US1984115A - Built-up print roll and method of making - Google Patents

Built-up print roll and method of making Download PDF

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Publication number
US1984115A
US1984115A US662470A US66247033A US1984115A US 1984115 A US1984115 A US 1984115A US 662470 A US662470 A US 662470A US 66247033 A US66247033 A US 66247033A US 1984115 A US1984115 A US 1984115A
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United States
Prior art keywords
shell
rings
filler
core
roll
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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US662470A
Inventor
Charles F Cooper
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American Brass Co
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American Brass Co
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Publication date
Application filed by American Brass Co filed Critical American Brass Co
Priority to US662470A priority Critical patent/US1984115A/en
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Publication of US1984115A publication Critical patent/US1984115A/en
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Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41FPRINTING MACHINES OR PRESSES
    • B41F13/00Common details of rotary presses or machines
    • B41F13/08Cylinders
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49544Roller making
    • Y10T29/49545Repairing or servicing
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49544Roller making
    • Y10T29/49547Assembling preformed components
    • Y10T29/49549Work contacting surface element assembled to core
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49826Assembling or joining
    • Y10T29/49908Joining by deforming
    • Y10T29/49925Inward deformation of aperture or hollow body wall
    • Y10T29/49927Hollow body is axially joined cup or tube
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T29/00Metal working
    • Y10T29/49Method of mechanical manufacture
    • Y10T29/49826Assembling or joining
    • Y10T29/49908Joining by deforming
    • Y10T29/49925Inward deformation of aperture or hollow body wall
    • Y10T29/49934Inward deformation of aperture or hollow body wall by axially applying force

Description

Dec. 11, 1934. c. F. COOPER BUILT-UP PRIN T ROLL AND METHOD OF MAKING Filed March 24, 1953 ATTORNEYS,

isssi U ED retails emit-pr rater were. asp menus or resume @harleo il @Jooper, @orrington, @o, assignor to The American Brass @ompamy, Waterbury,

(Donia, a corporation of Connecticut Apphcatioza March 2%, 1933, Serial No. 562.4%

This invention relates to new and useful improvements in printing means such as are used for printing textile fabrics, wall-paper, oil cloth,

linoleum and the like, and has particular relation to a print roll and method of making the same.

Heretofore, in practice these rolls have beeu substantially solid having only a longitudinal tapered opening therethrough to receive a mandrel. Such rolls are expensive and when one etched or engraved design is to be discarded the roll is turned ofi in a lathe and another design etched or engraved thereon. "When the roll has been reduced to a certain diameter or tbicknas it is no longer adapted for printing and although it still includes considerable metal it is merely sold as scrap. This results in a waste of material and has other dis advantages. Furthermore, the larger sized solid rolls are very heavy and dificult to handle.

An object of the present invention is to provide a built up printing roll employing a minimum of material and reduced weight, and still will have great strength and rigidity. Rolls of large diameter or circumference can therefore be produced with less metal. That is, with this built up con-= struction I can reduce the amount of copper required per roll, thus reducing not only the original cost but also the tying up of considerable capital where large numbers of rolls are involved.

- Another object is to provide a print roll including an inner structure or filler and an outer shell bearing the design and which shell may be replaced by a new shell on the filler when the old shell is no longer of use.

A further object is to provide an improved method of making built up print rolls, the method including steps whereby the inner structure or filler and the outer design bearing shell are firmly secured together against relative movement.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from a consideration of the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing wherein a satisfactory embodiment of the invention is shown. However. it will be understood that the invention is not limited to the details disclosed but includes all such variations and modifications as fall within the spirit of the invention and the scope of the appended claims.

Fig. l is a view showing the parts of my improved printing roll assembled ready to be drawn through a die in accordance with the method of the present invention, the filler or inner structure of the roll being shown in elevation while the outer shell and die are shown in section;

shown) pared for its present function, or it may be an old Fig. 2 is a longitudinal central sectional view through the roll when the latter is part way through the die;

Fig. 3 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 3-3 of Fig. 2;

Fig. i is a detail sectional view on an enlarged scale, showing a portion oi the assembly before after they have been passed through the die;

Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 4 showing a different portion of the shell before passing through the die; and

Fig. 'l is a view somewhat similar to Fig. 5 but showing this latter portion of the shell and filler after passing through the die.

