US20020167236A1 - Linear magnetic harmonic motion converter - Google Patents

Linear magnetic harmonic motion converter Download PDF

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Publication number
US20020167236A1
US20020167236A1 US10/141,745 US14174502A US2002167236A1 US 20020167236 A1 US20020167236 A1 US 20020167236A1 US 14174502 A US14174502 A US 14174502A US 2002167236 A1 US2002167236 A1 US 2002167236A1
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United States
Prior art keywords
axial shaft
plurality
magnet
magnets
rotor
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Abandoned
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US10/141,745
Inventor
Johnny Long
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Harmonic Drive Inc
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Harmonic Drive Inc
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Priority to US28987101P priority Critical
Application filed by Harmonic Drive Inc filed Critical Harmonic Drive Inc
Priority to US10/141,745 priority patent/US20020167236A1/en
Assigned to HARMONIC DRIVE, INC. reassignment HARMONIC DRIVE, INC. ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST (SEE DOCUMENT FOR DETAILS). Assignors: LONG, JOHNNY D.
Publication of US20020167236A1 publication Critical patent/US20020167236A1/en
Application status is Abandoned legal-status Critical

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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02KDYNAMO-ELECTRIC MACHINES
    • H02K7/00Arrangements for handling mechanical energy structurally associated with dynamo-electric machines, e.g. structural association with mechanical driving motors or auxiliary dynamo-electric machines
    • H02K7/06Means for converting reciprocating motion into rotary motion or vice versa
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H33/00Other toys
    • A63H33/26Magnetic or electric toys
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02KDYNAMO-ELECTRIC MACHINES
    • H02K49/00Dynamo-electric clutches; Dynamo-electric brakes
    • H02K49/10Dynamo-electric clutches; Dynamo-electric brakes of the permanent-magnet type
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T74/00Machine element or mechanism
    • Y10T74/18Mechanical movements
    • Y10T74/18056Rotary to or from reciprocating or oscillating

Abstract

A linear magnetic harmonic motion converter apparatus for transferring linear motion into rotational motion for producing work from an interaction of at least two magnetic fields. An axial shaft and a perimeter frame member are disposed in sliding or pivoting orientation. The frame member includes at least one perimeter magnet positioned to provide a first magnetic field moved between different positions in response to external forces on the frame member. The first magnetic field reciprocates parallel to a longitudinal axis of the frame member that is aligned with the axial shaft. One or a plurality of rotor magnets are orientated proximal to the axial shaft to provide a second magnetic field that is attracted or repulsed by the first magnetic field. Movement of the perimeter magnet creates repulsion and attraction of the rotor magnets, with inducement of axial shaft rotation, thereby producing rotational movement that is harnessed to perform work. Also disclosed are combinations of a plurality of rotor magnet units disposed to rotate about respective axial shafts upon the reciprocation of stator magnets disposed proximal to each rotor magnet unit, for utilization in the operation of a fluid pump and an electric generator.

