US1901552A - Combination box for electro-pneumatic pipe organs - Google Patents

Combination box for electro-pneumatic pipe organs Download PDF

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US1901552A
US1901552A US541483A US54148331A US1901552A US 1901552 A US1901552 A US 1901552A US 541483 A US541483 A US 541483A US 54148331 A US54148331 A US 54148331A US 1901552 A US1901552 A US 1901552A
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combination
switch
box
switches
levers
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US541483A
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Dargis Christopher Charles
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Dargis Christopher Charles
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10BORGANS, HARMONIUMS OR SIMILAR WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH ASSOCIATED BLOWING APPARATUS
    • G10B3/00Details or accessories
    • G10B3/10Actions, e.g. key actions, couplers or stops

Description

. C. C. DARGIS Filed June 1, 1931 4 Sheets-Sheet l & J
v ATTO R NEYS March 14, 1933.
COMBINATION BOX FOR ELECTROPNEUMATIC PIPE ORGANS March 14, 1933. DAR I 1,901,552
COMBINATION BOX FOR ELECTROPNEUMATIG PIPE ORGANS Filed June 1, 1951 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 k \31 no g9 1Q 7 (3% N NVENTORS ATTORNEY March 14, 1 93 3. c c DARG|$ 1,901,552
COMBINATION BOX FOR ELECTROPNEUMATIC PIPE ORGANS Filed June 1, 1931 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 ATTO R N EYS 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 C. C. DARGIS COMBINATION BOX FOR ELECTROPNEUMATIC PIPE ORGANS Filed June 1, 1951 March 14, 1933.
( Mllllllll K ATTORNEYS Patented Mar. 14, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE v cnars'rorrma cnnanas Dams, or ATLANTIC CITY, NEW .iEnsEY OOIBIN'ATION BOX FOR ELECTRO-PNEUMAT'IQ PIPE OBGANS Application filled June 1, 1931. Serial No. 541,483.
is the purpose of this box to establish prior to the playingof a selection of music, all of the various combinations that are to be A used during'the rendition ofth'e' said selection, the combination box being operatively connected to the organ mechanism by other associated electrical and pneumatic devices; Through the medium of these devices the combinationsvare not only established, but at the proper moment during the rendition of the selection the combination maybe changedautomatically and quickly without any perceptible interruption in the music, merely by the touching of a switch element by the organist, the said switch element being conveniently mounted on, the console adjacent or in close proximity to the playing keys. In'the present instance the invention re- "sides in the detail construction of a combination box, and also in the'combination of the said box with its coordinating andassociate operating devices shown in the drawings and to be hereinafter described. I
.Heretofore combination boxeshave been of a very complicated'nature, necessitating difficult and awkward constructions for the successful operation of the same. In many cases instruction for operating them have been so confusing even to persons of average skill as to cause them to lose their utility.-
Still further, because of the multiplicity of intricate mechanisms used in their'operation,
the cost of building the boxes has been such v Well as low cost of construction Another object of the invention is tovprovide a combination box with associated op-' erating devices which may be operated by, or
derive their source of operation from mechinally recorded to besuccessively made by anisms and means of power supply (both electrical and pneumatic) usually found in the manufacture of. the ordinary pipe organ. 7 I
Still another object of the invention is to provide an electrical main control or transfer switch which through the medium of a pneumatic action, which is in turn controlled by a master switch'button located on the console, causes the initial selection of combination switches to' beset or made in the combination box, and also said switch when operated to another position by said pneumatic causes the combination selections origmeans of electrical connections from the combination-box to the said combination switches through the transfer switch. I
A further object of theinvention is to, provide a system ofcontrol, simple-in operation and adapted to be mounted adjacent the keys on the keyboard, so that by merely extending a fingerv the organistmay, during the rendition of a musical number, change the combination without any perceptible pause in the playing. I
With the foregoing and other objects in view, the invention will be more-fullydescribed hereinafter and will be more partic Y ularly pointed out in the claimsappended hereto. v
It is to be understood that the particulars herein given are in no way limitative, and that while still keeping within the scope of the invention, any desired modification of detailsand proportions may be made in the construction of the appliance according tocircumstances. I
Inthe drawings: I V
Figure 1 illustrates an organ console 0f modern type, showing the relation of the combination keys or switches to the playing keys. -Also, the relative position of t control panel with its various operating 1 buttons clearly demonstrate the ease with which it may be operated by the organist. Figure 2 is a plan'view of the combine tion box comprising the invention. 1
Figure 3 is a front elevation offthe said box.
cessible to the finger tips.