Referring in detail to the drawing. the improved built up printing roll includes an outer design. bearing shell 10 and an inner structure or filler 11 carrying said shell. Filler 11 includes a core 12 having a tapered opening 13 therethrough, the said opening being adapted to receive a similarly tapered mandrel onto which it is forced by hydraulic pressure, andwithin the opening the core includes a small key 14 adapted to cooperate with a keyway in the mandrel (not This core 12 may be especially preprinting roll which has been repeatedly turned down so that it is of too small a diameter for a printing roll and so would ordinarily be sold as scrap metal.

The end portions of the core 12 may be reduced to provide shoulders 15 and 16 and the reduced end portions then threaded as at 17 and 18. Next, a pair of filler rings 19 may be disposed on ,the core in spaced relation to one another and these rings are then shrunk on or otherwise rigidly secured to the core so as to move as a unit therewith. A filler ring 20 may now be threaded onto the end portion 17 of the core and into abutting relation with the shoulder 15 and the end of the tube portion may be burred over with a dull tool as indicated at 33. This ring may be further secured in place as by locking pins or screws 21 passing through the core and into the ring and it may also be soldered onto the threads, the idea being to use any suitable securlng means which will fasten the ring to the core so it cannot become loosened in use.

A filler ring 22 may also be threaded onto the end portion 18 of the core and into engagement with the shoulder 16 after which the outer end of the tube portion 18 is burred over as at 23 with a dull tool whereby to permanently secure the able bed 29 and when the parts are arranged as "relative to the rings.

ring 22 in place. This ring may also be secured by pins 21 and soldered to the threads the same as ring 20. It will be understood that the various filler rings need not be assembled in any particular order since instead of first applying the intermediate rings 19 one of the end rings may be applied and then the intermediate rings may be applied and finally the second end ring. Also, either end ring may be applied first, and the rings need not necessarily be secured as described but any suitable means for efiectively securing them in position may be used.

Each filler ring has its outer surface or edge roughened as by having its surface knurled or corrugated as indicated at 24 and the end rings 20 and 22 have their outer edges slightly beveled or tapered as best shown in Fig. 2 and from this figure it will be noted that the outer edges of these two rings are tapered in opposite directions with the smaller diameters toward the ends of the roll. When the inner structure or filler is completed as above described the outer tubular shell 10 is passed over the filler and the inner diameter of said shell is such that this may be easily accomplished although in Fig. l the clearance is exaggerated. As applied shell 10 at one end includes a reduced tapered portion 25 which embraces a head 26 carried by a rod 2'7 of 9. cylinder and piston construction (not shown).

At 28 is shown a die ring mounted in any suitshown in Fig. 1 any suitable means, as for example the cylinder and piston construction above referred to, is operated to draw the shell and the fillor through the die 28. This reduces the diameter of the shell forcing it against the filler rings as illustrated inthe left hand portion of Fig. 2. The pressure is such that portions of the material of the shell are forced into the grooves of the roughened or grooved outer edges 240i the ring as shown at 30 in Figs. 5 and 7. Also, the edges of the rings 19, 20 and 22 are embedded in the metal of the shell as indicated in Figs. 5 and 7 as the shell is supported by these rings as they pass through the die, but the shell is not directly supported by these rings in the spaces between them and so the metal of the shell is forced inwardly somewhat between the rings as indicated. This results in the shell being rigidly secured to the filler whereby all of the parts move together as a unit and there is no danger. of the shell or any of the supporting rings working loose in operation. After the assembly has been passed through the die the end portion 25 is cut from the shell as by severing it along the broken line 31 of Fig. 2.,

The end rings 20 and 22 taper downwardly toward their outer surfaces and as the assembly is passed through the die the inner sharp ridge portion of each end ring is forced into the shell as best shown at 32 in Fig. 5. In this way, sharp abutting shoulders are provided at each end portion of the shell and longitudinal movement of the shell is prevented. Further, the pressing of the shell into the grooves 24 in the outer edges of the rings serves to rigidly secure the shell to the rings and to prevent any movement of the shell The taper to the two end rings 20 and 22 provides a block of metal indicated between broken line 34, Fig. 5 and the surface of the ring which effectively prevents the ring moving outwardly.

