US1899378A - Method of and apparatus for separating a liquid from other liquids - Google Patents

Method of and apparatus for separating a liquid from other liquids Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1899378A
US1899378A US142810A US14281026A US1899378A US 1899378 A US1899378 A US 1899378A US 142810 A US142810 A US 142810A US 14281026 A US14281026 A US 14281026A US 1899378 A US1899378 A US 1899378A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
refrigerant
lubricant
compressor
liquid
evaporator
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US142810A
Inventor
George H Zouck
Baufre William L De
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
Servel Inc
Original Assignee
Servel Inc
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Servel Inc filed Critical Servel Inc
Priority to US142810A priority Critical patent/US1899378A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1899378A publication Critical patent/US1899378A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25BREFRIGERATION MACHINES, PLANTS OR SYSTEMS; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT-PUMP SYSTEMS
    • F25B43/00Arrangements for separating or purifying gases or liquids; Arrangements for vaporising the residuum of liquid refrigerant, e.g. by heat
    • F25B43/02Arrangements for separating or purifying gases or liquids; Arrangements for vaporising the residuum of liquid refrigerant, e.g. by heat for separating lubricants from the refrigerant
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25BREFRIGERATION MACHINES, PLANTS OR SYSTEMS; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT-PUMP SYSTEMS
    • F25B31/00Compressor arrangements
    • F25B31/002Compressor arrangements lubrication
    • F25B31/004Compressor arrangements lubrication oil recirculating arrangements
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F25REFRIGERATION OR COOLING; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT PUMP SYSTEMS; MANUFACTURE OR STORAGE OF ICE; LIQUEFACTION SOLIDIFICATION OF GASES
    • F25BREFRIGERATION MACHINES, PLANTS OR SYSTEMS; COMBINED HEATING AND REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS; HEAT-PUMP SYSTEMS
    • F25B2341/00Details of ejectors not being used as compression device; Details of flow restrictors or expansion valves
    • F25B2341/001Ejectors not being used as compression device
    • F25B2341/0011Ejectors with the cooled primary flow at reduced or low pressure

Description

Feb. 28, 1933. G H, ZOUCK' AL 1,899,378

METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR' SEPARATING A LIQU ID FROM OTHER LIQUIDS Filed Oct 20. 1926 anoeutou. George MZauck. wl'l/iam L. De Baufre Patented Feb. 28, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT- OFFICE GEORGE E. ZOUCK, OF ORANGE, NEW JERSEY, AND WILLIAM L. DE BAU'FRE, OF NEW YORK, N. Y., ASSIGNORS TO SERVEL, INGJOF NEW YORK, N. Y., A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE METHOD 01 AND APPARATUS FOR SEPAIRATING A LIQUID mom OTHER mourns Application filed October 20, 1926. Serial No. 142,810.

This invention relates to the temporary removal of'a liquid from one or more liquids of different densities as the liquids pass through their cycle of operations, and to preferably accomplish the removal without the use of moving parts. One or more' of the liquids may be in the form of gas or fluid during some of its cycle of operation. The invention, in its broad aspect, is also capable of operating to permanently or temporarily remove one of the liquids of a series of liquids, or to remove an undesirable liquid which for some reason becomes associated with the opcrating liquids during their cycle of operations thereof.

A concrete example of the essence of this invention is the temporary removal of a lubricant from its association with the refrigerant in the working part or evaporator of a refrigerating system and to return the lubricant to a point of usefulness.

In the operation of the usual type of refrigerating system it has been found that some of the lubricant employed to lubricate certain apparatus of the system automatically becomes associated with the one or more liquids used in the system, and this lubricant in association with the refrigerant materially reduces the efficiency of the system as it chokes the piping, andin some instances stopsthe operation thereof as the apparatus to be lubricated becomes drained of lubricant. It has for a long time been a problem of engineering to efficiently return this lubricant to the apparatus from which it was taken. This invention in its particular adaptation has to do with a very satisfactory solution of that problem.

It is well understood that the usual refrigerating system includes a compressor, a condenser, an expansion valve or means for reducing the pressure of the refrigerant, a refrigerating element which has become to be known as a cooler or working unit or evaporator in which the transfer of heat or the abthe refrigerating system, where it chokes up the system and finally causes the system to cease operation either by stopping the flow of the refrigerant or by causing the compressor to stop due to insuflicient lubrication provided more lubricant is not added. If the lubricant is not present in such quantities as to stop the operation of the system it acts, in any event, to materially reduce the efficiency ofthe system. The lubricant which has been carried from the compressor usually settles or collects at some point in the system where there is no provision for returning it to the compressor. This collecting is usually in the refrigerator part or evaporator of the system and is in association with the refrigerant. In view of the fact that the lubricant has different specific gravity than the refrigerant the lubricant and the refrigerating liqui-d become, to a' very large'extent, separated although'in contact with each other. It may bestated that manually actuated mechanical means have been employed to return the lubricant from the working unit to the compressor, but such means are operated at irregular intervals,and when operated, cause a large amount of the lubricant to be fed at one time to the compressor.

- The main object of this invention is to pro-.

returning to the compressor of a refrigel ating system such lubricant as has been car.- ried into the system by the refrigerant and tively small amounts thereof and thereby increase theeiiiciency of operation.

