US1871978A - Insect electrocutor - Google Patents

Insect electrocutor Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1871978A
US1871978A US24684028A US1871978A US 1871978 A US1871978 A US 1871978A US 24684028 A US24684028 A US 24684028A US 1871978 A US1871978 A US 1871978A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
wires
conductors
wire
lengths
spaced
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
William M Frost
Original Assignee
William M Frost
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01MCATCHING, TRAPPING OR SCARING OF ANIMALS; APPARATUS FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF NOXIOUS ANIMALS OR NOXIOUS PLANTS
    • A01M1/00Stationary means for catching or killing insects
    • A01M1/22Killing insects by electric means
    • A01M1/223Killing insects by electric means by using electrocution
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01MCATCHING, TRAPPING OR SCARING OF ANIMALS; APPARATUS FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF NOXIOUS ANIMALS OR NOXIOUS PLANTS
    • A01M1/00Stationary means for catching or killing insects
    • A01M1/02Stationary means for catching or killing insects with devices or substances, e.g. food, pheronones attracting the insects
    • A01M1/04Attracting insects by using illumination or colours
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A01AGRICULTURE; FORESTRY; ANIMAL HUSBANDRY; HUNTING; TRAPPING; FISHING
    • A01MCATCHING, TRAPPING OR SCARING OF ANIMALS; APPARATUS FOR THE DESTRUCTION OF NOXIOUS ANIMALS OR NOXIOUS PLANTS
    • A01M2200/00Kind of animal
    • A01M2200/01Insects
    • A01M2200/012Flying insects

Description

4 mg. 16, 1932. w. M. FROST 1,871,978

INSECT ELECTROCUTOR a FEJQE.

Aug. 16, 1932. w. M. FROST INSECT ELECTROCUTOR Filed Jan. 14, 1928 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented na is, than stares t int INSECT ELECTEOGUTGE Application filed January it, 1923. Serial No. 2%,840.

My invention relates to insect electrocutors and particularly to devices of this character which comprise spaced wires or other conductors adapted to be charged with an electric a current and to electrocute insects which come into contact with or in close proximity to the wires.

Tnsect electrocutors of this general type have heretofore been formed of alternately is positioned and suitably insulated positive and negative electric wires or conductors, examples of devices of this kind being disclosed in Letters Patent No. 974,7 85, granted to me on November 8, 1910.

The conductor elements employed in such devices may be positioned and arranged in various ways. Forexample, they may consist of only a pair of continuous conductors looped or bent to form a plurality of lengths or runs; or they may be in the form of relatively shorter separate conductors provided with suit-able electrical connections at their ends. In whichever way the lengths or runs of the conductor elements are provided they are capable of a variety of modes of arrangement. They may be disposed horizontally, or vertically, or at any desired angle. Or, when suitably insulated, vertical and horizontal wires may be crossed, with or without oblique wires or conductors, to present a grid formation, which may also be produced by crossed oblique conductors, or by combining oblique conductors with either the horizontal or vertical conductors in similar fashion I have found it preferable, however, to arrange all of the conductors or lengths or runs of the conductors in substantially arallel relation, and in the same plane, or su stantially so, as in the forms of devices shown in my former Patent No. 974,7 85.

The parallel lengths or runs are preferably so arranged that alternate ones will be charged with currents of opposite polarity, and so spaced from one another that a normally open circuit may be completed through adjacent conductors or lengths of conductors by the body of an insect which comes into contact with the charged conductors or into the electrostatic field which is created be- 50 tween the conductors and for an appreciable device is to be installed and used. The wire distance beyond the plane in which they lie. in devices of this character and, general construction heretofore blown or used, the conductor elements more or less generally employed have been in the form of ordinary plain straight wire. This wire is ordinarily stretched upon a frame or between suitably spaced supports, according to the requirements of the particular situation in which the lengths or runs of necessity have been placed sufficiently close together to have the electrostatic fields of opposite polarities cover practically the entire space between the wires, in order to prevent the passage of small insects through the device between the wires without being electrocuted.

Under certain conditions, as, for example, where the device is to be made in the form of a screen, particularly for use in show windows, doors, transoms or the like, it is desirable to use fine wire, since the wires are not readily visible and form a screen which is substantiall transparent. Furthermore, wires of this kind may be charged with a relatively high tension current or static charge, so that insects will be electrocuted if they merely pass between adjacent wires without coming into contact with either of them. In order to accomplish this result however the wires must be comparatively close together; the best results I have found to be obtained by spacing the wires approximately only it; of an inch apart, when from 24 to 28 gauge wire is used.

