minimizing coverage and capacity constraints in a wireless communications network and a method for using the same
US7145903B2 (en) * 2001-09-06 2006-12-05 Meshnetworks, Inc. Multi-master bus architecture for system-on-chip designs
WO2003047175A1 (en) * 2001-11-28 2003-06-05 Millennial Net Etwork protocol for an ad hoc wireless network
US7256703B2 (en) * 2002-04-18 2007-08-14 4Front Engineered Solutions, Inc. Zone specific remote control panel for loading dock equipment
US20040078598A1 (en) * 2002-05-04 2004-04-22 Instant802 Networks Inc. Key management and control of wireless network access points at a central server
US7042867B2 (en) * 2002-07-29 2006-05-09 Meshnetworks, Inc. System and method for determining physical location of a node in a wireless network during an authentication check of the node
US6754193B2 (en) * 2002-08-01 2004-06-22 Motorola, Inc. Method and base station controller for operating in accordance with a wireless communication protocol
US7787572B2 (en) 2005-04-07 2010-08-31 Rambus Inc. Advanced signal processors for interference cancellation in baseband receivers
EP1404043B1 (en) * 2002-09-26 2007-10-24 VKR Holding A/S Method of controlling operation of at least one transmitter and/or one receiver, communication system and use of such a method or such a system
US7606190B2 (en) 2002-10-18 2009-10-20 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Apparatus and messages for interworking between unlicensed access network and GPRS network for data services
US7471655B2 (en) * 2003-10-17 2008-12-30 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Channel activation messaging in an unlicensed mobile access telecommunications system
US7369859B2 (en) * 2003-10-17 2008-05-06 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Method and system for determining the location of an unlicensed mobile access subscriber
US7640008B2 (en) 2002-10-18 2009-12-29 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Apparatus and method for extending the coverage area of a licensed wireless communication system using an unlicensed wireless communication system
US20080132207A1 (en) * 2003-10-17 2008-06-05 Gallagher Michael D Service access control interface for an unlicensed wireless communication system
US7272397B2 (en) 2003-10-17 2007-09-18 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Service access control interface for an unlicensed wireless communication system
US7885644B2 (en) 2002-10-18 2011-02-08 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Method and system of providing landline equivalent location information over an integrated communication system
US7349698B2 (en) * 2002-10-18 2008-03-25 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Registration messaging in an unlicensed mobile access telecommunications system
US7283822B2 (en) * 2003-10-17 2007-10-16 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Service access control interface for an unlicensed wireless communication system
US7634269B2 (en) * 2002-10-18 2009-12-15 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Apparatus and method for extending the coverage area of a licensed wireless communication system using an unlicensed wireless communication system
US7873015B2 (en) 2002-10-18 2011-01-18 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Method and system for registering an unlicensed mobile access subscriber with a network controller
US7953423B2 (en) * 2002-10-18 2011-05-31 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Messaging in an unlicensed mobile access telecommunications system
US7565145B2 (en) * 2002-10-18 2009-07-21 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Handover messaging in an unlicensed mobile access telecommunications system
WO2004036770A9 (en) * 2002-10-18 2004-08-19 Kineto Wireless Inc Apparatus and method for extending the coverage area of a licensed wireless communication system using an unlicensed wireless communication system
EP1584160B1 (en) * 2003-01-13 2011-07-06 Meshnetworks, Inc. System and method for achieving continuous connectivity to an access point or gateway in a wireless network following and on-demand routing protocol
WO2004084022A3 (en) * 2003-03-13 2005-07-14 John M Belcea Real-time system and method for computing location of mobile subcriber in a wireless ad-hoc network
WO2004084462A3 (en) * 2003-03-14 2006-09-21 Meshnetworks Inc A system and method for analyzing the precision of geo-location services in a wireless network terminal
US20040196812A1 (en) * 2003-04-07 2004-10-07 Instant802 Networks Inc. Multi-band access point with shared processor
US7154381B2 (en) * 2003-05-23 2006-12-26 Sonos, Inc. System and method for operating a sensed power device over data wiring
US7734809B2 (en) * 2003-06-05 2010-06-08 Meshnetworks, Inc. System and method to maximize channel utilization in a multi-channel wireless communication network
WO2004110082B1 (en) * 2003-06-05 2005-02-03 Meshnetworks Inc System and method for determining location of a device in a wireless communication network
US7280483B2 (en) * 2003-06-05 2007-10-09 Meshnetworks, Inc. System and method to improve the network performance of a wireless communications network by finding an optimal route between a source and a destination
US7116632B2 (en) * 2003-06-05 2006-10-03 Meshnetworks, Inc. System and method for determining synchronization point in OFDM modems for accurate time of flight measurement
EP1632044B1 (en) * 2003-06-06 2011-10-19 Meshnetworks, Inc. Method to improve the overall performance of a wireless communication network
EP1632057B1 (en) * 2003-06-06 2014-07-23 Meshnetworks, Inc. Mac protocol for accurately computing the position of wireless devices inside buildings
EP1631915A4 (en) * 2003-06-06 2012-04-25 Meshnetworks Inc System and method for characterizing the quality of a link in a wireless network
US7075890B2 (en) 2003-06-06 2006-07-11 Meshnetworks, Inc. System and method to provide fairness and service differentation in ad-hoc networks
US20050009191A1 (en) * 2003-07-08 2005-01-13 Swenson Kirk D. Point of care information management system
US7957348B1 (en) 2004-04-21 2011-06-07 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Method and system for signaling traffic and media types within a communications network switching system
US8041385B2 (en) 2004-05-14 2011-10-18 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Power management mechanism for unlicensed wireless communication systems
US8024055B1 (en) 2004-05-15 2011-09-20 Sonos, Inc. Method and system for controlling amplifiers
US20060080423A1 (en) * 2004-06-07 2006-04-13 James Brewer System and method for a printer access point
US7940746B2 (en) 2004-08-24 2011-05-10 Comcast Cable Holdings, Llc Method and system for locating a voice over internet protocol (VoIP) device connected to a network
US7167463B2 (en) * 2004-10-07 2007-01-23 Meshnetworks, Inc. System and method for creating a spectrum agile wireless multi-hopping network
US20060239277A1 (en) * 2004-11-10 2006-10-26 Michael Gallagher Transmitting messages across telephony protocols
US20060209799A1 (en) * 2005-02-09 2006-09-21 Gallagher Michael D Unlicensed mobile access network (UMAN) system and method
US7933598B1 (en) 2005-03-14 2011-04-26 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Methods and apparatuses for effecting handover in integrated wireless systems
US7756546B1 (en) 2005-03-30 2010-07-13 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Methods and apparatuses to indicate fixed terminal capabilities
ES2528403T3 (en) 2005-04-28 2015-02-09 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Pharmaceutical systems
US8836513B2 (en) 2006-04-28 2014-09-16 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Communication system incorporated in an ingestible product
US9756874B2 (en) 2011-07-11 2017-09-12 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Masticable ingestible product and communication system therefor
US8730031B2 (en) 2005-04-28 2014-05-20 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Communication system using an implantable device
US9198608B2 (en) 2005-04-28 2015-12-01 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Communication system incorporated in a container
US8802183B2 (en) 2005-04-28 2014-08-12 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Communication system with enhanced partial power source and method of manufacturing same
US8912908B2 (en) 2005-04-28 2014-12-16 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Communication system with remote activation
US7843900B2 (en) 2005-08-10 2010-11-30 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Mechanisms to extend UMA or GAN to inter-work with UMTS core network
US7515575B1 (en) 2005-08-26 2009-04-07 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Intelligent access point scanning with self-learning capability
EP1920418A4 (en) 2005-09-01 2010-12-29 Proteus Biomedical Inc Implantable zero-wire communications system
KR100872413B1 (en) * 2005-09-13 2008-12-05 삼성전자주식회사 Method for acquisition of the information about neighbor base stations and neighbor relay stations in a multi-hop relay broadband wireless access communication system
US8886261B2 (en) * 2005-12-06 2014-11-11 Motorola Mobility Llc Multi-mode methods and devices utilizing battery power level for selection of the modes
US8165086B2 (en) 2006-04-18 2012-04-24 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Method of providing improved integrated communication system data service