' tice a similar control panel might be mount n Figurev7.
F i ure 6 is an end elevational view of the combinationbox; I Figure 7 IS a diagrammatic electrica wiring 'dlagram illustrating the combination box in relation'to its associated operating parts, and showing how the various circuits controlled from the console serve to actuate the said parts, and also including enlarged detached fragmentary "longitudinal sectional view through the combination box as a part of Figure 7 more clearly settingf forth the circuits of the said combination box as-formedb'y its operating parts.
Figure 8 is a detached fragmentaryfron elevation view of the transfer switch shown Figure 9 is an enlarged jelevational view of 'one'of the combination keys or switch elements shown on. the console in Figure 1. Referring more particularly to Figure l of the drawings 1 designates the eonsoleot a modern electr c-pneumatic. pipe, organ. In
the present instance three rows of playing keys 2 are shown which are controlled in the usual manner through combination switches 3,; the operating pallets of the switches extending through the back 5 of the console, Asthese combination switches are not new in the art and form no'part of the present invention the description of the lsame will not include the operation of the 7 keys by thembut will be confined to structural details of the switch as are affected by theyvarious operating elements 01 the invention.
.For the purpose of illustration the con-- trol panel 6 is shown mounted on the back 5 of'the console and immediately above, the
top row of playing keys being readily ac- I-nactual praced on'each of the vertical backportions 7 of the keyboard, and affording the organist an opportunity to change the combination" 1 conveniently regardless of which keyboard the organist is using at the time of change.
.As "will be obvious,.in anarrangement of this-type vthe control panel n onekey section will be a duplicate'oi a controlpanel in each of the other sections, and switches 'on one panel will be in parallel circuit with corresponding switches in each of the other panels. I V
The operation of these switches will be disclosed in detail later inthe specification.
Located within the housing-of the organ proper and suitablysupported therein is a combination box 8, comprising in the present instance front and back vertical wall members 9 and 10, and end members ll and with crosstie pieces 1313 form the main frame of the box and are preferably made of some non-current conducting material such as wood or fibre.
Extending longitudinally of the box proper and yieldably supported against the under side of the end portions 11 and 12 by spring elements 14:, are'bars 15 also of insulatingmaterial. These bars are retained in spaced relation to each other transversely,
andare adapted to 'be'moved vertically upon tened in the main frame members 9 and 10 of the combination. box,
The spring contacting elementsv 17 nor- 8 mally bear against the contact wires18 and are retained in this position by other trans versely extending insulated rods 20. These rods are likewise secured in the frame mem bers ,9 and 1O and each rod 20 is, positioned immediately above each ,pair of contact wires 18 and19. j Insulating retaining strips 21 extending longitudinally of the box and secured to the end members 11 and12 thereof, serve to insulate the resilient. contacting elements 17 of adjacent bars 15, and due to a slight flex ure of the elements 17 against'the strips 21 provided during the assembly of the unit, the elements 17 are held in substantial alignment to each other between their respective contactingwires 18 and 19. I I
Also extending transversely of the ,combination box 8 and pivotally supported in having bifurcated elements 23 loosely and pivotally attached to the levers 22 by a rivet box 8 and is slidably mounted, at each end of the box in supporting brackets 27 and 28 These brackets have rectangular openings 29 through which the bar '26 extends and is supported from-.movement sidewise, by the vertical sides of the said openings. The bar 26 is supported vertically by anti-friction rollers 30 contained in [the bearings 81 which are fastened to the brackets'27 andv 28 at each end of thebox. The'lower edge ofthe bar-26 has a plurality of notches orl cut-outs 32 the same corresponding to the-number of levers 22 and are adapted to receive in. en-
gag'ement the lowerfingers, 33 of the bifurcated elements23. These notches 32 are retained in indexing position with'the fingers, i e
33. A' springa normally acts to deflate the bellows of the pneumatic unit and themembers 9 and 10 thereof, are levers 22,- 1
, movements.
through the rod 34 operativelyconnected at 35 "to the bar 26, bears the bar 26 against the bracket 28,- thereduced" end of :bar 26 providing abutment shoulders 3636.