When ordinary plain straight wires are placed so close to ether, the electrostatic field created beyon the plane of the wires is considerably less, both as todepth' and intensity, than can be obtained by spacing the wires farther apart. The field created when the wires are sufficiently close together to insure against the passage. of insects between them is'insufiicient, in fact, to accomplish the electrocution of the insects at a distance from the screen, as can be effected where a deeper and stronger electrostatic field exists. As a result, insects approaching the wires are in many cases not affected until they actually come into contact with the wires. The burn- 1 ing of insects upon the wires of the screen is objectionable, for the reason that the screen may become fouled and clogged, and rendered unsightly and less efficient.

I have also discovered that, where the conductor elements of the screen are plain straight'wires, and are as close together as is required to prevent the passage of insects between them, it is practically impossible to maintain the wires in their required spaced relation without the aid of some means for exerting a constant tension upon them. However taut the wires may be stretched when they are placed upon their frame'or other support, and however exactly they may then be positioned and spaced, they cannot be depended upon to maintain an accurate or even operative spaced relationship under all conditions of temperature and climate. It has been found that, when exposed even to ordinarily high atmospheric temperatures, the wires will lengthen and sag to such an extent and so irregularly that adjacent wires of opposite polarity will contact and short circuit the device, thus rendering it inoperative.

One of the principal objects of my invention is the provision of an insect electrocutor which will possess all of the advantages of devices of similar character heretofore known or used, and which will, at insignificant additional cost, if any, have a wider field of influence to attract insects to the device and will possess a considerably more extended and more powerful electrocutive action.

A further object of my invention is the provision of an insect electrocutor comprising spaced wires or conductors so fashioned, shaped, constructed and arranged as to be capable of being positioned in close juxtaposition and yet creating, when charged with electric current, a suction or attraction of insects toward the wires, and the electrocution of the insects before they come into contact with the wires.

A further object of the invention is the provision of an insect electrocutor composed of wires or conductors of such form, configuration or construction as to effect the holding of the conductors securely in their assembled relation with the desired tautness, without the aid of separate holding, securing, or tensioning devices, and without materially increasing the difficulty or cost of manufacture or assembly of the device. In fact, the omission of the heretofore essential separate tension devices for the wires tends both to cheapen and to facilitate production.

These objects and advantages are attained by the use of wires, thin metallic strips or ribbons, or other conductors of a particular form, construction and configuration. The desired effects are produced by employing conductor elements which have incorporated or produced in them a series of bends throughout their entire length or a substantial portion thereof. These bends may be in the form of crimps, waves or corrugations, placed in the conductor by dies or other suitable means well known in the art. Or the bends may be produced by giving the conductor a spiral or helical form throughout its entire length or a part or parts thereof. As a result of such bending of the conductors, they are made to possess the characteristics of springs, being given a positive and substantial longitudinal resiliency by virtue of which they tend to return to their original condition when stretched. Conductors so formed, when stretched and secured in their elongated condition upon a support or supports will tend to shorten themselves, thus exerting a pull upon the support at their points of attachment, and constantly maintaining a high degree of tension in the conductors themselves.

By this means the proper tensioning of the conductors is obtained, and adjacent conductors or adjacent lengths or runs of conductors are maintained uniformly spaced from one another throughout the width or length of the device, irrespective of temperature or other climatic conditions. Thus, the use of separate tensioning devices is made unnecessary. This, in itself is an important advantage.

Of even greater importance,however, are the widening of the scope of action of the device and its increased effectiveness. Because of the configuration of the conductors the current through them creates greater inductance and establishes anelectrostatic field on each side which is considerably more extensive and intensive than would be obtained if the current were passed through plain straight wire such as has heretofore been used in devices of this character. The electrostatic field, it has been observed, is deepest and strongest immediately beyond the points or convex sides of the bends, at which points the condition of the surrounding atmosphere is most affected, and electrical discharges tend most strongly to occur.

One of the greatest advantages arising from my present invention is due to the effect thus produced upon the atmosphere around, and particularly in front, of a series of spaced conductors bent in the manner described. A device constructed of conductors of such formation, when charged with current, produces a substantial and distinctly perceptible ozonification of the atmosphere, rarefying the air for an appreciable distance on either side of the plane of the conductors. The result is a I marked draft or suction toward the wires, this being so noticeable as to give the appearance of a magnetic attraction, insects ap proaching the screen being drawn forcibly toward it and into the strong electrostatic terrace field in front of it, wherein they are electrocuted before they actually come into contact with the wires.