Description

    CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/289,871, filed May 9, 2001.[0001]
  • STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT
  • Not Applicable [0002]
  • BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION
  • 1. Field of Invention [0003]
  • This invention pertains to an apparatus for linear motion conversion using magnets that convert movement in a linear direction into linear or rotational motion. More particularly, this invention pertains to a plurality of magnets disposed proximal to each other for energy conversion of reciprocating linear or rotational movement into useful motion in rotational or linear movement. [0004]
  • 2. Description of the Related Art [0005]
  • Prior magnetic drive mechanisms include a combination of a rotor and a stator with the rotor having at least one magnet thereon for rotation about the stator. According to magnetic principles, magnetic fields of rotors and stators interact in symmetrical alignment in radial fashion and concentric relationship with a magnetically driven output shaft. Magnetic or electromagnetic components of prior magnetic drive mechanisms rotate to a top, dead or center position, utilizing skewed magnetic lines as the components seek alignment and de-energizing prior to a top, dead or center position by timing methods to allow the rotor to continue in a rotational path. In prior magnetic drive mechanisms the stator includes a plurality of inwardly oriented poles and the rotor includes a plurality of outwardly oriented poles. In basic electromagnetic motor designs, the speed of the output shaft is a function of the frequency with which the polarities and voltages are alternated in relation to proper timing of the rotation and orientation of the respective magnetic fields generated to influence the rotor and/or the stator. Timing is addressed by coil arrangements, voltage frequency, reversal of current and electronic controls known to those skilled in the art. [0006]
  • One example of a prior art device is an electromagnetic motor with a rotating disc and a rotating magnet on a shaft coupled to the disc. The magnetic motor includes a reciprocating magnet aligned proximal to, and movable toward and away from, the rotating magnet in order to repel the rotating magnet. The rotating magnet includes a predetermined number of permanent magnets disposed radially outward from the shaft. The rotating magnets are disposed substantially within the magnetic field of the reciprocating magnet for interaction of the magnetic fields of the rotating magnet and the reciprocating magnet through repulsion or attraction. The magnetic motor requires an actuator means and timing means for displacing the reciprocating magnetic assembly with respect to the rotating magnetic assembly to provide interaction with the magnetic fields of the rotating magnet and the reciprocating magnet to impose a rotational force on the shaft. [0007]
  • Another example of a prior art device is a rotor apparatus including a permanent magnet type rotating machine having a stator with armature windings thereon. The rotor includes a rotor and a plurality of permanent magnets arranged on the rotor core so as to negate magnetic flux of the armature windings passing through interpoles. The rotor is constructed so that the average of magnetic flex in an air gap between the rotor and the stator which is produced by the permanent magnets at the armature windings, provides a rotating machine which operates as an induction machine at the machine's starting and also operates as a synchronous machine at the rated driving due to smooth pull-in. [0008]
  • There is a need for a system for motion and force conversion that utilizes a plurality of magnets oriented for converting linear or nonlinear motion from an external energy source such as the movement of a human, into rotational motion for a pair of rotor magnets radially disposed in relation to a central magnetic element that is attracted or repulsed at multiple pivot angles to cause continuous rotary motion upon movement of the rotor magnets. [0009]
  • Further, it is an object of the present invention to provide an apparatus having units of motion and force conversion that are joined by stacking in parallel or by connecting in series to produce significant power outputs in relation to motion or energy inputs to each unit. [0010]
  • Additionally, it is an object of the present invention to provide a motion and force converter that operates without partial or incomplete strokes, and does not provide variations of amplitude by a reciprocating member where a continuous torque is desired. [0011]
  • BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION
  • A motion and energy conversion apparatus for transferring linear motion into rotational motion for producing power from the interaction of at least two magnetic fields. The motion and energy conversion apparatus includes a rotor element having a rotor magnet disposed proximal to an axial shaft. The rotor magnet includes respective north and south poles oriented in a circumferential path of rotation about the axial shaft, with the net flux fields of the north and south poles directed substantially perpendicular to a radius from the axis of rotation of the axial shaft. [0012]
  • A frame member is disposed in sliding, rotating or pivoting orientation to the axial shaft. The frame member includes at least one perimeter magnet positioned to provide a first magnetic field that influences the movement of the rotor magnet and the rotation of the axial shaft extended through the frame member. The perimeter magnet on the frame member exhibits anisotropic properties having different magnetic flux field values when measured along axes in different directions. The perimeter magnet is moved between different positions in response to external stimuli from an energy source such as a physical input and/or a magnetic influence to force the frame member to reciprocate in relation to the axial shaft. The perimeter magnet on the frame member includes a first magnetic field that is moved by pivoting or sliding in relation to the rotor magnet disposed proximal to the axial shaft. One or more magnets are orientated on the axial shaft in an arrangement providing a second magnetic field sufficiently proximal to the perimeter magnet to be influenced by the attraction and repulsion of the second magnetic field in relation to the first magnetic field. Movement of the perimeter magnet creates a simultaneous repulsing and attracting of rotor magnets on the axial shaft, thereby producing a rotation of the axial shaft for production of rotational movement that is harnessed to perform work. The motion and energy conversion apparatus is utilized as a water wave energy converter, a pumping device for movement of fluids, and/or as a generator of electrical energy that is harnessed to perform work.[0013]
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS
  • The above-mentioned features of the invention will become more clearly understood from the following detailed description of the invention read together with the drawings in which: [0014]
  • FIG. 1 is a side view of a linear magnetic harmonic motion converter of the present invention illustrating a pivotable frame having at least one magnet mounted to rotate around an axial shaft with at least one rotor magnet positioned on the axial shaft; [0015]
  • FIG. 2 is a side view of an alternative embodiment of FIG. 1, illustrating a cross-member slidably movable in relation to a frame mounted to rotate about an axial shaft having at least two magnets thereon, the axial shaft provides rotation for the frame having at least one magnet on opposed ends of the cross-member; [0016]
  • FIG. 3[0017] a is a side view of an alternative embodiment of FIG. 2, illustrating a rotatable frame member having corner pivots, with a plurality of rotor magnets disposed on an axial shaft and a plurality of spaced-apart magnets disposed on the side members of the frame member;
  • FIG. 3[0018] b is a side view of FIG. 3a, illustrating a frame member pivoted at the corner pivots, with the side member magnets moved in relation with the plurality of rotor magnets, resulting in rotation of the axial shaft;
  • FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a linear magnetic harmonic apparatus illustrating a rotatable axial member having magnets thereon and a plurality of perimeter magnets attached on an interior surface of a pivoting structural member; [0019]
  • FIG. 5[0020] a is a side view of an alternative embodiment of FIG. 2, illustrating a sliding member having two cross-members with at least two magnets thereon, the cross-members slidably positioned between parallel perimeter members, the cross-members positioned at a first end of an axial shaft around which the perimeter members are rotatable;
  • FIG. 5[0021] b is a side view of FIG. 5a, illustrating a rotated axial member and a sliding member slid to a second end of the axial shaft, with the axial shaft rotating as the sliding cross-member moves between first and second ends;
  • FIG. 6[0022] a is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment of a motion converter apparatus illustrating a cylindrical member including a slidable stator unit having magnets thereon and an interior axial shaft having rotor magnets thereon, with the axial member rotatable by changing magnetic flux fields when the stator unit is slide along the exterior of the cylindrical member;
  • FIG. 6[0023] b is a perspective view of the slidable stator unit of FIG. 6a, illustrating a plurality of magnets positioned on the stator unit;
