US1825433A - Heater - Google Patents

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US1825433A
US1825433A US330733A US33073329A US1825433A US 1825433 A US1825433 A US 1825433A US 330733 A US330733 A US 330733A US 33073329 A US33073329 A US 33073329A US 1825433 A US1825433 A US 1825433A
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casing
heater
ducts
fluid
pipe
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US330733A
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White John William
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White John William
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24HFLUID HEATERS, e.g. WATER OR AIR HEATERS, HAVING HEAT GENERATING MEANS, IN GENERAL
    • F24H1/00Water heaters having heat generating means, e.g. boiler, flow- heater, water-storage heater
    • F24H1/10Continuous-flow heaters, i.e. in which heat is generated only while the water is flowing, e.g. with direct contact of the water with the heating medium
    • F24H1/12Continuous-flow heaters, i.e. in which heat is generated only while the water is flowing, e.g. with direct contact of the water with the heating medium in which the water is kept separate from the heating medium
    • F24H1/14Continuous-flow heaters, i.e. in which heat is generated only while the water is flowing, e.g. with direct contact of the water with the heating medium in which the water is kept separate from the heating medium by tubes, e.g. bent in serpentine form
    • F24H1/16Continuous-flow heaters, i.e. in which heat is generated only while the water is flowing, e.g. with direct contact of the water with the heating medium in which the water is kept separate from the heating medium by tubes, e.g. bent in serpentine form helically or spirally coiled
    • F24H1/165Continuous-flow heaters, i.e. in which heat is generated only while the water is flowing, e.g. with direct contact of the water with the heating medium in which the water is kept separate from the heating medium by tubes, e.g. bent in serpentine form helically or spirally coiled using fluid fuel

Description

' Sept. 29, 1931. I i J, w, WHITE 1,825,433

HEATER Filed Jan. 7. 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Ign- Sept. 29, 1931. I w WHITE 1,825,433

HEATER Filed Jan. 7, 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Patented Sept.'29, 1931 UN TED AT S P TENT OFFICE JOHN WILLIAM WHITE, or-BUrFALo, NEW YORK HEATER.

Application filed lanuary 7, 1929. SerialNo. 330,733.

in a casing in such a manner that access thereto and cleaning of the passages thereabout has also been difficult. The present invention provides a heater of this type in 20 which a plurality of independently removable pipe sections are provided, a unique arrangement being afforded to permit the independent removal of any selected pipe section from the other sections which may remain in their normal relation to each other. Furthermore, this invention permits the convenient removal of the heat insulating casing from the pipe sections which it normally encloses so that access is afforded servation, cleaning or removalof the same. 1 Furthermore, the VElIlOllS. pipes, ducts,

fines and the like are arranged in heat trans fer relation to each other to enhance the thermal efficiency of the, heater and to afford a simple, inexpensive, compact and commercially practical assembly permitting the ready inspection, cleaning orreplacementof parts.

In the accompanying drawings, 1

Fig. 1 is central sectional View through a heater exemplifying this invention;

Fig. 2 is abroken section of the'casing and related parts with the former in its raised position to afford access to the interior of the heater; 1 s

Fig. 3 is a section online 38 of Fig. l, certain portions of the header being broken away to afford clarity of illustration;

50 Fig. 1 is a sectional detail of the central pipe elements for cleaning orreplacement. and ordinarlly the same have been installed to the interior of the heater to permit ob;

portion of the upper header and the flue connection therewith; and p Fig. 5 is a section on line 55 of Fig. 1, certain parts being broken away. Y

Referring to .the accompanying drawings,

and'more particularly to Fig. 1 thereof, it is evident that myimproved heater may be provided with any suitable heating means 1 such as a gas burning apparatus having a plurality of jets which are fed through the gas pipe 2. v

Legs 3 at each side of heating means 1 support an annular member .5 of inverted T section, which'has a horizontal flange 7 upon Y" which the lower edge of the side wall of a heat insulating casing 10 rests, and a-n upstanding annular flange 13 preferably is disposed in telescoping engagement with the.

bottom of the casing. The latter may be of any conventional construction, for example having inner andouter sheet metal walls with a suitable heat non-conductor therebetween, and has a suitable top 12 of similar construction. Annular member 5 forms the lower "part of a skeleton frame located within the casing 10, being connected to an upper annular member 15 by a'plurality of vertically disposed elongate bolts 21 thatare clamped to the members 15 and 5.