Other objects and advantages of my invention will be apparent from the following specification and drawings, in which like numerals refer to like parts throughout the several views, and in which Figure 1 is a side elevational view of an-' insect electrocutor' of the screen type constructed in accordance with my invention and showing the preferred form of conductor elements.

Figure 2 is a similar view of an insect electrocutor, also showing the preferred form of conductors similarly arranged but attached to the support in a different manner.

Figure 3 is a broken enlarged horizontal sectional yiew on line 3-3- of Fig. 2, showing the preferred manner of crimping or corrugating the conductors.

Figure 4 is an enlarged fragmentar s'imilarto Fig. 1, showing a modified of conductor element. a

Figure 5 is a view similar to Fig. 2, showing the form of conductor of Fig. 4 secured view form to the support in the manner illustrated in 5 electric conductors.

Figure 6 is a view similar to Fig. 2, show-' ing a different arrangement of the conductors.

Figure 7 is a perspective view of a cage type-of insect electrocuton, showing my preferred form of conductor element.

Figure 8 is a view similar to Fig. 7, showing my preferred form of conductor element applied to a specifically different form of device of the cage type.

In the drawings m invention is shown applied to supportmg ames of several shapes and types. These frames are employed merely as illustrative examples, the invention being adapted for use in any insect electrocuting device wherein there are spaced The shape, size or construction of the support for the conductors is unimportant. The invention resides in the use of spaced electric conductors of the character and configuration described, and they may be held upon a support of any suitable character. The preferable form of suport is an open' frame of one of the types illustrated. The conductors, however, may be stretched across an opening in a door or windo or across any opening of suitable size to t e walls of which the conductors can be fastened in taut condition. (Jr, the conductor elements may even be stretched upon I are securely held oppositely supporting strips, preferably 0 and secured to a suitable imperforate support, such as a flat board.

By we of illustration I have, in Figs. 1 to 6 inc usive, shown in the invention applied to a rectangular frame 1 within which dis osed, wireinsulating material. tween the strips are stretched, in spaced parallel relation, the conductor elements,wh1ch are preferably of steel or spring tensioned alloy. The conductorsmay be in the form of wires or thin narrow metallic 7 The wire-supporting members may be made of wood, fibre-board or other suitable sheet insulatingmaterial, or may be of rubber, pyroxylin or any other suitable composition molded to shape. They may be made in the form of a single unitary strip, or as a plurality of strip sections.

In Figs. 1 and 4 the wire-supporting strips 2 are provided with rows of heads or projections 3, about which the wires 4 and 5 may be turned or looped, and by which the several lengths of wire may be securely held. These heads or projections may be located upon either or both of the faces of the supporting strips. Their form and construc-- tion constitute an invention for which I have made application for Letters Patent, said application being Serial No. 246,47 5, filed January 13, 1928 co-pending herewith. By the use of supporting strips of this general character, the strands or lengths or reverse bends of the Wires 4 and 5, formed by looping the wiresback and forth across the frame around oppositely disposed supporting heads or projections 3, will lie in spaced parallel relation, all in the. same plane. By supporting one Wire upon projections on one side of the strips and the other wire upon projections on the opposite side, the parallel lengths of the two wires will be in alternating arrangement throughout the screen. The wire supporting projections may be so arranged and dimensioned that adjacent wires of opposite polarity will be sufficiently close together to prevent insects from passing between them without bridging the circuit and from the ordinary house lighting circuit, I

through a suitable transformer 15 to the opposite poles of which the wires 4 and 5 may e respectively connected.

Each of the wires 4 and 5 is formed with a k series of bends in it which are preferably re-v peated at short intervals. throu hout its en-' tire length. These bends may produced questionably effective in bringing about the electrical phenomena and advantageous results hereinbefore described.

Like results are obtained by using separate lengths of wire instead of the pair of looped wires arranged with their lengths or runs in parallel relation, as shown in Figs. 1 and 4. Figs. 2, 5 and 6 show several different modes of arrangement of such separate parallel lengths of wire. In Fig. 5 the wires illus trated are of the spiral or helical form depicted in Fig. 4. In the other views the wires are shown as crimped, waved or corrugated.

