US1920998A - Inseam shoe sewing machine - Google Patents

Inseam shoe sewing machine Download PDF

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US1920998A
US1920998A US208116A US20811627A US1920998A US 1920998 A US1920998 A US 1920998A US 208116 A US208116 A US 208116A US 20811627 A US20811627 A US 20811627A US 1920998 A US1920998 A US 1920998A
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machine
cam
needle
shaft
thread
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US208116A
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Alfred R Morrill
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United Shoe Machinery Corp
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United Shoe Machinery Corp
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Priority to US208116A priority Critical patent/US1920998A/en
Priority claimed from US42534230 external-priority patent/US1905735A/en
Priority claimed from US64807432 external-priority patent/US1981062A/en
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B15/00Machines for sewing leather goods

Description

g- A. R. MORRILL I INSEAM SHOE SEWING MACHINE Filed July 25, 1927 16 Sheets-Sheet I Aug. 8, 193 A. R. MORRILL INSEAM SHOE SEWING MACHINE Filed Ju1y' 1927 16 Sheets-Sheet 2 Aug. 8, 1933. A. R. MORRILL 1,920,998

INSEAM SHOE SEWING MACHINE Filed July 25, 1927 16 Sheets-Sheet 3 6 a a 6 H a a W fif M; .1 MN MW 1 5. m a f Aug. 8, 1933. A. R. MORRILL INSEAM SHOE SEWING MACHINE 16 Sheets-Sheet 4 w I a M a 1 1 TH? i l x 1 6 a w m 1 m M 6 1933- A. R. MORRILL INSEAM SHOE SEWING MACHINE 16 Sheets-Sheet 5 3 Filed July 25 1927 Aug- 3, 1933- A. R. MORRILL INSEAM SHOE SEWING MACHINE F iled J 25, 1927 16 Sheets-Sheet 6 Aug. 8, 1933- A. R. MORRlLL INSEAM SHOE SEWING MACHINE Filed July 25, 192'? 16 Sheets-Sheet 7 Aug. 8, 1933- A. R. MORRILL INSEAM SHOE SEWING MACHINE Filed July 25. 1927 16 Sheets-Sheet 8 ll I llll l ll I- 1,920,99&

Aug. 8, 1933- A. R. MORRlLL INSEAM SHOE SEWING MACHINE Filed July 25 1927 16 Sheets-Sheet 9 g- 8, 1933- A. R. MORRILL INSEAM SHOE SEWING MACHINE Filed July 25, 1927 16 Sheets-Sheet 10 Aug. 8, 1933- A. R. MORRILL INSEAM SHOE SEWING MACHINE I I I I I 16 Sheets-Sheet 11 1% 5 Filed Ju Aug. 8, 1933'. A. R. MORRILL DISEAM SHOE SEWING MACHINE Filed July 25, 1927 16 Sheets-Sheet 12 Aug. 8, 1933. A. R. MORRILL I INSEAM SHOE SEWING MACHINE Filed July 2 1 27 16 Sheets-Sheet l3 8, 3 A. R. MORRILL INSEAM SHQE SEWING MACHINE Filed July 25', 1927 16 Sheets-Sheet 14 v em W .r

Aug. 8, 1933- A. R. MORRILL INSEAM SHOE SEWIIQG MACHINE Filed July 25, 1927 16 Sheets-Sheet 15 1,920,998 33. A. R. MORRILL Aug. 8 INSEAM SHOE SEWING MACHINE Patented Aug. 8, 1933 1,920,998

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 1,920,998 INSEAM SHOE SEWING MACHINE Alfred R. Merrill, Beverly, Mass, assignor to United Shoe Machinery Corporation, Paterson, N. J a Corporation of New Jersey Application July 25, 1927. Serial No. 208,116 19 Claims. (Cl. 112-35) The present invention relates to inseam shoe View of the two speed and reversing switch taken sewing machines and is herein disclosed as emon the line 15-l5 of Fig. i l; Fig. 16 is a detail bodied in a machine for sewing the upper to view on the line l6--16 of Fig. 14 illustrating parthe sole of a turn shoe, the operating instruticularly the mechanism. for starting and stop- 5 ments of which include a curved hook needle, ping the machine, the parts being shown in rest an awl or feed point cooperating therewith, a position; Fig. 17 is a detail sectional View taken looper, a thread finger, a channel guide, and on the line 1717 of Fig. 16; Figs. 18, 19 and 20 a take-up. are views similar to Fig 16 illustratingdilferent The object of the invention is to produce a positions of the starting and stopping mechan- 1 novel and improved machine of this type which ism, the parts being shown in low, high and rewill have a novel and advantageous arrangeverse positions respectively; Fig. 21 is a detail nient of the operating elements, will operate view in left side elevation illustrating particumore accurately and efficiently than machines larly the switch cam mechanism for operating previously produced, and may be more readily the thread arm and for causing the looper to controlled by the operator to run at a fast or avoid threading the needle at the last stitch upon 70 slow speed and to stop with'the needle retracted stopping the machine; Fig. 22 is a detail view of from the work. the take-up lever and its actuating cam; Fig. 23

