US1992355A - Gas control system - Google Patents

Gas control system Download PDF

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Publication number
US1992355A
US1992355A US555803A US55580331A US1992355A US 1992355 A US1992355 A US 1992355A US 555803 A US555803 A US 555803A US 55580331 A US55580331 A US 55580331A US 1992355 A US1992355 A US 1992355A
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Prior art keywords
valve
gas
diaphragm
burner
casing
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US555803A
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Frank H Cornelius
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Frank H Cornelius
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G05CONTROLLING; REGULATING
    • G05DSYSTEMS FOR CONTROLLING OR REGULATING NON-ELECTRIC VARIABLES
    • G05D23/00Control of temperature
    • G05D23/01Control of temperature without auxiliary power
    • G05D23/12Control of temperature without auxiliary power with sensing element responsive to pressure or volume changes in a confined fluid
    • G05D23/125Control of temperature without auxiliary power with sensing element responsive to pressure or volume changes in a confined fluid the sensing element being placed outside a regulating fluid flow
    • G05D23/126Control of temperature without auxiliary power with sensing element responsive to pressure or volume changes in a confined fluid the sensing element being placed outside a regulating fluid flow using a capillary tube

Description

Feb. 26, 1935.
F. H. CORNELIUS GAS CONTROL SYSTEM Filed Aug. '7. 1931 2 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR Funk f2. Come/ms.
BY R fifiorm j Feb. 26, 1935. F. H, CORNELIUS GAS CONTROL SYSTEM Filed Aug. 7, 1931 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR fia/m H Carm /1'05.
BY A 5 ATTORNEY iii Patented Feb. 26, 1935 UNITED ,STATES PATENT OFFICE GAS CONTROL SYSTEM Frank H. Cornelius, Swlssvale, Pa. Application August 7, 1931, Serial No. 555,803
3Claims.
My invention relates to a gas control syste and it has special reference to furnace gas control systems involving safety devices;
One object of my invention is to provide, in conjunction with a valve for supplying gas to a burner or the like, in a furnace, an arrangement ut izing temperature variations in the rooms to be heated or elsewhere for relatively varying opposing pressures associated with the valve, and thus opening or closing the same.
A second object of my invention is to provide a device of the character indicated, embodying a diaphragm adapted to be flexed in accordance with opposing gas pressures thereon for actuating the valve member, the diaphragm being controllable either by specified above, or being manually lockable in a certain position.
A further object of my invention is to provide a device of the character in question, wherein the manually lockable means is automatically released when the valve moves to another position.
Another object of my invention is to provide a pilot light system, in conjunction with a valve for supplying gas to a burner or the like, in which the closure of the valve is effected when a control burner is unlighted for any reason, thereby preventing the flow of gas to the burner when the burner has become extinguished, which is an important safety measure.
A further object of my invention is to provide an apparatus of the character just set forth, wherein the heat from the control burner serves to control a thermostatic member, which in turn controls the operation of the main valve.
Another object of my invention is to provide a simple, rigid and durable gas control system, wherein the gas, itself, is used as the operating medium instead of an electric current.
Other objects of my invention will become evi dent from the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein Figure 1 is a top plan view of a pilot light and burner apparatus constructed and arranged in accordance with my present invention,
Fig. 2 is a view in side elevation, with certain parts in section, of the apparatus shown in Fig. 1, and
Figs. 3 and 4 are enlarged longitudinal sectional views of the apparatus parts that are shown in section in Fig. 2.
Referring to the drawings, I have herein shown a supply pipe 1 which is provided with a handoperated valve or stop cock 2 leading to a gas prestemperature variations, as'
sure regulator 3, of any well-known type, for reducing and regulating the pressure 01. the m. then to a main valve and control device 4, and finally to a suitable grid type or other burner 5, where the gas is consumed, in order to heat' air passing through a furnace, or water in a boiler, for example. A pilot light device 6, an electrically controlled gas valve 7 and a room thermostat 8 comprise the auxiliary or control-elements of my system.
The hand valve 2 may be opened or closed, as desired, by applying a suitable handle or wrench to the square outer end 11 of the stem. Whether the valve 2 is open or closed, however, high pressure gas is directed from the inlet side of the valve through a suitable pipe or conduit 12 to the vicinity of the pilot light device 6, further control and flow thereof being manually and automatically governed as subsequently set forth in detail.