US20070253351A1 (en) * 2006-05-01 2007-11-01 Oswal Anand K Automatically Discovering Devices Of A Wimax Network System
US8956287B2 (en) 2006-05-02 2015-02-17 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Patient customized therapeutic regimens
US8438239B2 (en) * 2006-05-11 2013-05-07 Vocollect, Inc. Apparatus and method for sharing data among multiple terminal devices
US7768963B2 (en) 2006-07-07 2010-08-03 Skyhook Wireless, Inc. System and method of improving sampling of WLAN packet information to improve estimates of Doppler frequency of a WLAN positioning device
WO2009039318A1 (en) * 2007-09-18 2009-03-26 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Method and system for supporting large number of data paths in an integrated communication system
US7852817B2 (en) * 2006-07-14 2010-12-14 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Generic access to the Iu interface
US20080039086A1 (en) * 2006-07-14 2008-02-14 Gallagher Michael D Generic Access to the Iu Interface
US7912004B2 (en) * 2006-07-14 2011-03-22 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Generic access to the Iu interface
US20080076425A1 (en) * 2006-09-22 2008-03-27 Amit Khetawat Method and apparatus for resource management
US8204502B2 (en) 2006-09-22 2012-06-19 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Method and apparatus for user equipment registration
US8036664B2 (en) * 2006-09-22 2011-10-11 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Method and apparatus for determining rove-out
US8073428B2 (en) 2006-09-22 2011-12-06 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Method and apparatus for securing communication between an access point and a network controller
US20080076392A1 (en) * 2006-09-22 2008-03-27 Amit Khetawat Method and apparatus for securing a wireless air interface
US7995994B2 (en) * 2006-09-22 2011-08-09 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Method and apparatus for preventing theft of service in a communication system
EP2087589B1 (en) 2006-10-17 2011-11-23 Proteus Biomedical, Inc. Low voltage oscillator for medical devices
JP5916277B2 (en) 2006-10-25 2016-05-11 プロテウス デジタル ヘルス, インコーポレイテッド Ingestible control activation identifier
US20080132239A1 (en) * 2006-10-31 2008-06-05 Amit Khetawat Method and apparatus to enable hand-in for femtocells
US7856234B2 (en) 2006-11-07 2010-12-21 Skyhook Wireless, Inc. System and method for estimating positioning error within a WLAN-based positioning system
WO2008063626A3 (en) 2006-11-20 2008-07-03 Proteus Biomedical Inc Active signal processing personal health signal receivers
US7650433B2 (en) 2007-01-05 2010-01-19 Microsoft Corporation Power management for multi-interface device clusters
US8858432B2 (en) 2007-02-01 2014-10-14 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Ingestible event marker systems
CN103066226B (en) 2007-02-14 2016-09-14 普罗透斯数字保健公司 The body having a high surface area electrode power supply
US8019331B2 (en) * 2007-02-26 2011-09-13 Kineto Wireless, Inc. Femtocell integration into the macro network
US8932221B2 (en) 2007-03-09 2015-01-13 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. In-body device having a multi-directional transmitter
US9270025B2 (en) 2007-03-09 2016-02-23 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. In-body device having deployable antenna
US8379609B2 (en) * 2007-03-29 2013-02-19 Vixs Systems, Inc. Multimedia client/server system with adjustable data link rate and range and methods for use therewith
US7984177B2 (en) * 2007-04-30 2011-07-19 Vixs Systems, Inc. Multimedia client/server system with adjustable packet size and methods for use therewith
US8540632B2 (en) 2007-05-24 2013-09-24 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Low profile antenna for in body device
US7978621B2 (en) * 2007-09-24 2011-07-12 Broadcom Corporation Power consumption management in a MIMO transceiver and method for use therewith
WO2009042812A1 (en) 2007-09-25 2009-04-02 Proteus Biomedical, Inc. In-body device with virtual dipole signal amplification
US20090080442A1 (en) * 2007-09-26 2009-03-26 Narayan Ananth S Conserving power in a multi-node environment
US8254992B1 (en) 2007-10-08 2012-08-28 Motion Computing, Inc. Wireless docking system and pairing protocol for multiple dock environments
US9429992B1 (en) 2007-10-08 2016-08-30 Motion Computing, Inc. Wired and wireless docking station
CA2717862C (en) 2008-03-05 2016-11-22 Proteus Biomedical, Inc. Multi-mode communication ingestible event markers and systems, and methods of using the same
US20090262683A1 (en) * 2008-04-18 2009-10-22 Amit Khetawat Method and Apparatus for Setup and Release of User Equipment Context Identifiers in a Home Node B System
JP5654988B2 (en) 2008-07-08 2015-01-14 プロテウス デジタル ヘルス, インコーポレイテッド Ingestible event marker data framework
US8540633B2 (en) 2008-08-13 2013-09-24 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Identifier circuits for generating unique identifiable indicators and techniques for producing same
US20100040023A1 (en) * 2008-08-15 2010-02-18 Gallagher Michael D Method and Apparatus for Inter Home Node B Handover in a Home Node B Group
US8036748B2 (en) 2008-11-13 2011-10-11 Proteus Biomedical, Inc. Ingestible therapy activator system and method
EP2358270A4 (en) 2008-12-11 2014-08-13 Proteus Digital Health Inc Evaluation of gastrointestinal function using portable electroviscerography systems and methods of using the same
US9439566B2 (en) 2008-12-15 2016-09-13 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Re-wearable wireless device
US9659423B2 (en) 2008-12-15 2017-05-23 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Personal authentication apparatus system and method
CA2792224A1 (en) 2008-12-15 2010-07-01 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Body-associated receiver and method
CA2750158A1 (en) 2009-01-06 2010-07-15 Proteus Biomedical, Inc. Ingestion-related biofeedback and personalized medical therapy method and system
CN102365084B (en) 2009-01-06 2014-04-30 普罗秋斯数字健康公司 Pharmaceutical dosages delivery system
US8540664B2 (en) 2009-03-25 2013-09-24 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Probablistic pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic modeling
US8545402B2 (en) 2009-04-28 2013-10-01 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Highly reliable ingestible event markers and methods for using the same
EP2432458A4 (en) 2009-05-12 2014-02-12 Proteus Digital Health Inc Ingestible event markers comprising an ingestible component
US8022877B2 (en) 2009-07-16 2011-09-20 Skyhook Wireless, Inc. Systems and methods for using a satellite positioning system to detect moved WLAN access points
EP2467707A4 (en) 2009-08-21 2014-12-17 Proteus Digital Health Inc Apparatus and method for measuring biochemical parameters
US8811905B1 (en) * 2009-09-02 2014-08-19 Airhop Communications, Inc. Power savings and interference reduction for multimode devices
WO2011057024A3 (en) 2009-11-04 2011-08-18 Proteus Biomedical, Inc. System for supply chain management
CN103405341A (en) 2009-12-02 2013-11-27 普罗秋斯数字健康公司 Integrated ingestible event marker system with pharmaceutical product
WO2011094606A3 (en) 2010-02-01 2011-10-20 Proteus Biomedical, Inc. Data gathering system
CN102169624A (en) * 2010-03-15 2011-08-31 朱曼平 Remote-control ordering car
KR20130045261A (en) 2010-04-07 2013-05-03 프로테우스 디지털 헬스, 인코포레이티드 Miniature ingestible device
WO2012071280A3 (en) 2010-11-22 2012-07-26 Proteus Biomedical, Inc. Ingestible device with pharmaceutical product
EP2683291A4 (en) 2011-03-11 2014-09-03 Proteus Digital Health Inc Wearable personal body associated device with various physical configurations
US8645604B2 (en) * 2011-03-25 2014-02-04 Apple Inc. Device orientation based docking functions
WO2013006102A1 (en) * 2011-07-05 2013-01-10 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson (Publ) Methods, apparatus and computer programs for base station initiated energy savings within an associated user equipment
US9235683B2 (en) 2011-11-09 2016-01-12 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Apparatus, system, and method for managing adherence to a regimen
RU2015105699A (en) 2012-07-23 2016-09-10 Протеус Диджитал Хелс, Инк. Methods for the preparation of ingestible event markers containing ingestible component
KR101565013B1 (en) 2012-10-18 2015-11-02 프로테우스 디지털 헬스, 인코포레이티드 Apparatus, system, and method to adaptively optimize power dissipation and broadcast power in a power source for a communication device
US9796576B2 (en) 2013-08-30 2017-10-24 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Container with electronically controlled interlock
WO2015042411A1 (en) 2013-09-20 2015-03-26 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Methods, devices and systems for receiving and decoding a signal in the presence of noise using slices and warping
WO2015044722A1 (en) 2013-09-24 2015-04-02 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Method and apparatus for use with received electromagnetic signal at a frequency not known exactly in advance
US9244516B2 (en) 2013-09-30 2016-01-26 Sonos, Inc. Media playback system using standby mode in a mesh network
US10084880B2 (en) 2013-11-04 2018-09-25 Proteus Digital Health, Inc. Social media networking based on physiologic information
CN105094900A (en) * 2015-07-13 2015-11-25 小米科技有限责任公司 Method and apparatus for downloading control program