By way of example, these wires are shown applied to a rectangular frame similar to that illustrated in Figs. 1 and 4. The wires 4a,

5a are supported by wire-supporting strips 2a, generally similar to strips 2, the ends of the wires being secured to the strips in any suitable and convenient manner, preferably by being run through apertures or grooves in the strips or by being looped around or otherwise fastened to projections upon the opposite faces of the strips.

Fig. 2 shows the horizontal positioning of the wires, which will in most instances be found convenient and preferable. In this illustrative example, the bends in the wire may he as shown in Fig. 2, or in the position indicated in Fig. 3, wherein the corners or ends of the bends point outwardly and lie in parallel planes on either side of the frame. This manner of forming and arranging the bends has been found to produce the best results. It may be accomplished by means of dies, applied to all of'the wires simultaneously after they have been secured in the frame. Other methods .of crimping or corrugating may be used, however, and good results may be obtained by crimping the wires before they are placed upon the screen (as in Figs. 1, 2 and 6), in which event the direction the bends will take will tend to deviate somewhat from the uniform arrangement shown in Fig. 3. Either method of crimping may be employed, as the uniformity indicated in Fig. 3, although advantageous, is not necessary.

The disclosure contained in Fig. 6 differs from that of Fig. 2 only in the arrangement of the wires, Fig. 6 showing them in vertical position.

Fig. 5 illustrates a frame similar to the frame shown in Figs. 2 and 6, with spiral instead of crimped wires supported thereon.

The invention may be applied to insect electrocuting devices of other types, including devices of the lamp or cage type, examples of which are shown in Figs. 7 and 8. In Fig. 7 the device is in the form of a frusto-pyramid, while in Fig. 8 a frusto-conical cage is illustrated. In either of these forms the wires may be secured upon the frame of the device in Various ways. For example, the frame 11 may be made of glass or other suitable insulating material, or'if of metal, may be provided with means for properly insulating the wires from the frame, and the wires may, in either instance, be stretched around the frame, preferably in grooves provided for this purpose. Or the frame may be made with ribs defining panels having insulating strips at opposite sides of each panel, upon which the wires may be supported in a manner similar to that illustrated in Fig. 1 or in Fig. 2. Insects are attracted to the device by a lamp within the frame.

The form and construction of the devices illustrated in Figs. 7 and 8 constitute the subject-matter of a separate application, and need be considered herein only as diagrammatic disclosures. They are mentioned here merely as illustrative examples of possible applications of the present invention in additionto its use upon a flat rectangular form such as that shown in the other figures.

As will be apparent, the drawings do not show all of the various forms of insect electrocuting. devices to which the presentinvention may be applied. The invention consists of the novel form of device composed of a plurality of wires provided in any suitable manner with a series of bends of the general applicability to insect electrocuting devices in which spaced electric wires are employed.

I claim:

1. An insect electrocutor comprising a frame having spaced wire supporting members, a plurality of spring wires stretched in parallel relation between said supporting members, and means for supplying adjacent' lengths of wire with current of opposite polarity.

2. A frame comprising spaced insulating members, wires stretched between and supported by said members in spaced parallel relation, and means for supplying current of opposite polarity to alternate wires, each of said wires having a series of bends therein between its points of support, whereby the resulting electrostatic field is increased and the wire is inherently spring-tensioned.

3. In an insect electrocutor, a plurality of parallel lengths or runs of inherently springtensioned wire, and means to supply the adjacent lengths or runs with current of opposite polarity.

4. In an insect electrocutor, a plurality of parallel lengths or runs of wire, each length or run having spring-tensioning transverse bends therein intermediate its ends, and means for supplying current of opposite polarity to adjacent lengths or runs of said wires.

5. An insect electrocutor comprising a support, and a plurality of lengths of inherently spring-tensioned wire stretched in substantially parallel relation upon said support, alternate lengths being arranged to receive current of opposite polarities.

6. An insect electrocutor comprising spaced wire-supporting members. and a plurality of inherently spring-tensioned wires stretched in substantially parallel relation between said members.

7 An i'n'sect electrocutor comprising a support, and a plurality of lengths of crimped wire stretched in substantially parallel relation upon said support, the inherent spring tension of said lengths of wire maintaining such relation under varying atmospheric conditions, and the crimped nature of the wire enlarging the electrostatic field.

8. An insect electrocutor comprising spaced wire-supporting members, and a plurality'of crimped spring wires stretched in substantially parallel relation between said members, adiacent lengths of said wires being arranged to receive current of opposite polarity.