Extending longitudinally of the box and mounted on the face thereof between the brackets 27 and 28 is a shelf 37. This shelf carries onits top sideand securely fastened thereto a plurality of electro-magnets 38 in spaced relation to each other each positioned immediately above a finger '25 of the bifurcated elements 23. The core of each of the magnets extends through the shelf, which is of insulatlngmaterlal, and has suitably fastened to its lower ends a contacting plate 39. These magnets ,when energized are adapted to magnetize the plates 39, thereby attracting the fingers -25 of the bifurcated elements 23 and causingthein to pivot at 24 upon the levers 22 and to beheld in. contact with the plates 39 as shown in dot and dash lines in Figure 5. This brings the lower fingers 33 into operative engagement with the notches 32 on the bar 26, and it will be obvious then that-any movement of thebar 26 will cause the various levers 22 that have been selected by energizing their respective magnets 38, to be turned about their respective pivot points in theframe at 40 and 41. A crank portion 42 of the lever 22-will be thenbrought to bear against the resilient contact wires 17.
Also extending longitudinally and retained within-the-side walls 11 and 12 of the boxare other levers 43 pivotally mounted therein at 44 and 45. A crank portion 46 adapted to engage the bars 15 and to contact against the wires 17 is provided, while an outer extending crank portio1r47 which serves to operate the said levers is pivotally connected at 48 to other levers 49. The levers 43 are retained in normal .position by the action of springs 50 which; are tensioned between the end wall of the box at 51 and .the crank portion 47 at 52. 'The springs causing the crank portions 46 to abut against a shoulder 53 provided on the end wall 11 of the box.
The levers 49 which are used to actuate the contact levers 43 and are attached at 48 to them, are pivotally secured by pins 54 to the collars 55 and said collars beingloosely retained on the reduced end of the levers 43 by cotter pins or the like. Retaining the le- ;.vers 49 in a substantially vertical position at all times is a bracket. 56 mounted on the side wall 12 of the box, having cut-out portions 57 which receive the upper ends of the said levers 49. These cut-out portions 57 are necessarily wider than the width of the lever so as not to interfere with any of its The lower ends of the levers 49 are provided with extendingdiool: portions 58 which are adapted to be engaged by r 5 a bracket 59 located. onithe bellows 114 of the pneumatic 107, the said bracket being. securedto the expanding-wing :of the bellows.
' Normally the hooklends of the levers 49 lie out of the-path ofengagment by the.
by attracting the particular lever 49 which it controls and drawing itinto operative engagenient with the bracket 59..
Extending transversely ofthe box. and securely fastened to the underside of the wall members 9 and. 10 thereof, is a conductor 64. As will be obvious by referring to Figure 4,
resilient spring current distributors securely attached to the conductor 64 extend upward through'slots 66 in'the bars 15, and 1 bear slightly against the insulating strips 21,-thereby supporting the upper ends of the distributors and retaining them insubstantial alignment withthe contact wires 17.
Referring more particularly to the wiring; diagram shown in Figure 7 and to its asses J crate Figures 8. and 9,-a more comprehensive understanding of the operation of the combination box together with its associated operating parts-may be obtained.
The combination switch 3 as shown in the diagram is of the usual construction. As previously stated the wiring diagram does not include the wiring connections between the switches and the playing, keys as this forms no part of the present invention.
Also while there are many such switches used in the installation of a modern pipe organ, the diagram, for the purpose of clarity, s ows one of them,and illustrates with accompanying figures clearly how it operates and is in turn operated by the combination box. It will be obvious that if one can control and be controlled, that utilizing the same mechanism any number of switches may be employed.
The switches are mounted on the console in the usual manner as shown in Figure 1,.
and have withinthe organ proper a pair of parallel supporting bars 67 between which they are held in position.- lVhile forming a' support for the switches the bars also act as conductors, being connected by a lead wire 68 to a trunk 69 of one side of a source of current supply.
With reference to Figure-9 the detail con struction of one of the switches is shown, il-
lustrating clearly how the various current impulses effect its operation.