The several features of the invention consist in is a View in right elevation of the mechanism the devices, combinations and arangement of shown in Fig. 21 with the parts in the position parts hereinafter described and claimed, and they assume immediately after the stopping 75 together with the advantages to be obtained mechanism has been thrown into operation; thereby should be readily understood by one Fig. 24 is a detail sectional plan View of the stitch skilled in the art from the following description forming devices in the position illustrated by Fig. taken in connection with the acompanying 23; Fig. 25 is a view in right elevation of the 2.5 drawings. switch cam mechanism illustrating the parts in 80 In the drawings which illustrate the preferred rest position as in Fig. 21 after the machine has embodiment of the invention in a turn sewing been stopped; 26 is a view similar to Fig 23 machine, Fig. 1 is a view in side elevation of the illustrating the positions of the parts immediatewhole machine; Fig. 2 is a plan view of the base ly after starting the machine; Fig. 27 is a detail of the machine taken on the line 22 of Fig. view in right elevation of certain of the operat- 86 1; Fig. 3 is a sectional view in side elevation of ing elements of the machine, the parts being the base taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 2; Fig. 4-. shown in rest position; Fig. 28 is a View in front is a detail view partly in section taken on the elevation of the parts illustrated in Fig. 27 Fig. line 44 of Fig. 6 of the knee control mech- 29 is a detail sectional plan view illustrating the anism for operating the machine at low speed, operating elements in the position shown in Fig. the parts being shown in position for the full 27; Figs. 30 and 31 are corresponding views in speed operation; Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. side elevation and plan illustrating the position 4 with the parts in position to operate the maof the operating elements at a point in the formchine at low speed; Fig. 6 is a plan view of the ation of the first stitch after the machine is 40 parts shown in Figs. 4 and 5 taken on the line started; Figs. 32 and 33 are views similar to Figs. 6-6 of Fig. 1; Fig. 7 is an enlarged view in front 30 and 31 showing the position of the, elements elevation of the head of the machine; Fig. 8 at the end of the loop drawing stroke of the is a plan view of the head of the machine; Fig. needle in the formation of the first stitch; Figs. 9 is a view of the head of the machine in left 34 and 35 are similar views illustrating the po 45 elevation; Fig. 10 is a view in right side elevasition of the parts during the feeding of the tion partly in section illustrating particularly work by the awl or feed point; Figs. 36 and 37 are certain of the operating instruments and actuatsimilar views illustrating the position of the parts ing mechanism; Fig. 11 is a detail plan view at the end of the advancing stroke of the needle of a portion of the mechanism for operating the and during the threading oi the needle; and Figs. 50 thread finger; Fig. 12 is a view in right side 38 and 39 are similar views illustrating the posielevation of the head of the machine; Fig. 13 tion of the parts at the end of the loop drawing is a sectional plan view of the head of the mastroke of the needle during the formation of chine taken on the line 13-13 of Fig. 12; Fig. 14 the second and succeeding stitches. is a vertical sectional view taken on the line The shoe machine illustrated in the drawings 1414 of Fig. 12; Fig. 15 is a detail sectional is adapted for sewing the upper to the sole of a turn shoe and is provided with the usual operating elements of a chain stitch. turn sewing machine comprising a curved hook needle, a curved awl cooperating therewith, a looper, a thread arm, a take-up, a back gage, a channel guide and a back rest. These elements are arranged and actuated to secure a continuous and even feed of the work, the needle and channel guide to this end being mounted on one slide to move together in the line of feed, while the awl and back gage are similarly mounted on a second slide. In order to facilitate the handling of the work by the operator, especially when operating on the toe of the shoe, and also to secure a more con venient arrangement of parts, the awl is arranged to pierce the work from the outside, that is, the side on which the upper is located being positioned on the same side of the work as the needle. The machine is driven by means of a motor which is adapted to run at either of two speeds, and is controlled by the operator through a two speed starting and stopping switch which operates to stop the machine with the needle retracted from the work. The machine is also provided with means for preventing the threading of the needle during the last stitch forming cycle and for cutting and holding'the thread as the. machine stops and with simplified and improved means for operating the various parts.

