US1841942A - Cushioned insole - Google Patents

Cushioned insole Download PDF

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Publication number
US1841942A
US1841942A US35439329A US1841942A US 1841942 A US1841942 A US 1841942A US 35439329 A US35439329 A US 35439329A US 1841942 A US1841942 A US 1841942A
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Grant
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Prior art keywords
insole
portion
foot
forward
body
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Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
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Inventor
Fenton John
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Fenton John
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/1425Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the ball of the foot, i.e. the joint between the first metatarsal and first phalange
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/1435Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the joint between the fifth phalange and the fifth metatarsal bone
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/1445Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the midfoot, i.e. the metatarsal

Description

Jan. 19, 1932. J. FENTON CUSHIONED INSOLE Filed April 11, 1929 gwoemtoz (70/222 Rhzfin abtomoq Patented Jan. 19, 1932 UNITED (STATES JOHN FENTON, OF COLUMBUS, QHIO GUSHIONED INSOLE Application filed April 11,

This invention relates to shoes and more particularly to insoles for use in shoes and in its preferred form my invention forms a part of the shoe itself. The modern hard surface pavements produce a shock-to the body when walking for which there is no provision in nature and in order to provide the comfort nature intended it is necessary to place a cushion in the soles of the shoes to I receive the weight atthe weight bearing points and to provide a shock absorbing medium at the vital points and thereby restore the proper form of contact for which the foot is adapted by nature.

Ithas been found that in walking or taking a step forward the entire weight of the body is sustained momentarily by the os calcis or heel bone, the heel being first to contact with the ground, the point of contact being below the lower rear ortion of the os calcis. When a person stan' s erect on a hard level surface I the weight of the body is transmitted through the feet to the pavement at three weight bearing points in each foot. These principal weight bearing points on the bottom of each foot are the area toward the inner rear portion of the heel which lies directly below the lowermost extending portion of the os calcis or heel bone, the area lyingdire'ctly below the forward end of the first metatarsal bone and the area lying below the forward end of the fifth metatarsal bone. The weight bearing center in each foot is on the line extending from the center of the lowermost portion of the heel bone forwardly through the center of the forward end of the second metatarsal bone fromwhich it will be seen that that portion of the weight which is distributed forward of the heel bone falls about equally on either side of the second metatarsal bone. It is obvious that when the foot contacts with the earth or soil those portions of the foot which have been designated the weight bearing points sink into the earth or soil and permit the other areas on the bottom of the 1929,. Serial No. 354,393.

foot to contact and support the weight .of the body. Since the principal weight bear- 1 ing pomtsarefirst to contact with the ground 'a provision was set up by nature whereby the entire supporting area of the foot did not contact until the principal weight bearing points had depressed the earth thereby abi sorbing the shock incident to walking.

The principal object of my invention resides in the provision of an insole having cushions at the principal weight bearing portions of the foot for absorbing the shock caused by contact with hard pavements, thereby eliminating the jar incident to walk ing on modern pavements.

A further object of my invention resides in the provision of an insole which will not wrinkle or creep and which retains all of the shock absorbing qgalities usually found in cushion insoles, and rubber top lifts on heels. 55

A still further object of my invention is the provision of an insole which insures the correct weight distribution at the ball of the foot as well as insuring correct tread thereby relieving the toes from unnatural strain.

With these and other objects in view which will appear as thedescription proceeds, my invention consists in the novel features of construction, combinations of elements and arrangements of parts hereinafter to be fully described and pointed out in the appended claims.

In the accompanying drawings:

Figure 1 is a plan view of the insole comprisin the present invention with the position 0 the bones of the footindicated when the shoe is worn,

Figure 2 is a longitudinal sectional view of Figure 1 taken on' the line 2-2,

Figure 3 is a detailed sectional view'of a shoe embodying the present invention.

