US1941359A - Radiator valve - Google Patents

Radiator valve Download PDF

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Publication number
US1941359A
US1941359A US538526A US53852631A US1941359A US 1941359 A US1941359 A US 1941359A US 538526 A US538526 A US 538526A US 53852631 A US53852631 A US 53852631A US 1941359 A US1941359 A US 1941359A
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Prior art keywords
valve
radiator
thermostat
fluid
bellows
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US538526A
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James R Lawler
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Lawler Automatic Controls Inc
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Lawler Automatic Controls Inc
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G05CONTROLLING; REGULATING
    • G05DSYSTEMS FOR CONTROLLING OR REGULATING NON-ELECTRIC VARIABLES
    • G05D23/00Control of temperature
    • G05D23/01Control of temperature without auxiliary power
    • G05D23/12Control of temperature without auxiliary power with sensing element responsive to pressure or volume changes in a confined fluid
    • G05D23/121Control of temperature without auxiliary power with sensing element responsive to pressure or volume changes in a confined fluid characterised by the sensing element
    • G05D23/122Control of temperature without auxiliary power with sensing element responsive to pressure or volume changes in a confined fluid characterised by the sensing element using a plurality of sensing elements

Description

Dec. 26, 1938. J R LAWLER 1,941,359

RADIATOR VALVE Filed May 19, 1981' mj'j dawef, qyeww GM 8 Patented Dec. 26, 1933 I a `miDIA'roR VALVE James Lawler, Glencoe, Ill., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Lawler Vi'iutomatic Controls, Inc., Mount Vernon, N. Y., a Corporation of New g York Application May 19, 1931. Serial No. 538,526 'c1aims." (cl. zas-42),

inye'ntionrelates to`valves'in general and particularly to thermostatically Controlled radiator valves.

The primary objectof the invention is to pro- 5' vide v'a' sensitive "positively operating i radiator vValve which is' appliedinside of-'a'radiaton which can be readilyand' economically manufactured, and which is applicable forapplication in the usual opening provided in radiators and which is ;[0` usually closed by a plug. j

' Numerous 'other objects and advantages will be apparent throughout the progress of the following specification. Ther'accompanying drawing vfllus'trates Va selected embodiment of the inventionand the views therein areas follows: o i

t Fig. 1 is afdetail elevation of a radiator having the improved'valve' appliedthereto. V

Fig. 2 i's` a detail sectional View showing the valve-applied to afradiator and having the thermostatic control -oper'avtively connected thereiFig. 3 is a. deta end elevation ofA the valve. I

a Fig..4 is a sectional'view of an improved form .25 of 'valve-i Fig. 5 is a detail sectional view showing another manner in which. the valve maybe. applied to a radiator.v

Referring to the drawing; :1. designates a ra --v diator'having the usual threaded opening2 which isusually 'closed by a plug... (not shown). The opening-2 i's'the-opening which ,is usually provided in radiators to permitV the' core tov be` removed during the process of, casting and maybe locatedeither'at theupper or thelower end of the radiator. 4 The radiator is, of course, provided withH anoutlet (not shown) to which the return line is connected. VA .supply line 3 containing a zheating fiuid'of steam; or'hot water leads'to the improvedyalve 4. If desi-red, ahand controlledvvalve 5 be interposed between the supply line 3 and imprcved valve4. V i, The new valve 4 comprisesal body portion 6 which threadedly engages the opening 2, and the supporting member 7 which is connected to the body portion 6 by means of fastening elements.

The body portion constitutes a threaded bushj ing and has an elongated end hcusing 8' whichV is hollow' to, provide achamber 9., Apassage Chamber 9. VAA corruglated, 'collapsibla and exv pa'nsible'member or bellowsllisarrangedv in the Chamber 9 'andvhas a VVrigid portion 12 rigidly conn'ecte'd to the bellows. A screw 13 passes through 1 0fis formed in the body 6,.,as clearlyshown, in' Fig. 2, and has communication with the the member 12. and makes threaded engagement witha solid plug 01' stem 14. A spring ,15 surrounds thescrew 13 to provide a'resilient connection between the member 12 and the member 14 and to 'take up play between thetwo members. This construction also'provides a flexible con-` nection between the members, and acts as a relief spring Vwhen the valve has already moved to its limit. The spring 'provides an additional movement which 'might take place if the thermo- Stat were overheated. This relief spring is extremely important in Valves of ,the present type as extrei'nely Vhigh 'temperatures might develop which would fracture some part of the tubing if this relief means werev not provided. This plug has a fiange 16 provided thereon which is bev'- eled at 17 and makes a tight fit with the bevel portion 18 of the housing. A threaded bushing 19 is arranged linside of the body 6 and has an angular opening 20 through which the solid stem 14 extends. A Valve 21 is connected to the solid plug or stem by means of a screw 22 and is adapt- Ved 'to bear'against` the valve seat '23 to`l shut olf communication from the supply line 3.