Referring more specifically to the drawings, the

casing, which forms the head of the machine and houses the sewing mechanism and the electric motor by which it is driven, is indicated at 42 and is adjustably supported on a. column or base 44. The head 42 is hinged to the base at 45 to permit the head readily to be swung forward to give access to the motor which is located in the lower portion of the head. The operating elements carried in the head of the machine, as shown in Figs. 10 and 12, include a curved hook needle indicated at 46, an awl 48, a looper 50, a thread finger 52, a channel guide 54, aback gage 56, and a take-up 53. These elements are actuated from a main cam shaft mounted in the head of the machine, through mechanism hereafter described, which cam shaft is driven .by the electric motor which is permanently connected to the cam shaft through a gear 62 on the cam shaft and a worm gear 64 on the vertical driving shaft 66.

A starting and stoppingv mechanism is provided which is treadle controlled by the operator and acts automatically when thrown into operation to stop the machine with the needle withdrawn from the work. This mechanism comprises a two speed starting and stopping switch for the motor and mechanism which is actuated by the foot treadle to throw the switch into low speed position and thereafter acts in timed relation. to the rotation of the cam shaft to shift the switch to the reverse position to stop the machine with the needle removed from the work.

The two speed starting and stopping switch for the motor is mounted, concentrically with the main cam shaft 60 in a casing 68 which, for convenience of assembling and repair, is pivotally mounted at 79 on the head of the machine and held in position by means of a screw '72. When the switch casing 68 is released and swung back out of the way, the plate 69 which is screwed to the head casing 42 may be readily removed to give access to the cam shaft. The switch is controlled partly from the starting treadle of the machine and partly from the main cam shaft 60. Referring to Figs. 14, 15 and 16, the switch blades as indicated at 74, are mounted upon a rotatable frame '76 and are arranged to cooperate with spring contact plates '78 rigidl mounted on the casing 68. The blades '74 are suitably cross connected and the contact plates 78 are connected to the lead-in wires 80 of the motor which enter the switch casing 68 through the pivot 70. The blades and contact plates of the switch are so arranged and connected that in the different positions of the switch the circuits of the motor may be open or they may be connected to cause the motor to run at a high or low speed or to reverse its direction of rotation. The switch may be said, therefore, to be movable to high, low, reverse and off positions.

The rotatable frame 76 on which the blades are mounted is loosely sleeved on a fixed stud 82 in the casing 68 and is provided at one end with a clutch face 84 which is held yieldingly in engagement with a corresponding surface 86 on the abutting end of the switch actuating shaft 88 by means of a spring 89 coiled about the fixed stud 82 within the rotatable frame '76.

The mechanism for actuating the switch actuating shaft 88 and thus for positioning the starting and stopping switch, comprises (see Figs. 13, 14 and 1626, inclusive) a control lever 90 loosely mounted on a shaft 92 and provided with a gear segment 93 adapted at all times to engage a pinion 94 formed on the shaft 88. A plunger 95 mounted in a casing 96 in the machine frame is forced by means of a heavy spring 98 into contact with the control lever 90 and tends to swing it about the pivot shaft 92 and acting through the actuating shaft 88 to throw the starting and stopping. switch into low speed position. The abutment 100 on the plunger which engages the end of the casing. 96. prevents movement of the plunger beyond this point. On the upper portion of the control lever so is mounted a spring pressed bolt or plunger 101 formed at its outer end as a cam follower or roll 192 which in the rest position of the mechanism is illustrated in Fig. 16 engages a cam groove 104 formed in the face of the cam disk 282 secured to the main cam shaft 60 and so locks the control lever 90 against movement under the pressure of the spring 98. There is also loosely mounted on the pivot shaft 92 a lever 108 which is controlled through intermediate connections hereinafter to be described from the foot treadle 132 of the machine. This lever is provided with a cam surface 112 which is adapted to engage an 114 of a yoke 1-16 pivotally mounted at 113 on the control lever 90 to engage a groove .in the bolt 101.