The switch proper is encased in a rec-.
tangular .housing 70 comprising., a front portion 71. The pallets 4: which-provide a switch arm extending through'a slot 73 in the front portion 71 of the housing and pivotally secured by a pin 7l'thereto. An
arcuately curvedend portion radialto the pin 7 1- is adapted to be moved between a pair of felt stops .76 and 77 suitably retainedin metallic cups secured to the housing 70. Extending through a slot 7 8 in the rear of the housing and yield-ably engaging a V slot 79 cut in the end portion '75 of the switch arm 72, is a switch tensionin'g" de vice 80, adapted to retain; the switch arm in either or" its two positions. Suitable electron'iagnets 81 and 82 securedto' the front portion 71 of the housing 70; are employed to actuate the switch arm automatically,from
the combination box. In the position illustrated the switch is in its oil position By. energizing the coil 81 through theinsulated terminal 82 and associated lead ire,
the switch arm will'be attracted by themagnetized core of the coil 81 suihciently' to overcome the resistance of the ten'sioning device 80, and flip :overiasfit were to the on position where it'will be retained by the said tensioni-ng' device. To bringthe switch arm back to its original position the coil 82 is similarly energized through its respective terminal 83- and associated lead wire. In each case the felt stops 76 and 77 limit the movement of the switch arm against the tension device 80.
It will benoted that when the switch arm 72 is actuated by the magnet 81 the member 81 of the tensioning device extending through the slot 78 in the housing 70 will be brought to bear against a resilient contact element 85 secured to the insulated terminal 86. In this manner a circuit is completed from the conductor bars 67 through the the switch frame 70 and working elements of itself to the terminal 86.
Associated with the combination boxin the wiring diagram is an electrical control or transfer switch 87. This switch comprises a base panel 88 securedin any suit able place Within the organ mechanism, having vertically extending bearings 89 at opposite ends thereof, and supporting therein a shaft 90 which has securely fastened to one an operating-lever 91. ,Itigidly se-, cured to theshaft 90between-the two bearings 89is a contacting panel 92 which carries on its-face two rows-of terminals, 93-
and 94. The terminals v93 connect to flat spring contact elements 95 which extend through the panel 92 to the opposite side 1 base panel 88. I
The terminals 94 are arranged in pairs 97 and 98 respectively, each pair being-disthere being twiceas many terminals 94 as there are terminals 93. (Figure 8.) For a reason hereinafter disclosed connected to the terminals 97 and 98 'are'similar flat spring contact elements 99 and 100which extend through the panel 92 tothe opposite sidethereof where they index with similarly opposed contact plates 101 and 102 secured to the base panel 88. The contacting panel 92 is adapted to alternately connect the terposed immediately above a terminal 93,"
from the bellows 114.- of the pneumatic; 106
the said bellows being operatively connn'ect-.
ed to the lever 91, of-the transfer switch through a connecting rod 103. g V
Inthe diagram, 105 designates the pneu matic unit that actuates the bar 26 of the" combination box 8 through the-connecting The pneumatic unit forv operating 7 the transferswitch 87 is designated at 106-;
rod 3%.
107 identifies the pneumatic unit foractuat ing the "levers 4:9 and at l08'isshown an mix I- iliary pneumaticunit usedto limit at'icertaintimes the downward movement of the bellows 114a oi the pneumatic unit 107.
Each pneumatic unit comprises a windbox 104 common to ever neuinatic or an a i valve 109. operatively controlled by a diaphragm 110; an electromagnetic valve 11;"
an inter-connecting port 112 between the valve ll and diaphragm 110; an inter-connecting port 113 between the wind box 10 1, the atmosphere, and the associated bellows. Each bellows has a spring 115 which normally acts to expel the air from the bellows and to retain the bellows in a collapsed condition.
on the control panel 6 located on the console of the organ are the various pushbuttons used in conjunction with the inven tion. "116 desi nates a master control but-v ton, and 117 designates the six buttons that control six difler'ent combinations, It will be understood that the number ofcombi'nationsettings on an nstrument of this character can vary. Inthe drawings the various parts illustrated provide for a possible setting of six combinations although will be understood thatthe invention is iot limited to six, but a combination box constructed in accordance with theprinciplesfinvolved in the invention can accommodate any number of combinations and llkew se any. number of combination switches.
As has been previously set forth,all'co1nbinations thatare to beused in the rendition of a musical selection are setgprevious been depressed from the dot and dash-post the first combination, will, by depressing the various pallets 1 of the combination switches selected, have caused those certain selections to be transferred to the combination box.