' A particular object of the invention is to automatically return to the compressor such lubricant that has reached the refrigerator or evaporator.

Another object of the invention as relating to refrigerating systems is to provide an improved refrigerating apparatus in which liquids pass through a cycle of operations and which provides for the temporary substantial separation of one of the liquids from the others and the return of the separated liquid to another point in the cycle of operations.

An object of the invention, in its broad aspect, is the provision of an improved method and means of removing one liquid from one or more other liquids of different densities as those liquids pass through their cycle of operations.

Further objects and advantages of this invention will be appreciated when reading the detailed dGSCIlPlJlOIl given below.

In the forms of refrigerating apparatus which are now being manufactured there are found several types of compressors. Among these types are the rotary, the gear, the centrifugal and the reciprocating. With any one of these compressors it becomes necessary to use a lubricant, and some of them require more lubricant than others.

Experience with refrigerating systems which include compressors, has shown that some of the lubricant invariably becomes mixed with the refrigerant and passes into the refrigeration system. It will be seen that such lubricant performs no useful function in the refrigerating cycle, while at the same time it has been removed from the apparatus where its use is necessary. Usually this lubricant is carried from the compressor in one or more of the following two ways :-one, by becoming mechanically suspended in the refrigerant, and two, as a gas mixed with the refrigerant. It has been found that the gas of the refrigerant as it leaves the compressor is partially saturated with the lubricant in one or the other of the conditions mentioned above. It willbe understood that a separator positioned near the compressor will remove a portion of the lubricant which is mechanically suspended, but it has been found that such a separator does not remove the lubricant held in the vapor form. This invention is particularly applicable for returning to the compressor the lubricant which has collected in some part of the system and particularly in the evaporator and to accomplish this result in the most efficient manner and in such a way as to have a more or less continuous amount of lubricant in small quantities returned to the compressor for use to properly lubricate the moving parts of the flooded system, or they may operate on the so-called small quantity boil-off system.

The flooded s stem provides that the cooler or evaporator s all be sufficiently large to receive the refrigerant in liquid form in relatively large quantities at low pressures and will permit the refrigerant to boil-ofl' or vaporize at a rate depending upon the pressure and upon the heat transfer between the refrigerant and its surroundings. In the small quantity boil-ofi' system the liquid refrigerant is fed through valves as required and boils-off as needed and there is hardly ever a great amount of liquid present in the cooler or evaporator as is the case in the flooded system.

The refrigerating system may consist of small condenser coils and a tank or working unit or evaporator in which the large quantity of liquid is held, or the whole system may be constituted by one or more series of pipes which may be connected in series or in parallel. It will be seen that when the system includes pipingalone that the presence of the lubricant materially decreases the efliciency of operation as it chokes the pipes, and usually the lubricant settles at the most undeslrable positions in the pipes.

The invention herein set forth will be described, for purposes of disclosure, as applied to a refrigerating system of the flooded type and in which system, inone instance, the refrigerant will be considered lighter in specific gravity than the lubricant. However, a part of this invention will be described in connection with a flooded system which shows the refrigerant to be heavier than the lubricant.

It is to be noted that in most of the refrigerating systems which are particularly adaptable for use in the home, it is usual to have them intermittent in operation in order to ob- 1 tain the highest efficiency and to obtain the lowestcost of operation. WVith refrigerating systems of this intermittent type it will be noted that when they are not operating there will often be a leaking of the lubricant from the compressor back to the evaporator. If the valves and fitting parts are tight the amount of leakage Will be relatively small, but after some of the parts have become worn the loss of lubricant from the compressor becomes highly detrimental and the efliciency of operation is considerably reduced. By reason of the automatic return of the lubricant to the compressor, as herein provided, the efliciency is maintained at a high standard and thus one of the prior disadvantages has been eliminated. I

The preferred apparatus in which this invention is incorporated is illustrated in the accompanying diagrammatic figuresv where- "form of apparatus for accomplishing this 1n:-- a q i v v Fig. 1 illustrates, a refrigeration apparatus in which there is a by-pass of relatively small diameter leading from the evaporator to the compressor;

Fig. 2 is an same as Fig. 1 except that a lubricant separator is incorporated therein;

Fig. 3 illustrates a difi'erentconstruction of by-pass and shows the compressor located below the top of the evaporator;

Fig. 4 is somewhat the same as Fig. 3 with the addition of a nozzle of reduced crosssection at the outlet endv ofthe by-pass;

Figs. 5 and 6 show refrigeration apparatus in which the lubricant is lighter than the refrigerant;

Figs. 7, 8 and 9 illustrate different constructions of weirs for use in the apparatus of Fig. 6 and Fig. 10 illustrates the use of the Venturi construction for assisting in raising the lubricant to the compressor.

Referring now to the drawing there is shown in Fig. 1 a diagrammatic representation of one form of apparatus which increases the efliciency of the operation of the refrigerating system. In this drawing a compressor 1 of any desirable form is illustrated as being connected to a conduit 2 which leads to a suitable condensing coil 3. The refrigerant employed in this system passes from the compressor to the condenser and collects in liquid orm back of an expansion valve 4 which may, be operated manually or automatically to permit the refrigerant to pass in its liquid form through a conduit or pipe 5 to the refrigerator or evaporator 6. A suitable conduit 7 connects this evaporator at some point near the top thereof to the compressor 1 so that the refrigerant in gas form may readily pass to the compressor where it again starts its cycle of o eration. Usually the conduit 7 is a pipe of a out three eighths of an inch in diameter for the small household device.

