US1874480A - Speech translating system and method - Google Patents

Speech translating system and method Download PDF

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US1874480A
US1874480A US451814A US45181430A US1874480A US 1874480 A US1874480 A US 1874480A US 451814 A US451814 A US 451814A US 45181430 A US45181430 A US 45181430A US 1874480 A US1874480 A US 1874480A
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microphone
speech
language
receiving
receiving stations
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Edward A Filene
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Priority to CH154664D priority patent/CH154664A/en
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04RLOUDSPEAKERS, MICROPHONES, GRAMOPHONE PICK-UPS OR LIKE ACOUSTIC ELECTROMECHANICAL TRANSDUCERS; DEAF-AID SETS; PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEMS
    • H04R27/00Public address systems
    • HELECTRICITY
    • H04ELECTRIC COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUE
    • H04RLOUDSPEAKERS, MICROPHONES, GRAMOPHONE PICK-UPS OR LIKE ACOUSTIC ELECTROMECHANICAL TRANSDUCERS; DEAF-AID SETS; PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEMS
    • H04R3/00Circuits for transducers, loudspeakers or microphones
    • H04R3/12Circuits for transducers, loudspeakers or microphones for distributing signals to two or more loudspeakers

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  • the general object of the invention is to provide apparatus whereby such requirements can be met eiiciently.
  • a further object of the invention is to provide an apparatus whereby limitations of prior systems or methods are overcome by making any required number of interpretations simultaneously, and, if desired, simultaneous'ly with the speech itself so that time loss is almost entirely eliminated and the choice of any required number of languages can be provided for without diHiculty.
  • Fig. 1 is a diagramatic view illustrating a preferred embodiment of the invention
  • Fig. 2. is a diagrammatic view illustrating one ampliiier unit, the microphone connected therewith and one of the language selecting receiving sets;
  • Fig. 3 is a diagrammatic view of an audi torium showing a general arrangement of the invention.
  • each interpreter is provided with an individual microphone connected through an amplifier to telephone receiving instruments installed at various parts ofthe hall occupied by the audience, each receiving instrument being provided with selector means whereby any one of the translators may be selected for reception.
  • selector means whereby any one of the translators may be selected for reception.
  • any 'member of the audience can select the interpretation or translation into theparticular 'language in which he desires to hear the speech, irrespective of the language selected by any other hearer.
  • members of the audience are enabled to receive the speech in the language of their choice irrespective of the language in which the speech is delivered.
  • the interpreters should be placed as close to the speaker as possible.
  • the individual microphones are provided with silencers or devices designed to prevent ingress of extraneous sounds and egress of the interpreters voices.
  • the interpreter may 85 give undivided attention to the task and may. not be called upon to attend in any way to the actual operation of the system
  • automatic control of the system as a whole is provided for, as through the medium of magnetic relays. For example, provision is made whereby the appropriate transmitter is brought into operation by removing the corresponding microphone from a supporting hook and is switched olf by returning the microphone to the hook.
  • the removal of the microphone from the hook and the return thereof to the hook are also utilized to control a language indicator which ⁇ is located in a position visible to the audience as a whole and indicates the lan- .rial and prefera guage being transmitted at any given time.
  • a language indicator which ⁇ is located in a position visible to the audience as a whole and indicates the lan- .rial and prefera guage being transmitted at any given time.
  • a receivingv instrument which leaves the head and hands entirely free but which excludes so far as possible the speakers voice so that the translation required may be received free from 1nterference.
  • the transmissions are amplified to a suitable degree before delivery to the audience so that thestrength of the' reception may always be sufficient to predominate ever extraneous sounds and overcome ordinary defects of hearing.
  • a volume control device is y provided at each receiving instruvment without affecting the transmission as a whole.
  • 10 designates the position occupied by the speaker on a platform or stage 1l; and 12g, 12f, 128, 12e, and 12j indicate, respectively, the positions occupied by interpreters or translators to transmit interpretations or translations in German, French, Spanish, English and Japanese. Positioned at the frontof the corresponding interpreters positions are microphones 13g, 13f, 13s, 13e and 13j, and these microphones are connected by suitable input circuits, including wires or conductors 14 with amplifier units 15g, 157, 15a, 15e and 15j, each of which is provided with means for indicating the language with which it is to be used.
  • German is indicated by Gr, French by F, Spanish by S, English by E, and Japanese by J; such letters bein outlined by opaque mately being formed of transparent material' covering the corresponding openings in. the opaque material forming sldes of language indicators or compartments 16g, 16f, 16s, 16e, and 16g, respectively.
  • These language indicators or compartments are preferably positioned at or above the rostrum or latform and may be independent of each ot er or may be formed as parts of a single box.
  • Said compartments are individual to these letters and each contains a source of light, controlled in a manner to be described hereinafter.
  • each letter or the corresponding lamp has a characteristic color. As will be brought out hereinafter, these lamps are lighted only when :the corresponding microphones are in use and the lighting is preferably controlled automatically.