When the treadle is depressed in starting the machinethe lever 108 is rotated in a counter clockwise direction from the position illustrated in Fig. 16, to bring the cam surface 112 into contact with the projecting arm 114 of. the yoke 1. .6 which acts in turn to withdraw the cam roll 102 from engagement with the cam groove 104 thus permitting the control lever 90 to swing about its pivot under the pressure of the heavy spring 98 into low speed position as previously explained. The control lever is held in low speed position in contact with the plunger 95 by means of a tension spring 120 which is connected between a lever arm 122 formed on the lever108 and a point 124 on the control lever 90. The further movement of the foot treadle to its lowest position causes the lever 108 to be rotated still further in a counter clockwise direction about its pivot, thus swinging the lever arm 122 and the tension spring 120 past center to swing the control lever 90 to its furthest limit and to rotate the switch to high speed position. 7

Mechanism is provided for bringing the machine to a stop in a predetermined angular position with the needle retracted from the work independently of whether the machine is operating at high or low speed. When the treadle is released during high speed operation, the switch is first thrown into low speed position Where it is held for nearly one complete revolution of the cam shaft and is then thrown predetermined angular position of the cam shaft. The machine will thus be operating at low speed whenthe switch is thrown to reverse, and the inertia to be overcome by the reversing torque of the motor will always be the same and the machine will be stopped at the same point with the needle withdrawn from the work.

In stopping the machine when the treadle is released, the lever 108 is swung downward in a clockwise direction from the position illustrated in Fig. 19. The lever arm 122 with the tension spring is again moved past the center position causing the control lever 90 to swing back again about its pivot to low speed position (see Fig. 18), where it is held by contact with the spring pressed plunger 95. In this position of the parts, as illustrated particularly in Fig. 18, with the foot treadle partially raised and the control lever 90 in low speed position, the cam roll 162 is still held in retracted position out of contact with the cam disk 106 by the engagement of the cam surface 112 on the lever 108. When the treadle is entirely released permitting the lever 168 to return to the rest position illustrated in Fig. 16, the cam roll 182 is released and is pressed endwise against the face of the cam disk 282 until the cam disk 282 reaches a position in which the cam roll can enter the extreme outer portion of the cam groove 104. Continued rotation of the cam disk causes the control lever 90 to be moved to its extreme left position against the pressure or" the spring pressed plunger 95, as illustrated by Fig. 20, corresponding to the reverse position of the switch. The contour of the cam groove 104 is such as to permit the cam shaft 60 to make nearly a complete revolution with the switch set at low speed position before the switch is thrown to reverse at a predetermined angular position of the cam shaft. The control lever 90 is held in reverse position until the machine is brought to a complete stop and starts to reverse under the infiuence of the reversing torque imparted to the motor, by the engagement of an abutment 126 with a catch 128 formed on a ring 130 surrounding the cam shaft and connected therewith by an overrunning clutch arrangement of ordinary construction. During the normal operation of the machine, the catch 128 is held in position by means of a spring pressed detent lever 132 mounted on the machine frame. When the machine starts to reverse, the ring 138 will be clutched to the main cam shaft 60 and will rotate therewith in a counter clockwise direction as in against the lower end of a vertical rod 136 which forms one of the connections to the lever 108 for operating the starting and stopping switch. The

into reverse at a 3 vertical rod 136 is normally held in a depressed position with the foot treadle raised by means of a compression spring 138 coiled about the rod between a collar 140 on the rod and a bracket 142 through which the rod slides. A sleeve 144 is formed at the upper end of the rod 136 to receive the lower end of a rod 146 which is threaded for lengthwise adjustment to an elongated nut or sleeve 148 adapted to fit within the sleeve 144 and connected thereto as will be described.

Mechanism is provided for enabling the operator to reduce the machine to low speed whenever it is desired to do so independently of the foot threadle and without throwing the stopping mechanism into operation. This mechanism comprises a knee treadle 149 mounted upon a rod 150 which is loosely fitted to move longitudinally in the bracket 142 and is normally held in an advanced position by means of a com ression sprin 152 coiled about the rod between a collar 154 and the other direction by the engagement of a collar with another arm 162 of the bracket. A link 164 is pivotally secured at one end to the collar 156 on the rod 150 and at the other end to the central pivot of two toggle levers 168 and 170 which'are connected respectively at their free ends to the nut 148 on the rod 146 and the sleeve 144 on the rod 136. The toggle is held normally in straightened position by the pressure of the spring 152 on the knee treadle rod 150 to hold the rods 136 and 146 rigidly in position with relation to each other when they are raised or lowered by the action of the foot treadle-in starting and stopping the machine. When, however, it is desired to operate the machine at low speed, the knee treadle 149 is pressed inwardly by the operator breaking the toggle and depressing the rod 146 partway to bring the lever 108 exactly to low speed position.