The refrigerator proper or the evaporator 6 is located so that as the refrigerant, in its liquid form as shown at 8, volatilizes or boils off it absorbs the heat from the surrounding articles or bodies thereby reducing the temperature of the surrounding bodies. The evaporator 6 is here shown as a relatively large container. It is to be understood, of course, that it may be substituted by a series of coils, connected either in series or in parallel..

Some of the lubricant which is provided for the compressor passes to the evaporator and is shown as having collected at 9 within the evaporator 6. As one of the particular objects of this invention is to return this collected lubricant to the compressor substantially continuously and in relatively small quantities and without thepresence of movillustration substantially the ing, parts, there is here shown a preferred purpose. This preferred apparatus consists preferably of a by-pass or conduit 10 which extends from some point below the surface of the liquid refrigerant in the evaporator 6.

to the'conduit 7 j at some desirable point, preferably relatively near the compressor. With this by-pass itwill' be noted that when an abnormal quantity of the lubricant collects in the evaporator 6 some of it will flow into the conduit 10 along with some of the refrigerant in liquid form. It is to be understood, however, that while there is a substantial separation of the refrigerant in liquid form from the lubricant there is, however, a certain commingling or intermingling of the refrigerant and lubricant so that there is practically always some of the refrigerant in liquid form mixed with'the lubricant that passes into the by-pass 10.

' This by-pass conduit 10 preferably passes through the compartment of the refrigerator box in which the foods to be cooled are placed this lubricant will automatically be raised from the bottom of the working unit to-the compressor, thereby supplying the compressoralmost continuously with lubricant and at the same time removing the lubricant from the refrigerating unit where it is not desired. It will be noted that this result will be accomplished without the presence of moving parts. While this construction discloses one method of applying heat to volatilize the refrigerant in the by-pass, it will be understood that any other satisfactory method or apparatus may be employed for this purose. p The reason why the refrigerant will be raised in conduit 10 may possibly be explained in different ways. We believe, however, that the following is the correct reason Take a U-tube and place in it a mixture of lubricant and a refrigerant in liquid form. This mixture will come to equilibrium at equal heights in both legs of the tube. Now, if one leg of the tube is heated the refrigerant in that leg will vaporize and will push ahead of it the lubricant in that leg for the mixture in the other leg is still in liquid form and has a definite weight. Consequently the top level in the heated leg will rise due to the vaporization of the refrigerant. The product of the height of the refrigerant in liquid form and the lubricant times their densities in the cool lcg will be equal to the height of the lubricant and refrigerant in gas form times their densities in the heated leg in order to give equilibrium.

Itwill be seen that the by-pass 10 will correspond to the heated leg of the U-tube while the height of the refrigerant in liquid form and the lubricant in evaporator 6 will correspond to the other leg of the tube. It will also be noted .that the height of the by-pass 10 will be predetermined as it must be less than the static height of the level in the heated leg. This length of by-pass 10 may be varied however as the operation of the compressor in drawingthe refrigerantin gas formthrough conduit 7 will decrease the pressure at the outlet of by-pass 10. Additional means of decreasing the pressure at the outlet of conduit 10 will be disclosed below. This decreasing ofpressure at the outlet of by-pass 10 assists in moving the lubricant from the evaporator 6 to the compressor 1.

It has been found desirable in increasing the efiiciencyof the whole apparatus to have the internal diameter of by-pass 10 about five millimeters or less for in that case when the refrigerant is vaporized the bubbles formed extend across the full diameter of the by-pass thus creating an alternate condition of a layer of lubricant and a bubble, then another 'layer of lubricant and so on. As further heating continues the bubbles expand and push the layers of lubricant ahead of them. It will be understood, however, that the systern will operate successfully with by-passes of larger internal diameters but the efficiency will not be as high unless the vertical height of the by-pass or the reduction of pressure at the outlet are varied.

It has heretofore been stated that a separator may be provided for separatingout the amount of l'ubricantwhich is mechanically suspended in the refrigerant as the refrigerant passes from the compressor. A form of separator which has been successful in operation as incorporated in the refrigerating system is shown in Fig. 2. The lubricant passes from the compressor into the separator 11 through conduit 12 and is directed downward by reason of a shell 14 which preferably isprovided on its inner surface with suitable bafile plates 15. The gas follows the path of the arrows out of the separator and passes to the condenser 3. The gas in coming out from under shell 14 rises to the top of the separator and it is again subjected to contact with baffle plates such as plates 16 illustrated as being formed on the inner walls of the separator. The refrigerant in its gas form after leaving the separator passes through its regular cycle of operation as before described. In the separator it is preferred to form an inwardly extending trough 17 at the base of the shell 14 and to have a lead of]? pipe 18 to convey the lubricant which has been caught in the shell 14 to the bottom of the separator 11. There is provided a suitable lubricant return pipe 19 preferably connected,

to the compressor at some point where it will not permit gas to fiowthrough pipe 19back to the compressor. The preferred form of pipe 19 is shown in Fig. 2 wherein a U is provided to form a trap of lubricant to prevent the gas from returning to the compressor. Also in accomplishing this end the pipe 19 may be connected to the bearings of the compressor thus backing up enough lubricant in pipe 19 and in the lower part of separator 11 to prevent the flow of gas therethrough to the compressor. I V