Referring more particularly to the drawings, the numeral 1 designates my improved insole in itsentirety, which comprises a main body portion 2 which is formed preferably from leather although other substances with similar non-resilient qualities may be employed. The body portion 2 is formed with openings to receive cushions 3 and 4. The cushion 3 is formed preferably from soft spongy rubber, although other cushioning material may be employed such as felt, wool or fabric, and is positioned within an elliptical shaped opening in the heel portion of the body 2. The cushion 4 is also formed preferably from soft spongy rubber and is positioned within the forward portion of a cart shaped opening .in the forward portion of the body 2. Immediately adjoining the cushion 4 and occupying the rear portion of the heart shaped opening is a supporting area 5'which is formed referably from harder rubber which is pliable and of sufficient hardnessto effect the support of the area of the foot above. The cushions 3 and 4 are cemented to the edges of the openings in which they are placed and the supportin area 5 is likewise cemented to the edges 0 the opening in'which it is placed, its forward edge being cemented to the rear edge of the cushion 4. i

In constructing shoes employing my invention the upper 6 is lasted in place to the sole 7 by any of the well known methods. The insole 1 is then cemented in place above the inner side of the sole 7, as shown in Fig ure 3, after which the soles 1 and 7 may be sewed or otherwise fastened together in the usual manner. The heel portion of the insole 1 is then raised and the heel is attached after which the heel portion of the insole is cemented in place. It will thus be seen that the lasting tacks are completely covered up by the insole 1 leaving a smooth insole surface. The upper surface of the insole 1 may then be covered with a sock lining 8 formed from thin leather or other suitable material and firmly cemented in place.

Referring to Figure 2 it will be seen that the cushions 3 and 4 extend slightly above the' up er surface of the body portion 2 but are formed preferably of soft resilient rubber that is capable ofbeing compressed below the upper surface of the insole 1. It will also be observed that the edges of the openings in the insole l are bevelled so that when the insole is applied the cushions 3 and 4 extend above the lower edges of the openings thus insuring a flexible meeting edge.

Referring to Figure 1 it will be observed that when the shoe is worn the inner rear portion 9 of the os calcis 10 will be directly above the cushion 3. It is that portion of the foot immediately below the rear portion 9 which first contacts with the ground when walking. The position of the cushion 3 permits that portion of the heel, when the foot is planted, to first contact with the resilient rubber body which acts as a shock absorber and provides the form of contact for which the foot is by nature designed by permitting the principal weight bearing point at the heel to be yieldingly received in the resilient area provided in the insole and permitting the remainder of the heel area to contact properly with the non-resilient area of the heel portion of the insole. The cushion 4 is formed with a narrow middle portion 11 and circular shaped ends 12 and 13. It will be seen by reference to Figure 1 that the end 12 is positioned immediately below the forward end of the first metatarsal bone 14, the other end 13 beingimmediately below the forward end of the fifth metatarsal bone 15. The narrow or middle portion 11 joining the two ends 12 and 13 lies below the second, third and fourth vmetatarsal bones and just to the rear of their forward ends. Since the principal weight bearing points of the ball of the foot are immediately below the forward end of the first metatarsal bone and the forward end of the fifth metatarsal bone, it will be seen that the cushion 4 is shaped and positioned to receive those weight bearing points. When weight is applied to the foot, the weight bearing points will sink into the resilient ends 12 and 13 of the cushion 4 and permit the forward ends of the second, third and fourth metatarsal bones and the toes of the foot to correctly contactwith the nonresilient portion 2 of the insole l at its forward portion. The middle portion 11 of the cushion -4 imparts to the insole the necessary flexibility. It "will be seen that the cushion 4 absorbs the shock at the principal weight bearing points at the ball of the foot and permits that portion of the foot when the weight is ap lied to contact in the manner for which it is y nature designed and compensates for the unyielding surfaces presented by the modern pavement. It will also be noticed that while adequate cushioning is provided at all points, that portion of the insole 1 underneath the toes and underneath the forward ends of the second, third and fourth metatarsal bones is ofnon-resilient material so that the toes are permitted to grip the shoe in lifting the body forward. Immediately to the rear of the cushion 4 is the support 5 which is trian 'ular in shape and formed preferably of re atively hard but flexible rubber. The support 5 extends under all of the metatarsal bones rearward of their forward ends and is so fashioned that when weight is applied to the foot two of the principal weight bearing points sink into the cushion 4. The metatarsal bones are prevented from crowding by being supported at the rear of the ball of the foot.