Located within the skeleton frame thus provided'are the fluid ducts 25 which may be ,in the form of spiral pipes of comparatively high heat conductivity and: of 'material having little tendency to permit the formation of scale, aluminum, for example, being advantageous for. this purpose. The spiral pipes 25 preferably are nested in concentric juxtaposition, as shown in Fig. 1,

with their upper and lower ends connected to the upper and lower headers 30 and 31 respectively. 'Each of these headersis provided with outstanding branches which permit the convenient connection of the fluid ducts thereto in such a manner that the attachment of the same to the headers is facilitated and that ready access is permitted to the connections for the removal of any of the spiral ducts. particularly the arrangement of the upper Fig. 3 shows more header 30 which is provided with two branches 35 having their outer ends secured by means of a suitable lug and bolt connections 36 to the annular member 15. The ends of the adjoining spiral ducts preferably are disposed in the region of the opposite branches of the header so that alternate ducts may be secured to the same header branch; for this purpose I may provide suitable unions 37, as shown. Due to this arrangement suiflcient room is provided be tween adjoining unions to permit the ready assembly of the parts or the removal of any selected one of the spiral ducts.

Fig. 5 discloses in detail the arrangement of the lower header 31 which similarly carries spaced unions 37 upon each of its branches that are connected to alternate pipe sections so that suflicient room is permitted between each of the unions to permit the ready replacement of any spiral duct. Similarly the branches of this header are secured by lug and bolt connections 36 to flange 7 A fluid return pipe 40 is connected to a supply duct 42 and to a fluid inlet a3 which extends inwardly to join one branch of the lower header 31, the bottom portion of casing 10 being broken away at this point to permit the pipe 43 to extend thcrethrough.

Figs. 3 and a show in detail the arrangement of the central portion of the upper header, the branches of which are provided with downwardly extending continuations 47 which terminate in a heating chamber 50 that may form a super-heater, drier or the like. Chamber 50 is located in the central portion of the heater and is arranged within the innermost of the spiral ducts so that hot gases passing upwardly flow against the chamber, which acts as a baflle to direct the gases outwardly past the spiral ducts. The heated fluid passing downwardly through pipes 47 is received in chamber 50, flowing upwardly through the central vertically extending passage 55 in the header. A fluid outlet pipe 57 forms a continuation of this passage and preferably extends upwardly for a considerable distance in a vertical direction. The upper end of this pipe may be provided with suitable branches 59 which extend to the point of fluid use, such as the radiators or the like. A flue 60 extends downwardly through an opening 1 in the top of the casing 10, this flue having a flange 62 that normally engages the lower face of the top of the casing adjoining this opening. The flue preferably encloses duct 57 and extends upwardly beyond the same. A suitable annular collar 67 may be arranged upon the casing 10 in sliding engagement with the flue so that the latter forms a vertical guide to facilitate the raising of the casing. Lugs 70 are pivota ly mounted upon the ring 15 in such a manner that they may be readily swung outwardly to engage and support the lower edge of the casing when the same is raised, as shown in Fig. 2, to afford access to the interior of the heater.