' It will be noted that with this preferred construction of separator a certain amount of lubricant which has passed from the compressor 1 in mechanically suspended form will be caught and returned to the compressor in a more or less constant flow. The lubricant which is carried beyond the separator by reason of being vaporized will pass through the expansion valve 4, conduit 5 into the evaporator 6 and will collect therein as shown at 9. It may, however, collect at other places and suitable piping connections may be provided to return it to the compressor or to the evaporator. The by-pass 10 is also provided in the construction illustrated in Fig. 2 for automatically returning to the 00111- pressor the lubricant which has settled in the evaporator. In Fig. 3 there is disclosed a modified form of by-pass or conduit 10 wherein there is formed in this conduit a complete turn as represented at 20, which turn is preferably an inch and one-half to two inches in diameter for the small household unit. One of the objects of providing this turn or loop 20 is to assist in increasing the efficiency of operation. It will be noted, during periods of shut down in the intermittent operation of the device, that the. refrigerant as a gas in the turn 20-will rise to the top of the turn and the lubricant will settle to the bottom of the turn. When the compressor is again started the refrigerant in gas form and the refrigerant in liquid form which will become gasified, will push the lubricant up conduit 10 against a minim-um head rather than p'ushing. the lubricant back into the chamber 6 where the maximum head of liquid refrigerant 8 exists.

When it is desirable in mounting this apparatus in a refrigerator box to locate the compressorv below the top of the working unit, the construction shown in Fig. 3 shows one manner of making suitable connection in order to maintain the highest efliciency of operation.

There is disclosed in Fig. 4 a modified form of apparatus which includes the turn 20 in the by-pass 10 and also provides a nozzle 2.1 at the outlet end of the by-pass 10 and positioned within the conduit 7. With this construction the pressure at the end of the conduit 10 is further reduced as an injector ac- The foregoing descriptions relate to a re-.

frigerating system of the flooded type where in the lubricant is heavier than the refrigerant. Consideration will now be had of an apparatus wherein the lubricant is lighter than the refrigerant.

Referringnow to Figs. 5-and 6 there are disclosed two different forms of construction for returning the lubricant to the compressor when the lubricant is of less density than the refrigerant. In Fig. 5 the compressor 1, condenser 3, expansion valve 4 and conduit 5 are substantially the same as! before described. The evaporator 6 is, however, modified as shown to provide an outlet in the form of a pipe extending from the interior of the evaporator to the by-pass 10. It is to be understood that this by-pass may be substituted by the form of by-pass shown in Fig. 1 if desired. With this construction the operation will be the same as above described.

In Fig. 6 there is shown another modification of the evaporator 6 wherein there is provided a plate 22 which permits the lubricant 9 and some of the refrigerant 8 in its liquid form to flow to compartment 24 and from there into the by-pass or conduit 10, which also in this instance, is provided with turn 20. The plate 22 may be of any desired form or may have any one or more of the forms of openings as illustrated in Figs. 7 8 and 9 which include holes 25, square shape slots 26 or saw-tooth slots 27.

It will be seen from the foregoing detailed description that there is provided an improved and novel method and means for returning lubricant which hascollected in some part of the refrigerating system to the compressor and to accomplish this purpose with,- out the presence of moving parts. It is to be .understood that this by-pass arrangement may be provided and connected to any suitable part of the refrigerating system so that it will return thelubricant to the compressor in a satisfactory manner and thereby materially increase the efficiency of operation of such a refrigerating system.

It will also be understood that this method of operation may be employed for the separation of one liquid from two or more liquids of densities which are different from the density of the liquid to be separated. In accomplishing this purpose it is assumed that one'of the liquids is capable of being volatilized. When employing this method for removing one liquid from other liquids it is to be understood that the type of apparatus herein disclosed may be employed, or any desired modification thereof, and to preferably provide a separate container to which the I liquid to be removed may pass to instead of passing to the compressor 1. The liquid which volatilizes may be retained or captured a and used again in thecycle of operation of the liquids. It is to be understood that there would be no material modifications, of the method of operation herein disclosed-in providing the removal of one of these liquids fromthe other liquids.