  • the receiving station 17 includes five rela-tively stationary contacts 17g, 17f, 17s, 17e and 17 j, and 'a movable contact 17m; such stationary contacts being connected respectively with language lines 19g, 19f, 19.9, 19e, and 19j of the output circuitsof the respective amplifier units, and the movable contact 17m being connected by a common return line 20 connected with the other sides of the out ut circuits of all of the amplifier units. bviously by bringing the movable contact 17m into engagement with any of said stationary contacts, the receiving station 17 will be connected with the amplifier unit corresponding with such stationary contact.
  • the language line contacts 17g, 17', 17', 17e and 17J are arranged in corresponding order to the order of the visual indicators 16S, 16, 16s, 16e and 161,'so that the listener may select the desired language line by noting the relative position of the indicator of the language desired and then selecting the correspondingly arranged language line contact.
  • the receiving station 18 includes stationary contacts 18g, 18f, 18s, 18e, and 18y connected respectively with the amplifier unit output lines 19g, 19f, 19s, 19e and 19j; and av movable contact 18m for selective cooperation with these stationary contacts.
  • the receiving stations are arranged at the seats for the audience, and of course, the entire apparatus is arranged in a suitable auditorium. It is usual in auditoriums of this character to provide each person of the seated audience with a small desk, and the receiving stations ma be conveniently arranged at such desks. he seats are within hearing range of the speaker and the speaker is in view of the'seated audience.
  • amicrophone which will be considered as microphone 13g of Fig. 1
  • an amplifying unit which will be considered as amplifier unit 15g of Fig. 1
  • a receiving station which will be considered as receiving station 17 of Fig. 1; and by describing these parts and the connections therewith the o eration of the entire apparatus will be ma e clear.
  • the microphone 13g is not shown in detail but is referably of t e same general ty as that sown in the British patent to G. Brown, No. 29,833, of 1910.
  • Such preferred form of microphone is of the ⁇ electrodynamic t and consists of a light iron reed adjustalii); mounted between the poles of the permanent magnet.
  • the reed is secured at one end to the frame of the instrument and at the other to the apex of a small conical diaphragm of the semi-floating type and made of suitable material, such as spun aluminum or thin mica.
  • This combination of reed and diaphragm constitutes a substantially aperiodic couple.
  • the microphone just descrlbed 1s preferably mounted in a container of water-tight construction so that the mechanism will not be iniuenced by dampness due to condensation of the breath of the interpreter.
  • the permanent magnet should be wound with a coil of 4000 to 6000. ohms resistance, and, under normal conditions, the vibration of the reed caused by the voice should produce a terminal potential of the order of 2.5 volts between the terminals of the coil.
  • the microphone should also be fitted with an exterior voice-localizing device consisting, for example, of a small acoustic chamber provided with a mouth oriice of aluminum or other suitable light material. Condensation and any tendency to resonate may be absorbed by sound-dempers of sponge rubber, felt or other absorbent material inserted at the extremities of the acoustic chamber and held in place by detachable end-caps, which permit of renewal when necessary.
  • an exterior voice-localizing device consisting, for example, of a small acoustic chamber provided with a mouth oriice of aluminum or other suitable light material. Condensation and any tendency to resonate may be absorbed by sound-dempers of sponge rubber, felt or other absorbent material inserted at the extremities of the acoustic chamber and held in place by detachable end-caps, which permit of renewal when necessary.
  • the hand microphone 13g is suspended, when not in use, on a hook 21 which may be the spring-loaded hook of a switch-pedestal of the usual table type.
  • This hook 21 forms part of a switch 22 in the microphone circuit and, when the microphone is lifted from the hook, the hook is moved upwardly by a spring 23 into engagement with a ⁇ Contact 24, thus closing the circuit at this point.
  • the coil of the microphone is connected in series with a relay 25, a 1/5 ratio transformer 26 and a'suitable source of current such as a 4- Volt A battery 26a.
  • the 'switches 29 and 32 may be closed by means of separate relays but are here shown as controlled by a single magnet or relay 33.
  • the language indicator taken as a Whole, consists kof as many parts as therel are languages to be transmitted, that is as many parts as there are amplifier units.
  • a wall or cover containing a transparent character or letter indicating a language to be transmitted and back of each of said covers is a suitable source of light, such as an incandescent lamp 3l.
  • the relay 25 for any unit is operated, the corresponding relay 33 is operated, the corresponding lamp 31 is connected across the A. C. supply lines and the corresponding transparent indication or letter i's illuminated to indicate the language to be transmitted.
  • the transparent indications or letters are of different colors for the different parts to assist in distinguishing between them.
  • the same general color effects could be produced by using colored lamps.
  • the secondary of this transformer is loaded with a one megohm resistance 34 to improve quality, and a stabilizing resistance 35 of 25,000 ohms is connected in series with the grid connection 36 to prevent self oscillation.
  • The-microphone output is amplified by two pentode tubes 37 connected in parallel.
  • the use of two tubes offers increased current capacity and also increases the reliability of transmission in that the burning out of one tube during operation would not prevent transmission.
  • a pilot lamp 38 connected in parallel with the tube filaments 39 and tinted with the same color as the color determining element of the corresponding part of the language indicator, glows, when the filament potential, which is under the control of a switch 40, is thrown on, and serves as an indicator of proper filament current supply.
  • the output of the pentode amplifiers is delivered from plates 41 thereof to one or more of the pentode tubes and the 'secondary Winding is designed to match the impedance of tele hone receivers 43 supplied thereby and used) at the various receiving stations.