It is evident that a heat generator of this character is adapted to a large number of uses, and while illustrated as being provided with a gas burning factor is obviously applicable to use with oil burners or various other heating means. Such a heater may be utilized to provide hot water, vapor or steam for household heating or hot water for household use. If desired, a plurality of these heaters may be provided so that under ordinary conditions of use only a certain number of the same will be in operation, being run substantially at their individual maximum capacities, thus permitting high thermal efflciency. The incoming fluid enters the lower header 41 through pipe 43 passing upwardly through the spiral duct members 25 which are arranged to receive heat from the burners with high efficiency. The heated fluid, for example steam, passes into the upper header and downwardly through pipes 47 to the heating chamber 50 where its temperature is still further raised; it then rises through passage 55 and pipe 57 to the branches 59 which extend to the radiators or other points of use. The fluid is there cooled and may be collected in any conventional manner and returned to the pipe l0. Any loss of the fluid in the system is compensated for by incoming fluid re ceived through pipe 42.

Due to the novel arrangement of the spiral ducts, convenient access to the unions 37 is afforded; thus, if it is desired to remove any selected one of the ducts, it is necessary only to remove the upper header and to detach the lower end of the selected duct from the lower header. The other ducts continue to be secured to the heater 31 and thus remain in substantially their normal assembled relation. Due to the arrangement of the casing 10 and the lugs 70 the former readily may be lifted and held out of its normal position to permit access to the interior of the heater for inspection, cleaning, repair and the like.

Due to the provision of a large number of pipe convolutions of high heat conductivity, and due to the provision of the central heating chamber 50 and the fluid outlet duct 57 and the flue 60 in heat transfer relation to each other, heat is conserved and a heater of this type may be highly eflicient in use.

I claim:

1. A heater comprising heating means, a plurality of spiral ducts in mutually concentric juxtaposition, the adjoining ends of the ducts terminating in at least two separate regions, headers in each of said regions, each of said headers providing outwardly extending substantially straight Eli header sections, and connecting unions between said duct ends and header sections, whereby the unions on each'header section are spaced sufliciently to permit ready access thereto and whereby any selected spiral fluid duct may be independently removed.

2. A heater comprising heating means, a

plurality of spiral ducts arranged in mu ward in relation to said flue and pipe in order to aflord access to the ducts and their connections to the headers.

3. A heater comprising heating means, a

plurality of spiral ducts arranged in mutually concentric juxtaposition above the same, headers at the opposite ends of theducts, each of said headers having outwardly extending branches, detachable connections between the ducts and header branches, said connections securing adjoining duct sections to different branches whereby ready access to the connections for each duct is permitted and whereby each duct may be independently removable from the headers, a casing about the ducts, a flue extending upwardly from the top of the casing, a fluid outlet pipe connected to the upper header, said flue and pipe being arranged inheat transfer relation to each other, said casing having an opening through which the flue and pipe extend and being slidable upwardly in relation to the same to afford access to the fluid ducts.

4. A heater comprising heating means, a plurality of spiral ducts arranged in mutually concentric juxtaposition above the same, headers at the upper and lower ends of the ducts, each of said headers having outwardly extending branches, detachable connections between the ducts and header branches, said connections securing adjoining duct sections to different branches whereby access to the connections for each duct is permitted and whereby each duct may be independently removable from the headers, a

casing about the ducts, a flue extending upwardly fromthe top of the casing, a fluid outlet pipe connected to the upper header,

said flue and pipe being arranged in heat transfer relation to each other, said casing having an opening through which the flue and pipe extend and being slidable upwardly in relation to the same to afford access to the fluid ducts, and means associated with the upper portion ofthe ducts to support the lower edge of the casing in its raised position.

5. A heater comprising heating means, fluid piping thereabove, a heat insulating casing having side walls surrounding the piping and providing a top thereabove, a flue and a fluid outlet pipe extending upwardly through the top of the casing in heat transfer relation to each other.

6. A heater comprising heating means, fluid piping thereabove, a heat insulating casing having side walls surrounding-the piping and providing a top thereabove, a flue and a fluid outlet pipe extending upwardly through the top of the-casing in heat transfer relation to each other, said casing being slidable upward in relation to the 'flueand outlet pipe to permit ready cleaning of the piping and the like.