It will thus be seen that by my improved insole cushioning is provided at the points required, while at the same time the grip of the toes is not interfered with and the posslbility of wrinkles or lumps forming onthe cushioning portion of the insole is eliminated, thereby contributing to the comfort and service of the shoe. When the weight of .the body is applied to the foot the resilient v the shock incident to walking on hard pavements absorbed but a cushioned insole is provided which correctly conforms to the anatomy of the foot. My invention by providing proper contact at the heel insures the proper distribution of the weight on either side of the weight bearing center line of the foot, thereby preventing strain on the ankle and foot. With the use of my device unusual foot comfort is providedand walking is made more pleasurable.

What is claimed is:

1. A shoe insole comprising a non-resilient body conforming in shape to the sole of a shoe and formed with an opening in the heel portion and a second opening in the forward portion thereof, a resilient body positioned within said first named opening and secured to said non-resilient body and arranged to extend substantially only beneath the downward extending portion of the os calcis, a second resilient body positioned within the forward portion of said last named opening and secured to said non-resilient body, said last named resilient body being arranged to extend transversely of the insole and beneath the forward ends of the first and fifth metatarsal bones and to the rear of the forward ends of the second, third and fourth metatarsal bones, and a harder body positionedwithin the rearward portion of said second named opening and secured to said non-resilient body and said resilient body and extending beneath portions of all of said metatarsal bones rearward of their forward ends.

2. A shoe insole comprising a non-resilient body conforming in shape to the sole of a shoe and formed with a substantially triangular opening in the forward portion thereof beneath the metatarsal bones, the forward edge of said opening extendin transversely of said sole, forwardly of the orward ends of the first and fifthmetatarsal bones and rearwardly of the forward ends of the second, third and fourth metatarsal bones,

' and a triangular shaped member positioned within said opening, the forward portion of said member being resilient and its rearward ortion being relatively hard, said relatively Hard portion extending under the forward portion of all the metatarsal bones rearwardly of their forward ends.

3. A shoe insole comprising a non-resilient bod conforming in shape to the sole of a shoe an formed with an opening below the metatarsal bones, the forward edge of said opening extending transversely of said sole, forwardly of the forward ends of the first and fifth metatarsal bones and rearwardly of the forward ends of the second, third and fourth metatarsal bones, and a resilient body positioned within said opening. L

In testimony whereof I aflix my signature.

JOHN FENTON'.

US1841942A 1929-04-11 1929-04-11 Cushioned insole Expired - Lifetime US1841942A (en)