The connections through which the lever 108 in the head of the machine is actuated from the rod 146 in the base are arranged concentrically to permit the head 42 of the machine to tip about its pivot without injury to the parts. One arm of the lever 108 is connected to the upper end of a vertical rod 174 which is connected at its lower end to a lever arm 176 formed on a sleeve 178 surrounding the hinge 45. A second lever arm 180 is formed on the sleeve 178 to engage the upper end of the vertical rod 146 and is held yieldingly in engagement therewith by means of a spring 182 coiled about the hinge 45.

In order that the machine may be readily adjusted to the height of the operator, the head 42 is mounted on a tubular support 184 which fits tightly into the upper end of the base 44. A vertical shaft 186 is rotatably mounted in a journal 188 formed in the support 184 and is held against endwise movement relatively thereto by means of a bearing block 190 formed on the shaft which is adapted to sustain the weight of the support 184 and the head 42. The shaft'186 at its lower end is threaded into a stationary nut 192 mounted in the base 44 and its upper end is provided with a pinion 194 adapted to engage with a worm gear 196 on a hand operated cross shaft 198 so that the shaft 186 may be readily the rod 146 is rotated to adjust itself automatically as the head of the machine is raised or lowered.

The general construction and mode of operation of the operating elements in the head of the machine are similar in many respects to those disclosed in the inventors pending application for a shoe machine, Serial No. 114,441, filed June 8, 1926. The work engaging parts of the sewing mechanism are arranged on the slides to feed the shoe continuously through the machine and the thread handling devices operate to form a chain stitch the chain of which is laid on the upper of the shoe. The needle is clamped to a needle carrier 204 which is mounted to oscillate and also to move in the line of feed to assist in feeding the work. The needle carrier 204 is formed integrally with a sleeve 206 on one side which surrounds a shaft 203 and on the other side is formed integrally with a shaft 210 to which is sleeved the supporting hub 212 for the thread finger and channel guide. Two sleeves 214 and 216 cap the shafts 2G8 and 210 at each end of the slide. To oscillate the needle, the carrier 204 is connected by means of a link 218 with one end of a cam actuated lever 2.20 which is loosely mounted on a shaft 222 and carries at its other end a cam roll 224 adapted to engage in a cam groove formed on the face of the gear 62. The needle carrier also has a lateral movement to impart work feeding and return movements to the needle and accordingly a universal joint is provided at each end of the connecting link 218. Movements are imparted to the needle carrier to give the lateral feeding and return movements to the needle by means of two levers 230 and 232 mounted respectively on pivot shafts 234 and 236, (see Fig. 10) and engaging at their forward ends slots 238 formed in the ends of the sleeves 214 and 216 of the needle slide. The levers 230 and 232 are connected by a link 240 and the lever 232 is provided with a rearward extension carrying a roll engaging a cam in the periphery of the cam disk 242 on the cam shaft 60.

The needle guide 244 (see Figs. 16, 12, 2'1 and 28) is mounted on a block 246 which is rigidly moun ed on the shaft 208 and operates in a slot 243 formed in needle carrier 204. The shaft 268 is rotated to oscillate the needle guide in timed relation to the movement of the needle by means of a gear segment 259 formed on the shaft 208 which engages with a rack 252 formed on the forward end of the rod 254, the rear end of which is connected to one end of the bell crank lever 256 loosely mounted on the shaft 222. The free end of the bell crank carries a roll 258 adapted to engagea cam on the face of the cam disk 242 on the cam shaft 60.