Citations (99)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2731622A (en) * 1952-12-26 1956-01-17 Motorola Inc Lock-out system
US2932729A (en) * 1953-02-12 1960-04-12 Int Standard Electric Corp Communication system with interlocking calling system
US2942072A (en) * 1957-06-17 1960-06-21 Gen Dynamics Corp Helmet communication system
US2987615A (en) * 1957-12-23 1961-06-06 Automatic Elect Lab Mobile selector for common carrier radio telephone service
US3366880A (en) * 1965-11-08 1968-01-30 American Tele Extension Co Tone controlled wireless telephone extension system
US3387212A (en) * 1964-06-09 1968-06-04 Mu Western Electronics Co Inc Mobile radio paging system wherein the receivers are all made operative for a brief interval following a transmitted tone burst
US3586977A (en) * 1969-01-02 1971-06-22 Harvey V Lustig Communication system for helmeted motorcycle riders
US3745462A (en) * 1972-01-20 1973-07-10 Public Syst Inc Mobile radio extension interface for converting conventional transmit/receive to a repeater
US3826900A (en) * 1972-10-13 1974-07-30 Ncr Cordless scanning probe
US3876980A (en) * 1973-11-05 1975-04-08 Products Of Information Techno Vehicle location systems
US3876863A (en) * 1973-02-12 1975-04-08 Jack M Boone Inventory taking utilizing tone generation
US3955140A (en) * 1975-05-20 1976-05-04 Public Systems, Inc. Mobile radio extension unit with punch through operation
US4004225A (en) * 1974-05-21 1977-01-18 Licentia Patent-Verwaltungs-G.M.B.H. Method for synchronizing the pulse frames in time multiplex data transmission via communication satellites
US4004098A (en) * 1973-12-06 1977-01-18 Communications Satellite Corporation (Comsat) Satellite on-board switching system with satellite-to-satellite link
US4025734A (en) * 1976-07-27 1977-05-24 Harry Aloupis Ambient noise shielded ear transceiver
US4251865A (en) * 1978-12-08 1981-02-17 Motorola, Inc. Polling system for a duplex communications link
US4367378A (en) * 1980-08-05 1983-01-04 Jordan Arthur A Telephone and holding band therefor
US4460120A (en) * 1982-01-25 1984-07-17 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Narrow bodied, single- and twin-windowed portable laser scanning head for reading bar code symbols
US4491966A (en) * 1982-07-29 1985-01-01 Rockwell International Corporation Maritime telecommunications system
US4513447A (en) * 1982-12-13 1985-04-23 Motorola, Inc. Simplified frequency scheme for coherent transponders
US4606044A (en) * 1983-03-09 1986-08-12 Ricoh Company, Ltd. Adjusting data transmission rate based on received signal quality
US4639914A (en) * 1984-12-06 1987-01-27 At&T Bell Laboratories Wireless PBX/LAN system with optimum combining
US4659878A (en) * 1985-09-11 1987-04-21 General Electric Company Method and apparatus for interference free communications between a remote handset and a host subscriber unit in a Cellular Radio Telephone System
US4677655A (en) * 1984-06-01 1987-06-30 Hashimoto Corporation Cordless telephone with automatic telephone answering/recording function
US4682351A (en) * 1984-10-29 1987-07-21 Nec Corporation Cordless Telephone system
US4741019A (en) * 1984-03-15 1988-04-26 Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd. Cordless telephone
US4745632A (en) * 1985-12-27 1988-05-17 Duffy Anthony G Wireless mobile telephone communication system
US4748655A (en) * 1984-07-25 1988-05-31 Racal Research Limited Portable telephones
US4831539A (en) * 1984-04-27 1989-05-16 Hagenbuch Roy George Le Apparatus and method for locating a vehicle in a working area and for the on-board measuring of parameters indicative of vehicle performance
US4833726A (en) * 1986-03-07 1989-05-23 Ngk Insulators, Ltd. Helmet with two-way radio communication faculty
US4850006A (en) * 1986-11-18 1989-07-18 Nec Corporation Booster and charger unit used for hand-held portable telephone and having overheat protection circuit
US4857716A (en) * 1986-05-12 1989-08-15 Clinicom Incorporated Patient identification and verification system and method
US4906989A (en) * 1987-02-27 1990-03-06 Nec Corporation Paging system having a vehicle mounted repeater with a portable paging receiver detachably mounted thereon
US4916441A (en) * 1988-09-19 1990-04-10 Clinicom Incorporated Portable handheld terminal
US4924461A (en) * 1987-12-22 1990-05-08 Fujitsu Limited Polling network communication system having transmission request registration means
US4945532A (en) * 1988-03-18 1990-07-31 Bull, S.A. Local network testing using carrier sense multiple access and collision detection (CSMA/CD)
US4989230A (en) * 1988-09-23 1991-01-29 Motorola, Inc. Cellular cordless telephone
US5003619A (en) * 1989-01-31 1991-03-26 Motorola, Inc. Method and apparatus for adjusting the power of a transmitter
US5006996A (en) * 1988-03-26 1991-04-09 Fuji Electric Co., Ltd. System of conveying, storing, retrieving and distributing articles of manufacture
US5007050A (en) * 1987-03-27 1991-04-09 Teletec Corporation Bidirectional digital serial interface for communication digital signals including digitized audio between microprocessor-based control and transceiver units of two-way radio communications equipment
US5006699A (en) * 1987-11-13 1991-04-09 Felkner Donald J System for collecting medical data
US5008953A (en) * 1989-06-26 1991-04-16 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson Mobile station link supervision utilizing digital voice color codes
US5020135A (en) * 1987-03-27 1991-05-28 Teletec Corporation Computerized multistandard, field-convertible, multiregional/multiservice, remote controllable, remote programmable mobile two-way radio system with digital serial bus link, built-in programmer and autodiagnostics
US5021938A (en) * 1988-03-15 1991-06-04 Fujitsu Limited Transmission system with backup function
US5023824A (en) * 1987-10-02 1991-06-11 Norand Corporation Hand-held computerized data collection terminal with indented hand grip and conforming battery drawer
US5025488A (en) * 1989-11-16 1991-06-18 Rockwell International Corporation Optical heterodyne detector
US5029183A (en) * 1989-06-29 1991-07-02 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Packet data communication network
US5029232A (en) * 1989-01-12 1991-07-02 Cycle-Sat., Inc. Satellite communications network
US5031098A (en) * 1989-04-28 1991-07-09 Norand Corporation Transaction control system including portable data terminal and mobile customer service station
US5032845A (en) * 1990-02-08 1991-07-16 D.G.R., Inc. Vehicle locating system with Loran-C
US5040238A (en) * 1990-06-29 1991-08-13 Motorola, Inc. Trunking system communication resource reuse method
US5042082A (en) * 1989-06-26 1991-08-20 Telefonaktiebolaget L. M. Ericsson Mobile assisted handoff
US5044010A (en) * 1990-03-29 1991-08-27 At&T Bell Laboratories Arrangement and method for selecting an available communication channel for a cordless telephone
US5043736A (en) * 1990-07-27 1991-08-27 Cae-Link Corporation Cellular position locating system
US5090054A (en) * 1989-05-26 1992-02-25 Grilliot William L Ventilated hood for firefighter
US5103448A (en) * 1989-03-31 1992-04-07 Gec Plessey Telecommunications Ltd. Simultaneous ringing control in the time division duplex telecommunications system
US5115514A (en) * 1987-08-03 1992-05-19 Orion Industries, Inc. Measuring and controlling signal feedback between the transmit and receive antennas of a communications booster
US5119102A (en) * 1990-02-28 1992-06-02 U.S. Philips Corporation Vehicle location system
US5142700A (en) * 1990-08-27 1992-08-25 Reed John W Protective helmet containing an integral transceiver
US5179721A (en) * 1990-11-05 1993-01-12 Motorola Inc. Method for inter operation of a cellular communication system and a trunking communication system
US5187646A (en) * 1989-09-13 1993-02-16 Mannesmann Kienzle Gmbh Data storage device with an arrangement for receiving a transportable, card-shaped or disk-shaped data storage unit so that the data storage unit is inaccessible in an operating position
US5189291A (en) * 1989-05-01 1993-02-23 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Bar code reader operable as remote scanner or with fixed terminal
US5202829A (en) * 1991-06-10 1993-04-13 Trimble Navigation Limited Exploration system and method for high-accuracy and high-confidence level relative position and velocity determinations
US5208449A (en) * 1991-09-09 1993-05-04 Psc, Inc. Portable transaction terminal
US5218187A (en) * 1990-01-18 1993-06-08 Norand Corporation Hand-held data capture system with interchangeable modules
US5220678A (en) * 1991-08-12 1993-06-15 Motorola, Inc. Method and apparatus for adjusting the power of a transmitter
US5220564A (en) * 1990-09-06 1993-06-15 Ncr Corporation Transmission control for a wireless local area network station
US5227614A (en) * 1986-08-15 1993-07-13 Norand Corporation Core computer processor module, and peripheral shell module assembled to form a pocket size data capture unit
US5239622A (en) * 1991-11-28 1993-08-24 Monarch Marking Systems, Inc. Barcode identification system format editor
US5241542A (en) * 1991-08-23 1993-08-31 International Business Machines Corporation Battery efficient operation of scheduled access protocol
US5276703A (en) * 1992-01-13 1994-01-04 Windata, Inc. Wireless local area network communications system
US5276686A (en) * 1990-10-17 1994-01-04 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Mobile radio communication system having mobile base and portable devices as a mobile station
US5276918A (en) * 1990-11-16 1994-01-04 Orbitel Mobile Communications Limited Mobile radio telephone with booster unit
US5289378A (en) * 1989-01-31 1994-02-22 Norand Corporation Vehicle lan with adapters for coupling portable data terminals
US5291516A (en) * 1991-05-13 1994-03-01 Omnipoint Data Company, Inc. Dual mode transmitter and receiver
US5295154A (en) * 1991-10-01 1994-03-15 Norand Corporation Radio frequency local area network
US5319796A (en) * 1990-12-14 1994-06-07 Motorola, Inc. Communication system that avoids co-channel interference
US5335246A (en) * 1992-08-20 1994-08-02 Nexus Telecommunication Systems, Ltd. Pager with reverse paging facility
US5339316A (en) * 1992-11-13 1994-08-16 Ncr Corporation Wireless local area network system
US5389917A (en) * 1993-02-17 1995-02-14 Psc, Inc. Lapel data entry terminal
US5398257A (en) * 1993-01-11 1995-03-14 Groenteman; Frank S. Copier and monitoring network
US5398248A (en) * 1992-07-02 1995-03-14 U.S. Philips Corporation Resolving conflicts between communication systems
US5404577A (en) * 1990-07-13 1995-04-04 Cairns & Brother Inc. Combination head-protective helmet & communications system
US5404570A (en) * 1992-11-23 1995-04-04 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson Radio coverage in closed environments
US5422934A (en) * 1993-05-17 1995-06-06 Cellstar, Pacific Cellstar, Inc. Cordless range extension accessory apparatus for radio telephones
US5528664A (en) * 1991-03-25 1996-06-18 Harris Canada Inc. Cellular data overlay system providing packet-switched communication data service over a selected channel which is not in use by a circuit-switched communication subsystem
US5533029A (en) * 1993-11-12 1996-07-02 Pacific Communication Sciences, Inc. Cellular digital packet data mobile data base station
US5550895A (en) * 1993-12-02 1996-08-27 Lucent Technologies Inc. Bimodal portable telephone
US5602854A (en) * 1991-05-13 1997-02-11 Norand Corporation Wireless personal local area network utilizing removable radio frequency modules with digital interfaces and idle sense communication protocol
US5740366A (en) * 1991-10-01 1998-04-14 Norand Corporation Communication network having a plurality of bridging nodes which transmit a beacon to terminal nodes in power saving state that it has messages awaiting delivery
US5748619A (en) * 1991-10-01 1998-05-05 Meier; Robert C. Communication network providing wireless and hard-wired dynamic routing
US5862171A (en) * 1992-11-09 1999-01-19 Norand Corporation Radio frequency communication network having adaptive communication parameters
US5907794A (en) * 1994-03-03 1999-05-25 Nokia Telecommunications Oy Controlling a subscriber station on a direct mode channel
US6085109A (en) * 1992-04-30 2000-07-04 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Wireless telephone equipment operating as a cordless and cellular telephone
US6192400B1 (en) * 1990-05-25 2001-02-20 Intermec Ip Corp. Multilevel data communication system including local and host systems
US6192230B1 (en) * 1993-03-06 2001-02-20 Lucent Technologies, Inc. Wireless data communication system having power saving function
US6335356B1 (en) * 1994-01-07 2002-01-01 Sugen, Inc. Method of treating a patient by parenteral administration of a lipophilic compound
US6359872B1 (en) * 1997-10-28 2002-03-19 Intermec Ip Corp. Wireless personal local area network
US6876863B1 (en) * 1993-09-08 2005-04-05 Cirrus Logic, Inc. System for protecting AMPS data using CDPD channel