  • the 'secondary Winding is designed to match the impedance of tele hone receivers 43 supplied thereby and used) at the various receiving stations.
  • ⁇ 'primary winding is shunted, as by use of a 0.5 megohm resistance 44.
  • a filter For inhibiting a low-frequency oscillation with the consequent periodic thumping sound called motor-boating, a filter, preferably consisting of a 3 microfarad condenser 45 and a 50 henry iron-cored choke coil 46, is connected in the plate circuit which is supplied from a suitable B battery 47, such as a 180 volt, 2 ampere-hour capacity, storage battery.
  • a suitable B battery 47 such as a 180 volt, 2 ampere-hour capacity, storage battery.
  • eachamplifier unit and transformer is enclosed in ametallic box 48 which is grounded.
  • the several amplifiers, one for each language transmitted are housed in a single cabine
  • the grid potential may be given a. suitable negative value in any suitable manner.
  • the desired action is obtained, without using a C battery, by connecting a one microfarad condenser 49 and a resistance 50 in parallel between the joint negative terminals of the A and B batteries and the grid connection, thus producing the proper grid bias by the potential drop method.
  • the value of the resistance depends upon the operat ⁇ ing conditions in the tubes.
  • a general check-up on the operation of each amplifying unit may bemade by plugging a telephone receiver (not shown) in a test jack 51 connected across the output circuit of the corresponding transformer 42. By testing in this way, the operator is able to determine the quality and volume of each language transmission.
  • the current in the plate circuit is indicated by a milliammeter 52.
  • the filament circuit is provided with a suitable fuse, such as a 0.5 ampere fuse 52a.
  • the plate circuit is also protected by suitable means, such as a 50 milliampere fuse 53.
  • A. C. power lines 55 and 56 effects a connection between A. C. power lines 55 and 56 and devices for charging the A and B batteries during the operation of the amplifier unit.
  • the charging of the B battery is effected by means of a rectifier unit consisting of a copper-0X- ide rectifier 57, a filter 58, and a transformer 59.
  • the copper-oxide rectifier is connected in bridge formation to give full wave rectification.
  • the filter 58 consists of a 75 henryironcored choke coil connected in series with a rectifier supply line.
  • a 3 microfarad condenser 61 and a 4 to 6 microfarad condenser Y 62 are connected across the rectifier supply
  • the transmission lines from the microphones t o the amplifier units and from the amplifier units to the receiving stations consist of screened non-inductivewires enclosed in grounded metallic tubing drawn through conduits throughout the auditorium.
  • the transmission lines are connected, at suitable points or receiving stations, to multiple connector sockets 65 from which portable connections of' all lines may be made to any receiving position or desk.
  • the transmission on both sides of the amplifier unit is at low potential to reduce the capacitance effects of the wiring system.
  • each multiple connector socket 65 includes an individual socket 66 connected with the common return line 2O and a plurality of individual sockets 67 connected with the output transformer circuits of other amplifier units but at the other side thereof from their connection with the common return line 20.
  • Each telephone receiver set 68 is provided with a. multi-contact plug 69 providing an individual plug 70 to cooperate with the individual socket 66 and a plurality of single plugs 71 to cooperate with said individual sockets 67.
  • Such multi-contact plugs 69 are preferably of irreversible design so that they can be inserted only in the positions giving the proper connections.
  • each multi-contact plug 69 extends, preferably in the form of a portable cable to a selector switch 72 on a desk not shown) and forming part of a receiving station 17.
  • the switch 72 is illustrated asof a rotary multicontact type with each contact identified as to its language connection by a letter associated with the reference numeral applied thereto.
  • the receiving instrument or set is also provided With a volume-control device 73, here shown as a rotary Variable rheostat connected in series with the telephone receiver 43. By turning this rheostat each listener may control the volume of the transmitted speech to suit his individual acutcnessof hearing.
  • the various translators or interpreters will be seated side by side before the speaker, each translator being provided with a microphone, such as microphone 13g of which a general description has already been given.
  • the 'removal of any microphone from a corresponding hook will cause the corresponding language indicator to announce the corresponding language and will energize the associated amplifier unit.
  • the input for each amplifier is controlled directly by a microphone. It should be understood, however, that the rest of the system may be operated irrespective of the particular kind of control for the input of each amplifier.
  • the method of supplying translations of a speech in one language into other languages simultaneously with the delivery of the speech which comprises transmission of the speech to a plurality of translators corresponding to said other languages, interpretation of the speech into the corresponding other languages by said translators substantially simultaneously with the delivery of said speech, individual selection by each of a plurality of listeners at a corresponding plurality of points of the original speech or of any of the translations, and transmission to said listeners, of the original speech or of the translations in accordance With such selection.
  • An apparatus ortransmitting speeches in various languages to an audience comprising a series of individual microphones into which speech in different languages may be spoken by translators, a series of amplifiers each being individually connected to receive the output of an associated microphone, a series of visual indicators one for each microphone, and a control circuit to each indicator from the corresponding microphone, a series of language lines each being individually con nected to the corresponding amplifier and a common return line for all amplifiers, a series of receiving stations With switching devices at each station connecting each station to a receive the speech delivered into any microcommon return line and adapted to be selectively connected to the language lines, said switching mechanism being arranged to correspond With the arrangement of the visual indicator so that a listener can readily establish a connection with a language line which is receiving speech.
