US1984707A - Exhaust device for internal combustion engines - Google Patents

Exhaust device for internal combustion engines Download PDF

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Publication number
US1984707A
US1984707A US55337931A US1984707A US 1984707 A US1984707 A US 1984707A US 55337931 A US55337931 A US 55337931A US 1984707 A US1984707 A US 1984707A
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passageway
gas
exhaust
shell
device
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William B Sommer
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William B Sommer
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N1/00Silencing apparatus characterised by method of silencing
    • F01N1/08Silencing apparatus characterised by method of silencing by reducing exhaust energy by throttling or whirling
    • F01N1/089Silencing apparatus characterised by method of silencing by reducing exhaust energy by throttling or whirling using two or more expansion chambers in series
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N1/00Silencing apparatus characterised by method of silencing
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F01MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; ENGINE PLANTS IN GENERAL; STEAM ENGINES
    • F01NGAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR MACHINES OR ENGINES IN GENERAL; GAS-FLOW SILENCERS OR EXHAUST APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F01N1/00Silencing apparatus characterised by method of silencing
    • F01N1/08Silencing apparatus characterised by method of silencing by reducing exhaust energy by throttling or whirling

Description

Dec. 18, 1934. w. B. SOMMER EXHAUST DEVICE FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES Filed July 2'7, 195]. 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fig.3.

v gwuentoz \Viiliam B Sommer Dec. 18, 1934. w. B, SOMMER EXHAUST DEVICE FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES Filed July 27, 195]. 2 SheetsSheet 2 gmento'o William B. Summer Patented Dec. 18, 1934 PATENT OFFICE EXHAUST DEVICE FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES William B. Summer, St. Paul, Minn.

Application July 27,

2 Claims.

of the engine can be procured.

An object of the invention resides in providing an exhaust device whereby the noise caused by detonation may be greatly reduced.

An object of the invention resides in providing a device whereby kinetic energy of the moving exhaust gas may be imparted to a mass of fluid and subsequently utilized to accelerate the movement of the exhaust gas.

Another object of the invention resides in providing a device in which an appreciable reduction in back pressure or suction in the cylinders can be produced.

An object of the invention resides in providing a conduit forming a main passageway for exhaust gases and in providing a second conduit by-passing a portion of said first named conduit and discharging back into said first named conduit.

A feature of the-invention resides in providing one of said conduits with a nozzle adapted to discharge into the other so as to cause a suction within the other conduit to increase the flow of exhaust gases therethrough.

An object of the invention resides in providing a chamber in which a portion of the exhaust gases may be discharged and stored, said chamber having a discharge outlet for subsequently discharging the stored gases into the discharge conduit when the velocity of the gases in the discharge conduit is lessened.

A still further object of the invention resides in concentrically disposing the nozzle and the conduit into which it discharges so as to cause a suction through either thereof, upon the rapid flow of exhaust gas through the other.

Another object of the invention resides in utilizing the exhaust device with internal combustion engines having a plurality of cylinders arranged with overlapping periods of exhaust.

Other objects of the invention reside in the novel combination and arrangement of parts and in the details of construction hereinafter illustrated and/or described.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a longitudinal sectional view of a muffler illustrating an embodiment of my invention.

Fig. 2 is a cross sectional view taken on line 2-2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig. l of a modification of the invention.

Fig. 4 is a cross sectional view taken on line 4-4 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary sectional view showing a still different form of the invention.

1931, Serial No. 553,379

Fig. 6 is a cross sectional view taken on line 6-6 of Fig. 5.

Fig. 7 is a longitudinal sectional view of still another form of muiiler.

Fig. 8 is a sectional view taken on line 8-8 of Fig. 7.

Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 7 of still another form of the invention.

Fig. 10 is a cross sectional view taken on line 10-10 of Fig. 9.

Fig. 11 is a cross sectional view taken on line 11-11 of Fig. 9.

One form of my invention is illustrated in detail in Fig. 1 and comprises an outer case or shell '70, which is cylindrical in form and which is constructed with inwardly turned ends 71 and '72. The structure forming the ends '71 and '72 may be spun out of the metal of shell '70 or the same may be constructed separately and attached thereto as by welding or in any other suitable manner. To the center of the inturned portion of the shell 72 is connected an intake pipe '73, which is constructed with a flange '74 whereby the same may be connected to the flange 33 of the exhaust manifold or exhaust pipe of an internal combustion engine. The pipe '73 discharges centrally into the interior of the shell 70. At the inturned portion 71 of the shell '70 is provided an outlet or exhaust pipe 75, which is concentrically disposed relative to the pipe 73 and the shell 70. Within the interior of the shell '70 is provided a tubular member 76, which in the form of the invention shown in Fig. 1, is constructed of gradually decreasing thickness and of gradually increasing internal diameter past the medial point thereof. This tubular member may be constructed of sheet metal or may be made solid. In the former case, an outer tube 77 is employed, which has connected to it, an inner tube '78 of suitable diameter and spaced therefrom to give the desired thickness to the composite structure. The ends of the two tubes are turned toward each other as indicated at '79 and 81 and welded or otherwise secured together. The portion of the tube 78, beyond the center thereof, which I have indicated at 80, flares gradually outwardly to provide an enlargment at the extreme end thereof.