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Cited By (44)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2426735A (en) * 1945-12-03 1947-09-02 John M Hiss Stabilizing insert for shoes
US2446449A (en) * 1946-10-18 1948-08-03 Goodrich Co B F Arch support member
US2486653A (en) * 1946-09-20 1949-11-01 Harry E Hukill Basic arch foundation
US2531579A (en) * 1948-09-02 1950-11-28 Molas Philip Orthopedic bar
US2569721A (en) * 1949-05-16 1951-10-02 Edward H Juers Foot support
US2586057A (en) * 1947-05-13 1952-02-19 Knellwolf Hans Casar Foot-supporting means
US2623307A (en) * 1950-06-14 1952-12-30 Dudley J Morton Orthopedic insole
US2771691A (en) * 1954-09-22 1956-11-27 J W Landenberger & Co Cushioned foot protector
US2862313A (en) * 1957-06-03 1958-12-02 Canadian Footwear Res Inc Fabrication of differentially deformable insoles
US2863231A (en) * 1957-06-03 1958-12-09 Canadian Footwear Res Inc Fabrication of footwear having differentially deformable insoles
US2959875A (en) * 1957-11-13 1960-11-15 Jr Albert C Frese Slip-proof sock lining for shoes
US3067752A (en) * 1958-01-07 1962-12-11 Schaller Shoe sole construction with flexible shank
US3103931A (en) * 1960-09-03 1963-09-17 Hans C Knellwolf Shoe sole
US4250886A (en) * 1979-06-26 1981-02-17 Riso Rhea R Orthotic
US4316332A (en) * 1979-04-23 1982-02-23 Comfort Products, Inc. Athletic shoe construction having shock absorbing elements
US4316335A (en) * 1979-04-05 1982-02-23 Comfort Products, Inc. Athletic shoe construction
US4803989A (en) * 1988-02-08 1989-02-14 Collins Jack N Full width metatarsal pad
US4866860A (en) * 1988-07-25 1989-09-19 Wolverine World Wide, Inc. Metatarsal head shoe cushion construction
US4928404A (en) * 1988-01-08 1990-05-29 Bauerfeind Gmbh & Co. Heel cushion
US4932141A (en) * 1987-12-11 1990-06-12 Anita Cox Insole
US5547620A (en) * 1993-12-01 1996-08-20 Guiotto; Dino Method of manufacturing a footwear insole having an integrated comfort and support pad
US20030033730A1 (en) * 2001-08-15 2003-02-20 Burke Robert G. Footwear to enhance natural gait
US20040049946A1 (en) * 2002-07-31 2004-03-18 Lucas Robert J. Full length cartridge cushioning system
US20050060909A1 (en) * 2003-09-18 2005-03-24 Mark Kerns Multi-density lasting board
US20050166425A1 (en) * 2002-04-24 2005-08-04 Hams Seiter Shoe insole for diabetics
US20060254092A1 (en) * 2005-05-12 2006-11-16 Rachel Stevens Anterior transverse arch support with phalanges grip
US20060265905A1 (en) * 2005-02-11 2006-11-30 Adidas International Marketing B.V. Structural element for a shoe sole
US20060277797A1 (en) * 2005-06-02 2006-12-14 Mclinden Shannon M Absorbent footwear liner
US20060288612A1 (en) * 2002-07-31 2006-12-28 Adidas International Marketing B.V. Structural element for a shoe sole
US20070151124A1 (en) * 2006-01-05 2007-07-05 Wen-Chieh Chan Woman's shoe
US20070256329A1 (en) * 2006-04-04 2007-11-08 Adidas International Marketing B.V. Sole element for a shoe
US7322130B2 (en) * 1997-05-14 2008-01-29 Hans Seiter Inner sole for a shoe
US20080115385A1 (en) * 2005-06-02 2008-05-22 Mclinden Shannon M Absorbent footwear liner
WO2008113197A2 (en) * 2007-03-19 2008-09-25 Daniel Gross Comfortable high heel shoes
US20090094856A1 (en) * 2007-10-11 2009-04-16 Ginger Guerra Integrated, cumulative-force-mitigating apparatus, system, and method for substantially-inclined shoes
USD611237S1 (en) 2009-06-05 2010-03-09 Dashamerica, Inc. Cycling shoe insole
USD630419S1 (en) 2009-06-05 2011-01-11 Dashamerica, Inc. Base plate for adjustable strap
USD636983S1 (en) 2009-06-05 2011-05-03 Dashamerica, Inc. Cycling shoe
US8595956B2 (en) 2011-09-29 2013-12-03 C. & J. Clark International Limited Footwear with elastic footbed cover and soft foam footbed
US8776398B2 (en) 2005-06-02 2014-07-15 Summer Soles, Llc Absorbent footwear liner
US20150157085A1 (en) * 2013-12-09 2015-06-11 Po-Yao Lee Structure of platform shoe
US20150164178A1 (en) * 2013-12-13 2015-06-18 Po-Yao Lee Structure of athletic shoe
EP2611326A4 (en) * 2010-09-02 2015-12-09 Nike Innovate Cv Sole assembly for article of footwear with plural cushioning members
WO2017065669A1 (en) * 2015-10-13 2017-04-20 Stinaa & J Fashion Ab Insole for high-heeled footwear