  • An apparatus for transmitting speech in various languages to an audience comprising a plurality of microphones, a plurality of receiving stations selectively 4connectible to phone, and visual indicating devices connected with and controlled by each microphone to indicate to persons at said receiving stations when said microphone is in operav tion.
  • An apparatus for transmitting speech in various languages to an audience comprisin an auditorium having a speakers station an a series of seats for the audience7 comprising a plurality of microphones adjacent the speakers station, a plurality of receiving stations at said seats selectively connectible to receive speech delivered ino any microphone; and visual indicating devices connected with and controlled by each microphone to indicate to persons at said receiving stations when said microphone is in operation.
  • An apparatus for transmitting speech in various languages to an audience comprising an auditorium having a speakers stat-ion and a series of seats for the audience, comprising a plurality of microphones adjacent the speakers station, a plurality of receiving sta tions at said seats selectively connectible to receive speech delivered into any micro phone; and visual indicating devices associated with each microphone and operable to indicate to persons at said receiving stations that the microphone is in use and the langauge being delivered to the receiving stations from said microphone.
  • an auditorium having .a speakers station and a series of seats for an audience, a plurality of translators microphones arranged adjacent to the speakers station and adapted to transmit spoken translations of a speech, a plurality of receiving stations at said seats Within direct hearing range of the speakers station, means including amplifiers individual to said microphones for delivering said translations at said receivA ing stations; a device at each receiving sta.- ⁇ tion for selectively connecting the said receiving station with any one of said microphones; and a visual indicating device associated with each microphone and operable to indicate when the microphone is in use and the language being delivered by it to the receiving stations.

Description

Aug. 30, 1932. E. A. FILENE SPEECHVTRANSLATING SYSTEM AND METHOD IN VENT 0R F/m gf'dwdrdlm@ T) JI m Ml wm w .J 1 o @o @o M, y @o AV e 1 W o @o @o @o /r/J .mh m no, @o @o E@ @o M/ G no a@ E@ E@ E@ E@ len/J .W W Ao E@ E@ Eo Q /MJ 4 7@ @o @o @o l g lin/l1. 0&0 @o @o e |||||VU Wn W o 1W d WH gaf-Dc A TT ORNE YS' Aug. 30, 1932. E. A. FILENE SPEECH TRANSLATING SYSTEM AND METHOD Filed May 12, 1930 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENT OR Ewald/Amm@ B Y 1 Patented Aug. 30, 1932 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE EDWARD A. FILENE, F BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS SPEECH TBANSLATING -Application ledlay 12,
full understanding of persons to whom the subject-matter of the speeches is of interest and importance, and the general object of the invention is to provide apparatus whereby such requirements can be met eiiciently.
At gatherings such as international conferences, diiculties arise in interpreting the speechesinto a number of different languages and much waste oi time results from ordinary methods of interpreting under such conditions. According to the usual methods of meeting such a situation, a speech delivered A in one language is subsequently interpreted into one or more languages and the overall or total time occupied per speech is greatly increased thereby. Furthermore, this time feature generally precludes interpretation being given in an adequate number of languages where several nationalities are represented. Another important object of the invention is to meet these requirements.
A further object of the invention is to provide an apparatus whereby limitations of prior systems or methods are overcome by making any required number of interpretations simultaneously, and, if desired, simultaneous'ly with the speech itself so that time loss is almost entirely eliminated and the choice of any required number of languages can be provided for without diHiculty.
Other objects and advantages will appear upon consideration of the following description and ofthe drawings, in which:
Fig. 1 is a diagramatic view illustrating a preferred embodiment of the invention;
Fig. 2. is a diagrammatic view illustrating one ampliiier unit, the microphone connected therewith and one of the language selecting receiving sets; and
Fig. 3 is a diagrammatic view of an audi torium showing a general arrangement of the invention.
The objects of the invention are attained in general in the following manner: All of the translations are made by interpreters suitably positioned with respect to the speaker SYSTEM am) METHOD 1930. serial No. 451,814.'
and their translations are delivered to the audience by telephony. For this purpose each interpreter is provided with an individual microphone connected through an amplifier to telephone receiving instruments installed at various parts ofthe hall occupied by the audience, each receiving instrument being provided with selector means whereby any one of the translators may be selected for reception. For example, whereinterpretations or translations of a speech deliveredv in German are made into English, French and Spanish, any 'member of the audience can select the interpretation or translation into theparticular 'language in which he desires to hear the speech, irrespective of the language selected by any other hearer. Also where translations are delivered 'simultaneously with the speech itself, members of the audience are enabled to receive the speech in the language of their choice irrespective of the language in which the speech is delivered.
In order that the translations of this nature may be made successfully, the interpreters should be placed as close to the speaker as possible. At the same time to enable a number of interpreters to work close together as well as in close proximity of the speaker without mutual disturbance, the individual microphones are provided with silencers or devices designed to prevent ingress of extraneous sounds and egress of the interpreters voices.