An automatic regulating'control o-r thermostat 24 is provided with a pipe 25 which communicates with the passage 10. The thermostat comprises a casing 26 which is fix'ed to a plug or nipple 2'7, as indicated at 28.2 A nut 29 has threaded engagement with the plug or-nipple 27 .85 and looks the casing 26 rigidly to the 'nipple 27. A collapsible, metal bellows 30 is arranged inside of the thermostatic element 24' and contains a metal plugl or stem 31. This stem vextends through the nipple 27, has threaded engagement therewith and is provided with a serrated thumb nut 32 fo-r the purpose of regul'a'ting the metal bellows 30.

The automatic control orthermostat 24 is filled with an expansible fluid 33. The fiuid in-the thermostat 24 expands under heat, 'causing the` fluid to fiow through the pipe 25 into the passage 10 to fill the Chamber 9. Whensufficient fluid-v passes into the chamber 9, a pressure exists in the chamber causing the bellows to collapse and.v I

the chamber and back into thethermostat, thus' permitting the Vmetal bellows to attain its normal position and move the valve 21 from its seat 23.

i Normally, however, the resiliency of the bellows' 11 is sufiicient to retract the valve from its seat.

but it may be desirable to arrange a spring 34, Fig. 4, between the seat 23 and the valve 21 for pushing the valve back away from the seat when the fluid leaves the Chamber 9.

The valve 4, as shown in Pig. 2, extends into the body of the radiator, the body portion being provided with spaced legs 35 providing spaces or openings 36 therebetween for permitting the heating fluid coming through the line 3 to pass through the openings 36 and into the radiator. The valve being in direct communication with the heating fiuid, will attain a temperature substanltially the same as the heating fluid. Therefore, the Valve is normally set to meet these conditions, i. there being a greater difference in temperature between the fluid in the thermostat than the temperature of the fiuid in the supply line. The valve, however, and the thermostat are set to overcome these variations in temperature. In other words, the operation of the valve is controlled by the temperature of the fluid in the thermostat 24.

The stem 31 and its cooperating thumb nut32 is used for the purpcse of expanding or contracting the bellows 3G. If a higher temperature is required, the thumb nut 32 is operated to contract the bellows. Thus, the fluid in the thermostat must reach a higher temperature in order to expand sufficiently to operate the 'valve mem- 30V ber 21. Also, when a lower temperature is desired, the thumb nut 32 is operated in a reverse direction to expand the bellows 30. As soon asl the liquid in the thermostat expands, it will immediately enter the Chamber 9, operate the bellows 11 and close the valve member 21. The valve just described has its body threadedfor direct engagement with the threaded opening 2 in the radiator. iowever, it is often desirable that the entire valve be not rotated and in such instance the valve will merely slip into the opening as shown in Fig. 5, there being a separate bushing 37 which threadedly engages the opening 2. This bushing has threaded engagement With a packing nut 38, a hacking gland or rubber 1 39 being arranged between the two members as shown in Fig. 5 for making a tight connection between the valve body and the bushing 37.

In operation, the valve is arranged in place and projecting into the radiator. The thermostat element is arranged in some predetermined position, such as on the front, where the temperature is usually the lowes Thus, when the temperature of the atmosphere surrounding the thermostat reaches .a predetermined minimum `temperature, the fluid in the Chamber 9 will flow into the thermostat permitting the valve mem-l ber 21 to become unseated and permitting the heating fluid coming through the supply line 3, to enter the radiator. When the temperature of the atmosphere surrounding the thermostat reaches a certain predetermined maximum, the fluid in the thermostat will expand and flow through the line 25, through the passage 10 and into the Chamber 9 where the pressure of the .fiuid will cause contraction of the metal bellows 11 and move the valve member 21 against its seat 23 and cut oif communication from the supply line 3.