Cited By (62)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2426735A (en) * 1945-12-03 1947-09-02 John M Hiss Stabilizing insert for shoes
US2486653A (en) * 1946-09-20 1949-11-01 Harry E Hukill Basic arch foundation
US2446449A (en) * 1946-10-18 1948-08-03 Goodrich Co B F Arch support member
US2586057A (en) * 1947-05-13 1952-02-19 Knellwolf Hans Casar Foot-supporting means
US2531579A (en) * 1948-09-02 1950-11-28 Molas Philip Orthopedic bar
US2569721A (en) * 1949-05-16 1951-10-02 Edward H Juers Foot support
US2623307A (en) * 1950-06-14 1952-12-30 Dudley J Morton Orthopedic insole
US2771691A (en) * 1954-09-22 1956-11-27 J W Landenberger & Co Cushioned foot protector
US2862313A (en) * 1957-06-03 1958-12-02 Canadian Footwear Res Inc Fabrication of differentially deformable insoles
US2863231A (en) * 1957-06-03 1958-12-09 Canadian Footwear Res Inc Fabrication of footwear having differentially deformable insoles
US2959875A (en) * 1957-11-13 1960-11-15 Jr Albert C Frese Slip-proof sock lining for shoes
US3067752A (en) * 1958-01-07 1962-12-11 Schaller Shoe sole construction with flexible shank
US3103931A (en) * 1960-09-03 1963-09-17 Hans C Knellwolf Shoe sole
US4316335A (en) * 1979-04-05 1982-02-23 Comfort Products, Inc. Athletic shoe construction
US4316332A (en) * 1979-04-23 1982-02-23 Comfort Products, Inc. Athletic shoe construction having shock absorbing elements
US4250886A (en) * 1979-06-26 1981-02-17 Riso Rhea R Orthotic
US4932141A (en) * 1987-12-11 1990-06-12 Anita Cox Insole
US4928404A (en) * 1988-01-08 1990-05-29 Bauerfeind Gmbh & Co. Heel cushion
US4803989A (en) * 1988-02-08 1989-02-14 Collins Jack N Full width metatarsal pad
US4866860A (en) * 1988-07-25 1989-09-19 Wolverine World Wide, Inc. Metatarsal head shoe cushion construction
US5547620A (en) * 1993-12-01 1996-08-20 Guiotto; Dino Method of manufacturing a footwear insole having an integrated comfort and support pad
US7322130B2 (en) * 1997-05-14 2008-01-29 Hans Seiter Inner sole for a shoe
US20030033730A1 (en) * 2001-08-15 2003-02-20 Burke Robert G. Footwear to enhance natural gait
US7100307B2 (en) * 2001-08-15 2006-09-05 Barefoot Science Technologies Inc. Footwear to enhance natural gait
US20050166425A1 (en) * 2002-04-24 2005-08-04 Hams Seiter Shoe insole for diabetics
US7380352B2 (en) 2002-04-24 2008-06-03 Hans Seiter Shoe insole for diabetics
US20040049946A1 (en) * 2002-07-31 2004-03-18 Lucas Robert J. Full length cartridge cushioning system
US8122615B2 (en) 2002-07-31 2012-02-28 Adidas International Marketing B.V. Structural element for a shoe sole
US7644518B2 (en) 2002-07-31 2010-01-12 Adidas International Marketing B.V. Structural element for a shoe sole
US20080271342A1 (en) * 2002-07-31 2008-11-06 Adidas International Marketing B.V. Structural element for a shoe sole
US20080155859A1 (en) * 2002-07-31 2008-07-03 Adidas International Marketing B.V. Structural Element for a Shoe Sole
US20060288612A1 (en) * 2002-07-31 2006-12-28 Adidas International Marketing B.V. Structural element for a shoe sole