Family Cites Families (80)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3082314A (en) * 1959-04-20 1963-03-19 Shin Meiwa Kogyo Kabushiki Kai Plasma arc torch
US3145287A (en) * 1961-07-14 1964-08-18 Metco Inc Plasma flame generator and spray gun
US3360988A (en) * 1966-11-22 1968-01-02 Nasa Usa Electric arc apparatus
US3886554A (en) * 1973-04-23 1975-05-27 Motorola Inc Method and apparatus for improving the accuracy of a vehicle location system
US4083003A (en) * 1973-11-05 1978-04-04 Products Of Information Technology, Inc. Vehicle location system
US3908088A (en) * 1974-05-22 1975-09-23 Us Army Time division multiple access communications system
US4217588A (en) * 1975-04-16 1980-08-12 Information Identification Company, Inc. Object monitoring method and apparatus
US4116237A (en) * 1977-02-07 1978-09-26 Norman Birch Emergency breathing apparatus
DE2805420C2 (en) * 1978-02-09 1987-12-17 Robert Bosch Gmbh, 7000 Stuttgart, De
US4152647A (en) * 1978-02-23 1979-05-01 The United States Of America As Represented By The United States Department Of Energy Rapidly deployable emergency communication system
US4256779A (en) * 1978-11-03 1981-03-17 United Technologies Corporation Plasma spray method and apparatus
US4415065A (en) * 1980-11-17 1983-11-15 Sandstedt Gary O Restaurant or retail vending facility
US4445021A (en) * 1981-08-14 1984-04-24 Metco, Inc. Heavy duty plasma spray gun
FR2517146B1 (en) * 1981-11-20 1983-12-30 Trt Telecom Radio Electr
US4471218B1 (en) * 1982-05-19 1989-08-01
US4481382A (en) * 1982-09-29 1984-11-06 Villa Real Antony Euclid C Programmable telephone system
US4539706A (en) * 1983-02-03 1985-09-03 General Electric Company Mobile vehicular repeater system which provides up-link acknowledgement signal to portable transceiver at end of transceiver transmission
US4706274A (en) * 1984-05-11 1987-11-10 Southwestern Bell Telecommunications, Inc. Cordless telephone system
JPS6141262A (en) * 1984-07-31 1986-02-27 Omron Tateisi Electronics Co Voice recordable card
DE3430383A1 (en) * 1984-08-17 1986-02-27 Plasmainvent Ag Plasma spray gun for interior coatings
DE3582309D1 (en) * 1984-11-20 1991-05-02 Fujitsu Ltd Input terminal.
DE3514851A1 (en) * 1985-04-25 1986-11-06 Npk Kontrol Zavarachni Raboti Nozzles for a plasmatron
US4697243A (en) * 1985-07-25 1987-09-29 Westinghouse Electric Corp. Methods of servicing an elevator system
US4672658A (en) * 1985-10-16 1987-06-09 At&T Company And At&T Bell Laboratories Spread spectrum wireless PBX
US4674683A (en) * 1986-05-06 1987-06-23 The Perkin-Elmer Corporation Plasma flame spray gun method and apparatus with adjustable ratio of radial and tangential plasma gas flow
US4750036A (en) * 1986-05-14 1988-06-07 Radio Telcom & Technology, Inc. Interactive television and data transmission system
US4746632A (en) * 1986-09-08 1988-05-24 Corning Glass Works Inorganic crystalline fibers
US4873711A (en) * 1986-10-10 1989-10-10 Motorola, Inc. Method and apparatus for remote talk/listen communication system
US4700375A (en) * 1986-10-10 1987-10-13 Motorola, Inc. Battery charging, reset, and data transfer system
CA1290020C (en) * 1987-02-09 1991-10-01 Steven Messenger Wireless local area network
US4841114A (en) * 1987-03-11 1989-06-20 Browning James A High-velocity controlled-temperature plasma spray method and apparatus
JP2566948B2 (en) * 1987-04-03 1996-12-25 エヌ・ティ・ティ移動通信網株式会社 Regional co - dress phone system
US4882765A (en) * 1987-05-22 1989-11-21 Maxwell Ray F Data transmission system
US4879755A (en) * 1987-05-29 1989-11-07 Stolar, Inc. Medium frequency mine communication system
US5152002A (en) * 1987-08-03 1992-09-29 Orion Industries, Inc. System and method for extending cell site coverage
WO1989004093A1 (en) * 1987-10-27 1989-05-05 Nysen Paul A Passive universal communicator
US4853515A (en) * 1988-09-30 1989-08-01 The Perkin-Elmer Corporation Plasma gun extension for coating slots
US5025486A (en) * 1988-12-09 1991-06-18 Dallas Semiconductor Corporation Wireless communication system with parallel polling
US4955038A (en) * 1988-12-09 1990-09-04 Dallas Semiconductor Corporation Low-power RF receiver
US5073972A (en) * 1989-01-12 1991-12-17 Tendler Robert K Modular communications system including a portable unit range extender and selective-call system
US5465207A (en) * 1989-01-31 1995-11-07 Norand Corporation Vehicle data system
US5457629A (en) * 1989-01-31 1995-10-10 Norand Corporation Vehicle data system with common supply of data and power to vehicle devices
US6654378B1 (en) * 1992-03-18 2003-11-25 Broadcom Corp. Transaction control system including portable data terminal and mobile customer service station
JPH0773385B2 (en) * 1989-04-03 1995-08-02 三菱電機株式会社 Mobile telephone unit
US5095529A (en) * 1989-05-30 1992-03-10 Motorola, Inc. Intersystem group call communication system and method
US5046130A (en) * 1989-08-08 1991-09-03 Motorola, Inc. Multiple communication path compatible automatic vehicle location unit
US5454024A (en) * 1989-08-31 1995-09-26 Lebowitz; Mayer M. Cellular digital packet data (CDPD) network transmission system incorporating cellular link integrity monitoring
US5121503A (en) * 1989-11-06 1992-06-09 Motorola, Inc. Satellite signaling system having a signal beam with a variable beam area
US5657317A (en) * 1990-01-18 1997-08-12 Norand Corporation Hierarchical communication system using premises, peripheral and vehicular local area networking
JP2765161B2 (en) * 1990-02-23 1998-06-11 ソニー株式会社 Cordless phone
US5125103A (en) * 1990-04-30 1992-06-23 Motorola, Inc. Automatic control channel acquisition method and apparatus in a trunked communication system
US5058199A (en) * 1990-05-02 1991-10-15 Motorola, Inc. Inter-truncked radio systems bridge protocol
US6749122B1 (en) * 1990-05-25 2004-06-15 Broadcom Corporation Multi-level hierarchial radio-frequency system communication system
US6006100A (en) * 1990-05-25 1999-12-21 Norand Corporation Multi-level, hierarchical radio-frequency communication system
ES2104716T3 (en) 1990-07-25 1997-10-16 Norand Corp Data communication system.
US5293642A (en) * 1990-12-19 1994-03-08 Northern Telecom Limited Method of locating a mobile station
CA2061090A1 (en) * 1991-03-11 1992-09-12 Richard A. Miska Personal mobile communication system with call bridging
CA2040234C (en) * 1991-04-11 2000-01-04 Steven Messenger Wireless coupling of devices to wired network
US5481545A (en) * 1991-08-26 1996-01-02 Ericsson Inc. Conventional network interface for multisite RF trunking system
US5335356A (en) * 1991-09-05 1994-08-02 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson Adaptive resource allocation in a mobile telephone system
US5349631A (en) * 1991-11-21 1994-09-20 Airtouch Communications Inbuilding telephone communication system
US5404544A (en) * 1992-06-05 1995-04-04 Advanced Micro Devices System for periodically transmitting signal to/from sleeping node identifying its existence to a network and awakening the sleeping node responding to received instruction
WO1994000946A1 (en) * 1992-06-23 1994-01-06 Motorola Inc. Dual system cellular cordless radiotelephone apparatus with sub-data channel timing monitor
US5285443A (en) * 1992-08-25 1994-02-08 Motorola, Inc. Method and apparatus for synchronizing a time division duplexing communication system
US5225843A (en) * 1992-09-01 1993-07-06 Motorola, Inc. Method for accessing a trunked communication system
US5388101A (en) * 1992-10-26 1995-02-07 Eon Corporation Interactive nationwide data service communication system for stationary and mobile battery operated subscriber units
US5375051A (en) * 1992-11-13 1994-12-20 Daiblo Research Corporation Apparatus using serial data line to turn on a transceiver or other device
US5252979A (en) * 1992-11-23 1993-10-12 Lanen Holdings Pty. Ltd. Universal communication system
US5682379A (en) * 1993-12-23 1997-10-28 Norand Corporation Wireless personal local area network
US5371734A (en) * 1993-01-29 1994-12-06 Digital Ocean, Inc. Medium access control protocol for wireless network
US5311197A (en) * 1993-02-01 1994-05-10 Trimble Navigation Limited Event-activated reporting of vehicle location
EP0636290B1 (en) * 1993-02-16 2001-08-08 Telefonaktiebolaget Lm Ericsson Arrangement for telecommunication
US5483465A (en) * 1993-02-26 1996-01-09 Grube; Gary W. Method for reprogramming duplicated communication units
US5351270A (en) * 1993-05-20 1994-09-27 Stanford Telecommunications, Inc. Portable cellular telephone using spread spectrum communication with mobile transceiver
JPH0746248A (en) * 1993-07-30 1995-02-14 Toshiba Corp Radio communication system
US6108559A (en) * 1993-10-26 2000-08-22 Telefonaktiebolaget Lm Ericsson System and method for routing messages in radiocommunication systems
CA2134395A1 (en) * 1993-11-26 1995-05-27 Keith Andrew Olds Method and apparatus for management of automatically initiated communication
US5521904A (en) * 1993-12-07 1996-05-28 Telefonaktiebolaget Lm Ericsson Method and apparatus for testing a base station in a time division multiple access radio communications system
US6175308B1 (en) * 1993-12-16 2001-01-16 Actall Corporation Personal duress security system
US5797099A (en) * 1996-02-09 1998-08-18 Lucent Technologies Inc. Enhanced wireless communication system