As will be seen from Fig. l, the tubular member 76 is somewhat shorter than the shell 70 and is also of lesser diameter to cause the same to become spaced from the walls of said shell. The tubular member 76 is held in place within the shell '70 through a number of radial fins 82, which may be welded to the outer tube 77 of said tubular member and the shell 70. These fins hold the tubular member '76 in position both in a radial as well as in a longitudinal direction. By means of the construction illustrated, a central passageway 83 is formed through the member 76, which is directly in communication with the inlet pipe '73 and the outlet or exhaust pipe '75 of the device. Another passageway 84 is also formed, which is annular in form and which is disposed between the tubular member 76 and the shell '10. This passageway curves about the two ends 79 and 81 of the tubular member '76 as indicated at 85 and 86 to bring said passageway in communication at both ends with the main passageway through the mufiier. It will be noted that the passageway '73 is more or less direct between the inlet and outlet while the passageway 84 is circuitous and by-passes the passageway 83. It will also be noted that the passageway 84 discharges back into the passageway 83 in the direction of travel of the gases therethrough.

The device shown in Fig. 1 operates as follows: When the exhaust gas passes through the pipe 78, which as illustrated, functions as a nozzle, the kinetic energy of such gas is transferred to the mass of gas within the passageway 88. The velocity of the gas in this passageway is hence increased, the gas travelling in a direction opposite to that of the gas in the passageway 83. As the exhaust gas passes through the pipe 73, a suction is created in the outlet 85 of passageway 84, which causes the gas within said passageway to be drawn into the stream of gas leaving the nozzle or pipe I8. As the gas leaves this pipe, the same expands and follows along the inner surface of the tubular member '76. A portion of this gas passes directly outwardly through the exhaust pipe 75, where the same may be delivered to the atmosphere or discharged from the muffier as desired. Another portion of the exhaust gas enters the passageway 8 through the curved inlet 88 thereof, due to the kinetic energy imparted to the same from the velocity of the gas travelling in nozzle '73 and in response to the suction created at said nozzle. The impelling of the flow of gas in the passage way 84 continues as long as the velocity of the gases leaving the nozzle '73 is relatively high, though of course the gas in passageway 84 is at all times in motion. As soon as the velocity of the gas entering the passageway 83 becomes re duced, the kinetic energy of the moving gas in the passageway 84 aids in maintaining the dying speed of gas flowing in the passageways 83 and 84:. This, however, occurs at a time when the velocity of the gas through the nozzle '78 is a minimum. This causes the introduction of the exhaust gases into the main passageway from the auxiliary passageway when the velocity of gas delivered by the manifold is a minimum. By means of the auxiliary gas passageway, a more or less uniform flow of gas from the exhaust pipe '75 results than would be the case were the engine directly exhausted into said pipe. At the same time, an appreciable reduction in noise is brought about.

If desired, the tubular member '76 may be constructed of a single sheet of material and of uniform thickness as illustrated in Fig. 9. Also a plurality of units as shown in Fig. 9 may be employed, each one assisting in further reducing the noise of the engine and in further making the flow of exhaust gases from the engine more uniform. The device shown in Fig. 9 consists of three sections, 8'7, 88 and 89, which are arranged in series. All of these sections being identical in construction, only the section 87 will be described. This section comprises an outer shell 90, similar to the shell 70, which is formed with inturned ends 91 and 92, similar to the ends 71 and '72 of the other form of the invention. Within the interior of the shell 87 is disposed a tubular member 93 of uniform thickness and diameter, which is spaced from the walls of the shell 8'1 and is shorter than said shell to cause the ends thereof to terminate short of the inturned ends 91 and 92 of the shell 90. This tubular member is held in position within said shell through fins 94, similar to the fins 82. At the end 91 of the shell 90 is provided an inlet pipe 95, which is secured to said shell and which serves to direct the exhaust gases into the muffler proper. At the other end of the shell 87 is provided an exhaust or outlet pipe 96, which is connected both to the end 92 of the shell 90 of section 87 and to the corresponding end 91 of the adjoining section 88. This pipe serves as an outlet for the section 87 and at the same time serves as an inlet for the section 88. Sections 88 and 89 are constructed identically the same as the section 87, except that the same are progressively shorter in length. The sections 88 and 89 are connected together through a conduit 97 similar to the conduit 96, while an outlet for the entire muflier, indicated at 98, is connected to the end 92 of section 89.