  • FIG. 6[0024] c is a top view of the slidable stator unit of FIG. 6b, illustrating a pair of slide pins having magnetic poles within the stator unit; FIG. 6d is a cut-away view of the interior of FIG. 6a, illustrating a plurality of rotor magnets positioned on the axial shaft;
  • FIG. 7 is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment of FIG. 5[0025] a, illustrating a rectangular frame member including a sliding cross-member with at least two magnets thereon, the cross-members slidably positioned exterior of parallel perimeter members, with the magnets on the cross-members positioned to provide a magnetic field for influencing the rotation of a plurality of magnets positioned on a rotatable axial shaft;
  • FIG. 8[0026] a is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment of FIG. 6a, illustrating a plurality of motion converters having magnets therein as illustrated in FIG. 6d, with the motion converters submerged in a body of water and the slidable stator unit having magnets thereon for each motion converter being attached to a buoy on the surface of the water;
  • FIG. 8[0027] b is a perspective view of an alternative embodiment of FIG. 8a, illustrating a motion converter mounted to a pier and partially submerged in water;
  • FIG. 9[0028] a is a top perspective view of an alternative embodiment illustrating a pump assembly having a plurality of rotatable impeller fin units;
  • FIG. 9[0029] b is a side perspective view of FIG. 9a illustrating a plurality of pump assemblies in a stacked configuration;
  • FIG. 9[0030] c is a side view of one rotatable impeller fin magnet unit of FIG. 9a;
  • FIG. 9[0031] d is a top view of FIG. 9a illustrating a plurality of fluid flow channels in relation to the stator magnets of the pump assembly;
  • FIG. 9[0032] e is a top view of FIG. 9d illustrating a plurality of fluid flow channels;
  • FIG. 9[0033] f is a side perspective view of one fluid flow channel of FIG. 9e;
  • FIG. 10[0034] a is a top view of an alternative embodiment illustrating an electrical generator having a plurality of rotatable rotor magnet units positioned in a radial configuration within the generator;
  • FIG. 10[0035] b is a side perspective view of the electrical generator having units in a stacked configuration;
  • FIG. 10[0036] c is a side perspective view of one rotor magnet unit utilized in the electrical generator illustrated in FIGS. 10a and 10 b;
  • FIG. 10[0037] d is a side perspective view of a central magnet positioned within the electrical generator of FIGS. 10a and 10 b;
  • FIG. 11[0038] a is a top view of an alternative embodiment of an electrical generator illustrating a plurality of magnetic induction elements disposed between a plurality of rotatable rotor magnet units within the generator;
  • FIG. 11[0039] b is a top view of an alternative embodiment of FIG. 10a illustrating an electrical generator including a plurality of electromagnetic elements disposed between a plurality of rotatable rotor magnet units within the generator; and
  • FIG. 11[0040] c is a side perspective view of one rotatable rotor magnet unit utilized in the electrical generator illustrated in FIG. 10a.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION
  • An apparatus for a linear magnetic harmonic motion converter [0041] 10 is disclosed as generally illustrated in FIGS. 1-3 a and 3 b. In one embodiment, the motion converter 10 provides conversion of linear, reciprocating movement into rotational motion by the interaction of magnetic fields created by the north and south magnetic poles of a plurality of magnets positioned in a spaced apart configuration around a rotational axis 26. The motion converter 10 includes a frame 12 disposed to reciprocate along a longitudinal axis that is substantially parallel to the rotational axis 26. The frame includes at least one side member, or a pair of side members 14, 14′ having opposed first and second ends, and end members 16, 16′ connected at a plurality of pivot junctions at each corner formed by respective opposed first and second ends of the side members 14, 14′. A means for pivoting includes first side pivot points 18, 18′, and second side pivot points 20, 20′, and mid-line pivot points 22, 22′ for allowing the first side member 14 and second side member 14′ to reciprocatingly pivot in alternating directions when an external reciprocating force is imposed on the frame 12. The plurality of pivot points 18, 18′, 20, 20′, 22, 22′, allow the frame 12 to pivot in a reciprocating manner as induced by external forces, with resulting repositioning of at least one frame magnet 40 between first and second positions, resulting in re-orientating of the magnetic fields affecting the at least one rotor magnet 30 mounted along a rotational axis 26.
  • The at least one rotor magnet [0042] 30 includes an anisotropic permanent magnet attached on an axial shaft 28 (see FIG. 1), also referred to as an axial pivot member, with the axial shaft 28 aligned with the rotational axis 26. A counter weight 30′ may be attached opposite the one rotor magnet 30. The rotor magnet 30 includes respective north and south poles oriented of opposed sides of the rotor magnet 30 (see FIG. 1), or on opposed ends of the rotor magnet 30 (not shown). The magnetic flux fields of the rotor magnet are oriented in a circumferential path of rotation about the axial shaft 28, with the net flux fields of the north and south poles of the rotor magnet 30 are directed substantially perpendicular to a radius from the axis of rotation 26 of the axial shaft 28. The axial shaft 28 serves as a rotational axis about which side members 14, 14′ are reciprocated (see FIG. 1 and 2). Movement of the side members 14, 14′ by pivoting at pivot points 18, 18′, 20, 20′, 22, 22′, is effective in causing the re-orientation of the magnetic fields created by the north and south magnetic pole of the frame magnet 40, and results in the creation of rotation of the rotor magnet 30 and rotation of the axial shaft 28 that can be harnessed for creation of rotational movement to perform work (see FIG. 1).
  • In an alternative embodiment of a motion converter [0043] 60, a first rotor magnet 62, a second rotor magnet 64, a third rotor magnet 66, and a fourth rotor magnet 68 are aligned on the axial shaft 28 and the rotational axis 26 (see FIG. 2). The motion converter 60 includes a frame 12″ having at least two side members 14″, 14′″ and a pair of end members 16″, 16′″ connected to support a slidable cross-member 70 between the at least two side members 14″, 14′″. The slidable cross-member 70 may be aligned to connected at right angles to respective side members 14″, 14′″, or the cross-member 70 may be angled to connected at an angle to respective side members 14″, 14′″ (see FIG. 2). The cross-member 70 includes at least two cross-member magnets 74, 76 positioned on opposed ends of the cross-member 70. As the cross-member 70 is moved by external forces to slide 72 along the respective side members 14″, 14′″, the cross-member magnets 74, 76, having north and south magnetic ends, are slid with resulting repositioning of the cross-member magnets 74, 76 between first and second positions in respect to rotor magnets 62, 64, 66, and 68 on the axial shaft 28. Sliding of cross-member magnets 74, 76 results in movement of the cross-member magnets 74, 76 and re-orientation of the north and south magnetic fields created by cross-member magnets 74, 76, in relation to rotor magnets 62, 64, 66, and 68. The re-orientation of the magnetic fields created by cross-member magnets 74, 76 influence the magnetic fields of rotor magnets 62, 64, 66, and 68, and result in the creation of rotation of the rotor magnets 62, 64, 66, and 68, and rotation of the axial shaft 28 that can be harnessed to perform work (see FIG. 2).
  • An alternative embodiment of the motion converter [0044] 10 is illustrated in FIGS. 3a and 3 b, includes a plurality of permanent magnet positioned along the frame 12, including a first frame magnet 42 disposed in a spaced apart configuration on the first side member 14 from a second frame magnet 44. A third frame magnet 46 is disposed in a spaced apart configuration on the second side member 14′ from a fourth frame magnet 48. The axial shaft 28 includes a plurality of rotor magnets thereon, including a first rotor magnet 32, a second rotor magnet 34, a third rotor magnet 36, and a fourth rotor magnet 38, disposed along the length of the axial shaft 28 between the first end member 16 and the second end member 16′. The rotor magnets include respective north and south poles oriented in a circumferential path of rotation about the axial shaft 28, with the net flux fields of the north and south poles directed substantially perpendicular to a radius from the axis of rotation 26 of the axial shaft 28. Reciprocating movement of the side members 14, 14′ by pivoting at pivot points 18, 18′, 20, 20′, 22, 22′, is effective in causing the re-orientation of the magnetic fields created by the north and south magnetic poles of the permanent frame magnets 42, 44, 46, 48, and results in the creation of rotation of the rotor magnets 32, 34, 36, 38 and rotation 24 of the axial shaft 28, providing rotational movement that can be harnessed to perform work (see FIGS. 3a and 3 b). An alternative embodiment of permanent frame magnets 42, 44, 46, 48 includes a plurality of electromagnets (not shown) disposed on the side members 14, 14′, with each electromagnet connected electrically to circuitry and a power means for timing the electrical pulses to each electromagnet, thereby providing a timed and repeated change in the electrical pulses to each electromagnet for repetitively changing the north and south polarity of each of the electromagnets disposed on the side members 14, 14′. With each change in polarity of the electromagnets, a re-orientation of the respective electromagnetic fields occurs to provide a means for reciprocating the polarity of the electromagnetic fields, therefore inducing rotation of rotor magnets 32, 34, 36, 38 and corresponding rotation 24 of axial shaft 28 to perform work.