The switch 3 designated in Figure 7 is shown as having been selected, the pallet 4 having tion indicated in the drawing. The said switch 3 as before described, being connected to one side of the circuit through the bars 67, completes the circuit through its respec-' tive operating parts to the terminal 86 on the housing 70 thereof. From this terminal a lead wirellS continues the circuit to a'terminal 93 on the transfer switch 87.
In each instance where a combination switch is manually "selected a similar circuit is closed between the respective combination switch and the control or transfer switch- 87.
The various combination keys or switches being selected, must now be set Within the combination box, sothat at'the properrpoint in the rendition of the musical selection this original setting will, through the control transfer switch 87 and other associated mechanism'showmrestore the switches-to their original setting.
This is accomplished by depressing the first push-button'117 of the group shown on the control panel 6. The first button is indicative of the first combination, the second button of the second combination, and so forth.
By depressing the button 117 three circuits are closed and simultaneously three actions result.
First, current from a trunk conductor 122, said conductorconnecting to one side of a source of power 123, passes through the lead wire 124 and energized the electro-mag netic associated spring 115.
The valve disc of the electro-magnetic valve 111 also normally seatsunder air pressure of the windbox-"104,and closes the communicating port 112 to the'said pressure.
However, immediately upon the energization of'the magnet of the electro-magnetic valve 111, by depressing the push button 117, the metallic valve piece of the'valve 111'is raised, and air pressure enters the port 112 causing the diaphragm 110 to expand and seat the valve 109 against the outer-face of "the port 113. This closes the [said port 113 to atmosphere, and allows the airpressure -to enterthe: bellows, expanding the same against the action of the spring 115.
Through connecting rod 103 and lever 91 the panel 92' of the switch 87 is caused to pivot about the shaft 90 in a counter clock wise direction, bringing the flat spring contact elements 95 of the terminals 93 into, contacting engagement with the opposed con-" tact plates 96 on the b35688 thereof, causing the circuit from the-combination switch 3 to be closedfthrough' the transfer switch'87, through the lead wire 119 to the magnet 38.
on the combination box' 8.] A lead wire120 connecting themagnet with-the opposite side of the circuit completes the said circuit through the trunk conductor 122.
' This causes the magnet -38'to be energized M which in turncausesthebifurcated member 23 ofthe lever 22 to pivot'at24ythereby bringing thefinger 33 into operativeengagement with the notch 32 on the bar '26,"as
shown at 121 "in Figure 7 and in-dot and dash lines in'Fi'gure 5.-
In this. manner all of the combination switches-selected on-the console, magnetize their corresponding magnetic cooperating parts on the combination box 8, through the medium of the transfer switch 87."
The second circuit to be closed through the depression of the button 117 is described as follows.
The current'from the said trunk conductor 122 upon-depressing the push button 117 is also conducted'through a line 126 to one side of'a magnet 62, thesaid magnet'62'being one of a groupof similar magnets (not shown) mounted onv the stationary wing of the bel- 'lows 114a of the pneumatic unit 107. These magnets correspond in number to the operating levers 49, each magnet being anassociated part thereof, opposed to, and adapted to magnetically attract the'saidlevers'49 11 The magnet 62 is connected to the other side of'the circuit through the line 127,'and thence through the trunk conductor'69.
Current through the line 126 energizing the magnet 62, attracts'the lever 49, causing it to pivot on'the pin 48 and move its'hooked end 58 into the downward path of the bracket 57 secured to the underside of-the bellows 114a of the pneumatic unit 104.
As one lever49 is controlled, and inci-- dentally the first in line of the group 128 shown on the'side of the combination-box 8 in Figure 6, it will be understood that each of the levers 49 in the saidgrou'p may be actuated in a similar manner through their individual circuits 129 shown in Figure 7,
operatively controlled through their respective combination push buttons 117. Each-of the push buttons 117 representing the control of-one setting or combination.
The third circuit to be closed by depressing the said combination button follows.
, The current from thetrunk conductor 122 i is passed through a line 130, andenergizes the electro-magnetic valve 111 of the pneumatic unit 107, the other side of the circuit being constant through the line 131 which connects it to the trunk conductor 69.