The operation of the device shown in Fig. 9 is identically the same as that illustrated in 1. A portion of the exhaust gases entering the muffler through the pipe 95 enters a passageway 99 in section 87. A part of it passes through the conduit 96 and into a similar passageway 100 in section 88-. The remainder of it passes through an annular space 101 between tubular member 93 and shell 90 of section 89. The exhaust gas entering this passageway is discharged back into the passageway 99, where the same finally escapes from the passageway 99 and into the passageway 100, through the conduit 96. The gas entering this passageway similarly divides, one part passing through conduit 97 and into passageway 102 in section 98. Another part of the exhaust gases entering section 88 through conduit 96 passes through an annular space 103,where the same is discharged into the passageway 100. The same procedure occurs in section 89 where part of the gas is discharged from the device through conduit 98 and the remainder is discharged into the passageway 104 where it subsequently enters passageway 102 and finally leaves the mumer through the same exhaust pipe. With a device constructed in accordance with Fig. 9, practically all of the noise of the exhaust is eliminated. The exhaust leaving the device flows at a uniform rate of speed. At the same time, the performance of the engine is greatly improved, due to the suction created in the various chambers from the nozzle action of the device. An evacuation of the gas in the cylinders is produced, which increases the efficiency of the engine and the ultimate performance of the same.

Where the tubular member is constructed of a single sheet of material of uniform thickness, a spreader 105 may be employed in the inlet pipe 95, as best shown in Figs. 9 and 10. This spreader causes a more uniform distribution of the exhaust gases between the two passageways. Where a number of sections are used in the mufller, the same may be connected together through flaring conduits, such as illustrated in Fig. 9, which serve a similar purpose to the spreader 105.

In Fig. '7, I have shown a form of the invention in which the main and auxiliary passageways are reversed. The device illustrated consists of three sections 117, 118 and 119, which are substantially identical in construction. Only section 117 will be described in detail. An outer shell 106 is again employed, together with a tubular member 107. Deflectors 108 and 109 are employed at the ends of the tubular member 107, which form the two passageways 110 and 111 of the device. An outlet pipe 115 is connected to the section 117, while an inlet pipe 116 is connected to section 119. The gas passes first into the passageway 110 where the same may leave section 117 of the muiiler through an annular space 112, surrounding the deflector 109. The balance of the gas flows about the end passageway 113 and into the passageway 111 within the interior of the tubular member 107. The gas then flows along the passageway 111 therein and is discharged through another end passageway 114 into the main passageway 110. The same fiow occurs through the other sections of the mufiier, the gas finally leaving the muflier through the outlet pipe 115.

In the description of my invention, I have described the muffler as constructed with a single auxiliary passageway. If desired, several auxiliary passageways may be employed. In Fig. 3 I have shown a device having one main air passageway and two auxiliary air passageways. This device consists of two sections 218 and 219, which are substantially identical in construction. The section 218 consists of an outer shell 120 and is provided with two spaced tubular members 121 and 122 concentrically disposed within the same. These members are held in proper spaced relation through fins 123 as in the other forms of the invention. An inlet pipe 124, connected to the inturned end 125 of the shell 120 discharges into the annular space 126 between the two tubular members 121 and 122. Deflectors 127 and 128, similar to the defiectors 108 and 109 direct a portion of the incoming gas into the interior passageway 130 within the inner tubular member 122. In operation, the incoming gas enters passageway 126 where the same'divides in three parts. A portion of the gas passes through an annular outlet passageway 131 between the two sections 218 and 219 and into the section 219 of the muffler. Another part passes about the curved inlet 132 and into an annular passageway 133 between the outer shell and the outer tubular member where the same is discharged back again into the passageway 126. Still another portion of the gas passes through a curved passageway 134 formed by the deflector 128 and into the central passageway 130 where the same is discharged through the aid of the deflector 127 back into the main passageway 126. The gas discharged from the passageway 126 through the annular passageway 131 travels through the section 119 in identically the same manner and is finally discharge from the device through the outlet pipe 135.