Patent Citations (100)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2731622A (en) * 1952-12-26 1956-01-17 Motorola Inc Lock-out system
US2932729A (en) * 1953-02-12 1960-04-12 Int Standard Electric Corp Communication system with interlocking calling system
US2942072A (en) * 1957-06-17 1960-06-21 Gen Dynamics Corp Helmet communication system
US2987615A (en) * 1957-12-23 1961-06-06 Automatic Elect Lab Mobile selector for common carrier radio telephone service
US3387212A (en) * 1964-06-09 1968-06-04 Mu Western Electronics Co Inc Mobile radio paging system wherein the receivers are all made operative for a brief interval following a transmitted tone burst
US3366880A (en) * 1965-11-08 1968-01-30 American Tele Extension Co Tone controlled wireless telephone extension system
US3586977A (en) * 1969-01-02 1971-06-22 Harvey V Lustig Communication system for helmeted motorcycle riders
US3745462A (en) * 1972-01-20 1973-07-10 Public Syst Inc Mobile radio extension interface for converting conventional transmit/receive to a repeater
US3826900A (en) * 1972-10-13 1974-07-30 Ncr Cordless scanning probe
US3876863A (en) * 1973-02-12 1975-04-08 Jack M Boone Inventory taking utilizing tone generation
US3876980A (en) * 1973-11-05 1975-04-08 Products Of Information Techno Vehicle location systems
US4004098A (en) * 1973-12-06 1977-01-18 Communications Satellite Corporation (Comsat) Satellite on-board switching system with satellite-to-satellite link
US4004225A (en) * 1974-05-21 1977-01-18 Licentia Patent-Verwaltungs-G.M.B.H. Method for synchronizing the pulse frames in time multiplex data transmission via communication satellites
US3955140A (en) * 1975-05-20 1976-05-04 Public Systems, Inc. Mobile radio extension unit with punch through operation
US4025734A (en) * 1976-07-27 1977-05-24 Harry Aloupis Ambient noise shielded ear transceiver
US4251865A (en) * 1978-12-08 1981-02-17 Motorola, Inc. Polling system for a duplex communications link
US4367378A (en) * 1980-08-05 1983-01-04 Jordan Arthur A Telephone and holding band therefor
US4460120A (en) * 1982-01-25 1984-07-17 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Narrow bodied, single- and twin-windowed portable laser scanning head for reading bar code symbols
US4491966A (en) * 1982-07-29 1985-01-01 Rockwell International Corporation Maritime telecommunications system
US4513447A (en) * 1982-12-13 1985-04-23 Motorola, Inc. Simplified frequency scheme for coherent transponders
US4606044A (en) * 1983-03-09 1986-08-12 Ricoh Company, Ltd. Adjusting data transmission rate based on received signal quality
US4741019A (en) * 1984-03-15 1988-04-26 Sanyo Electric Co., Ltd. Cordless telephone
US4831539A (en) * 1984-04-27 1989-05-16 Hagenbuch Roy George Le Apparatus and method for locating a vehicle in a working area and for the on-board measuring of parameters indicative of vehicle performance
US4677655A (en) * 1984-06-01 1987-06-30 Hashimoto Corporation Cordless telephone with automatic telephone answering/recording function
US4748655A (en) * 1984-07-25 1988-05-31 Racal Research Limited Portable telephones
US4682351A (en) * 1984-10-29 1987-07-21 Nec Corporation Cordless Telephone system
US4639914A (en) * 1984-12-06 1987-01-27 At&T Bell Laboratories Wireless PBX/LAN system with optimum combining
US4659878A (en) * 1985-09-11 1987-04-21 General Electric Company Method and apparatus for interference free communications between a remote handset and a host subscriber unit in a Cellular Radio Telephone System
US4745632A (en) * 1985-12-27 1988-05-17 Duffy Anthony G Wireless mobile telephone communication system
US4833726A (en) * 1986-03-07 1989-05-23 Ngk Insulators, Ltd. Helmet with two-way radio communication faculty
US4857716A (en) * 1986-05-12 1989-08-15 Clinicom Incorporated Patient identification and verification system and method
US5227614A (en) * 1986-08-15 1993-07-13 Norand Corporation Core computer processor module, and peripheral shell module assembled to form a pocket size data capture unit
US4850006A (en) * 1986-11-18 1989-07-18 Nec Corporation Booster and charger unit used for hand-held portable telephone and having overheat protection circuit
US4906989A (en) * 1987-02-27 1990-03-06 Nec Corporation Paging system having a vehicle mounted repeater with a portable paging receiver detachably mounted thereon
US5020135A (en) * 1987-03-27 1991-05-28 Teletec Corporation Computerized multistandard, field-convertible, multiregional/multiservice, remote controllable, remote programmable mobile two-way radio system with digital serial bus link, built-in programmer and autodiagnostics
US5007050A (en) * 1987-03-27 1991-04-09 Teletec Corporation Bidirectional digital serial interface for communication digital signals including digitized audio between microprocessor-based control and transceiver units of two-way radio communications equipment
US5115514A (en) * 1987-08-03 1992-05-19 Orion Industries, Inc. Measuring and controlling signal feedback between the transmit and receive antennas of a communications booster
US5023824A (en) * 1987-10-02 1991-06-11 Norand Corporation Hand-held computerized data collection terminal with indented hand grip and conforming battery drawer
US5006699A (en) * 1987-11-13 1991-04-09 Felkner Donald J System for collecting medical data
US4924461A (en) * 1987-12-22 1990-05-08 Fujitsu Limited Polling network communication system having transmission request registration means
US5021938A (en) * 1988-03-15 1991-06-04 Fujitsu Limited Transmission system with backup function
US4945532A (en) * 1988-03-18 1990-07-31 Bull, S.A. Local network testing using carrier sense multiple access and collision detection (CSMA/CD)
US5006996A (en) * 1988-03-26 1991-04-09 Fuji Electric Co., Ltd. System of conveying, storing, retrieving and distributing articles of manufacture
US4916441A (en) * 1988-09-19 1990-04-10 Clinicom Incorporated Portable handheld terminal
US4989230A (en) * 1988-09-23 1991-01-29 Motorola, Inc. Cellular cordless telephone
US5029232A (en) * 1989-01-12 1991-07-02 Cycle-Sat., Inc. Satellite communications network
US5289378A (en) * 1989-01-31 1994-02-22 Norand Corporation Vehicle lan with adapters for coupling portable data terminals
US5003619A (en) * 1989-01-31 1991-03-26 Motorola, Inc. Method and apparatus for adjusting the power of a transmitter
US5103448A (en) * 1989-03-31 1992-04-07 Gec Plessey Telecommunications Ltd. Simultaneous ringing control in the time division duplex telecommunications system