It will be understood that whilewe have herein described in detail a particular embodiment of our invention for purposes of o tions may be made in the particular construction and arrangement: of parts without de parting fromthe broad scope of our invention which is outlined in the sub-joined claims.

l/Ve claim a 1. In a refrigerating system in which a refrigerant is adapted to be circulated, a compressor having lubricant; a condenser for receiving said refrigerant from said compressor, an evaporator for receiving said refrigerant in liquid form from said condenser, said evaporator adapted to absorb heat from the surrounding bodies, a conduit for conducting the refrigerant in gas form from said evaporator to said compressor, some of said lubricant being carried to said evaporator by said refrigerant, a second conduit connecting said evaporator and said first conduit which second conduit is constantly open and which is adapted to receive relatively small amounts of the lubricant and of the refrigerant in liquid form, said second conduit extending above the top level of liquid in said evaporator and being connected to said first conduit in a manner to have the passing of the refrigerant in gas form through said first conduit cause a reduction in pressure at the end of the second conduit at the point of juncture with said first conduit. 7

2. In a refrigerating system in which a re frigerant is adapted to be circulated, a compressor having lubricant, a condenser for re.- ceiving said refrigerant from said compressor, an evaporator for receiving said refrigerant in liquid form from said condenser, said evaporator adapted to absorb heat from the surrounding bodies, a conduit for conducting the refrigerant in gas form from said evaporator to said compressor, some of said lubricant being unavoidably carried to said evaporator by said refrigerant, and a by-pass pipe connecting'said evaporator and said conduit for permitting the return of said lubricant to said compressor, said by-passpipehaving a complete turn formed therein and extending above the top level of liquid in said evaporator.

3. In a refrigerating system, the method of returning to the compressor lubricant which has collected in the evaporator of said.

system, which method consists in passing some of the lubricant and some of the refrigerant into a conduit connected between the evaporator and the compressor, applying heat to the lubricant and the refrigerant in said conduit to volatilize the refrigerant, and reducing the pressure at the mouth of the conduit near said compressor.

4. In a refrigerating system in which a refrigerant is ada ted to be circulated, a compressor having lu ricant, acondenser for receiving said refrigerant from said compressor, an evaporator for receivin said'refrigerant in liquid form from sai condenser, sald evaporator adapted to absorb heat from the surrounding bodies, a conduit for conducting the refrigerant in gas form from said evaporator to said compressor, some of said lubricant being carried to said evaporator by said refrigerant, and a constantly o n byc-pass extending above the top love 0 liquid in said evaporator andleading from said evaporator to said compressor for permitting the return of said lubricant to said compressor without requirin said compressor to be operated, said by-pass aving a material part of its length positioned outside of the influence of sald evaporator.

5..' The process of refrifgerating which coniprises compressing a re rigerant carrying a ubricant, liquefymg the refrigerant, evaporating the refrigerant, assemb ing a body of liquid refrigerant and lubricant m the pres ence of evaporated refri erant, withdrawing evaporated refrigerant om the presence of said body,-passing all the evaporated refrigerant through an orifice to produce a fall in pressure in the withdrawn refrigerant to produce a suction, drawing liquid from said body due to said suction and again compressmg said refrigerant.

6. The process of refrigerating which comprises compressing a refrigerant carrying a lubricant, liquefying the refrigerant, evaporating the refrigerant, assembling a body of liquid refrigerant and lubricant in the presence of evaporated refri erant, withdrawing evaporated refrigerant from the presence of said body, passing'the evaporated refrigerant through an orifice to produce a fall in pressure in the withdrawn refrigerant to produce a suction, drawing liquid from said body due to said suction, evaporating further refrigerant from the withdrawn liquid and again compressing the refrigerant.

7. The process of refrigerating which comprises compressing a refrigerant carrying a lubricant, liquefying the refrigerant, evaporatin the refrigerant, assembling a body of liquid refrigerant and lubricant in the presence of evaporated refri erant, withdrawing evaporated refrigerant rom the presence of said body, producing a fall in pressure in the withdrawn refri erant to produce a suction, drawing liquid rom said body due to said suction, evaporating further refrigerant from the withdrawn liquid and again compressing the refrigerant.

8. The method of returning lubricant from the evaporator to the compressor of a refrigeratin system which consists in segregating a portion of the refrigerant and lubricant in the evaporator and heating the same by absorption of heat from the surrounding atmosphere to evaporate the refrigerant content and returning theoil to the compressor by conducting it in proximity to a zone of reduced pressure in the suction line.

9. In a refrigerating system of the compressor condenser expander type, a fluid accumulating chamber, a collection chamber, a

suction line having communication with said chambers for withdrawing vapor therefrom, and a conduit connecting the collection chamber with the suction line for returning lubricant to the compressor.

10. In a refrigerating system of the compressor condenser expander type, a fluid accumulating chamber, a collection chamber, a suction line having comunication with said chambers for withdrawing vapor therefrom, and a thermosiphon conduit connecting a portion of the collection chamber with the chambers for withdrawing vapor therefrom,

and provided with a restriction, a thermosiphon conduit connecting the suction line in the vicinity of the restriction to said collecting chamber.

13. In themethod of refrigerating with a system of the compressor condenser expander type, accumulating liquid refrigerant and lubricant together in a first body, separating lubricant and refrigerant from said first -body to form a second body, vaporizing refrigerant in said second body by heat from the surrounding medium and utilizing the vapor thus formed to raise lubricant above said second body.

14. In the method of refrigerating with a system of the compressor condenser expander type, accumulating liquid refrigerant and lubricant together in a first body, separating lubricant and refrigerant from said first body to form a second body, evaporatin refrigerant in said bodies, withdrawing re rigerant vapor from said first body, restricting the flow of vapor from said first body and utilizing pressure difference due to such restriction and the flow of vapor from said-first body and the lifting effect of vapor from said second body to create passage of lubricant from said second body.