  • An alternative embodiment of the motion converter [0045] 10 is illustrated in FIG. 4, includes a structural member such as a shell 82, either substantially rectangular (see FIG. 4) or cylindrical (not shown). The shell 82 includes a first interior side surface 84 and a second interior side surface 84′, and includes an end first bracket 86 and a second bracket 86′. An axial shaft 28 includes at least two rotor magnets 92, 94 disposed on the axial shaft 28 within the enclosure formed by the shell 82. A first side magnet 100 and a second side magnet 102 are disposed on respective side surfaces 84, 84′, and a first end magnet 104 and a second end magnet 106 are disposed on respective end brackets 86, 86′. The shell is rotatable 96 about about the axial shaft 28 by utilization of sleeves 88, 88′ (not shown), and is reciprocatingly moved up and down 98 in relation to the axial shaft 28. An upper range of motion is determined by the position of an upper stop member 90, and a lower range of motion is determined by the position of lower stop member 90′. When an external force reciprocates the shell 82 upwards or downwards, the resulting repositioning of side magnets 100, 102 and end magnets 104, 106, between a first, a second, and additional positions during rotation around axial shaft 28, results in re-orientating of the magnetic fields affecting rotor magnets 92, 94, which rotate under the influence of the re-orientation of the magnet fields to force rotation of axial shaft 28. Reciprocation movement 98 of shell 82 results in the creation of rotation of the rotor magnets 92, 94, and rotation 24 of the axial shaft 28 for creation of rotational movement that can be harnessed to perform work (see FIG. 4). The rotor magnets 92, 94 may be oriented at 180 degrees separation on the axial shaft 28, or an additional embodiment may include three rotor magnets (not shown) that are oriented at 120 degrees separation on the axial shaft 28, or may include two or four paired magnets oriented at 90 degrees separation, or any alternative angle of separation that allows the axial shaft 28 to remain balanced during rotation.
  • An alternative embodiment of the motion converter [0046] 110 is illustrated in FIGS. 5a and 5 b, including a frame 112 having a first side member 114 and a second side member 114′ that are substantially parallel to each other. A first end member 116 and a second end member 116′ are attached to the side members 114, 114′ to for a substantially rigid frame. A first rotation connector 118 and a second rotation connector 118′ are centered along respective end members 116, 116′, allowing an axial shaft 128 to extend through each rotation connector 118, 118′ to allow free rotation 124 of the frame 112 about a rotational axis 126 aligned along the axial shaft 128. A plurality of rotor magnets 130 are disposed in spaced apart positions along the axial shaft 128. Rotor magnets 130 may be oriented at 180 degree separation from each other, including two or more permanent magnets such as first rotor magnet 132, second rotor magnet 134, third rotor magnet 136, fourth rotor magnet 138, fifth rotor magnet 140 and sixth rotor magnet 142 (see FIG. 5a). The plurality of rotor magnets 130 may be positioned to extend from opposed sides (180 degree separation) of the axial shaft 128, or may extend at 120 degree separation, at 90 degree separation, or any alternative angle of separation that allows the axial shaft 128 to remain balanced during rotation. An alternative embodiment is illustrated in FIG. 5b, providing a plurality of pairs of rotor magnets 132, 132′, 134, 134′, 136, 136′, 138, 138′, 140, 140′, 142, 142′ that are disposed to extend outwards from the axial shaft 128.
  • The motion converter [0047] 110 further includes a slide bracket 150 disposed to extend between, and to be slidably moved along each side member 114, 114′. The slide bracket 150 includes a first cross-member 152 and a second cross-member 154 attached between first bracket 156 and second side bracket 156′. A pair of perimeter magnets 158, 158′ are positioned proximal to a connecting junction of first bracket 152 with side brackets 156, 156′. A similar sized pair of perimeter magnets 160, 160′ are positioned at a connecting junction of second bracket 154 with side brackets 156, 156′ (see FIGS. 5a and 5 b). The perimeter magnets 158, 158′, 160, 160′ are spaced apart and oriented inwardly in order for each magnet's magnetic field to influence the magnetic fields of the plurality of rotor magnets 130. A slide means includes sliding couplings 162, 162′ and 164, 164′ that provide reciprocating sliding motion 166 of the slide bracket 150 in relation to the frame 112. When an external force reciprocates the slide bracket 150 upwards or downwards, the resulting repositioning of perimeter magnets 158, 158′, 160, 160′, between a first and a second position, results in re-orientating of the magnetic fields influencing rotor magnets 132, 134, 136, 138, 140, 142, which are rotated under the influence of the re-orientation of the magnet fields to force rotation of axial shaft 128. Reciprocation movement 166 of slide bracket 150 results in the creation of rotation of the plurality of rotor magnets 130 and rotation 124 of the axial shaft 128 for creation of rotational movement that can be harnessed to perform work (see FIGS. 5a and 5 b).
  • An alternative embodiment of the motion converter [0048] 170 is illustrated in FIGS. 6a, 6 b, 6 c and 6 d, including a cylindrical frame 172 having a first end rotation connector 176 and a second end rotation connector 178. A rotational axis 196 is aligned along the longitudinal axis of the cylindrical frame 172. The rotational axis 196 is aligned with an axial shaft 198 that is rotated 194 in relation to the cylindrical frame 172. Attached to the axial shaft 198, on the interior of the cylindrical frame 172, and disposed in spaced-apart separation to extend outwardly from the axial shaft 198, are a plurality of rotor magnets. The magnets include a first pair of opposed rotor magnets 200, 200′, a second pair of opposed rotor magnets 202, 202′, a third pair of opposed rotor magnets 204, 204′, a fourth pair of opposed rotor magnets 206, 206′, and a fifth pair of rotor magnets 208, 208′. The plurality of rotor magnets may be positioned to extend from opposed sides (180 degree separation) of the axial shaft 198, or may extend at 120 degree separation, at 90 degree separation, or any alternative angle of separation that allows the axial shaft 198 to remain balanced during rotation.
  • As illustrated in FIGS. 6[0049] a, 6 b and 6 c, a slidable sleeve 180 is attached in a sliding configuration into at least one slot 174, and preferably two opposed slots 174, 174′ (not shown), in the exterior surface of the cylindrical frame 172. The sleeve 180 includes two interior positioned slide pin members 182, 184 which extend inwardly from the sleeve 180, and which insert into slots 174, 174′. Each pin member 182, 184 includes a separate permanent magnet having respective north and south poles. Attached on an exterior surface of the sleeve 180 is at least one magnet 186, and preferably at least one opposed magnet 188. A connector member 192 is releasably attachable to the sleeve 180, with the connector member attached to a means for movement (not shown) to the slidable sleeve 180. When force is transferred to the sleeve 180, the sliding movement 190 of sleeve 180, pin member magnets 182, 184 and perimeter magnets 186, 188 on the sleeve 180 in relation to the frame 172 provides a re-orientation of the magnetic fields influencing the rotor magnets disposed on the axial shaft 198. The re-orientation of the magnetic fields of the magnets associated with the sleeve 180, results in the creation of rotation 194 of the rotor magnets 200, 200′, 202, 202′, 204, 204′, 206, 206′, 208, 208′, and rotation of the axial shaft 198 that can be harnessed for creation of rotational movement to perform work (see FIGS. 6a and 6 d).
  • An alternative embodiment of the motion converter is illustrated in FIG. 7 as a motion converter [0050] 220 that is interconnectable to like-configured motion converters. A substantially rectangular frame 222 includes a first side member 224 and a second side member 224′ that are substantially parallel to each other. A first end member 226 and a second end member 226′ are attached to the side members 224, 224′ to for a substantially rigid frame. A first rotation connector 228 and a second rotation connector 228′ are centered along respective end members 226, 226′, allowing an axial shaft 238 to extend through each rotation connector 228, 228′ to allow free rotation 234 of the frame 222 about a rotational axis 236 aligned along the axial shaft 238. A pair of first slide channels 230, 230′ on opposed sides of first side member 224, and a second pair of second slide channels 232, 232′ on opposed sides of second side member 224′ allow for sliding of a slide bracket 252 along the length of frame 222. A plurality of pairs of rotor magnets 240 are disposed in spaced apart positions along the axial shaft 238. Each pair of rotor magnets 230 may be oriented at 180 degree separation from each other, and includes any combination of two or more pairs of rotor magnets with five pairs of magnets illustrated as first rotor magnet 242, second rotor magnet 244, third rotor magnet 246, fourth rotor magnet 248, fifth rotor magnet 250 (see FIG. 7). The plurality of pairs of rotor magnets 240 may be positioned to extend from opposed sides (180 degree separation) of the axial shaft 238, or may extend at 120 degree separation, at 90 degree separation, or any alternative angle of separation that allows the axial shaft 238 to remain balanced during rotation. The plurality of pairs of rotor magnets 240 include respective north and south poles oriented in a circumferential path of rotation about axial shaft 238, with the net flux fields of the north and south poles directed substantially perpendicular to a radius from the axis of rotation 236 of axial shaft 238.