Referring particularly to Fig. 3, the main valve and control device 4 therefor is shown as comprising a suitable globe valve body 13 interposed in the supply pipe 1, a casing 14 of relatively large diameter being located above the valve body for purposes to be described, together with a cap or cover 15 of smaller diameter located above the casing 14. The globe valve 13 may be provided with the usual inner partition 16 and horizontal central opening or seat 17, which may be closed by asuitable valve proper 18 secured to a valve stem 19. A small flexible diaphragm 20 has its edges clamped between the upper flanges of the globe valve 13 and the lowermember or cover 21 of the casing 14,'suitable bolts 22 being utilized to secure the member 21 and the upper flanges of the globe valve together. The middle portion of the diaphragm 20 is secured to the valve stem 19 by means of a pair of opposed nuts 23.
About the middle of the casing 14 a main or largediameter diaphragm 24 is also secured to the valve stem 19 by means of a pair of opposed nuts 25, the outer edge or periphery of the diaphragm 24 being secured to the casing 14 by means of screws or bolts 27 passing through flanges of the lower casing member 21 and upper. casing member 26 and clamping the periphery of the diaphragm 24 between them. For the purpose of permitting a slow leakage of gas under pressure from the lower part of the casing 14, that is, the part below the diaphragm to the upper part, an eyelet or opening 28 is provided in the diaphragm. To bias the main diaphragm 24 towards its lowermost position corresponding to closure. of the main valve 18, a coiled spring 29 is positioned between a shallow cup 36 on the upper side of the diaphragm 24 and the middle portion or boss 30 of the upper casing element 26;
To provide a manually lockable means for the main valve 18, in order to hold it open permanently, when desired, a right-angle or weighted lever 31 normally occupies the position illustrated in Fig. 3, and is pivoted near its free horizontal end at 32 to the upper end of the valve stem 19. The other right-angle portion 33 of the lockable means normally hangs downwardly, as illustrated in Fig. 3, because of its weight and its 10- catlon with respect to the pivotal point 32. However, if it is desired to temporarily lock the main valve 18 in its upper or open position, the cap 15 enclosing the upper end of the valve stem may be removed and the lockable means moved into a vertical position wherein the lever 31 engages the upper surface 'of the boss 30 and prevents downward movement of the main valve 18, thus holding the valve open. This expedient may be resorted to in the event of temporary failure or the automatic apparatus or for any other purpose.
However, it should be noted that the locking means in question is eflective merely in the one direction. That is to say, upon resumption of the operation of the automatic control apparatus, a slight upward movement of the main valve 18 and valve stem 19, by reason of gas pressure under the diaphragm 24, serves to release or free the locking or jamming action of the lever 31, in which case the weighted end 33 causes the looking means to automatically resume the position illustrated in Fig. 3, whereupon normal automatic operation, as subsequently described in detail, may proceed. It should be further noted that member 31, as shown in the drawings, is in the position for automatic operation, the valve 4 being shown in its open position. The member 31 cannot rotate clockwise to any greater degree than that shown by reason of the arm 33 projecting below the topmost side of the boss in the cover 26 through which the valve stem passes. For manual opening of the valve, the member 31 is rotated through approximately ninety degrees in a counter-clockwise direction, at which time the left-hand end of the member 31 after the valve dropped a trifle would rest on top of the boss through which the valve stem passes and will thus maintain the valve in the open position. The valve in this position is not as fully opened as is shown in the drawing, but should the automatic opening cycle be resumed, the valve stem 19 will move upwardly to the fully open position shown, as specified above. This action releases the left-hand end of the member 31 and the arm 33, because of its greater weight, will then produce rotation of the member 31 to the position shown which permits further automatic operation.
The upper chamber of the casing 14 communicates with an outlet pipe 35, which leads to the electrically controlled gas valve 7, as subsequently described.
Referring now particularly to Fig. 4, the pilot light device 6 is shown as comprising a casing 40 having an intermediate partition 41 with a central opening or seat 42 and a removable cap 43 at one end of the casing 40. A valve proper 44 is adapted to fit in the seat 42 and prevent communication between the two chambers 54 .and 56 of the casing 40 when a thermostatic element or diaphragm 48 occupies the normal or cold position indicated in dotted lines. The
thermostatic element 48 is suitably secured to a valve stem 45, which slides through a boss 46 in the adjacent end of the casing 40 and also operates through a small chamber 47 for a purpose to be set forth.