It is especially to be noted that as the assembled structure is drawn through the die the effect of this drawing operation is the setting together of all parts in the structure. The result is a roll which is practically a unitary or integral structure and which is of most unusual strength and rigidity. It is the combination of the construction and the drawing operation which gives these desired results.

It will be understood that Figs. 1, 2 and 3 show the roll on a very reduced scale and it is noted that Figs. 4, 5 and 6 show the portions of the roll at about half size. In an actual construction the shell 10 would be of stock approximately onehalf inch thick and the filler rings are of stock approximately two inches thick. The completed roll would be in the neighborhood of 46 inches long and after being passed through the die may be turned down to a diameter desired (as for example, approximately 11% inches) and to give it a finished surface.

Any desired design may be engraved or etched in the outer surface of the shell 10. It is preferred that the entire filler or inner structure 11 be of non-ferrous metal, such for example as copper or a copper alloy, and that the shell 10 be of a similar metal. Where the filler is of iron and the shell of copper the parts have different co-efiicients of expansion and when the roll heats up in use the shell has a tendency to work loose from the filler. When the shell and filler are both of a similar metal, such as copper or a copper alloy, then there is no trouble regarding the shell working loose from the filler due to unequal expansion of the parts.

After the shell 10 has been used with one design engraved or etched thereon the shell may be turned down to remove the used design and another design may be etched or engraved in the shell. When the shell becomes too thin for further use it may be cut or stripped from the filler and a new shell applied as above described. From this it will be seen that the filler will remain in use indefinitely, it being only necessary to occasionally replace the shell and therefore thematerial wasted is reduced to a minimum. Further, there is a minimum of material used in producing a roll and the roll may be produced at relatively low cost since it does not involve the use of a great deal of material and since the shell is easily and quickly assembled on the filler. Attention is also directed to the fact that no extra or special parts are employed for securing the shell on the filler. There is a positive anchoring of assembly so as to give a rigid, solid structure. This built up roll is easier to handle than the solid roll because of the reduction in weight. Another feature is that during the operation of drawing the shell through the die the metal is worked or wrought and is therefore stronger and is of better grain than cast metal.

Having thus set forth the nature of my invention, what I claim is:

1. In a printing roll, a core, spaced filler rings carried by and rigid with said core, said rings having roughened outer edges, an outer shell of worked metal supported by said rings, and said shell including portions extending into the depressions in the roughened edges of the rings to form a rigid connection between the shell and the rings.

2. In a printing roll, a core, spaced filler rings carried by and rigid with said core, said rings having grooved outer edges. an outer shell of worked metal supported by said rings, and said shell including portions extending into the grooves in the rings whereby the shell is rigidly connected with the rings.

3. In a printing roll, a filler comprising a core and spaced filler rings carried by and rigid with said core, said rings having roughened outer edges, an outer shell of worked metal on said rings, said shell including portions extending into the depressions in the roughened edges of the rings to provide a rigid connection between the shell and the rings, and said filler being of a metal having substantially the same coefiicient of expansion as the metal of the shell.

4. In a printing roll, a filler comprising a. core and spaced filler rings carried by and rigid with said core, said rings having roughened outer edges, an outer shell of worked metal on said rings, said shell including portions filling the depressions in the roughened edges of the rings to provide a rigid connection between the shell and the rings, said filler of non-ferrous metal and said shell being of a similar material. I

5. In a printing roll, a filler comprising a core and spaced filler rings carried by and rigid with the core, said rings having roughened outer edges and the end rings being tapered with the smaller diameters toward the ends of the core, and an outer shell of worked metal closely embracing the edges of the rings so the metal of the shell extends into the depressions in the edges of the rings and the edges of the rings are sunk into the shell so as to rigidly anchor the shell to the filler.