Although the inlet and outlet pipes of the various forms of the invention have all been described as being circular in construction, yet if desired, other shapes of inlet and outlet pipes may be employed. In Figs. 5 and 6, an inlet pipe 136 has been illustrated as applied to a muffler of the form shown in Fig. 9. This inlet pipe is constructed of a cross section similar to a cross so that the exhaust gas delivered into the muiiler enters in defined paths. Such construction aids in the proper distribution of the gases between the two passageways and also tends to decrease any eddy currents in the various chambers which decrease the efficiency of the engine and defeat the purpose of the invention.

Although I have described my invention as particularly applicable to internal combustion engines, yet it can readily be comprehended that the muffler may be used in any installation in which it is desired to unify the flow of gases or to reduce noise. Although I have shown the muiiler constructed in one, two and three sections, it can readily be comprehended that if desired the number of sections can be increased. The invention is equally as well applicable to engines of any number of cylinders.

The advantages of my invention are manifest. The device is extremely simple in operation and employs no moving parts to get out of order. Very little energy is dissipated in the operation of the device. The device functions in a manner to more fully scavenge the combustion chambers of the engine thereby permitting of the more perfect combustion of the fuel and in the increase of efficiency in the engine. By the use of my invention, a more complete combustion can be procured and less carbon will be liberated as manifested in either the combustion chamber or in the conduits leading therefrom.

Changes in the specific form of my invention as herein disclosed may be made within the scope of what is claimed, without departing from the spirit of my invention.

Having described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to protect by Letters Patent is:

1. An exhaust device for internal combustion engine-s comprising a conduit having a passageway therethrough, a second conduit encircling said first conduit and forming an inner annular passageway therebetween, a third conduit encircling said second conduit and forming therewith an outer annular passageway, means for conducting the exhaust gas from an engine to said inner annular passageway at one end thereof, means for conducting the exhaust gas from the other end of said inner annular passageway and into both the outer annular passageway and said first named passageway, means for conducting the exhaust gas from both said first named passageway and said outer annular passageway into the inner annular passageway at the first named end thereof, and means for conducting a part of the exhaust gas from the inner annular passage way out of the exhaust device.

2. An exhaust device for internal combustion engines comprising a conduit having a passageway therethrough, a second conduit encircling said first named conduit and forming an annular passageway therebetween, means for conducting the exhaust gas from the engine into said annular passageway at one end thereof, means for conducting part of the exhaust gas from the other end of said annular passageway and into said first named passageway, means for conducting the exhaust gas from said first named passageway into the annular passageway at the first named end thereof and means for conducting part of the exhaust gas from the annular passageway out of the exhaust device.

WILLIAM B. SOMMER.

US1984707A 1931-07-27 1931-07-27 Exhaust device for internal combustion engines Expired - Lifetime US1984707A (en)

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Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2864455A (en) * 1955-04-13 1958-12-16 Hirschorn Martin Exhaust noise abatement apparatus
US4809812A (en) * 1983-11-03 1989-03-07 Flowmaster, Inc. Converging, corridor-based, sound-attenuating muffler and method
US5245140A (en) * 1992-04-20 1993-09-14 Wu Kan Chiao Muffler
US5409229A (en) * 1992-08-05 1995-04-25 Callaway Golf Company Golf club head with audible vibration attenuation
US5441264A (en) * 1992-08-05 1995-08-15 Callaway Golf Company Iron golf club head with straight, horizontal recess
US5936210A (en) * 1998-01-15 1999-08-10 Maremont Exhaust Products, Inc. High performance muffler
US20120103719A1 (en) * 2009-03-23 2012-05-03 Vortex Performance Limited exhaust filter

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2864455A (en) * 1955-04-13 1958-12-16 Hirschorn Martin Exhaust noise abatement apparatus
US4809812A (en) * 1983-11-03 1989-03-07 Flowmaster, Inc. Converging, corridor-based, sound-attenuating muffler and method
US5245140A (en) * 1992-04-20 1993-09-14 Wu Kan Chiao Muffler
US5409229A (en) * 1992-08-05 1995-04-25 Callaway Golf Company Golf club head with audible vibration attenuation
US5441264A (en) * 1992-08-05 1995-08-15 Callaway Golf Company Iron golf club head with straight, horizontal recess
US5605511A (en) * 1992-08-05 1997-02-25 Callaway Golf Company Golf club head with audible vibration attenuation
US5704849A (en) * 1992-08-05 1998-01-06 Callaway Golf Company Golf club head with audible vibration attenuation
US5936210A (en) * 1998-01-15 1999-08-10 Maremont Exhaust Products, Inc. High performance muffler
US20120103719A1 (en) * 2009-03-23 2012-05-03 Vortex Performance Limited exhaust filter
US8627921B2 (en) * 2009-03-23 2014-01-14 Barry Mead Exhaust filter

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