US1788808A - Motion-picture apparatus - Google Patents

Motion-picture apparatus Download PDF

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US1788808A
US1788808A US155719A US15571926A US1788808A US 1788808 A US1788808 A US 1788808A US 155719 A US155719 A US 155719A US 15571926 A US15571926 A US 15571926A US 1788808 A US1788808 A US 1788808A
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pictures
disc
lens
circuit
carrier
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Samuel F Stein
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G03PHOTOGRAPHY; CINEMATOGRAPHY; ANALOGOUS TECHNIQUES USING WAVES OTHER THAN OPTICAL WAVES; ELECTROGRAPHY; HOLOGRAPHY
    • G03BAPPARATUS OR ARRANGEMENTS FOR TAKING PHOTOGRAPHS OR FOR PROJECTING OR VIEWING THEM; APPARATUS OR ARRANGEMENTS EMPLOYING ANALOGOUS TECHNIQUES USING WAVES OTHER THAN OPTICAL WAVES; ACCESSORIES THEREFOR
    • G03B15/00Special procedures for taking photographs; Apparatus therefor
    • G03B15/08Trick photography

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  • the object of my invention is to make possible the rendition of a pictorial illustration of and impartation of information pertaining to the progress of an event which is actually taking place and to give the pictorial illustration and furnish the information concurrently with such an event whereby the interest and thrill of the spectators can be maintained.
  • Fig. 1 is a side elevation diagrammatic in parts, of one form of apparatus broken away in parts for the practice of my invention
  • Fig. 2 is an elevation showing in detail the face side of the disc-form picture carrier, with some associated parts used therewith;
  • Fig. 3 is a view partly in elevation and largely diagrammatic of the motor and circuit and switch arrangement concerned in the rotation of the carrier disc;
  • Fi 4 is a detail view of the motor reversing switch
  • Fig. 5 is a detail view of a connection for securing the picture carrier to the shaft by which the carrier is rotated, the carrier in this case being shown as formed of a plurality of face to face discs;
  • Fig. 6 is a detail view in section illustrating one arrangement of securing the individual picture film sections to the carrier.
  • the disk may have its revolution reversed with the advantageous effects on the exhibition in showing the dancers steps sometimes to the right, sometimes to the left, sometimes forward and sometimes backward, as the dancers steps, in dancing, usually are.
  • Either a reversible electric motor can be used to rotate the disk or a suitable reversible clutch mechanism may be employed by which 75 the direction of the revolution of the disk may be changed.
  • the pictures, 15, showing such poses can be placed on the same disk, adjacent and concentric with the pictures, 11, and the projector lens tube may be adjusted to aline therewith, if the apparatus has a single lens that is shiftable to the several positions required by the radial position on the carrier of the set or group of pictures to be projected.
  • the dancers performance there may be repeated alterations of the pictures of 90 the two sets, 11 and 15, at diflerent intervals and for any selected period of time.
  • the picture-carrier, 10 is shown keyed upon a shaft, 16, which is adapted to be' revolved at 95 the desired speed by appropriate connection with a motor, and supported in proper position for projection of the several concentric groups or sets of pictures, 11 and 15, as shown in Fig.
  • the 1 0 lens, 17, being for projecting the outermost group of pictures, 11, the lens, 18, being in position for projecting the innermost group, 15, and the lens, 19, for projecting the middle group ofpictures, 15, and the three lenses being mounted ninety degrees apart upon the box-like frame, 20, within which is situated the carrier disc shaft, 16,
  • the frame, 20, is mounted for movement so that any one of the lenses, 17, 18 and 19, at a time may be focused on the screen and become the acting projecting lens-to project the group of pictures to which it is assigned upon the screen,
  • the normal position of the frame, 20, is to place the lens, 17 into focusing position and to close its lamp circuit so that that lens, 17, will be nor mally the active lens, and I so mount the frame, 20, on the horizontal pivot, 21, that automatically and normally it will swing to and when it,is in that position, a pair of contacts, 24:, that form a switch in the circuit in the lamp of lens, 17 will touohand thereby the circuit through such lamp be closed.
  • the lens is 'cut into circuit.
  • inxorderto render the lens, 18, the active pro ecting lens, I
  • I include in the circuit, which includes the 20, to render one lens.
  • a simple and vary eflicient gearing for imparting the necessary step by step or intermittent rotation to the picture carrier disc 10, is indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 2, and comprises a wheel or disc, 38, upon the shaft, 16, with a continuous circular circumference and a disc,39,whioh is adriven disc,whose periphery is notched or recessed to provide a series'of separated portions or segments, 40, that have frictional peripheral contact with the disc, 38, and thereby rotate the latter so long as such projections or segments, 40, are in contact with the disc, 38.
  • carrier disc members 100, placed face to face upon the shaft, 16, the members having central holes of a diameter to receive the end of the shaft, and the innermost disc being en aged by one end of a coil spring, 41, whose other end is engaged by a shoulder, 42, on the shaft, so that the spring exerts an outward pressure against the members, 100.
  • a latch device, 43 Resisting that pressure by engaging the outer face of the outer disc member, 100, is a latch device, 43, that includes a stem which extends axially within the interior of shaft, 16, Which is made hollow or tubular, and one or more radial projections, 44, on the outer end of the stem which project beyond the circular hole in the outer disc member, 100, and said latch device, 43, is pulled inward by a coil spring, 45,