The channel guide 54 is rigidly mounted on the huh 212 of the thread finger carrier 262 so that the movements imparted to the upper portion of the thread finger carrier will cause the channel guide to be moved towards and away from the work. The carrier is oscillated during each cycle of operations of the machine to impart the required movements to the channel guide by means of a cam lever 264 which is pivoted on the shaft 222. The lever is connected at one end to the carrier 262 by a link 265 and at its other end carries a cam roll 268 adapted to ride in a cam groove in the gear 62, on the cam shaft 60. Since the thread finger carrier is moved laterally with the needle during the work feeding and return movements of the needle'slide, a universal joint is provided at each end of the connecting link 266. V

The thread finger 52 of the illustrated machine cooperates with the looper in supplying thread to the needle during each stitch forming cycle, and like the thread finger of the machine disclosed in application Serial No. 114,441, is also utilized at the conclusion of the sewing operation as a part of a mechanism for severing and holding the thread between the looper and the work. The thread finger is formed on the lower end of a rock shaft 272 mounted in the thread finger carrier 262. The shaft 2'72 is rocked to cause the thread finger to draw off the requisite amount of thread for each stitch by means of a cam lever 274 secured to a loose sleeve 276 on the shaft 222 and provided at one end with a cam roll 2'78 adapted to ride normally during theoperation of the machine in a groove 280 in a cam disk 282 mounted on the shaft 60. The roll 273 is held yieldingly against the inner surface of the cam groove 280 by means of a tension spring 284 stretched between a point on the machine frame and an arm 286 formed on the under side of the sleeve 2'76. A link 288 provided at each end with universal joints connects the free end of the cam lever 274 with an arm 290 formed on the upper end of the rock shaft 272.

As has been stated, the thread finger carrier 262 is mounted to move laterally in the line of feed with the needle carrier. The thread finger thus maintains its proper position with relation to the needle during the lateral movements of the needle to and fro in the line of feed and operates to handle the thread to the best advantage at all points in the stitch forming cycle. To further improve the operation of the thread finger, the rock shaft 272 and the thread finger are so arranged that the thread finger extends across the line of feed and has a thread drawing movement substantially in the line of feed across the plane of the needle and in the opposite direction to the feedof the work. With this arrangement and mode of operation of thethread finger, the proper length of thread will be drawn out by the thread finger regardless of variations in the length of the stitch caused by the manipulation of the shoe by the operator or forany other reason.

The mechanism for cutting off and holding the thread at the end of each sewing operation and for holding the thread during the first stitch of the following operation comprises a thread gripper lever 292 mounted on the lower end of the thread finger carrier 262 and forced yieldingly in a direction to grip the thread against the thread finger by means of a spring 294 coiled in a recess in the rock shaft 272 within the carrier 262. An abutment 296 is formed on the carrier to engage the threadgripper lever 292 and limits the movement of the lever 292 under the pressure of the spring'294. A thread cutter 298 is pivotally mounted on the under side of the thread finger 52 being held normally out of operation against a detent pin 300 by means of a small spring 302. However, when the thread gripper 292 is brought into contact with the thread finger to grip the thread, the lower edge 304 of the gripper will come into contact with the free end of the thread cutter 298 and cause it to swing about its pivot against the pressure of the spring 302 to cut the thread. The movements imparted to the thread finger by the cam groove 280 during normal operation are merely sufficient to measure off the thread between the needle and the looper during each cy-

US208116A 1927-07-25 1927-07-25 Inseam shoe sewing machine Expired - Lifetime US1920998A (en)

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US208116A US1920998A (en) 1927-07-25 1927-07-25 Inseam shoe sewing machine

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US208116A US1920998A (en) 1927-07-25 1927-07-25 Inseam shoe sewing machine
US42534230 US1905735A (en) 1927-07-25 1930-02-01 Driving and stopping mechanism
US64807432 US1981062A (en) 1927-07-25 1932-12-20 Shoe machine

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US1920998A true US1920998A (en) 1933-08-08

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2629353A (en) * 1949-11-05 1953-02-24 United Shoe Machinery Corp Shoe sewing machine
US2906216A (en) * 1953-10-16 1959-09-29 United Shoe Machinery Corp Shoe machines
US3048133A (en) * 1960-03-21 1962-08-07 United Shoe Machinery Corp Needle guide for shoe sewing machines
US3775795A (en) * 1972-10-05 1973-12-04 Usm Corp Shoe inseaming machine with upper pre-tensioning means

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2629353A (en) * 1949-11-05 1953-02-24 United Shoe Machinery Corp Shoe sewing machine
US2906216A (en) * 1953-10-16 1959-09-29 United Shoe Machinery Corp Shoe machines
US3048133A (en) * 1960-03-21 1962-08-07 United Shoe Machinery Corp Needle guide for shoe sewing machines
US3775795A (en) * 1972-10-05 1973-12-04 Usm Corp Shoe inseaming machine with upper pre-tensioning means

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