  • The motion converter [0051] 220 further includes a slide bracket 252 disposed to extend between, and to be slidably moved along each side member 224, 224′ (see FIG. 7). The slide bracket 252 includes a first cross-member 254 and a second cross-member 254′ attached between first side bracket 256 and second side bracket 256′. At least one pair of slide bracket magnets 258, 258′ are positioned proximal to a connecting junction of first and/or second cross-member 254, 254′ with side brackets 256, 256′. The pair of slide bracket magnets 258, 258′, are spaced apart and oriented inwardly in order for each magnet's magnetic field to influence the magnetic fields of the plurality of rotor magnets 240. A second pair of slide bracket magnets 258″, 258′″ may be positioned to one of the cross-members 254, 254′. A slide means includes sliding couplings (not shown) inserted into respective grooves 230, 230′, 232, 232′, and a handle 262 or another device for manipulation of he slide means and slide bracket 252, that allow for generation of a reciprocating sliding motion 260, 260′ of the slide bracket 252 in relation to the frame 222. When an external force reciprocates the slide bracket 252 sideways, the resulting repositioning of slide bracket 258, 258′, between a first and a second position, results in re-orientating of the magnetic fields influencing the plurality of rotor magnets 242, 242′, 244, 244′, 246, 246′, 248, 248′, 250, 250′, which are rotated under the influence of the re-orientation of the magnet fields to force rotation of axial shaft 238. Reciprocation movement 260, 260′ of slide bracket 252 results in the creation of rotation of the plurality of magnets 240 and rotation 234 of the axial shaft 238 for creation of rotor rotational movement that can be harnessed to perform work (see FIG. 7).
  • Alternative embodiments for the slidable sleeve [0052] 180 of FIG. 6a includes a wave motion converter 270 as illustrated in FIGS. 8a and 8 b. The wave motion converter 270 includes a cylindrical shell 272 having a configuration similar to FIG. 6a, with a modification including an axial shaft 274 that does not rotate at the lower end 276, which is connected to an anchor 278 or a similar weighted tether that is connected or rests on a lake or ocean bottom (see FIG. 8a). A plurality of wave motion converters 270 may have a connector conduit 286 attached between each cylindrical shell 272. The connector conduit 286 may include electrical cables interconnected between electrical circuitry housed in bottom member 272′ for transmission of wave movement data and/or transmission of electrical signals generated by the operation of each wave motion converter 270. The axial shaft 274 extends through the interior of the cylindrical shell 272, and includes a plurality of rotor magnets attached on the axial shaft 274 that is rotatable within the cylindrical shell 272, with the magnets positioned in a spaced-apart configuration as illustrated in FIG. 6d. The wave motion converter 270 further includes a sliding sleeve 280 that is attached to slots along the length of the cylindrical shell 272 (see FIGS. 6a and 6 c), and is connected to a bracket 282 that extends upwards for a sufficient length from the sleeve 280 to connect to a buoy 284 that rests on, or just under, the surface of the lake or ocean. The buoy 284 moves upwards and downwards in unison with the movement of the waves, with resulting movement up 288 and movement down 288′ of the sleeve 280. The sleeve 280 includes one or more magnets disposed thereon, as illustrated in FIGS. 6b and 6 c. The sleeve magnets are of sufficient strength and are oriented to extend a magnetic field from each sleeve magnet attached to the sliding sleeve 280, to influence the rotation of the plurality of rotor magnets that are disposed on the axial shaft 274 within the shell 272. As waves move the buoy 284 up and down, the movement is transferred to the sleeve 280, resulting in sliding movements of the sleeve 280 and magnets 282, 282′ attached to the each sleeve 280 in relation to the shell 272 and the rotor magnets within the cylindrical shell 280. The reciprocating reorientation of the magnetic fields of the sleeve magnets influence the rotation of the rotor magnets disposed on the axial shaft 274, resulting in the creation of electrical energy by electrical circuitry positioned to connect to the rotatable axial shaft 274. The electrical energy created by the movement of the axial shaft 274 can be harnessed by electrical circuitry housed in water-tight bottom member 272′ for creation of electrical current for providing electrical power to illuminate buoy lights and/or buoy audio warning systems to warn marine vessels to maintain proper distances from the buoys 284. An alternative embodiment is illustrated in FIG. 8b, with the cylindrical shell 290 being connected in a sliding configuration to a dock or a similar non-movable object. The lower end 276 of the axial shaft 274 is connected to a submerged buoy 284 that is moved up 288 and down 288′ with the movement of the water. The reciprocating re-orientation of the magnetic fields of the sleeve magnets influence the rotation of the rotor magnets disposed on the axial shaft 274, resulting in the creation of electrical energy by electrical circuitry positioned to connect to the rotatable axial shaft 274. The electrical energy created by the movement of the axial shaft 274 can be harnessed for creation of electrical current for providing electrical power to illuminate dock lights and other accessories on the dock.
  • An alternative embodiment of the motion converter is illustrated in FIGS. 9[0053] a 9 f, illustrating a motion converter operating as a pump assembly 310 for movement of fluids through a housing 312 utilizing rotatable rotor magnet and impeller units 320 including impeller fins 322, 322′, 322″ having at least one rotor magnet 324 interposed between the impeller fins (see FIG. 9c). A second rotor magnet (not shown) may be opposed from the first rotor magnet 324, or a counter weight 326 may be opposed from the first rotor magnet 324. The impeller fins 322, 322′, 322″ are mounted in a radially extended orientation on an axial shaft 328 similar to a paddle wheel oriented within respective channels within a housing 312 having a plurality of fluid channels 314, 316, 318, 346, and 348 for fluids to move through. Each rotor magnet 324 includes respective north and south poles oriented in a circumferential path of rotation about each axial shaft 328. The net flux fields of the north and south poles of each rotor magnet 324 are directed substantially perpendicular to a radius from the axis of rotation of the axial shaft 328. The housing 312 includes a central fluid channel 318 for flow of fluid out of the housing 312, with the central fluid channel 318 interconnected by additional fluid channels to an input channel 314 A generally rectangular fluid channel 316 includes at least rotatable rotor magnet and impeller unit 320 therein. The housing 312 includes a plurality of perimeter oriented magnet channels 344 having at least one, or a pair of interconnected stator magnets 332, 332′ disposed to reciprocate in a linear direction within each magnet channel 318. FIG. 9b illustrates an interconnecting means such as a peripheral linkage 334 and a connector bracket 334′ attached between respective slide pins 336, 336′ that are manipulated to move linearly 338 by a mechanical means (not shown) for moving each stator magnet 332 or each pair of stator magnets 332, 332′ in linear relationship to the plurality of impeller fin units 320 rotatable 340 around each rotation shaft 328. During reciprocation of the peripheral linkage 334 and connector bracket 334′, the stator magnets 332, 332′ are reciprocated along magnet channels 344 in relation to each rotor magnet 324 on each impeller unit 320. Each rotatable rotor magnet and impeller unit 320 having respective impeller fins 322, 322′, 322″ are rotated under the influence of the re-orientation of the magnet fields from each pair of stator magnets 332, 332′ to force rotation of each axial shaft 328, with resulting movement of fluids through respective fluid channels 314, 316, 318. The housing 312 is stackable with like configured housings 342, 342′ to provide for additional capacity for pumping liquids.
  • FIGS. 9[0054] d and 9 e are top views of FIG. 9a illustrating a plurality of fluid flow channels in relation to the rotatable rotor magnet and impeller units 320 of the pump assembly 310. A fluid intake is illustrated as a plurality of fluid channel openings 314 that are in fluid communication with lateral channels 346, 346′. Fluid is allowed to move from lateral channels 346, 346′ into respective fluid channels 316 in which at least rotatable rotor magnet and impeller unit 320 is disposed. FIG. 9f is a side perspective view of one fluid channel opening 314 connected to lateral channels 346, 346′. Each respective impeller fin 322, 322′, 322″ rotates in response to rotation influenced by rotor magnets 324, 324′ to provide fluid flow from each respective fluid channel 316 through respective connector fluid channels 348 and into central fluid channel 318 for movement of fluid out of the housing 312. Flow may be reversed by changing the magnetic poles of the stator magnets 332, 332′ and/or changing the orientation and movement of the stator magnets 330, 330′, 330″ within the respective perimeter channels 344. The housing 312 is stackable with like configured housings 342, 342′ to provide for additional capacity for pumping liquids.