15. In the method of refrigerating with a system of the compressor condenser expander type, accumulating liquid refrigerant and lubricant together in a first body, withdrawing lubricant and refrigerant from said first body to form a second body, evaporating refrigerant in said bodies by the absorption of heat from the surrounding medium, withdrawing refrigerant .vapor from said first body and utilizing the flow of vapor from said first body and the lifting eflect of vapor from said second body to create flow of lubricant upwardly from said second body.

16. In a refrigerating system of the compressor condenser expander type, a fluid accumulating chamber adapted to contain both liquid refrigerant and. lubricant, a second chamber arranged to receive liquid refrigerant and lubricant from said accumulating chamber, means for withdrawing vapor from said chambers, and a conduit for liquid from said second chamber to said vapor withdrawing means extending in heat exchange rela- 1t-Jion with the medium surrounding the chamers.

17. In a refrigerating system of the compressor condenser expander type, a fluid accumulating chamber adapted to contain liquid refrigerant and lubricant, a second chamber arranged to receive liquid refrigerant and lubricant from said accumulating chamber, a

suction line communicating with said chambers for withdrawing vapor therefrom, and a conduit for liquid from said second chamher to said suction line extending in heat exchange relation with the medium surrounding the chambers.

18. In a refrigerating system of the compressor condenser expander type, a flooded type evaporator adapted to contain a main body of li uid refrigerant and lubricant, means forming a chamber in said evaporator adapted to receive liquid refrigerant and lubricant from said main body, a vapor suction line from said evaporator, and a conduit for liquid from said chamber to said suction line extending outside of said evaporator.

19. In a refrigerating system of the compressor condenser expander type, a flooded type evaporator adapted to contain a main body of liquid refrigerant and lubricant, means forming a chamber in said evaporator adapted to receive liquid refrigerant and lubricant from said main body, a vapor suction line from said evaporator, and a ther:

mosiphon conduit for liquid from said chamher to said suction line extending outside of line from said evaporator having a fluid flow restriction, and'a conduit for liquid froni' said'means to said suction line adjacent said restrictlon. v i I 1 21. In a refrigerating system of the "com-"- pressor ,condensen expander type, a flooded type evaporator adapted to contain a main body of liquidrefrigerant and lubricant, apartition forminga chamber in said evaporator adaptedto-receive liquid refrigerant and lubricant from said main body, asuction t and lubricant from said main body, a suction line froni' said evaporator having a restrict1on,and a conduit for liquid from said cham-' ber to sald'suction line adj acent'said restriction.

22. In a refrigerating system 'of the conipressor'condenser expander type, a fluid accumulating chamber, a collectionchamber, a suction line having communication with said chambers for withdrawing vapor therefrom and a connection between the collection chamber and the suction line for returningv lubricant to thc c0mpressor and including capillary means for advancing lubricant in said connection toward said suction line.

23. In a refrigerating system of the compressor condenser expander type, an evaporator adapted to contain a main body of liquid refrigerant and lubricant, means adapted to receive liquid refrigerant and lubricant from said main body, a suction line from said evaporator, a connection for liquid from said means to said suction line including capillary means for advancing lubricant in said means toward the suction line.

24. In a refrigerating system of the compressor condenser expander type, through which lubricant circulates with refrigerant, means for providing a fluid accumulation containing a refrigerant and a lubricant, a suction line, means for withdrawing lubricant from said accumulation and returning it by means of the suction line to the compressor, said means including capillary means exposed to the lubricant and arranged to advance lubricant toward the compressor.

25. In the method of refrigerating with a compression type system through which lubricant circulates with the cooling fluid the step which comprises raising the lubricant by capillarity from an accumulation with liquid cooling fluid toward the next succeeding portion of the system.

26. The process of refrigerating which com rises com ressin a refri erant carr a ing a lubricant, liquefying the refrigerant, evaporating the refrigerant, assembling a body of liquid refrigerant and lubricant in the presence of evaporated refrigerant, withdrawing evaporated refrigerant from the presence of said body, and flowing lubricant by capillarity into the path of the withdrawn refrigerant.

27. The process of refri crating which comprises compressing a re rigerant carrying a lubricant, liquefying the refrigerant,

evaporating the refrigerant, assembling a body of liquid refrigerant and lubricant in the presence of evaporated refrigerant, withdrawing evaporated refrigerant from the presence of said body, simultaneously withdrawing liquid refrigerant and lubricant from said body in substantially fixed relative proportion to the withdrawn evaporated refrigerant, and again compressing said refrigerant.

28. The process of refrigerating which comprises compressing a refrigerant carrying a lubricant, liquefying the refrigerant, evaporating the refrigerant, assembling. a body of liquid refrigerant and lubricant in the presence of evaporated refrigerant, withdrawingv evaporated refrigerant from the' presence of said body, producing a fall in pressure in the withdrawn refrigerant to produce a" suction, drawing liquid from said body due to said suction, heating the withdrawn liquidto evaporate the refrigerant portion thereof and again compressing said refrigeran 29. Refrlgerating apparatus comprising, in combination, a chamber, means to define a liquid space and a vapor space in-said chamber, a discharge connection leading from the vapor space of the chamber, an orifice in said discharge connection operating to produce a space of diminished pressure and a communication between said space of diminished pressure, and the liquid space of the cham er. a GEORGE H. ZOUCK, WILLIAM L. DE BAUFRE.