  • the spring, 45 is stronger than the spring
  • the carrier disc or discs as clearly shown in Fig. 2, has a radial notch, 47, openingoutward from the central hole in the carrier of a size to permit the passage of the radial lug, 44, when in alinement-therewith, but b the turning of the radial lug, 44, it may be placed out of alinement' with said notch, 47, and engage a solid surface on the carrier ad'acent the central hole.
  • the radial lu 44 is carried by a disc, 48, which by a hea ed pin or screw, 49,
  • lugs, 44 are employed arranged diametrically opposite, so that a balanced or equalized pressure is exerted by thelugs against the outer face of the outer carrier member disc, 100.
  • Fig. 3 is shown rather diagrammatically, mechanism which may be used to run and to control the revolution of the carrier disc.
  • a disc, 52 Secured to said shaft, 51, is a disc, 52, and it is so secured by one or more set screws, 52, may be rotatably adjusted on the shaft, 51, for a reason presently to appear.
  • the disc, 52 has a radial notch, 54, on its periphery which when opposite a lug or rojection, 55, on a 1ever,'56, may be entered y said pro ection, and thereby the rotation of the 53, so that the disc,
  • the motor, 50 is a reversible one, and in the motor circuit is a reversing switch, 60, and
  • the motor circuit is also under the control of the phonograph stop lever, 64, which as shown in Fig. 3, is of the well known type that engages the periphery of the phonograph turntable, 65.
  • a switch, 66, in the magnet circuit is arranged to be closed by the stop lever, 64:, when it is moved out of contact with'the turntable, 65, so that simultaneously with the release of the phonograph turntable the motor circuit is closed, and the motor supplied with energy.
  • he magnet circuit also includes a hand switch, 67, to open and close it when desired.
  • the screen, 13, may be formed upon or carried by the hinged cover, 75, of the phonograph, 14, so that the provision of the screen as a separate thing involving special supports may be unnecessary.
  • the screen surface may be a permanent part provided which is of the cover, 75, or to enable the substitution of screens with varied surroundings or adornments or decorations, the screen may be a detachable screen or plate, which would thus allow interchangeability.
  • the interest and thrill in the performance could be maintained by showing the intermediate stages between beginning and ending the race, in which case at least three groups of pitcures would be required, the first for example, showing the horses starting off together, the second showing A ahead of B, and the third showing B ahead of A, so that there would be no violent or sudden transition from one incident or event to the other.
  • the man at the race track can cause the desired operation of the distantly located apparatus for projecting the pictures of the race.
  • telegraph for example, he may i report to a distant operator the events of the race as it proceeds, and that the record of the events may be used for the projection of the pictures at subsequent time or times, so that as often as might be desired there could be an accurate and complete reproduction of the events of the race, as they transpired.
  • a to the disc, 68 which would close the notch therein corresponding to the notch, 54:, as for example, a slidable plate. 76, secured to the side of the disc, so that the projection corre sponding to the projection, 55, of lever. 56, of Fig. 3 could not enter the notch.
  • a notch closed plate could be provided with some key-lock device to prevent anybody tampering with the machine, so as to convert it from one kind of action to the other.
  • a picture projecting machine a disk having a notch operatively connected with the machine, an electric motor to drive the disk, a stop device adapted to bear against said disk and to interlock therewith at the notch and movable towards and from the i r;e, a motor switch in position to be operated by said stop device for starting and stopping of said electric motor, and
  • motion picture projecting apparatus the combination of mechanism for simultaneously moving a plurality of sets of motion pictures all of which pertain to the same event, each of the respective sets exhibiting diflerent movements which characterize the event, all sets constituting a unit for exhibiting a unitary event, and means for selectively projecting the respective sets in any desired order substantially on the same image receiving surface as a continuous exhibition of the related movements which characterize said unitary event.
  • motion picture projecting apparatus the combination of mechanism for simultaneously movinga plurality of sets of motion pictures all of which pertain to the same event, each or the respective sets exhibiting difierent movements which characterize the event, all sets constituting a unit for exhibiting a unitary event and means for selectively projecting the respective sets in any desired order substantially on the same image receiving surface as a continuous exhibition of the related movements which characterize said unitary event, and adjustable means for causing the display of a selected one oi the pictures when the projecting movement of the pictures stops.
  • motion picture projecting apparatus the combination of mechanism for simultaneously moving a plurality of sets of motion pictures, all of which pertain to the same event, each of the respective sets exhibiting diflerent movements which characterize the event, all sets constituting a unit for exhibiting a unitary event, difierent lenses for the difierent sets, each set having its own lamp, and means comprising a plurality of switches for projecting the respective sets in any desired order substantially on the same image receiving surface as a continuous exhibition of the related movements which characterize said unitary event,