Also, in order that the interpreter may 85 give undivided attention to the task and may. not be called upon to attend in any way to the actual operation of the system, automatic control of the system as a whole is provided for, as through the medium of magnetic relays. For example, provision is made whereby the appropriate transmitter is brought into operation by removing the corresponding microphone from a supporting hook and is switched olf by returning the microphone to the hook. n
The removal of the microphone from the hook and the return thereof to the hook are also utilized to control a language indicator which `is located in a position visible to the audience as a whole and indicates the lan- .rial and prefera guage being transmitted at any given time. Thus, when an interpreter lifts his microphone to deliver an interpretation or translation, the language appropriate thereto 1s announced on the indicator; and, if interpretations or translations in a number of languages are delivered simultaneously, each language is indicated in some manner.
To meet practical requirements where writing or note taking are to be carried out by the listener, use should be made of a receivingv instrument which leaves the head and hands entirely free but which excludes so far as possible the speakers voice so that the translation required may be received free from 1nterference. Furthermore to assure the reception of the translation free from interference by the speakers voice, the transmissions are amplified to a suitable degree before delivery to the audience so that thestrength of the' reception may always be sufficient to predominate ever extraneous sounds and overcome ordinary defects of hearing. Also in order that the actual strength may be adjusted to individual requirements, a volume control device is y provided at each receiving instruvment without affecting the transmission as a whole.
Referring to Fig. l of the drawings, 10 designates the position occupied by the speaker on a platform or stage 1l; and 12g, 12f, 128, 12e, and 12j indicate, respectively, the positions occupied by interpreters or translators to transmit interpretations or translations in German, French, Spanish, English and Japanese. Positioned at the frontof the corresponding interpreters positions are microphones 13g, 13f, 13s, 13e and 13j, and these microphones are connected by suitable input circuits, including wires or conductors 14 with amplifier units 15g, 157, 15a, 15e and 15j, each of which is provided with means for indicating the language with which it is to be used.
In the present diagrammatic showing, German is indicated by Gr, French by F, Spanish by S, English by E, and Japanese by J; such letters bein outlined by opaque mately being formed of transparent material' covering the corresponding openings in. the opaque material forming sldes of language indicators or compartments 16g, 16f, 16s, 16e, and 16g, respectively. These language indicators or compartments are preferably positioned at or above the rostrum or latform and may be independent of each ot er or may be formed as parts of a single box. Said compartments are individual to these letters and each contains a source of light, controlled in a manner to be described hereinafter. Preferably each letter or the corresponding lamp has a characteristic color. As will be brought out hereinafter, these lamps are lighted only when :the corresponding microphones are in use and the lighting is preferably controlled automatically.
One line in the output circuit of each amplifier unit is connected by suitable branches with a corresponding contact at each of the receiving stations in the system preferabl located at the seats or desks in the auditorium. For illustrating the principles of the system, it is considered sufiicient to show two receiving stations 17 and 18. The receiving station 17 includes five rela-tively stationary contacts 17g, 17f, 17s, 17e and 17 j, and 'a movable contact 17m; such stationary contacts being connected respectively with language lines 19g, 19f, 19.9, 19e, and 19j of the output circuitsof the respective amplifier units, and the movable contact 17m being connected by a common return line 20 connected with the other sides of the out ut circuits of all of the amplifier units. bviously by bringing the movable contact 17m into engagement with any of said stationary contacts, the receiving station 17 will be connected with the amplifier unit corresponding with such stationary contact.
.The language line contacts 17g, 17', 17', 17e and 17J are arranged in corresponding order to the order of the visual indicators 16S, 16, 16s, 16e and 161,'so that the listener may select the desired language line by noting the relative position of the indicator of the language desired and then selecting the correspondingly arranged language line contact.
Correspondingly, the receiving station 18 includes stationary contacts 18g, 18f, 18s, 18e, and 18y connected respectively with the amplifier unit output lines 19g, 19f, 19s, 19e and 19j; and av movable contact 18m for selective cooperation with these stationary contacts. The receiving stations are arranged at the seats for the audience, and of course, the entire apparatus is arranged in a suitable auditorium. It is usual in auditoriums of this character to provide each person of the seated audience with a small desk, and the receiving stations ma be conveniently arranged at such desks. he seats are within hearing range of the speaker and the speaker is in view of the'seated audience.
The system as a whole havin been described in a general way, a descri tion will now be given of so much of a pre erred embodiment as is necessary in connection with the general description to make the construction and opera-tion clear. In Fig. 2, there are shown amicrophone, which will be considered as microphone 13g of Fig. 1; an amplifying unit, which will be considered as amplifier unit 15g of Fig. 1; and a receiving station, which will be considered as receiving station 17 of Fig. 1; and by describing these parts and the connections therewith the o eration of the entire apparatus will be ma e clear.
The microphone 13g is not shown in detail but is referably of t e same general ty as that sown in the British patent to G. Brown, No. 29,833, of 1910. Such preferred form of microphone is of the `electrodynamic t and consists of a light iron reed adjustalii); mounted between the poles of the permanent magnet. The reed is secured at one end to the frame of the instrument and at the other to the apex of a small conical diaphragm of the semi-floating type and made of suitable material, such as spun aluminum or thin mica. vThis combination of reed and diaphragm constitutes a substantially aperiodic couple. J
.The microphone just descrlbed 1s preferably mounted in a container of water-tight construction so that the mechanism will not be iniuenced by dampness due to condensation of the breath of the interpreter. The permanent magnet should be wound with a coil of 4000 to 6000. ohms resistance, and, under normal conditions, the vibration of the reed caused by the voice should produce a terminal potential of the order of 2.5 volts between the terminals of the coil.