The invention provides a valve wln'ch extends into the body of the radiator and does not extend out into the room as in the case with conventional valves. The improved Valve may be applied to existing radiators without the necessity of providing special radiators for accommodat- J ing the valve. The valve of the present type is particularly applicable for old radiators now in use'which are not equipped with thermostatically Controlled valves. The valve is simple in construction, efficient and positive in operation, can be quickly and easily installed, and may be readily and econo-mica'lly manufactured.

Changes may be made in the form, construction, and arrangement of the parts without departing from the spirit of the invention or sacrificing any of its advantages, and the right is hereby reserved to make all such changes as fairly fall within the scope of the following claims.

The invention is hereby claimed as follows:

1. A valve having a body and adapted. to be fastened to a radiator, said body extending into the interior of the radiator, a valve carried by said body and totally housed within the radiator, means remotely situated from the valve and controlled by atmospheric temperature for Operating said valve, and means passing through the said body into the inside of the radiator and operatively connected to` said first named means for establishing communication from the first named means to theV said valve.

2. In a radiator, a valve totally arranged Vinside of said radiator, a body for said valve and extending into the interior of the radiator, vsaidv body having openings therein to permit heating fiuid to pass therethrough, a'member inside of the radiatorand body and Vadapted to be expanded and collapsed to operate the Valve, a thermostat outside of the radiator and Carrying thermal fluid which is expansible and contractibledue to higher. and lower temperatures respectively, said thermostat being operatively connected to said body, and means including the body leading to the member to cause contraction of said member to close the valve when, the fiuid in the thermostat reaches a predetermined high temperature and permitting expansion of 1 said member when the temperature of the. fluid reaches a predetermined minimum.

3. In a thermostatically Controlled radiator valve, a valve body inside ofv the radiator and having exterior threads for threaded engagement`1 with the radiator, a valve arranged in said body, fiuid pressure operated means for OperatingA said valve, a receptacle containing thermal fluid'remotely situated from said valve and having a passage through the body portion and leading toV 1;

the'interior of the radiator for controlling the operation of the thermostatic control means, a bellows arrangedin said container, and a threaded stem arranged inside of said bellows'for varying the pressure of the fluidin said container. 1'

4. In a radiator controlling valve, a valve casing arranged inside of a radiatorand having exterior threads for threaded engagement with a threaded opening in a radiator, said casingf1 having a main body portion and an ofi-set body portion of smaller diameter than the'mainl body portion, both of said portions being integrally connected by spaced legs, a fluid'inletline Connected to the main body portion, the Vheating fiuid entering the radiator through the spaces between the legs, a valve'seat in said main body portion, a valve operable against said seat, a valve stem in the off-set portion, a bellows surrounding the stem and ar-,g ranged in the off-set body, a container containing'thermal liquid for controlling the bellows, a liquid line from the container and connected to theV casing, said casing having a longitudinal passage. in the walls thereof andV establishing 1 communication with the interior of the off-set body portion.

5. In a radiator controlling valve, a valve casing arranged inside of a radiator and havingexterior threads for threaded engagement with "a threaded opening in a radiator, said casing having a main body portio'n and an oiT-set body portion of smaller diameter than the main body portion, both of said portions being integrally conneoted by spaced leg's, a fluid inlet line connected' to the main body portion, the heating fluid entering the radiator through the spaces between the legs, a valve seat in said main body portion, ai valve operable against said seat, a

JAMES R. LAWLER.

US538526A 1931-05-19 1931-05-19 Radiator valve Expired - Lifetime US1941359A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2555264A (en) * 1947-11-12 1951-05-29 Edward J Zeitlin Thermostatically controlled radiator valve
US3156413A (en) * 1953-12-16 1964-11-10 Danfoss Ved Ingenior Mads Clau Thermostatically-controlled radiator valve
US5413277A (en) * 1990-10-11 1995-05-09 Alfred Buchta Liquid-filled thermostatic system

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2555264A (en) * 1947-11-12 1951-05-29 Edward J Zeitlin Thermostatically controlled radiator valve
US3156413A (en) * 1953-12-16 1964-11-10 Danfoss Ved Ingenior Mads Clau Thermostatically-controlled radiator valve
US5413277A (en) * 1990-10-11 1995-05-09 Alfred Buchta Liquid-filled thermostatic system

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