US5031098A (en) * 1989-04-28 1991-07-09 Norand Corporation Transaction control system including portable data terminal and mobile customer service station
US5189291A (en) * 1989-05-01 1993-02-23 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Bar code reader operable as remote scanner or with fixed terminal
US5090054A (en) * 1989-05-26 1992-02-25 Grilliot William L Ventilated hood for firefighter
US5042082A (en) * 1989-06-26 1991-08-20 Telefonaktiebolaget L. M. Ericsson Mobile assisted handoff
US5008953A (en) * 1989-06-26 1991-04-16 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson Mobile station link supervision utilizing digital voice color codes
US5029183A (en) * 1989-06-29 1991-07-02 Symbol Technologies, Inc. Packet data communication network
US5187646A (en) * 1989-09-13 1993-02-16 Mannesmann Kienzle Gmbh Data storage device with an arrangement for receiving a transportable, card-shaped or disk-shaped data storage unit so that the data storage unit is inaccessible in an operating position
US5025488A (en) * 1989-11-16 1991-06-18 Rockwell International Corporation Optical heterodyne detector
US5218187A (en) * 1990-01-18 1993-06-08 Norand Corporation Hand-held data capture system with interchangeable modules
US5032845A (en) * 1990-02-08 1991-07-16 D.G.R., Inc. Vehicle locating system with Loran-C
US5119102A (en) * 1990-02-28 1992-06-02 U.S. Philips Corporation Vehicle location system
US5044010A (en) * 1990-03-29 1991-08-27 At&T Bell Laboratories Arrangement and method for selecting an available communication channel for a cordless telephone
US6192400B1 (en) * 1990-05-25 2001-02-20 Intermec Ip Corp. Multilevel data communication system including local and host systems
US5040238A (en) * 1990-06-29 1991-08-13 Motorola, Inc. Trunking system communication resource reuse method
US5404577A (en) * 1990-07-13 1995-04-04 Cairns & Brother Inc. Combination head-protective helmet & communications system
US5043736A (en) * 1990-07-27 1991-08-27 Cae-Link Corporation Cellular position locating system
US5043736B1 (en) * 1990-07-27 1994-09-06 Cae Link Corp Cellular position location system
US5142700A (en) * 1990-08-27 1992-08-25 Reed John W Protective helmet containing an integral transceiver
US5220564A (en) * 1990-09-06 1993-06-15 Ncr Corporation Transmission control for a wireless local area network station
US5276686A (en) * 1990-10-17 1994-01-04 Kabushiki Kaisha Toshiba Mobile radio communication system having mobile base and portable devices as a mobile station
US5179721A (en) * 1990-11-05 1993-01-12 Motorola Inc. Method for inter operation of a cellular communication system and a trunking communication system
US5276918A (en) * 1990-11-16 1994-01-04 Orbitel Mobile Communications Limited Mobile radio telephone with booster unit
US5319796A (en) * 1990-12-14 1994-06-07 Motorola, Inc. Communication system that avoids co-channel interference
US5528664A (en) * 1991-03-25 1996-06-18 Harris Canada Inc. Cellular data overlay system providing packet-switched communication data service over a selected channel which is not in use by a circuit-switched communication subsystem
US5291516A (en) * 1991-05-13 1994-03-01 Omnipoint Data Company, Inc. Dual mode transmitter and receiver
US5602854A (en) * 1991-05-13 1997-02-11 Norand Corporation Wireless personal local area network utilizing removable radio frequency modules with digital interfaces and idle sense communication protocol
US5202829A (en) * 1991-06-10 1993-04-13 Trimble Navigation Limited Exploration system and method for high-accuracy and high-confidence level relative position and velocity determinations
US5220678A (en) * 1991-08-12 1993-06-15 Motorola, Inc. Method and apparatus for adjusting the power of a transmitter
US5241542A (en) * 1991-08-23 1993-08-31 International Business Machines Corporation Battery efficient operation of scheduled access protocol
US5208449A (en) * 1991-09-09 1993-05-04 Psc, Inc. Portable transaction terminal
US5748619A (en) * 1991-10-01 1998-05-05 Meier; Robert C. Communication network providing wireless and hard-wired dynamic routing
US5295154A (en) * 1991-10-01 1994-03-15 Norand Corporation Radio frequency local area network
US5740366A (en) * 1991-10-01 1998-04-14 Norand Corporation Communication network having a plurality of bridging nodes which transmit a beacon to terminal nodes in power saving state that it has messages awaiting delivery
US5239622A (en) * 1991-11-28 1993-08-24 Monarch Marking Systems, Inc. Barcode identification system format editor
US5276703A (en) * 1992-01-13 1994-01-04 Windata, Inc. Wireless local area network communications system
US6085109A (en) * 1992-04-30 2000-07-04 Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd. Wireless telephone equipment operating as a cordless and cellular telephone
US5398248A (en) * 1992-07-02 1995-03-14 U.S. Philips Corporation Resolving conflicts between communication systems
US5335246A (en) * 1992-08-20 1994-08-02 Nexus Telecommunication Systems, Ltd. Pager with reverse paging facility
US5862171A (en) * 1992-11-09 1999-01-19 Norand Corporation Radio frequency communication network having adaptive communication parameters
US5339316A (en) * 1992-11-13 1994-08-16 Ncr Corporation Wireless local area network system
US5404570A (en) * 1992-11-23 1995-04-04 Telefonaktiebolaget L M Ericsson Radio coverage in closed environments
US5398257A (en) * 1993-01-11 1995-03-14 Groenteman; Frank S. Copier and monitoring network
US5389917A (en) * 1993-02-17 1995-02-14 Psc, Inc. Lapel data entry terminal
US6192230B1 (en) * 1993-03-06 2001-02-20 Lucent Technologies, Inc. Wireless data communication system having power saving function
US5422934A (en) * 1993-05-17 1995-06-06 Cellstar, Pacific Cellstar, Inc. Cordless range extension accessory apparatus for radio telephones
US6876863B1 (en) * 1993-09-08 2005-04-05 Cirrus Logic, Inc. System for protecting AMPS data using CDPD channel
US5533029A (en) * 1993-11-12 1996-07-02 Pacific Communication Sciences, Inc. Cellular digital packet data mobile data base station
US5550895A (en) * 1993-12-02 1996-08-27 Lucent Technologies Inc. Bimodal portable telephone
US6335356B1 (en) * 1994-01-07 2002-01-01 Sugen, Inc. Method of treating a patient by parenteral administration of a lipophilic compound
US5907794A (en) * 1994-03-03 1999-05-25 Nokia Telecommunications Oy Controlling a subscriber station on a direct mode channel
US6359872B1 (en) * 1997-10-28 2002-03-19 Intermec Ip Corp. Wireless personal local area network