7. A heater comprising heating means, fluid piping thereabove, a heat insulating casing having side walls surrounding the pipingand providing a top thereabove, a flue and a fluid outlet pipe extending upwardly through the top of the casing in heat transfer relation to each other, said casing being slidable upward in relation to the flue and pipe to permit ready cleaning of the fluid piping and the like, and means supported adjoining the upper part of the piping and movable to support the lower edge of the casing in its raised position.

8. A heater comprising heating means, fluid piping thereabove, a heat insulating casing having side walls surrounding the piping and providing a top thereabove, a flue and a fluid outlet pipe extending upwardly through the top of the casing in heat trans- 1 fer relation to each other, said casing being slidable upward in relation to the flue and pipe to permit ready cleaning of the piping and the like, and a fluid inlet connected to the lower portion of the piping, said casing having an opening at its lower edge through which the inlet extends.

9. A heater comprising heating means, a frame thereabove, fluid piping within the frame, upper and lower headers connected to the piping and supported by the frame, a heating insulating casing having side walls surrounding the frame and piping and resting upon the former, said casing being slidable upwardly, and means upon the upper part of the frame movable outwardly to support the lower portion of the casing in its raised position. whereby ready access is provided to the piping.

Signed by me at Buffalo, New York, this 96th day of December. 1928.

JOHN WILLIAM WHITE.

US330733A 1929-01-07 1929-01-07 Heater Expired - Lifetime US1825433A (en)

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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2566976A (en) * 1949-11-09 1951-09-04 Clarence R Bernstrom Water heater
US2805048A (en) * 1954-01-12 1957-09-03 Henry W Angelery Coil structure for heat exchanger
US3116790A (en) * 1958-03-28 1964-01-07 Kohlenscheidungs Gmbh Tube heat exchanger
US3130779A (en) * 1958-05-05 1964-04-28 Huet Andre Light boiler for nuclear energy installation
US20070000653A1 (en) * 2004-01-22 2007-01-04 Cosmogas S.R.L. Heat exchanger, in particular of the condensation type
US20100096115A1 (en) * 2008-10-07 2010-04-22 Donald Charles Erickson Multiple concentric cylindrical co-coiled heat exchanger
US20130008635A1 (en) * 2010-03-22 2013-01-10 Cosmogas S.R.L. Heat exchanger
US20140138053A1 (en) * 2011-05-19 2014-05-22 Cosmogas S.R.L. Heat exchanger and production process

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2566976A (en) * 1949-11-09 1951-09-04 Clarence R Bernstrom Water heater
US2805048A (en) * 1954-01-12 1957-09-03 Henry W Angelery Coil structure for heat exchanger
US3116790A (en) * 1958-03-28 1964-01-07 Kohlenscheidungs Gmbh Tube heat exchanger
US3130779A (en) * 1958-05-05 1964-04-28 Huet Andre Light boiler for nuclear energy installation
US20070000653A1 (en) * 2004-01-22 2007-01-04 Cosmogas S.R.L. Heat exchanger, in particular of the condensation type
US7669644B2 (en) * 2004-01-22 2010-03-02 Cosmogas S.R.L. Heat exchanger, in particular of the condensation type
US20100096115A1 (en) * 2008-10-07 2010-04-22 Donald Charles Erickson Multiple concentric cylindrical co-coiled heat exchanger
US20130008635A1 (en) * 2010-03-22 2013-01-10 Cosmogas S.R.L. Heat exchanger
US9194605B2 (en) * 2010-03-22 2015-11-24 Cosmogas S.R.L. Heat exchanger
US20140138053A1 (en) * 2011-05-19 2014-05-22 Cosmogas S.R.L. Heat exchanger and production process
US10030915B2 (en) * 2011-05-19 2018-07-24 Cosmogas S.R.L. Heat exchanger
EP2710307B1 (en) * 2011-05-19 2019-09-11 Cosmogas S.R.L. Heat exchanger and production process

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