US142810A 1926-10-20 1926-10-20 Method of and apparatus for separating a liquid from other liquids Expired - Lifetime US1899378A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US142810A US1899378A (en) 1926-10-20 1926-10-20 Method of and apparatus for separating a liquid from other liquids

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US142810A US1899378A (en) 1926-10-20 1926-10-20 Method of and apparatus for separating a liquid from other liquids

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1899378A true US1899378A (en) 1933-02-28

Family

ID=22501372

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US142810A Expired - Lifetime US1899378A (en) 1926-10-20 1926-10-20 Method of and apparatus for separating a liquid from other liquids

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1899378A (en)

Cited By (24)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2614402A (en) * 1948-12-15 1952-10-21 Carrier Corp Oil return mechanism for refrigeration systems
US2760355A (en) * 1948-12-15 1956-08-28 Carrier Corp Method of returning oil from an element of a refrigeration system to the compressor thereof
US3064449A (en) * 1960-11-28 1962-11-20 Task Corp Refrigerant compressor
US3070968A (en) * 1959-12-14 1963-01-01 Bendix Corp Liquid to gas conversion system
DE1227036B (en) * 1962-12-28 1966-10-20 Danfoss As Kaelteanlage with a separation space
FR2180965A1 (en) * 1972-04-19 1973-11-30 Howden Holima Bv James
US3777509A (en) * 1972-03-13 1973-12-11 Borg Warner Oil return system for refrigeration apparatus
US4651539A (en) * 1984-08-27 1987-03-24 Bengt Gustaf Thoren Heat pump
US5086621A (en) * 1990-12-27 1992-02-11 York International Corporation Oil recovery system for low capacity operation of refrigeration systems
EP0622445A1 (en) * 1993-04-27 1994-11-02 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Refrigerant circulating system
US5531080A (en) * 1993-04-27 1996-07-02 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Refrigerant circulating system
EP0803688A1 (en) * 1996-04-26 1997-10-29 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Accumulator
EP0846926A2 (en) * 1993-04-27 1998-06-10 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Refrigerant circulating system
US6065297A (en) * 1998-10-09 2000-05-23 American Standard Inc. Liquid chiller with enhanced motor cooling and lubrication
US6170286B1 (en) * 1999-07-09 2001-01-09 American Standard Inc. Oil return from refrigeration system evaporator using hot oil as motive force
US6233967B1 (en) 1999-12-03 2001-05-22 American Standard International Inc. Refrigeration chiller oil recovery employing high pressure oil as eductor motive fluid
WO2002010656A1 (en) * 2000-07-27 2002-02-07 Luk Fahrzeug-Hydraulik Gmbh & Co.Kg Device for collecting and returning lubricants and coolants to the coolant circuit of a cooling system
WO2003001130A2 (en) * 2001-05-04 2003-01-03 American Standard International Inc. Flowing pool shell and tube evaporator
EP1416234A1 (en) * 2002-11-01 2004-05-06 Axima Refrigeration GmbH Lubricant recirculation apparatus for a refrigerating machine
US20040134223A1 (en) * 2002-11-01 2004-07-15 Axima Refrigeration Gmbh Apparatus for the return of lubricant for a refrigeration machine
US20100218522A1 (en) * 2009-02-09 2010-09-02 Earthlinked Technologies, Inc. Oil return system and method for active charge control in an air conditioning system
US20110308272A1 (en) * 2005-10-06 2011-12-22 Mitsubishi Electric Corporation Refrigerating air-conditioning apparatus
US20150184906A1 (en) * 2012-08-09 2015-07-02 Thermo King Corporation Methods and devices to prevent fluid migration in a refrigeration system during an off cycle
US20180023847A1 (en) * 2015-03-23 2018-01-25 Denso Corporation Ejector refrigeration cycle