The thermostatic element 48 is provided with suitable gas-passing perforations 63 and is enclosed in a suitable casing having inner and outer members 49 and 50, respectively, provided with flanges for clamping the periphery of the thermostatic element 48 by means of suitable bolts 51. The central portion of the outer casing member 50 is provided with a suitably apertured nozzle, or safety burner tip, 52 for providing the desired control burner. A pipe or conduit 53 communicating with the pipe 12 opens into chamber 54, a second pipe 55, which communicates with both the pipe 12 and the pipe 62 leading to the casing 14, opens into chamber 56, while a pipe 57, communicating through a manually operable adjusting valve 59 with the outer portion of the pipe 12, opens into chamber 47 of the casing 40 for purposes to be hereinafter set forth.
A manually controlled spring-closed or pushbutton valve 58 is provided in the pipe 12 between the pipes 53 and 55, and another manually operable adiusting valve 60 is provided in the pipe 12 between the pipe '7 and additional pilot lights 61, which may be disposed wherever desired and will be controlled in accordance with the .conditionwhether lighted or unlightedof the control burner 52.
The operationof my pilot light system may be set forth as follows: Normally high pressure gas from the inlet side of the valve 2 will flow through pipe 12 to pipe 53 and chamber 54 of the pilot lightdevice 6. With the diaphragm 48 occupying its normal or cold position, indicated by the dotted lines, the valve 44 is, of course, closed and nothing further can occur, unless and until the burner tip 52 is lighted by means of temporarily pressing the push-button or spring valve 58 to permit gas to flow through valve 59 to chamber 47 and thence through the openings 63 in the thermostatic element 48 to the tip 52. After a short time, the heat'from the safety burner 52 will react on the thermostatic member or disc 48 and cause it to snap into its solid-line position illustrated in Fig. 4, in accordance with wellknown principles.
In this event, the high-pressure gas is permitted to flow from chamber 54 through the open valve seat 42 into the chamber 56 of the casing 40 and thence through pipes 55 and 62 to the lower side of the casing 14 that is associated with the main globe valve 13. At the same time, high pressure gas may flow from the chamber 56 through pipe 55 and valve 60 to the additional pilots 61 which may be lighted at this same time and which thus operate thereafter in conjunction with the control burner 52. The valves 59 and 60 are normally open, but may be adjusted as desired to regulate the size of the flames operating through'the tips 52 and 61, respectively. However, valve 58 being of the spring type, is always closed, except when manually operated for first lighting the burners 52 and 61.
The high pressure gas flowing into the lower chamber of the casing 14 associated with the main valve 18 likewise seeps into the upper half of the casing through the eyelet or opening 28. However, high-pressure gas acting on the upper side of the lower or smaller diaphragm 20, coupled with the biasing action of the spring 29 above the main diaphragm 24, causes the main valve 18 to be actuated downwardly into its closed position, thusshutting off the. flow of gas to the burner 5. This will be the condition of the apparatus when the room thermostat 8 does not call for heat, that is, when the temperature of the room is up to the desired degree.
However, when the room temperature decreases to the point where the thermostat 8, of any suitable type, operates, electricity being supplied from a suitable source 39, the electrically-controlled gas valve 7 will be thereby opened to permit the flow or release of gas under high pressure from the upper chamber of the casing 14 through pipe and valve 7 to the main supply pipe 1, at the illustrated point intermediate control device 4 and burner 5, low pressure gas being present within pipe,1 at this point by reason of the pressurereducing action of pressure regulator 3. This release of pressure from the upper side of the diaphragm 24 causes the pressure on the lower side thereof to raise the diaphragm upwardly, overcoming the downward pressure on the smaller diaphragm 20 and the biasing action of the spring 29, thus opening the main valve 18. As a result, gas flowsthrough the main globe valve 13 into the burners 5, where the gas is lighted by the burner 52 and the room temperature is increased in the usual way through the operation of the furnace in which the burners 5 are used.