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20040038717A1 (en) * 1992-03-18 2004-02-26 Mahany Ronald L. Transaction control system including portable data terminal and mobile customer service station
US7471651B2 (en) * 1992-03-18 2008-12-30 Broadcom Corporation Transaction control system including portable data terminal and mobile customer service station
US20060129850A1 (en) * 2004-12-15 2006-06-15 Microsoft Corporation Ultra wide band power save
EP1672468A2 (en) * 2004-12-15 2006-06-21 Microsoft Corporation Power management for ultra wide band (uwb) devices
EP1672468A3 (en) * 2004-12-15 2012-05-16 Microsoft Corporation Power management for ultra wide band (uwb) devices
US7689843B2 (en) * 2004-12-15 2010-03-30 Microsoft Corporation Ultra wide band power save
US20070189254A1 (en) * 2006-02-11 2007-08-16 Radioframe Networks, Inc. General access network controller bypass to facilitate use of standard cellular handsets with a general access network
US7944885B2 (en) * 2006-02-11 2011-05-17 Broadcom Corporation General access network controller bypass to facilitate use of standard cellular handsets with a general access network
US20110171956A1 (en) * 2006-02-11 2011-07-14 Broadcom Corporation General access network controller bypass to facilitate use of standard cellular handsets with a general access network
US20070191001A1 (en) * 2006-02-11 2007-08-16 Radioframe Networks, Inc. Using standard cellular handsets with a general access network
US8300605B2 (en) 2006-02-11 2012-10-30 Broadcom Corporation General access network controller bypass to facilitate use of standard cellular handsets with a general access network
US8543105B2 (en) * 2006-02-11 2013-09-24 Broadcom Corporation Using standard cellular handsets with a general access network