  • An alternative embodiment of the motion converter for utilization as an electrical generator [0055] 510 is illustrated in FIGS. 10a-10 d. FIG. 10a is a top view of an electrical generator 510 having a housing 512 with a plurality of rotor magnet units 520 positioned to rotate within channels 516 in a radial configuration in the housing 512. The plurality of rotor magnet units 520 are rotated about an axial shaft 528 due to the influence of a changing magnetic flux field generated by linear movement of opposed pairs of stator magnets 530, 530′, 530″ positioned at a perimeter of the housing 512. Each of the rotor magnet units 520 are disposed to rotate within a channel 516 that is radially oriented in relation to a central channel 518 formed within a central magnet 532. Each of the opposed pairs of stator magnets 530, 530′, 530″ are disposed in respective channels 514 that open outwardly in a spaced apart configuration along the perimeter of the housing 512. Each rotor magnet units 520 may include a two-sided magnet (not shown), a three-sided magnet 522 having a north and south pole on opposed, angled surfaces, or a multi-sided rotor magnet 524 having a north and south magnetic pole positioned on a perimeter side of the magnet 524. Additional north and south poles may be oriented on opposed angled sides of rotor magnet 524 as illustrated in FIG. 10c. Each north and south pole is oriented in a circumferential path of rotation about the axial shaft 528, with the net flux fields of the north and south poles directed substantially perpendicular to a radius from the axial shaft 528 around which the rotor magnet 524 rotates within each respective channel 516. Each channel 516 is oriented having a lengthwise axis positioned toward a central magnet 532 positioned within the housing 512 (see FIG. 10a and 10 d). A counter-weight 526 may be attached to axial shaft 528 in an opposed orientation from respective magnet 522 or 524. The rotation 540 of the rotor magnets 522 or 524 is induced by movement of the stator magnets 530 within respective channels 514 along the perimeter of the housing 512 A plurality of pairs of stator magnets 530, 530′, 530″ are oriented in pairs as illustrated in FIG. 10a. Each stator magnet 530, 530′, 530″ may be connected by a perimeter connector bracket 534 to allow movement of one pair 530 of stator magnets in unison with a second pair 530′, and a third pair 530″ of stator magnets, which can also be combined in a stacked orientation 542 (see FIG. 10b) to be disposed in a spaced apart orientation by a generally vertical oriented connector bracket 534′. One or a plurality of slide pins 536, 536′ are attached to the perimeter connector bracket 534 to allow an outside force to reciprocate the slide pins 536, 536′, the brackets 534, 534′ and the pairs of stator magnets 530, 530′, 530″ in a linear movement 538 within each channel 514. Upon reciprocating motion of the pairs of stator magnets 530, 530′, 530″, as induced by external forces, the resulting re-orientating of the respective north and south magnetic fields induces rotational movement 540 for each rotor magnet 522 or 524, thereby generating electrical energy that is collected by electrical circuitry (not shown) associated with the housing 512 and connected with each of the plurality of rotor magnet units 520.
  • An alternative embodiment of the motion converter for utilization as an electrical generator [0056] 510 illustrated in FIG. 10a, is an electrical generator 610 illustrated in FIGS. 11a-11 c. Electrical generator 610 includes a housing 612 in which a plurality of magnetic induction elements 622 (see FIG. 1a) are disposed between a plurality of rotor magnet units 620 that are individually rotatable within separate channels 616 in the housing 612. The magnetic induction elements 622 are interdisposed between the channels 616 and electric generation circuitry (not shown) is interconnected with each magnetic induction elements 622. The plurality of rotor magnet units 620 are rotated about an axial shaft 628 due to the influence of a changing magnetic flux field generated by linear movement of opposed pairs of stator magnets 630, 630′, 630″ positioned at a perimeter of the housing 612. Each of the rotor magnet units 620 are disposed to rotate within a channel 616 that is radially oriented in relation to a central channel 618 formed within a central magnet 632. Each of the opposed pairs of stator magnets 630, 630′, 630″ are disposed in respective channels 614 that open outwardly in a spaced apart configuration along the perimeter of the housing 612, as illustrated in FIG. 10b for the perimeter of a like-configured generator 510. As illustrated in FIG. 11c, each rotor magnet unit 620 includes a multi-sided rotor magnet 624 having a north and south magnetic pole positioned on a perimeter of the magnet 624. Additional north and south poles may be oriented on opposed angled sides of rotor magnet 624 as illustrated in FIG. 11c. Each north and south pole is oriented in a circumferential path of rotation about the axial shaft 628, with the net flux fields of the north and south poles directed substantially perpendicular to a radius from the axial shaft 628 around which the rotor magnet 624 rotates within each respective channel 616. Each channel 616 is oriented having a lengthwise axis positioned toward a central magnet 632 positioned within the housing 612 (see FIGS. 11a and 11 d). A counter-weight (not shown) may to attached to axial shaft 628 in an opposed orientation from rotor magnet 624, or alternative two-sided or three-sided rotor magnets (not shown) may be utilized for each rotor magnet unit 620. The rotation 640 of the rotor magnets 624 is induced by movement of the stator magnets 630 within respective channels 614 along the perimeter of the housing 612. A plurality of pairs of stator magnets 630, 630′, 630″ are oriented in pairs as illustrated in FIG. 11a. Each stator magnet 630, 630′, 630″ may be connected by a perimeter connector bracket 638 to allow movement of one pair 630 of stator magnets in unison with a second pair 630′, and a third pair 630″ of stator magnets, which may also be connected in a stacked orientation (not shown). One or a plurality of slide pins 636, 636′ are attached to the perimeter connector bracket 638 to allow an outside force to reciprocate the slide pins 636, 636′, 636″ and the pairs of stator magnets 630, 630′, 630″ in a linear movement along the perimeter of the housing 612. Upon reciprocating motion of the pairs of stator magnets 630, 630′, 630″, as induced by external forces, the resulting reorientating of the respective north and south magnetic fields induces rotational movement 640 for each rotor magnet 624, thereby generating electrical energy that is collected by electrical circuitry (not shown) associated with the housing 612 and connected with each of the plurality of rotor magnet units 620. An alternative embodiment, as illustrated in FIG. 11b, includes the housing 612 having a plurality of electromagnet induction elements 634 disposed between each rotor magnet unit 624. Pulsed electrical current may be provided to each electromagnet induction element 634 for re-orientating of the respective north and south magnetic fields of each induction element 634, thereby inducing rotational movement 640 for each rotor magnet 624, with or without reciprocating movement of each pair of stator magnets 630, 630′, 630″ resulting in generating of electrical energy that is collected by electrical circuitry (not shown) associated with the housing 612. Electrical generation circuitry (not shown) is associated with each electromagnetic induction element, with the circuitry producing electricity upon the rotation of each respective rotor magnet 624.
  • From the foregoing description, it will be recognized by those skilled in the art that a linear magnetic harmonic drive motion converter apparatus has been provided. For embodiments connecting to motors and pumps for conversion of linear motion into rotational motion, the present invention provides simplicity of structure and provides a highly adaptable and efficient apparatus. Additional embodiments are utilized for motors, positioning devices, battery recharging units, gear actuation devices, transit and conveying components, motion conversion, drive-trains, drive motors for water craft, and harnessing of energy from wave motion in aquatic environments. [0057]
  • While the present invention has been illustrated by description of several embodiments and while the illustrative embodiments have been described in considerable detail, it is not the intention of the applicant to restrict or in any way limit the scope of the appended claims to such detail. Additional advantages and modifications will readily appear to those skilled in the art. The invention in its broader aspects is therefore not limited to the specific details, representative apparatus and methods, and illustrative examples shown and described herein. Accordingly, departures may be made from such details without departing from the spirit or scope of applicant's general inventive concept as described in the appended claims. [0058]