Cited By (39)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2614402A (en) * 1948-12-15 1952-10-21 Carrier Corp Oil return mechanism for refrigeration systems
US2760355A (en) * 1948-12-15 1956-08-28 Carrier Corp Method of returning oil from an element of a refrigeration system to the compressor thereof
US3070968A (en) * 1959-12-14 1963-01-01 Bendix Corp Liquid to gas conversion system
US3064449A (en) * 1960-11-28 1962-11-20 Task Corp Refrigerant compressor
DE1227036B (en) * 1962-12-28 1966-10-20 Danfoss As Kaelteanlage with a separation space
US3777509A (en) * 1972-03-13 1973-12-11 Borg Warner Oil return system for refrigeration apparatus
FR2180965A1 (en) * 1972-04-19 1973-11-30 Howden Holima Bv James
US4651539A (en) * 1984-08-27 1987-03-24 Bengt Gustaf Thoren Heat pump
US5086621A (en) * 1990-12-27 1992-02-11 York International Corporation Oil recovery system for low capacity operation of refrigeration systems
EP0846925A3 (en) * 1993-04-27 1999-12-15 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Refrigerant circulating system
US5531080A (en) * 1993-04-27 1996-07-02 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Refrigerant circulating system
EP0622445A1 (en) * 1993-04-27 1994-11-02 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Refrigerant circulating system
EP0846925A2 (en) * 1993-04-27 1998-06-10 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Refrigerant circulating system
EP0846926A2 (en) * 1993-04-27 1998-06-10 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Refrigerant circulating system
EP0852323A3 (en) * 1993-04-27 1999-12-15 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Refrigerant circulating system
EP0844300A3 (en) * 1993-04-27 1999-04-28 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Refrigerant circulating system
EP0846926A3 (en) * 1993-04-27 1999-04-28 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Refrigerant circulating system
EP0846751A3 (en) * 1993-04-27 1999-12-22 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Refrigerant circulating system
EP0803688A1 (en) * 1996-04-26 1997-10-29 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Accumulator
US5799503A (en) * 1996-04-26 1998-09-01 Mitsubishi Denki Kabushiki Kaisha Accumulator
US6065297A (en) * 1998-10-09 2000-05-23 American Standard Inc. Liquid chiller with enhanced motor cooling and lubrication
US6170286B1 (en) * 1999-07-09 2001-01-09 American Standard Inc. Oil return from refrigeration system evaporator using hot oil as motive force
US6233967B1 (en) 1999-12-03 2001-05-22 American Standard International Inc. Refrigeration chiller oil recovery employing high pressure oil as eductor motive fluid
WO2002010656A1 (en) * 2000-07-27 2002-02-07 Luk Fahrzeug-Hydraulik Gmbh & Co.Kg Device for collecting and returning lubricants and coolants to the coolant circuit of a cooling system
CN100447504C (en) 2001-05-04 2008-12-31 特灵国际有限公司 Flowing pool shell and tube evaporator
WO2003001130A2 (en) * 2001-05-04 2003-01-03 American Standard International Inc. Flowing pool shell and tube evaporator
WO2003001130A3 (en) * 2001-05-04 2005-02-03 American Standard Int Inc Flowing pool shell and tube evaporator
EP1416234A1 (en) * 2002-11-01 2004-05-06 Axima Refrigeration GmbH Lubricant recirculation apparatus for a refrigerating machine
US20040134223A1 (en) * 2002-11-01 2004-07-15 Axima Refrigeration Gmbh Apparatus for the return of lubricant for a refrigeration machine
US6931886B2 (en) 2002-11-01 2005-08-23 Axima Refrigeration Gmbh Apparatus for the return of lubricant for a refrigeration machine
US20110308272A1 (en) * 2005-10-06 2011-12-22 Mitsubishi Electric Corporation Refrigerating air-conditioning apparatus
US20110308273A1 (en) * 2005-10-06 2011-12-22 Mitsubishi Electric Corporation Refrigerating air-conditioning apparatus
US8783059B2 (en) * 2005-10-06 2014-07-22 Mitsubishi Electric Corporation Refrigerating air-conditioning apparatus
US8931303B2 (en) * 2005-10-06 2015-01-13 Mitsubishi Electric Corporation Refrigerating air-conditioning apparatus
US20100218522A1 (en) * 2009-02-09 2010-09-02 Earthlinked Technologies, Inc. Oil return system and method for active charge control in an air conditioning system
US10184700B2 (en) * 2009-02-09 2019-01-22 Total Green Mfg. Corp. Oil return system and method for active charge control in an air conditioning system
US20150184906A1 (en) * 2012-08-09 2015-07-02 Thermo King Corporation Methods and devices to prevent fluid migration in a refrigeration system during an off cycle
US20180023847A1 (en) * 2015-03-23 2018-01-25 Denso Corporation Ejector refrigeration cycle
US10145588B2 (en) * 2015-03-23 2018-12-04 Denso Corporation Ejector refrigeration cycle

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3163998A (en) Refrigerant flow control apparatus
US5622055A (en) Liquid over-feeding refrigeration system and method with integrated accumulator-expander-heat exchanger
EP1518077B1 (en) Flowing pool shell and tube evaporator
US2507632A (en) Process for dehydrating materials under low-pressure conditions
US5570583A (en) Cooling of compressor lubricant in a refrigeration system
US2707868A (en) Refrigerating system, including a mixing valve
CA1110861A (en) Stored cryogenic refrigeration
US2321964A (en) Purge system for refrigerative circuits
US2359595A (en) Refrigerating system
US2713249A (en) Liquid defrosting system and the like
US2133949A (en) Refrigeration apparatus
US3563051A (en) Apparatus for lubricating the compressor of a refrigerating installation
US2164761A (en) Refrigerating apparatus and method
US2531315A (en) Liquid cooling apparatus
US2641908A (en) Refrigerator defrosting means
US2063646A (en) Cooling unit
US2247950A (en) Refrigerating apparatus
US2749723A (en) Oil separator for refrigeration system
US1836318A (en) Refrigerating system
US3421574A (en) Method and apparatus for vaporizing and superheating cold liquefied gas
JPH01111179A (en) Downflow liquid film type evaporator
US2315222A (en) Refrigerating apparatus
US2942432A (en) Defrosting of evaporator
US5636520A (en) Method of removing an immiscible lubricant from an refrigeration system
CN1692261A (en) Oil return from refrigeration system evaporator using hot oil as motive force