The microphone should also be fitted with an exterior voice-localizing device consisting, for example, of a small acoustic chamber provided with a mouth oriice of aluminum or other suitable light material. Condensation and any tendency to resonate may be absorbed by sound-dempers of sponge rubber, felt or other absorbent material inserted at the extremities of the acoustic chamber and held in place by detachable end-caps, which permit of renewal when necessary.
Small holes in the sidesof the acoustic chamber release internal air pressure caused by speaking into the microphone with the orifice closed by the lips. The holes do not, however, permit any appreciable ingress or egress of sound so that noise or speech in the immediate vicinity does not affect the microphone.
At this point it should be noted that the `microphones for the different interpreters are similar and are connected in the same general manner with the corresponding ampliier units. p f
The hand microphone 13g is suspended, when not in use, on a hook 21 which may be the spring-loaded hook of a switch-pedestal of the usual table type. This hook 21 forms part of a switch 22 in the microphone circuit and, when the microphone is lifted from the hook, the hook is moved upwardly by a spring 23 into engagement with a `Contact 24, thus closing the circuit at this point. The coil of the microphone is connected in series with a relay 25, a 1/5 ratio transformer 26 and a'suitable source of current such as a 4- Volt A battery 26a. Upon removal ofthe microphone 13g from the hook 21, lthe switch 22 is 'closed and the relay is energized to shift its normally retracted armature 27 into engagement with a -contact 28 and close another circuit througha suitable source of power, such as said 4-volt A battery 26a. This action of the relay 25 causes the closing of a switch 29 in a circuit. 30 containing the lighting means 31 for the language indicator associated with the amplifier unit 15g, and also causes the closing of a switch 32 to connect the amplifier unit with a suitable source of power, as will be described more .fully hereinafter. y
The 'switches 29 and 32 may be closed by means of separate relays but are here shown as controlled by a single magnet or relay 33.
The language indicator, taken as a Whole, consists kof as many parts as therel are languages to be transmitted, that is as many parts as there are amplifier units. At the front of each part of the language indicator, is a wall or cover containing a transparent character or letter indicating a language to be transmitted and back of each of said covers is a suitable source of light, such as an incandescent lamp 3l. When the relay 25 for any unit is operated, the corresponding relay 33 is operated, the corresponding lamp 31 is connected across the A. C. supply lines and the corresponding transparent indication or letter i's illuminated to indicate the language to be transmitted. Preferably the transparent indications or letters are of different colors for the different parts to assist in distinguishing between them. Of course, as previously pointed out, the same general color effects could be produced by using colored lamps.
eoV
The transformer 26, which as above stated,
is a step-up transformer of 1/ 5 ratio of transformation, has an impedance matching that of the microphone winding, and raises the potential of the microphone output before it is impressed upon the thermionic amplifier 15g. Preferably, the secondary of this transformer is loaded with a one megohm resistance 34 to improve quality, and a stabilizing resistance 35 of 25,000 ohms is connected in series with the grid connection 36 to prevent self oscillation.
The-microphone output is amplified by two pentode tubes 37 connected in parallel. The use of two tubes offers increased current capacity and also increases the reliability of transmission in that the burning out of one tube during operation would not prevent transmission. A pilot lamp 38, connected in parallel with the tube filaments 39 and tinted with the same color as the color determining element of the corresponding part of the language indicator, glows, when the filament potential, which is under the control of a switch 40, is thrown on, and serves as an indicator of proper filament current supply.
The output of the pentode amplifiers is delivered from plates 41 thereof to one or more of the pentode tubes and the 'secondary Winding is designed to match the impedance of tele hone receivers 43 supplied thereby and used) at the various receiving stations. To increase the stability of tube operation, the
` 'primary winding is shunted, as by use of a 0.5 megohm resistance 44.
For inhibiting a low-frequency oscillation with the consequent periodic thumping sound called motor-boating, a filter, preferably consisting of a 3 microfarad condenser 45 and a 50 henry iron-cored choke coil 46, is connected in the plate circuit which is supplied from a suitable B battery 47, such as a 180 volt, 2 ampere-hour capacity, storage battery. To prevent inductive interaction between the various amplifying units, eachamplifier unit and transformer is enclosed in ametallic box 48 which is grounded. Preferably, the several amplifiers, one for each language transmitted, are housed in a single cabine The grid potential may be given a. suitable negative value in any suitable manner. Ac-
i cording to the preferred embodiment ofthe invention, the desired action is obtained, without using a C battery, by connecting a one microfarad condenser 49 and a resistance 50 in parallel between the joint negative terminals of the A and B batteries and the grid connection, thus producing the proper grid bias by the potential drop method. The value of the resistance depends upon the operat` ing conditions in the tubes.