6. The method of forming a built up printing roll, the same comprising providing a. core, securing a plurality of filler rings on said core in spaced relation to one another, providing said rings with roughened outer edges, and then forcing a shell against the outer edges of the rings to force some of the material 0! the shell into the roughened edges of the rings.

7. The method of forming a built up printing roll, the same comprising providing a core, SCOUT-1 ing a plurality of filler rings on said core in spaced relation to one another, disposing a shell over said rings, and then passing the core, rings 7 and shell through a die to draw the shell onto the rings.

8. The method of forming a built up printing roll, the same comprising providing a core, securing a plurality of filler rings on said core in spaced relation to one another, disposing a shell over said rings, and then reducing the diameter of the shell to have it tightly embrace the outer edges of the rings.

9. The method of forming a built up printing roll, the same comprising providing a core, securing a pair of filler rings having oppositely inclined outer edges to said core, disposing an outer shell over said rings. and then forcing the shell against the rings to cause the latter to cut into the shell to rigidly secure the shell to the core.

CHARLES R COOPER.

US662470A 1933-03-24 1933-03-24 Built-up print roll and method of making Expired - Lifetime US1984115A (en)

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Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2501630A (en) * 1944-06-13 1950-03-21 Revere Copper & Brass Inc Method of making print rolls
US2544455A (en) * 1947-08-21 1951-03-06 Revere Copper & Brass Inc Method of making print rolls
US2716153A (en) * 1950-05-26 1955-08-23 Knut J Magnusson Facsimile scanner
US2987994A (en) * 1958-08-18 1961-06-13 Thomas K Allison Mandrel and cylinder for gravure printing
US3055100A (en) * 1957-07-01 1962-09-25 Zeller Corp Method of forming interlocking joint between telescoped members
US3239931A (en) * 1964-12-08 1966-03-15 Guarnaschelli Stephen Method of making plastic lined metal tubing
US3891336A (en) * 1970-05-25 1975-06-24 Trw Inc Ball joint and method of manufacture thereof
US4059882A (en) * 1976-05-24 1977-11-29 United Aircraft Products, Inc. Method of making an annular tube-fin heat exchanger
US4079492A (en) * 1975-03-22 1978-03-21 R. Stahl Aufzuge Gmbh Method of making bearing pulley
DE4005996A1 (en) * 1990-02-26 1991-08-29 Koppers Manfred Joint on printing roller - uses undercut groove on bearing pin with shaped edge on tubular roller fitting into it
US5511476A (en) * 1993-10-26 1996-04-30 R. R. Donnelley & Sons Co. Magnetic cylinder with surface gripping
US5759127A (en) * 1996-07-31 1998-06-02 Precision, Inc. Method for constructing a pulley for conveyor belts
US5802443A (en) * 1996-02-08 1998-09-01 Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd. Reinforced thin cylindrical structure, image fixing device using this cylindrical structure, and method for manufacturing reinforced thin cylindrical structure
WO1999017935A1 (en) * 1996-04-02 1999-04-15 Windmöller & Hölscher Sleeve for printing machine rollers
US5901427A (en) * 1997-04-07 1999-05-11 Precision, Inc. Method of constructing stub shafts for conveyor pulleys
US5960529A (en) * 1994-11-07 1999-10-05 Emitec Gessellschaft Fuer Emissionstechnologie Mbh Apparatus and method for deforming a jacket tube of a honeycomb body
ES2140289A1 (en) * 1996-04-02 2000-02-16 Windmoeller & Hoelscher Casing for printing rollers
US6047457A (en) * 1997-03-17 2000-04-11 Endress + Hauser Flowtec Ag Method of fastening a metal body to a measuring tube of a coriolis-type mass flow sensor
US6306069B1 (en) * 1997-07-07 2001-10-23 Suomen Intech Oy Spreader roll
US6634294B2 (en) * 2000-04-19 2003-10-21 Heidelberger Druckmaschinen Ag Device for reducing printing sleeve noise
US20100192790A1 (en) * 2007-03-02 2010-08-05 Mueller Martini Druckmaschinen Gmbh Printing Cylinder or Printing Sleeve with Insert
US20100199868A1 (en) * 2007-03-02 2010-08-12 Mueller Martini Druckmaschinen Gmbh Printing cylinder or printing sleeve, cup and method for producing a printing cylinder or printing sleeve

Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2501630A (en) * 1944-06-13 1950-03-21 Revere Copper & Brass Inc Method of making print rolls
US2501629A (en) * 1944-06-13 1950-03-21 Revere Copper & Brass Inc Print roll
US2544455A (en) * 1947-08-21 1951-03-06 Revere Copper & Brass Inc Method of making print rolls
US2716153A (en) * 1950-05-26 1955-08-23 Knut J Magnusson Facsimile scanner
US3055100A (en) * 1957-07-01 1962-09-25 Zeller Corp Method of forming interlocking joint between telescoped members
US2987994A (en) * 1958-08-18 1961-06-13 Thomas K Allison Mandrel and cylinder for gravure printing
US3239931A (en) * 1964-12-08 1966-03-15 Guarnaschelli Stephen Method of making plastic lined metal tubing
US3891336A (en) * 1970-05-25 1975-06-24 Trw Inc Ball joint and method of manufacture thereof
US4079492A (en) * 1975-03-22 1978-03-21 R. Stahl Aufzuge Gmbh Method of making bearing pulley
US4059882A (en) * 1976-05-24 1977-11-29 United Aircraft Products, Inc. Method of making an annular tube-fin heat exchanger
DE4005996A1 (en) * 1990-02-26 1991-08-29 Koppers Manfred Joint on printing roller - uses undercut groove on bearing pin with shaped edge on tubular roller fitting into it
US5511476A (en) * 1993-10-26 1996-04-30 R. R. Donnelley & Sons Co. Magnetic cylinder with surface gripping
US5960529A (en) * 1994-11-07 1999-10-05 Emitec Gessellschaft Fuer Emissionstechnologie Mbh Apparatus and method for deforming a jacket tube of a honeycomb body
US5802443A (en) * 1996-02-08 1998-09-01 Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd. Reinforced thin cylindrical structure, image fixing device using this cylindrical structure, and method for manufacturing reinforced thin cylindrical structure
US5887237A (en) * 1996-02-08 1999-03-23 Fuji Xerox Co., Ltd. Reinforced thin cylindrical structure, image fixing device using this cylindrical structure, and method for manufacturing reinforced thin cylindrical structure
WO1999017935A1 (en) * 1996-04-02 1999-04-15 Windmöller & Hölscher Sleeve for printing machine rollers
ES2140289A1 (en) * 1996-04-02 2000-02-16 Windmoeller & Hoelscher Casing for printing rollers
US5759127A (en) * 1996-07-31 1998-06-02 Precision, Inc. Method for constructing a pulley for conveyor belts
US6047457A (en) * 1997-03-17 2000-04-11 Endress + Hauser Flowtec Ag Method of fastening a metal body to a measuring tube of a coriolis-type mass flow sensor
US5901427A (en) * 1997-04-07 1999-05-11 Precision, Inc. Method of constructing stub shafts for conveyor pulleys
US6306069B1 (en) * 1997-07-07 2001-10-23 Suomen Intech Oy Spreader roll
US6634294B2 (en) * 2000-04-19 2003-10-21 Heidelberger Druckmaschinen Ag Device for reducing printing sleeve noise
US20100192790A1 (en) * 2007-03-02 2010-08-05 Mueller Martini Druckmaschinen Gmbh Printing Cylinder or Printing Sleeve with Insert
US20100199868A1 (en) * 2007-03-02 2010-08-12 Mueller Martini Druckmaschinen Gmbh Printing cylinder or printing sleeve, cup and method for producing a printing cylinder or printing sleeve
US8312810B2 (en) * 2007-03-02 2012-11-20 Mueller Martini Druckmaschinen Gmbh Printing cylinder or printing sleeve, cup and method for producing a printing cylinder or printing sleeve

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