Claims (16)

Having thus described the aforementioned invention, I claim:
1. A linear magnetic harmonic motion converter apparatus comprising:
a frame member including a first side member disposed to rotate about a longitudinal axis, said frame member having first and second end members attached between opposed ends of said first side member;
at least one perimeter magnet disposed on said first side member, said at least one perimeter magnet having first and second magnet ends defining respective north and south poles, said first and second magnet ends having a first magnetic field of sufficient strength to extend to said longitudinal axis of said frame member;
an axial shaft having an axis of rotation disposed parallel with said longitudinal axis of said frame member, said axial shaft extended substantially parallel to said first side member; and
at least one rotor magnet disposed on said axial shaft, said at least one rotor magnet rotates in unison with said axial shaft, said at least one rotor magnet having first and second magnet ends defining respective north and south poles, said first and second poles including a second magnetic field oriented in a circumferential path of rotation about said axial shaft, said second magnetic field directed substantially perpendicular to a radius from said axis of rotation of said axial shaft, said second magnetic field is alternately attracted to and repelled by said first magnetic field to induce rotation of said axial shaft when said frame member is reciprocated in relation to said axial shaft.
2. The apparatus of claim 1 wherein said axial shaft further includes a plurality of rotor magnets disposed in spaced apart orientation along said axial shaft, each rotor magnet having respective second magnetic fields oriented in a circumferential path of rotation about said axial shaft, each respective second magnetic field is alternately attracted to and repelled by said first magnetic field of said at least one perimeter magnet to induce rotation of said axial shaft when said first side member is reciprocated in relation to said axial shaft.
3. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein said plurality of rotor magnets further includes a plurality of pairs of rotor magnets positioned in spaced apart configuration along said axial shaft, each pair of said plurality of pairs of rotor magnets are separated by an angle of separation in a range between about 180 degrees of separation to about 90 degrees of separation.
4. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein said frame member further includes a second side member disposed parallel to and opposed from said first side member, said frame member further includes said first end member and said second end members extended to connect between respective first and second ends of said first and second side members, said first and second end members are disposed substantially parallel to said axial shaft and are reciprocatingly moved substantially parallel to said axial shaft, said first and second ends of said first and second side members are pivotably connected to said first and second end members to form corner junctions having means for pivoting at each corner junction to allow reciprocation of said first and second side members in relation to said axial shaft, whereby said first and second side members are reciprocated by an externally provided reciprocating force, said first magnetic field is re-oriented in relation to said plurality of rotor magnets with each reciprocation of said first and second side members, each second magnetic field is alternately attracted to and repelled by said first magnetic field to induce rotation of said axial shaft with each reciprocation of said first and second side members.
5. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein said frame member further includes an enclosure shell formed by a first and second end bracket positioned to extend parallel to respective first and second end members, said first and second end brackets rigidly connect between respective first and second ends of said first and second side members, said first end bracket having a third magnet connected to an interior surface of said first end bracket, said second end bracket having a fourth magnet connected to an interior surface of said second end bracket, said enclosure shell is rotatable as a substantially rigid unit in relation to said axial shaft that is extended through first and second pivot brackets disposed through a mid-portion of respective first and second end brackets, said third and fourth magnets having respective third and fourth magnetic fields of sufficient strength to extend to said axial shaft, each second magnetic field of said plurality of rotor magnets is alternately attracted to and repelled by said first magnetic field, said third magnetic field and said fourth magnetic field to induce rotation of said axial shaft when said enclosure shell is rotated in relation to said axial shaft.
6. The apparatus of claim 2 wherein said first and second side members are connected by at least one cross-member that is slidably connected between said first and second side members, said at least one cross-member having at least two perimeter magnets disposed at opposed ends of said at least one cross-member, said at least two perimeter magnets having respective north and south poles associated with each magnet, each of said at least two perimeter magnets having a first magnetic field of sufficient strength to extend to said longitudinal axis of said frame member.
7. A linear magnetic harmonic motion converter apparatus comprising:
a frame member including first and second side members disposed to be supported in a stationary position, said frame member further including first and second end members attached between respective first and second side members, said frame member having a lengthwise axis extended between a first end and a second end of said frame member;
said first and second side members are connected by at least two cross-members that are slidably connected between said first and second side members, said at least two cross-members having at least two perimeter magnets disposed at opposed ends of said at least two cross-members, said at least two perimeter magnets having respective north and south poles associated with each perimeter magnet, each of said at least two perimeter magnets having a first magnetic field of sufficient strength to extend to said lengthwise axis of said frame member, said at least two cross-members are reciprocatingly slid between said first end and said second end of said frame member;
an axial shaft extended substantially parallel with said lengthwise axis of said frame member, said axial shaft extended substantially parallel to said first and second side members, said axial shaft is rotatable in relation to said frame member; and
at least one rotor magnet disposed on said axial shaft, said at least one rotor magnet rotates in unison with said axial shaft, said at least one rotor magnet having first and second magnet ends defining respective north and south poles oriented in a circumferential path of rotation about said axial shaft with the net flux fields of the north and south poles directed substantially perpendicular to the axis of rotation of said axial shaft, said first and second magnet ends including a second magnetic field extended from said axial shaft, said second magnetic field is alternately attracted to and repelled from said first magnetic field to induce rotation of said axial shaft when said at least two cross-members having perimeter magnets thereon are slid between said first end and said second end of said frame member.
8. The apparatus of claim 7 wherein said at least one rotor magnet includes a plurality of pairs of rotor magnets positioned in spaced apart configuration along said axial shaft, each pair of said plurality of pairs are separated by an angle of separation of a range between about 180 degrees of separation to about 90 degrees of separation.
9. A linear magnetic harmonic motion converter apparatus comprising:
a cylindrical frame having first and second rotation brackets at opposed first and second ends of said cylindrical frame, said cylindrical frame having a pair of slots oriented through an exterior surface of said cylindrical frame, each of said slots extended along the lengthwise axis of said cylindrical frame, each slot being extended a spaced apart distance interior of said first end and said second end of said cylindrical frame;
a cylindrical sleeve positioned around an exterior of said cylindrical frame, said cylindrical sleeve having two interior slide members spaced apart to fit into respective first and second slots, each of said two interior slide members having a first and second perimeter magnet disposed to project inwardly on each slide member, said first and second perimeter magnets producing a perimeter magnetic field oriented inwardly of said cylindrical sleeve, said cylindrical sleeve is reciprocatingly slidable between said first end and said second end of said cylindrical frame;
an axial shaft extended through said first and second rotation brackets, said cylindrical frame is rotatable around said axial shaft; and
a plurality of pairs of rotor magnets disposed in spaced apart orientation along a length of said axial shaft, each of said rotor magnets having respective north and south poles oriented in a circumferential path of rotation about said axial shaft with the net flux fields of the north and south poles directed substantially perpendicular to the axis of rotation of said cylindrical frame about said axial shaft, said plurality of pairs of rotor magnets producing a plurality of second magnetic fields extended outwardly from said axial shaft;
whereby said perimeter magnetic field is re-oriented with each sliding movement of said cylindrical sleeve along the lengthwise axis of said cylindrical frame, said second magnetic fields are alternately attracted and repelled by said perimeter magnetic field to induce rotation of said axial shaft with each sliding movement of said cylindrical sleeve.
10. A linear magnetic harmonic motion converter apparatus for use in a body of water comprising:
a cylindrical frame having first and second rotation brackets at opposed first and second ends of said cylindrical frame, said cylindrical frame having a pair of slots oriented through an exterior surface of said cylindrical frame, each of said slots extended along the lengthwise axis of said cylindrical frame, each slot being extended a spaced apart distance interior of said first end and said second end of said cylindrical frame;
a cylindrical sleeve positioned around an exterior of said cylindrical frame, said cylindrical sleeve having two interior slide members spaced apart to fit into respective first and second slots, each of said two interior slide members having a first and second perimeter magnet disposed to project inwardly on each slide member, said first and second perimeter magnets producing a perimeter magnetic field oriented inwardly of said cylindrical sleeve, said cylindrical sleeve is reciprocatingly slidable between said first end and said second end of said cylindrical frame;
a bracket having a first end connected to said cylindrical sleeve, said bracket having a second end extended an sufficient length past said first end of said cylindrical frame, said second end connected to a device having buoyancy in water;
an axial shaft extended through said first and second rotation brackets, said axial shaft is rotatable within said cylindrical frame;
a plurality of pairs of rotor magnets disposed in spaced apart orientation along a length of said axial shaft, each of said rotor magnets having respective north and south poles oriented in a circumferential path of rotation about said axial shaft with the net flux fields of the north and south poles directed substantially perpendicular to the axis of rotation of said axial shaft, each of said rotor magnets producing a plurality of second magnetic fields extended outwardly from said axial shaft; and
an extension member of said axial shaft, said extension member is extended from said second end of said cylindrical frame, said extension member having a lower end connected to an anchor device for extension toward the floor of the body of water;
whereby said perimeter magnetic field is re-oriented with each sliding movement of said cylindrical sleeve in response to the device having buoyancy moving with wave motions of the body of water, said second magnetic fields are alternately attracted and repelled by said perimeter magnetic field to induce rotation of said axial shaft with each sliding movement of said cylindrical sleeve.
11. A linear magnetic harmonic motion converter apparatus comprising:
a frame member including first and second side members disposed to rotate about a longitudinal axis, said frame member further including first and second end members attached between respective first and second side members;
a plurality of electromagnets disposed in spaced apart orientation on said first and second side members, each of said plurality of electromagnets having an electrical control means powered by an electric power source connected thereto, said electrical control means provides electric power in a timed sequence to alternate the magnetic poles of each of said plurality of electromagnets with re-orientation of a first magnetic field for each electromagnet of sufficient strength to extend to said longitudinal axis of said frame member;
an axial shaft extended along said longitudinal axis of said frame member, said axial shaft extended substantially parallel to said first and second side members; and
at least one rotor magnet disposed on said axial shaft, said at least one rotor magnet rotates in unison with said axial shaft, said at least one rotor magnet having first and second magnet ends defining respective north and south poles oriented in a circumferential path of rotation about said axial shaft with the net flux fields of the north and south poles directed substantially perpendicular to the axis of rotation of said axial shaft, the net flux fields of the north and south poles provides a second magnetic field extended from said axial shaft, said second magnetic field is alternately attracted to and repelled from said first magnetic field for each electromagnet on said first and second side members to induce rotation of said axial shaft in relation to said frame member.
12. The apparatus of claim 11 wherein said at least one rotor magnet includes a plurality of pairs of rotor magnets positioned in spaced apart configuration along said axial shaft, each pair of said plurality of pairs of rotor magnets are separated by an angle of separation in a range between about 180 degrees of separation to about 90 degrees of separation.
13. A linear magnetic harmonic pump including a housing having a plurality of fluid channels therein, the plurality of fluid channels including at least one inlet fluid channel and at least one output fluid channel, comprising:
a plurality of stator magnets disposed in spaced-apart orientation along a perimeter of a housing, said plurality of stator magnets are reciprocatingly moved in a linear path relative to the perimeter of the housing, each stator magnet having a north and a south magnet pole having respective north and south magnetic fields;
a plurality of rotor magnet units disposed within the housing, each rotor magnet unit including an axial shaft disposed within each one of a plurality of radially oriented fluid channels of the plurality of fluid channels, each radially oriented fluid channel is in fluid communication with at least one inlet fluid channel and with a centrally disposed output fluid channel within the housing, each rotor magnet unit further including:
a plurality of impeller fins interconnected at a base end of each impeller fin to rotate around said axial shaft, each impeller fin having distal ends rotating around said axial shaft for transfer of fluid through each respective radially oriented fluid channel; and
at least one rotor magnet extended in a radial configuration interdisposed between said impeller fins, said at least one rotor magnet rotatable around said axial shaft in unison with said plurality of impeller fins, each rotor magnet including respective north and south poles oriented in a circumferential path of rotation about said axial shaft with the net flux fields of the north and south poles directed substantially perpendicular to the axis of rotation of said axial shaft;
whereby rotation occurs for each rotor magnet unit about each respective axial shaft upon the influence on the net flux fields of the north and south poles of each respective rotor magnet by the movement of the magnet fields of each stator magnet disposed along the perimeter of the housing, with resulting pumping of fluids through each respective fluid channel from the at least one inlet fluid channel and toward the at least one output fluid channel of the pump.
14. A linear magnetic harmonic pump including a housing having a plurality of fluid channels therein, the plurality of fluid channels including at least one inlet fluid channel and at least one output fluid channel, comprising:
a plurality of stator magnets disposed in spaced-apart orientation along a perimeter of a housing, said plurality of stator magnets are reciprocatingly moved in a linear path relative to the perimeter of the housing, each stator magnet having a north and a south magnet pole having respective north and south magnetic fields;
a plurality of rotor magnet units disposed within the housing, each rotor magnet unit including an axial shaft disposed within each one of a plurality of radially oriented fluid channels of the plurality of fluid channels, each radially oriented fluid channel is in fluid communication with at least one inlet fluid channel and with a centrally disposed output fluid channel within the housing, each rotor magnet unit further including:
a plurality of impeller fins interconnected at a base end of each impeller fin to rotate around said axial shaft, each impeller fin having distal ends rotating around said axial shaft for transfer of fluid through each respective radially oriented fluid channel;
at least one rotor magnet extended in a radial configuration interdisposed between said impeller fins, said at least one rotor magnet rotatable around said axial shaft in unison with said plurality of impeller fins, each rotor magnet including respective north and south poles oriented in a circumferential path of rotation about said axial shaft with the net flux fields of the north and south poles directed substantially perpendicular to the axis of rotation of said axial shaft; and
a plurality of electromagnets disposed in spaced apart orientation within said housing, each electromagnet is interdisposed between each rotor magnet unit, each electromagnet connected to an electric power source and a control means providing electric power in a timed sequence to each electromagnet to alternate the magnetic poles of each electromagnet;
whereby rotation occurs for each rotor magnet unit about each respective axial shaft upon the influence on the net flux fields of the north and south poles of each respective rotor magnet by the movement of the magnet fields of each stator magnet disposed along the perimeter of the housing and the alternation of the magnetic poles of each electromagnet, with resulting pumping of fluids through each respective fluid channel from the at least one inlet fluid channel and toward the at least one output fluid channel of the pump.
15. A linear magnetic harmonic electric generator including a housing having a plurality of channels therein, said electric generator including electromagnetic induction elements interdisposed between the plurality of channels and circuitry interconnected with the electromagnetic induction elements, said electric generator comprising:
a plurality of stator magnets disposed in spaced-apart orientation along a perimeter of a housing, said plurality of stator magnets are reciprocatingly moved in a linear path relative to the perimeter of the housing, each stator magnet having a north and a south magnet pole having respective north and south magnetic fields; and
a plurality of rotor magnet units disposed within the housing, each rotor magnet unit including an axial shaft disposed within each one of a plurality of radially oriented channels of the plurality of channels, each radially oriented channel is adjacent at least one of the electromagnetic induction elements, each rotor magnet unit further including:
at least one rotor magnet rotatable around said axial shaft, each rotor magnet including respective north and south poles oriented in a circumferential path of rotation about said axial shaft with the net flux fields of the north and south poles directed substantially perpendicular to the axis of rotation of said axial shaft;
whereby rotation occurs for each rotor magnet unit about each respective axial shaft upon the influence on the net flux fields of the north and south poles of each respective rotor magnet by the movement of the magnet fields of each stator magnet disposed along the perimeter of the housing, and the alternation of the magnetic poles of each electromagnet, the rotation of each rotor magnet unit produces a magnetic flux field within each rotor magnet unit that activates circuitry for the production of electricity.
16. A linear magnetic harmonic electric generator including a housing having a plurality of channels therein, said electric generator including magnetic induction elements interdisposed between the plurality of channels and circuitry interconnected with the magnetic induction elements, said electric generator comprising:
a plurality of stator magnets disposed in spaced-apart orientation along a perimeter of a housing, said plurality of stator magnets are reciprocatingly moved in a linear path relative to the perimeter of the housing, each stator magnet having a north and a south magnet pole having respective north and south magnetic fields; and
a plurality of rotor magnet units disposed within the housing, each rotor magnet unit including an axial shaft disposed within each one of a plurality of radially oriented channels of the plurality of channels, each radially oriented channel is adjacent at least one of the magnetic induction elements, each rotor magnet unit further including:
at least one rotor magnet rotatable around said axial shaft, each rotor magnet including respective north and south poles oriented in a circumferential path of rotation about said axial shaft with the net flux fields of the north and south poles directed substantially perpendicular to the axis of rotation of said axial shaft;
whereby rotation occurs for each rotor magnet unit about each respective axial shaft upon the influence on the net flux fields of the north and south poles of each respective rotor magnet by the movement of the magnet fields of each stator magnet disposed along the perimeter of the housing, the rotation of each rotor magnet unit produces a magnetic flux field within each rotor magnet unit that activates circuitry attached to each magnetic induction element for the production of electricity.
US10/141,745 2001-05-09 2002-05-09 Linear magnetic harmonic motion converter Abandoned US20020167236A1 (en)