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date Type
US20060209777A1 (en) 2006-09-21 application
US20030128685A1 (en) 2003-07-10 application
US20060215591A1 (en) 2006-09-28 application
US20090296677A1 (en) 2009-12-03 application
US20090303920A1 (en) 2009-12-10 application
US20040090945A1 (en) 2004-05-13 application
US6359872B1 (en) 2002-03-19 grant
US20060227739A1 (en) 2006-10-12 application

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US5371734A (en) Medium access control protocol for wireless network
US7155232B2 (en) Transmit request signaling between transceivers
US7873343B2 (en) Communication network terminal with sleep capability
US5678192A (en) Radio system
US5737706A (en) Power system supporting CDPD operation
US6751455B1 (en) Power- and bandwidth-adaptive in-home wireless communications system with power-grid-powered agents and battery-powered clients
US6052565A (en) Mobile communication terminal apparatus with data communication function
US7110783B2 (en) Power efficient channel scheduling in a wireless network
US6748246B1 (en) Method and apparatus for selecting an access technology in a multi-mode terminal
US7039358B1 (en) Coexistence techniques in wireless networks
US6434395B1 (en) Portable communications and data terminal having multiple modes of operation
US7363051B2 (en) Dual mode wireless data communications
US7512685B2 (en) Method and system for implementing wireless data transfers between a selected group of mobile computing devices
US20060252449A1 (en) Methods and apparatus to provide adaptive power save delivery modes in wireless local area networks (LANs)
US5560021A (en) Power management and packet delivery method for use in a wireless local area network (LAN)
US7433702B2 (en) Power status for wireless communications
US5392023A (en) Data communication system with automatic power control
US20060029024A1 (en) System and method for battery conservation in wireless stations
US6104937A (en) Power-saving method and circuit
US5890054A (en) Emergency mobile routing protocol
EP1207654A2 (en) Coexistence techniques in wireless networks
US20050198257A1 (en) Power conservation in wireless devices
US5790536A (en) Hierarchical communication system providing intelligent data, program and processing migration
US6067297A (en) Embedded access point supporting communication with mobile unit operating in power-saving mode
US20020065045A1 (en) Method of information sharing between cellular and local wireless communication systems

Legal Events

Date Code Title Description
AS Assignment

Owner name: BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., AS COLLATERAL AGENT, NORTH

Free format text: PATENT SECURITY AGREEMENT;ASSIGNOR:BROADCOM CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:037806/0001

Effective date: 20160201

AS Assignment

Owner name: AVAGO TECHNOLOGIES GENERAL IP (SINGAPORE) PTE. LTD

Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:BROADCOM CORPORATION;REEL/FRAME:041706/0001

Effective date: 20170120

AS Assignment

Owner name: BROADCOM CORPORATION, CALIFORNIA

Free format text: TERMINATION AND RELEASE OF SECURITY INTEREST IN PATENTS;ASSIGNOR:BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., AS COLLATERAL AGENT;REEL/FRAME:041712/0001

Effective date: 20170119