7 Upon the energization of the magnet of thesaid valve 111, the associated metallic valve disc of thevalve is raised, andvair pressure pres- Y ent in the windbox 104 of the unit is allowed I i to enter theportf112.thereof, balancing pressure on the diaphragm 110 and the pressure to seat the valve 109 against the outer face of the port 113.; This closes the said port 113 to atmosphere, and allows the .air pressure to enter the bellows, expanding the same against theaction of the spring 115. The
movable wing of the bellow 11 4a carrying the bracket 57 operatively engagesthe hook portion 58 of lever 49 and causes it to be drawn downward as thebellows is inflated. Referring now to Figures 4' to 6 inclusive, it will be obvious that thedownward movement of the lever 49, pivoting on the crank portion 47 .of the shaft 43, will cause the said shaft 43 to, turn in a clockwise direction in its bearings 44 and 45 against the action of the spring 50., The crankportion 46 of the lever 43 intermediate the ends 11 and 12 of the box, will then bear against the resilient contact elements 17 of the bar 15, but flexing the said contact elements slightly as it passes through its are generated radially to i -the pivots 44 and 45, the said crank portion 46 willcontinuing in. its downward path, en-
gage the top of thebar 15 and cause the said bar to be depressed downwardly on its guides 16-46 against theaction of the springs 14. This movement in the combination box occasioned by the bellows 114a of the pneumatic unit 107 through the lever 49, results in the lowering of the contact elements 17 onthe bar 15, from a position where the tops of the said contact elements are in substantiallythe same horizontal plane. as the top edges of the transversely extending insulated rods 20, to a position slightly lower than the plane of the lower edges of the said rods 20. However, operative contacting ra lation between the elements 17 and the con- 'ductors 18 is still maintained.
Therefore, immediately upon the depression ofthe push button 117, all of the various combination switches 3 that are selected at the console by operating the pallets 4 thereof,
are caused to be selected in the combination box, through their representative corresponding parts in the said box.
Thenext step is to set the combination of keys orswitches in the combination box. I v A This is accomplished by still retaining the push button 117 in its depressed posit-ion and thusly selected depressing the master switch or but-ton 116. Immediately a lead 132 is connected through the switch116 with the trunk conductor 122, thereby energizing the electro-magneticvalve 111 of the pneumatic unit 105, the other side i of the circuit being constant through the line 133 which connects to the trunk conductor 69. Upon the energization of the valve l'llair' pressure enters the bellows, expanding the same, andthrough the connecting rod 34, actuates the notched bar 26, against the action of the spring 115. 7
Immediately the various levers 22 of the combination box, whose bifurcated end por- I tions 23 and associated fingers33 thereof; are being held in operative engagement with their corresponding notches 32 on the bar 26, under the influence of the associated magnets 38, are turned in their pivots 40 and 41 of the box in a clock-wise direction. The various bifurcated portions23 of the levers 22 that have not been selected ormagnetized by the magnets 38 will continue to be supported upon'the top edge of the bar-26,v by the.
fingers 25 as the bar is advanced forward.
The various levers 22Ithat are caused to. pivot by this movement of the bar 26, bring their respective crank portions 42 to bear transversely against the resilient contact elements 17 of thebars 15. And the contact elements 17 having been lowered to a position clearing the rods 20, are deflected by the levers 22 until the ends of the said elements are substantially theopposite side of the rods I 20, causing thecentral bodyv portion of the elements 17 to impinge against the conductors 19. I I
As the contact elements on each bar 15'are acted upon, the contact elements in each idle section, on bars 15, will be caused to flex between the rods 20 and conductors 19, but maintaining their original setting. In this -manner all of the subsequent settings are preserved, and only changed when the setting is reset through the action of the levers 43 and associated operatingparts.
-After having depressed the master button or switch 116 the combination button 117 is released and a moment later the master button 116. This action breaks the circuits face of the port 113, communicating the The belbellows 114 with the atmosphere. lows under the action of the spring then collapse.
in each g The collapsing of the bellows of theunit '107 through the action of the spring 115 and coordinating action of the spring .50 releases the lever 49 and returns it to its normal pos1t1on,:restor1ng the lever 43 to 1ts normal 1 position, against the stop -53. This in turn allows the bar 15 torise on the=pin guides -16-16 under action-of the springs 1 l-14:,
. causing the various resilient contact elements 17 that have'been deflected to one side of the rods 20, to rise with the said bars and operatively engage the said sides of the .v the. conductors 19. The levers 22 not se- Consequently uponthe release of lecte'd by themagnets 38, however, are not moved by the bar 26, and retain their normal contact position against the conductors 18.