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US10/141,745 US20020167236A1 (en) 2001-05-09 2002-05-09 Linear magnetic harmonic motion converter

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US20020167236A1 true US20020167236A1 (en) 2002-11-14

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US10/142,124 Expired - Fee Related US6781270B2 (en) 2001-05-09 2002-05-09 Magnetically coupled dangling apparatus
US10/141,745 Abandoned US20020167236A1 (en) 2001-05-09 2002-05-09 Linear magnetic harmonic motion converter
US10/755,016 Abandoned US20040140722A1 (en) 2001-05-09 2004-01-09 Non-linear magnetic harmonic motion converter

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US10/142,124 Expired - Fee Related US6781270B2 (en) 2001-05-09 2002-05-09 Magnetically coupled dangling apparatus

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US20020167235A1 (en) 2002-11-14
WO2002091498A2 (en) 2002-11-14
AU2002259168A1 (en) 2002-11-18
US20040140722A1 (en) 2004-07-22
WO2002091545A3 (en) 2003-01-16
WO2002091498A3 (en) 2003-02-20
AU2002259182A8 (en) 2008-01-10
WO2002091400A2 (en) 2002-11-14
AU2002259182A1 (en) 2002-11-18
US6700248B2 (en) 2004-03-02
WO2002091545A2 (en) 2002-11-14

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Owner name: HARMONIC DRIVE, INC., TENNESSEE

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Effective date: 20020508

STCB Information on status: application discontinuation

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