9. An insect electrocutor comprising a support, and a plurality of spirally-wound spring wires stretched insubstantially parallel spaced relation upon said support. alternate lengths or runs of said wires being arranged to receive current of opposite polarities. v

10. An insect electrocutor comprising a support. and a plurality of lengths or runs of coil spring wire stretched in substantially parallel spaced relation upon said support and respectively arranged to receive current of opposite polarities.

11. An' insect electrocutor comprising spaced wire-supporting members, and a plurality f lengths or runs of coil spring wire stretched in substantially parallel relation between said members. 12. In an insect electrocutor, a suppo comprising s acedinsulating members. a plurality of lengths or runs of "coil spring wire stretched between and supported by said members in spaced parallel relation, and

means for supplying current of opposite polarity to alternate lengths'or runs.

13. In an insect electrocutor. spaced supporting members, a plurality of substantially parallel lengths or runs of coil spring wire supported in stretched condition between said members, and means for supplying current of opposite polarity to adjacent lengths 14. In an insect electrocutor, aframe havmg an opening therein, coil "spring wires stretched across said opening in spaced parallel relation, means for insulating said wires, and means for supplying current of opposite polarity to alternate wires.

WILLIAM M. FRQST.

US1871978A 1928-01-14 1928-01-14 Insect electrocutor Expired - Lifetime US1871978A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US1871978A US1871978A (en) 1928-01-14 1928-01-14 Insect electrocutor

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US1871978A US1871978A (en) 1928-01-14 1928-01-14 Insect electrocutor

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1871978A true US1871978A (en) 1932-08-16

Family

ID=22932449

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US1871978A Expired - Lifetime US1871978A (en) 1928-01-14 1928-01-14 Insect electrocutor

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1871978A (en)

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2588894A (en) * 1947-09-17 1952-03-11 Clifford B Taff Insect and rodent exterminator
US3520066A (en) * 1966-05-26 1970-07-14 Pillsbury Co Spray drying method
US6874273B1 (en) * 2004-05-06 2005-04-05 Weisenburg, Iii Edward F. Portable window unit for killing insects
US20070006519A1 (en) * 2005-07-11 2007-01-11 Gunderman Robert D Jr Electronic Carpenter Bee Trap
FR3002114A1 (en) * 2013-02-20 2014-08-22 Didier Robert Device for selective electrocution of Asian hornets for protecting bee hive against hornets, has wires, where distance separating wires is equal to distance corresponding to sum of distance and distance corresponding to thousands of voltage

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2588894A (en) * 1947-09-17 1952-03-11 Clifford B Taff Insect and rodent exterminator
US3520066A (en) * 1966-05-26 1970-07-14 Pillsbury Co Spray drying method
US6874273B1 (en) * 2004-05-06 2005-04-05 Weisenburg, Iii Edward F. Portable window unit for killing insects
US20070006519A1 (en) * 2005-07-11 2007-01-11 Gunderman Robert D Jr Electronic Carpenter Bee Trap
US7757432B2 (en) * 2005-07-11 2010-07-20 Gunderman Jr Robert Dale Electronic carpenter bee trap
FR3002114A1 (en) * 2013-02-20 2014-08-22 Didier Robert Device for selective electrocution of Asian hornets for protecting bee hive against hornets, has wires, where distance separating wires is equal to distance corresponding to sum of distance and distance corresponding to thousands of voltage

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3349359A (en) Electrical heating elment
US3291897A (en) Electrically conducting rope
US3366854A (en) Pest repelling apparatus and methods
US3073094A (en) Electrostatic filter panel
US2076483A (en) Sprinkler head for automatic sprinkler systems
US7481021B2 (en) Electric deterrent device
US20060032111A1 (en) Conductor connector and methods for making and using the same
US2043082A (en) Bead loom
US4514791A (en) Lamp ribbon
US3198726A (en) Ionizer
US2142371A (en) Birdproofing
US5007619A (en) Chain link fence
US4663911A (en) Device for securing profiles for concealed suspension lattice work ceilings
US3699387A (en) Ionic wind machine
US2135131A (en) Sensitive door edge structure
US3775590A (en) Portable space heater
US2293672A (en) Lamp shade and method of making same
US3768196A (en) Electric fly killer
US3512760A (en) Wire fabric and apparatus and method for making same
US1423021A (en) Screening apparatus
US2163954A (en) Electric fence
US2262498A (en) Cooking apparatus
US2034880A (en) Heated windshield wiper
US1962420A (en) Electric insect exterminator
US2233719A (en) Method of producing metal shelf support channels