The deflation of the bellows of the unit 106, effected through the release of push button 117, causes'the panel 92through the mediumoftheconnecting rod 103" and asso ciated sw tch lever 91, to pivot on the shaft and return'the various spring contact elements 99 andlOO into contacting engagementwith their corresponding contact plates 101 and 102 on the base panel 88. This closes the return circuits between the conductors 18 and 19 in the combination box 8 and the respective combination keys or switches 3 on the organ console.
' The-deflation of the bellows 11 1?) of the pneumatic unit 105 results in the said bellows through the action of the spring and connecting rod 34-to return the bar 26, and'consequently thelevers engaged in the notches 32 thereof, to its'normal position. 1
Thus, the first combination is set and like wise each succeeding combination in the manner described, until all havebeen set, each setting employing a separate combination button 117 in conjunction with the master button 116.
The organisthaving completed the combination settings is now ready to play the musical selections.
However, before the actual playing thereof, a switch diagrammatically illustrated at 135 and shown mountedon the panel 6 adjacent the push buttons 117 in Figure 7, is actuated'closing through the leads 136 and 137, the circuit from the line to the electromagnetic valve 111 of the auxiliary pneumatic unit 108.
Also before playing, the combination keys or switches must be reset to correspond to'the first combination of the same used indie music. This is'accomplished by the organist depressing the first push button 117 of the group shown, the said button corresponding to and controlling the first combination .lection previously set in the combination box.
The depression of the said push button 117 results as before in the COIlIlBCt-lOllOf'thG leads 124 and 130 with the trunk conductor 122, thereby energizing the electro-magnetic valves 1111 of the pneumatic units 106 and 107 respectivelyvand causing the bellows of said units to expand in the manner heretofore described.
Through the lead 136 andy137, connected to lead 130, the electro-magneticvalve111 of the unit 108is also energized resulting in a like expansion of the bellows of the respective unit, causing the expanding wing thereof to be brought into the line of operative engagement with, and intercepting the expansible wing of the bellows of the unit 107 through abutment-138 mountedthereon.
This limits the downward travel of'the lever 49, the said lever 'l9 having'been magnetized by the magnet 62 andbrought into' engagement with the bracket 57 in its respective downward travel upon :the depression of the said button 117.
This permits the crank portions 46 of the levers 13 to bear in contactv relation only against the various contact elements 17 being held from further movement by the engagement of the abutment 138 by the bellows of the unit 108.
A lead wire 139 connecting to the tru k";
conductor 122 energizes at all times the spring contact strips 65 through the conductor 64, and upon the contacting oflever 43 against the side thereof all of the contact elements 17 are. energized, the said lever- 43 and the elements 17 in turn energlze the respective conductors 18 or 19 according to whichone they are in contact with.
Thusly the various current impulses are sent throughthe leads 1410 and 14:1 to the re spective terminals 97 and 98 on thetransfer switch 87. Then through the spring contact elements 99 and 100 and opposed plates 101 and. 102 the circuits are completed to the combination switch 3, energizing either the magnet 81 or 82 thereof according to the setting of the elements 17 in the combination box. This operates the'said switch 3 'to either an on or off position thereby making the first combination.
As these actions take place simultaneously and due to the flexibility of the contact elements 95, 99 and 100 the return circuits are completed throughthe switch 87 before the said switch has moved sufficiently to break the circuitbetween the said contact elements 99 and 100 and their respective contacting plates 101 and. 102.
As .the foregoing description has fully described the method and means whereby combination of combination keys or switches may be first selected, then the said selection set in the combination box, and thereafter through a controlswitch or button be caused to be brought into working rela tion with the organ. at the option of the organistby the depression of the said button, it will be-obvious that any number oi combinations may be made and controlled in the same manner. Also by operating the control buttons successivel by the finger tips the combinations maybe successively changed throughout the rendition of any musical selection and without any perceptible pause in the playing.
The invention having been set is claimed is:
1. Stop selectoractuating mechanism for organs comprising stop actuators manually movable to select a desired stop combination, on and off circuits for each actuator includingrespectively means to move the forth, what actuator to on and off positions, aplurality of banks of switches each bank of switches containing a. switch for each actuator, each switch'c ontrolling the on and oil circuits of the associated actuator to open and close the same, and normally closing the oil circuit, aplurality of means each cooperating withthe switches of each I bank common-to a given actuator and opmerit.
erable only after a manual setting of the actuators and a preliminary movement of a switch bank for moving the switches of selected actuators in such bank to open tl'ie off and close the on circuit thereof, and meansfor selecting the bank of switches to be operated by the operationof the last named means.