Thus the temperature in a remote room where the thermostat 8 is located serves to release the pressure from one side of the main diaphragm 24 and thus permit gas to flow to the burner 5, provided the burner 52 is in its lighted condition. However, should thelatter become extinguished, then the lack of heat on the adj acent thermostatic element or disc 48 will cause it to return to the dotted line position illustrated in Fig. 4 and thus close the valve 44 in the pilot light device 6. The
closure of this valve shuts ofi the flow of gas under pressure to the underside of the diaphragm 24, whereupon the action of the spring 29 coupled with what pressure there is on the upper side of the lower diaphragm 20 causes the main valve 18 to be closed and to remain closed as long as the burner 52 is unlighted. The closure of valve 44 in the pilot light device 6 also shuts off the flow of gas to the other pilots 61, whereby they are also extinguished.
In the event that the burner 52 becomes extinguished, therefore, the flow of gas to any point other than the chamber 54 of the burner 52 is stopped, and, in particular, no gas can be supplied through the main valve 18 to the burners 5 so long as the burner 52 remains unlighted.
It will be seen that I have thus provided a simple and effective safety gas control for furnaces and the like, wherein the gas pressure, itself, or the release thereof, is utilized to control the main gas-supplying valve, and, in the event that the control burner becomes extinguished, the supply of gas fuel to the burners is cut' oil and remains so until the master pilot is again lighted by hand.
I do not wish to be restricted to the specific structural details or arragement of parts herein set forth, as various'modiflcations thereof may be effected without departing from the spirit and scope of my invention, I desire, therefore, that only such limitations shall beimposed as are indicated in the appended claims.
I claim as my invention:
' 1. The combination with a gas-supply controlling valve, of means to bias said valve toward closed position, a gas supply line, a valve housing in said line, a diaphragm dividing said housing into two chambers and operatively connected to said valve to permit or cut oil gas flow in said line, a pressure-reducing device in said line, two conduits connected to said line at the high and low pressure sides, respectively, of said device and leading to opposite sides of said diaphragm, said diaphragm responding to the gas diiferential between said chambers to open said valve, a bleed passage interconnecting said chambers, and thermostatic valve means in said high pressure conduit whereby when said thermostatic valve is closed, the gas pressure is reduced in one of said chambers to permit said bias means to effect closure of said first-named valve.
2. The combination with a gas-supply-controlling valve, of means to bias said valve, a gas supply line, a valve housing in said line, a diaphragm dividing said housing into two chambers and operatively connected to said valve to permit or cut oif gas flow in said line, a pressure-reducing device in said line, two conduits connected to said line at the high and low pressure sides, respectively, of said device and leading to opposite sides of said diaphragm, said diaphragm responding to the gas difierential between said chambers to open said valve, a bleed passage interconnecting said chambers, thermostatic valve means in said high pressure conduit whereby when said thermostatic valve is closed, the gas pressure is reduced in one of said chambers to permit said bias means to efiect closure of said first-named valve, and means for temporarily manually moving and locking said first-named valve in one extreme position, said means being automatically releasable upon movement of said first-named valve toward its other extreme position.
3. The combination with a gas-supply controlling valve, of means to bias said valve toward closed position, a gas supply line, a valve housing in said line, a diaphragm dividing said housing into two chambers and operativeiy connected to said valve to permit or cut ofl gas flow in said line, a pressure-reducing device in said line, two conduits connected to said line at the high and low pressure sides, respectively, of said device and leading to opposite sides of said diaphragm, said diaphragm responding to the gas diflerential between said chambers to open said valve, 9, bleed passage interconnecting said chambers, a control burner, means operably responsive to operation of said burner having a movable thermostatic member and also having a valve member secured thereto for admitting gas from said high pressure conduit to one of said chambers, said thermostatic member and valve member being movable to a position to permit high pressure gas to flow into one of said chambers and move the diaphragm against said valve bias means.
FRANK H. CORNELIUS.
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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2902047A (en) * 1954-08-23 1959-09-01 Blackman Keith Ltd Gas pressure loaded regulator
US2939482A (en) * 1960-06-07 Donges
US3096971A (en) * 1959-06-01 1963-07-09 Honeywell Regulator Co Dryer apparatus

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2939482A (en) * 1960-06-07 Donges
US2902047A (en) * 1954-08-23 1959-09-01 Blackman Keith Ltd Gas pressure loaded regulator
US3096971A (en) * 1959-06-01 1963-07-09 Honeywell Regulator Co Dryer apparatus

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