A general check-up on the operation of each amplifying unit may bemade by plugging a telephone receiver (not shown) in a test jack 51 connected across the output circuit of the corresponding transformer 42. By testing in this way, the operator is able to determine the quality and volume of each language transmission. The current in the plate circuit is indicated by a milliammeter 52. In addition to the switch 40, the filament circuit is provided with a suitable fuse, such as a 0.5 ampere fuse 52a. The plate circuit is also protected by suitable means, such as a 50 milliampere fuse 53.
`The automatic closing of the switch 32,
resulting from the removal of the microphone from its hook, effects a connection between A. C. power lines 55 and 56 and devices for charging the A and B batteries during the operation of the amplifier unit. The charging of the B battery is effected by means of a rectifier unit consisting of a copper-0X- ide rectifier 57, a filter 58, and a transformer 59. The copper-oxide rectifier is connected in bridge formation to give full wave rectification.
-The filter 58 consists of a 75 henryironcored choke coil connected in series with a rectifier supply line. A 3 microfarad condenser 61 and a 4 to 6 microfarad condenser Y 62 are connected across the rectifier supply Preferably, the transmission lines from the microphones t o the amplifier units and from the amplifier units to the receiving stations consist of screened non-inductivewires enclosed in grounded metallic tubing drawn through conduits throughout the auditorium.
The transmission lines are connected, at suitable points or receiving stations, to multiple connector sockets 65 from which portable connections of' all lines may be made to any receiving position or desk. The transmission on both sides of the amplifier unit is at low potential to reduce the capacitance effects of the wiring system.
As illustrated in Fig. 2, each multiple connector socket 65 includes an individual socket 66 connected with the common return line 2O and a plurality of individual sockets 67 connected with the output transformer circuits of other amplifier units but at the other side thereof from their connection with the common return line 20.
Each telephone receiver set 68 is provided with a. multi-contact plug 69 providing an individual plug 70 to cooperate with the individual socket 66 and a plurality of single plugs 71 to cooperate with said individual sockets 67. Such multi-contact plugs 69 are preferably of irreversible design so that they can be inserted only in the positions giving the proper connections.
The various transmission lines connected with each multi-contact plug 69 extend, preferably in the form of a portable cable to a selector switch 72 on a desk not shown) and forming part of a receiving station 17. The switch 72 is illustrated asof a rotary multicontact type with each contact identified as to its language connection by a letter associated with the reference numeral applied thereto. The receiving instrument or set is also provided With a volume-control device 73, here shown as a rotary Variable rheostat connected in series with the telephone receiver 43. By turning this rheostat each listener may control the volume of the transmitted speech to suit his individual acutcnessof hearing.
Preferably, each telephone receiver is an electromagnetic one of about 60 ohms resistance, is of substantially the same construction i asl the ymicrophone transmitter 13g, `and is mounted in a. small box (not shown) which also contains the corresponding selector switch. Each telephone receiver may include a pair of ear phones. i Generally these ear phones are of the stethoscopic type suitably connected to form stethophones which are adapted for use by'listeners who wish to have thehands free for taking notes.
Generally, the various translators or interpreters will be seated side by side before the speaker, each translator being provided with a microphone, such as microphone 13g of which a general description has already been given. The 'removal of any microphone from a corresponding hook will cause the corresponding language indicator to announce the corresponding language and will energize the associated amplifier unit. A listener at one of the receiving stations, 17 for example, then turns his selector switch to the stationary contact corresponding to the language desired,` adjusts the volume by means of the corresponding volume control device 7 3, and listens to the translation of the speech as it is being delivered in another language.
According to the illustrative form of the invention the input for each amplifier is controlled directly by a microphone. It should be understood, however, that the rest of the system may be operated irrespective of the particular kind of control for the input of each amplifier.
it should be i understood that various changes may be made i the construction and arrangement of parts and that certain parts may be used Without others Without departing from the true spirit and scope of the invention.
Having thus described my invention, I claim: l
l. The method of supplying translations of a speech in one language into other languages simultaneously with the delivery of the speech, Which comprises transmission of the speech to a plurality of translators corresponding to said other languages, interpretation of the speech into the corresponding other languages by said translators substantially simultaneously with the delivery of said speech, individual selection by each of a plurality of listeners at a corresponding plurality of points of the original speech or of any of the translations, and transmission to said listeners, of the original speech or of the translations in accordance With such selection.
2. The method of supplying translations of a speech in one language into other languages simultaneously. with the delivery of the speech, which comprises transmission of the speech directly to a plurality of translators corresponding to said other languages and positioned adjacent to the speaker Where they can readily hear the speech, translation of the speech into the corresponding other languages by said inter reters substantially simultaneously with t e deliver of said speech,- individual selection by eac of a plurality o-f listeners at a corresponding plurality of points Within direct hearing range of the speaker of the language of the speaker or of any of the translations, and transmission to said listeners either directly from said speaker or indirectly from said translation in accordance with such selection.
3. Inapparatus of the class described, the combination of a plurality of translators `microphones arranged adjacent to a speakers position so that translators using the same can readily hear a speaker in that-position, each of said microphones being such that the translation spoken into the same will not be interfered with by the speaker or by the translations spoken into the other microphones, a plurality of receiving stations within direct hearing range of thel speakers position, at each of which any selected translation may be heard by a listener without interference by the speaker or by the other receiving stations, means for transmitting the translations to said receiving stations, and means under the control of' the listener at each receiving station for selecting the original speech or the interpreted language for hearing at that station.