2. A mechanism of the. character described, a plurality of switches each including an element alternately engageable with a pair of contacts and normally engaged with one thereof, a'member associated with each switch and adapted when operated to move the switch out of engagement with said contact and into engagement with the other contacts, a longitudinal movable bar and lectro-magnet for relatively connecting said members-with the bar to be operated thereby. v p
3. A deviceas set forth in claim 2 wherein each switch is movable out of engagement wfithl its normally engaged contacts only aftera preparatory operation thereof, and means for simultaneously moving all the switches to effect such preparatory move- 1 4. Stop-selector-actuating mechanism for organs comprising stop actuators manually movable to select a desired stop combination, electrical operating means for selective ly moving said actuators to on and ,oil positions, circuits for said operating means, a plurality of banks of switches, each bank containing a switch for each operating means, said switch being normally positioned to actuate the o eratin means and 1 I 1 1 place the actuator 1n off position, means for moving said switches to the on posi-V tion comprising a member for each actuator and common to the switchesassociated with said actuator in all of said banks, means for preventin operation of the switch-moving means until the associated bank'hasbeen bodily moved, means for bodily moving a selected bank, and means for connecting the selected switch-operating means to a -mov able member to be actuated thereby.
5. Stopselector-actuating mechanism for organs comprising stop actuators manually movable to'select a desired stop combination, electrical operating meansfor selectively moving said actuators to on and oillpositions, circuits forsaid operatingj means, a plurality of banks of switches, each bank containinga switch'for each operating means, said switch being normally positioned to actuate the operating means and place the actuator in ofi position, means,
for moving said switches .to the on-p0sition comprising a member for each actuator and common to the switches associated with said actuator, mall of sald banks, means for v preventing operation of the switch-moving,
means until the associated bank has been bodily moved, means for bodily moving a selected bank, and means for connecting the selected switch-operatingmeans to a movable member to be actuated thereby, said; switches each comprising a flexible element I with which the operator directly engages to shift the flexible element and establish the on circuit, the means for preventing operation of the switches comprising stops with which said flexible elements engage until the associated bank has been shifted through a predetermined distance.
6. Stopselector-actuating mechanism for organs comprising stop actuators manually, movable tovselect a desired stop combination,electrical operating means for selectively moving said actuators to on and oil positions, circuits for said'operating means, a plurality of banks of sw1tches,
' each bank containing a switch for each opthereby, and a common means for shiftinga selected bank and for supplying current to the switches of the bank. a
7. Stop-selector-actuating mechanism for organs comprising stop actuators manually movable to select a desired stop combination, electrical operating means for selectively moving said actuators to on and off positions, circuits for said operating means, a plurality of banks of switches, each bank containing a switch for each operating means, said switch being normally positioned to actuate the operating means and place the actuator in off position, means for moving said switches to the on position comprising a member for each actuator and common to the switches associated with said actuator in all of said banks, means for preventing operation of the switch-moving means until the associated bank has been bodily moved, means for bodily moving a selected bank, means for connecting the selected switch-operating means to a movable member to be actuated thereby, and a common means for shifting a selected bank and for supplying current to the switches of the bank, and means for controlling operation of the last-named means to determine in which of its capacities it is efi'ective.
In testimony whereof I afiix my signature.
CHRISTOPHER CHARLES DARGIS.
US541483A 1931-06-01 1931-06-01 Combination box for electro-pneumatic pipe organs Expired - Lifetime US1901552A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2954716A (en) * 1956-02-20 1960-10-04 Organ Ind Inc Capture-type combination action for organs
US3420131A (en) * 1965-05-12 1969-01-07 Wurlitzer Co Electronic organ preset and cancel mechanism
US4019418A (en) * 1976-04-01 1977-04-26 D. H. Baldwin Company Organ stop tablet mechanism

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2954716A (en) * 1956-02-20 1960-10-04 Organ Ind Inc Capture-type combination action for organs
US3420131A (en) * 1965-05-12 1969-01-07 Wurlitzer Co Electronic organ preset and cancel mechanism
US4019418A (en) * 1976-04-01 1977-04-26 D. H. Baldwin Company Organ stop tablet mechanism

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