US7013582B2 (en) 2002-07-31 2006-03-21 Adidas International Marketing B.V. Full length cartridge cushioning system
US7401419B2 (en) 2002-07-31 2008-07-22 Adidas International Marketing B.V, Structural element for a shoe sole
US20050060909A1 (en) * 2003-09-18 2005-03-24 Mark Kerns Multi-density lasting board
US7350320B2 (en) 2005-02-11 2008-04-01 Adidas International Marketing B.V. Structural element for a shoe sole
US20060265905A1 (en) * 2005-02-11 2006-11-30 Adidas International Marketing B.V. Structural element for a shoe sole
US20060254092A1 (en) * 2005-05-12 2006-11-16 Rachel Stevens Anterior transverse arch support with phalanges grip
US20080115385A1 (en) * 2005-06-02 2008-05-22 Mclinden Shannon M Absorbent footwear liner
US8776398B2 (en) 2005-06-02 2014-07-15 Summer Soles, Llc Absorbent footwear liner
US20060277797A1 (en) * 2005-06-02 2006-12-14 Mclinden Shannon M Absorbent footwear liner
US20070151124A1 (en) * 2006-01-05 2007-07-05 Wen-Chieh Chan Woman's shoe
US8555529B2 (en) 2006-04-04 2013-10-15 Adidas International Marketing B.V. Sole element for a shoe
US20070256329A1 (en) * 2006-04-04 2007-11-08 Adidas International Marketing B.V. Sole element for a shoe
US20110197473A1 (en) * 2006-04-04 2011-08-18 Adidas International Marketing B.V. Sole element for a shoe
US7954259B2 (en) 2006-04-04 2011-06-07 Adidas International Marketing B.V. Sole element for a shoe
WO2008113197A3 (en) * 2007-03-19 2008-11-20 Nathalie Bellengi Comfortable high heel shoes
WO2008113197A2 (en) * 2007-03-19 2008-09-25 Daniel Gross Comfortable high heel shoes
US20090094856A1 (en) * 2007-10-11 2009-04-16 Ginger Guerra Integrated, cumulative-force-mitigating apparatus, system, and method for substantially-inclined shoes
US8490297B2 (en) * 2007-10-11 2013-07-23 Ginger Guerra Integrated, cumulative-force-mitigating apparatus, system, and method for substantially-inclined shoes
USD611237S1 (en) 2009-06-05 2010-03-09 Dashamerica, Inc. Cycling shoe insole
USD645652S1 (en) 2009-06-05 2011-09-27 Dashamerica, Inc. Cycling shoe
USD636983S1 (en) 2009-06-05 2011-05-03 Dashamerica, Inc. Cycling shoe
USD630419S1 (en) 2009-06-05 2011-01-11 Dashamerica, Inc. Base plate for adjustable strap
US9572399B2 (en) 2010-09-02 2017-02-21 Nike, Inc. Sole assembly for article of footwear with plural cushioning members
EP2611326A4 (en) * 2010-09-02 2015-12-09 Nike Innovate Cv Sole assembly for article of footwear with plural cushioning members
US8595956B2 (en) 2011-09-29 2013-12-03 C. & J. Clark International Limited Footwear with elastic footbed cover and soft foam footbed
US9565895B2 (en) 2011-09-29 2017-02-14 C & J Clark International Limited Footwear with elastic footbed cover and soft foam footbed
US20150157085A1 (en) * 2013-12-09 2015-06-11 Po-Yao Lee Structure of platform shoe
US20150164178A1 (en) * 2013-12-13 2015-06-18 Po-Yao Lee Structure of athletic shoe
US9380828B2 (en) * 2013-12-13 2016-07-05 Po-Yao Lee Structure of athletic shoe
WO2017065669A1 (en) * 2015-10-13 2017-04-20 Stinaa & J Fashion Ab Insole for high-heeled footwear

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