4. In apparatus of the class described, the. combination of a plurality of translators transmitters arranged adjacent to a speakers position; a plurality of receiving stations Within direct hearing range of the speakers position; an independent transmitting circuitfor each transmitter, each of such circuits leading to all of said plurality of receiving stations whereby each transmitter will be connected by a non-interfering circuit with all of the receiving stations independently of the other transmitters; receiving means at each of said receiving stations including a telephone receiver adapted for preventing interference by extraneous noise; and means at each receiving station for selectively connecting the telephone at such receiving station with any one of said transmitting circuits and disconnecting it from all of the other transmitting circuits.
5. An apparatus ortransmitting speeches in various languages to an audience, comprising a series of individual microphones into which speech in different languages may be spoken by translators, a series of amplifiers each being individually connected to receive the output of an associated microphone, a series of visual indicators one for each microphone, and a control circuit to each indicator from the corresponding microphone, a series of language lines each being individually con nected to the corresponding amplifier and a common return line for all amplifiers, a series of receiving stations With switching devices at each station connecting each station to a receive the speech delivered into any microcommon return line and adapted to be selectively connected to the language lines, said switching mechanism being arranged to correspond With the arrangement of the visual indicator so that a listener can readily establish a connection with a language line which is receiving speech.
6. An apparatus for transmitting speech in various languages to an audience, comprising a plurality of microphones, a plurality of receiving stations selectively 4connectible to phone, and visual indicating devices connected with and controlled by each microphone to indicate to persons at said receiving stations when said microphone is in operav tion.
. 7. An apparatus for transmitting speech in various languages to an audience, comprisin an auditorium having a speakers station an a series of seats for the audience7 comprising a plurality of microphones adjacent the speakers station, a plurality of receiving stations at said seats selectively connectible to receive speech delivered ino any microphone; and visual indicating devices connected with and controlled by each microphone to indicate to persons at said receiving stations when said microphone is in operation.
8. An apparatus for transmitting speech in various languages to an audience, comprising an auditorium having a speakers stat-ion and a series of seats for the audience, comprising a plurality of microphones adjacent the speakers station, a plurality of receiving sta tions at said seats selectively connectible to receive speech delivered into any micro phone; and visual indicating devices associated with each microphone and operable to indicate to persons at said receiving stations that the microphone is in use and the langauge being delivered to the receiving stations from said microphone.
9. In apparatus of the class described, thecombination of an auditorium having .a speakers station and a series of seats for an audience, a plurality of translators microphones arranged adjacent to the speakers station and adapted to transmit spoken translations of a speech, a plurality of receiving stations at said seats Within direct hearing range of the speakers station, means including amplifiers individual to said microphones for delivering said translations at said receivA ing stations; a device at each receiving sta.-` tion for selectively connecting the said receiving station with any one of said microphones; and a visual indicating device associated with each microphone and operable to indicate when the microphone is in use and the language being delivered by it to the receiving stations.
In testimony whereof I hereunto aix my signature.
EDWARD A. FILENE.
US451814A 1930-05-12 1930-05-12 Speech translating system and method Expired - Lifetime US1874480A (en)

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Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US451814A US1874480A (en) 1930-05-12 1930-05-12 Speech translating system and method
GB15905/30A GB352179A (en) 1930-05-12 1930-05-23 Speech-translating method and apparatus therefor
FR696315D FR696315A (en) 1930-05-12 1930-05-30 Method and apparatus for speech translation
CH154664D CH154664A (en) 1930-05-12 1930-06-24 Installation to transmit speeches, readings, etc. in several languages.

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

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Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2567431A (en) * 1947-05-05 1951-09-11 William S Halstead Communications system of restricted-range type
US2588191A (en) * 1949-06-09 1952-03-04 Frank M Zuras Control unit for visual training devices
US20140186807A1 (en) * 2013-01-03 2014-07-03 East Carolina University Methods, systems, and devices for multi-user improvement of reading comprehension using frequency altered feedback
USD819126S1 (en) 2013-01-03 2018-05-29 East Carolina University Multi-user reading comprehension therapy device

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2567431A (en) * 1947-05-05 1951-09-11 William S Halstead Communications system of restricted-range type
US2588191A (en) * 1949-06-09 1952-03-04 Frank M Zuras Control unit for visual training devices
US20140186807A1 (en) * 2013-01-03 2014-07-03 East Carolina University Methods, systems, and devices for multi-user improvement of reading comprehension using frequency altered feedback
US9547997B2 (en) * 2013-01-03 2017-01-17 East Carolina University Methods, systems, and devices for multi-user improvement of reading comprehension using frequency altered feedback
USD819126S1 (en) 2013-01-03 2018-05-29 East Carolina University Multi-user reading comprehension therapy device
US10008125B2 (en) 2013-01-03 2018-06-26 East Carolina University Methods, systems, and devices for multi-user treatment for improvement of reading comprehension using frequency altered feedback

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Publication number Publication date
GB352179A (en) 1931-07-09
CH154664A (en) 1932-05-15
FR696315A (en) 1930-12-27

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