Description

Jan. 13, 1931. s STEIN MOTION PICTURE APPARATUS Filed Dec. l8 1926 MIMM Patented Jan. 13 1931 OFFICE-- SAMUEL F. STEIN, or wrnnmmsroa'r, PENNSYLVANIA MOTION-PICTURE APPARATUS Application filed December 18, 1926. Serial No. 155,719.
The object of my invention is to make possible the rendition of a pictorial illustration of and impartation of information pertaining to the progress of an event which is actually taking place and to give the pictorial illustration and furnish the information concurrently with such an event whereby the interest and thrill of the spectators can be maintained. p
What I show in the drawings is merely for the purpose of disclosing some mechanism which will serve'the purpose of exemplifica- 'tion, or illustration and is not to be taken as a limitation to anyv particular instrumentalities by which my invention may be practiced. Y
In the drawings:
Fig. 1 is a side elevation diagrammatic in parts, of one form of apparatus broken away in parts for the practice of my invention;
Fig. 2 is an elevation showing in detail the face side of the disc-form picture carrier, with some associated parts used therewith;
Fig. 3 is a view partly in elevation and largely diagrammatic of the motor and circuit and switch arrangement concerned in the rotation of the carrier disc;
Fi 4 is a detail view of the motor reversing switch;
Fig. 5 is a detail view of a connection for securing the picture carrier to the shaft by which the carrier is rotated, the carrier in this case being shown as formed of a plurality of face to face discs;
Fig. 6 is a detail view in section illustrating one arrangement of securing the individual picture film sections to the carrier.
In what I now regard as the best procedure, taking the case of a dancer for example, whose motions or movements are to be reproduced in motion pictures with the accompaniment of the appropriate music preferably only selected portions of the dance are photographed, and these portions are printed or otherwise mounted in proper sequence on a carrier, which as shown in the drawings, is a disk, 10, on the side of which the pictures, 11, are arranged in a circular series, so that by the revolution of the disk, in a projecting machine, 12, the pictures, in succession, may
be projected on to the usual screen, 13, and
, simultaneously with such projection a phonograph, 14, will be operated, having a record that contains the music appropriate to the dance steps exhibited on the screen. Obviously, since the pictured dance steps and the rendered music will be in time, the spectator or auditor will get as much enjoyment of the joint production as if the entire picturization of the dance from start to finish should be produced on the screen, instead of only a few, selected portions of the pictures of the dancer. The rotation of the disk will continue as long as the music record runs, and of course, there will be many complete or repeated rotations of the disk. v And to give variety, the disk may have its revolution reversed with the advantageous effects on the exhibition in showing the dancers steps sometimes to the right, sometimes to the left, sometimes forward and sometimes backward, as the dancers steps, in dancing, usually are. Either a reversible electric motor can be used to rotate the disk or a suitable reversible clutch mechanism may be employed by which 75 the direction of the revolution of the disk may be changed.
' Still referrin to the caseof the dancer, should it be des1red to show his poses or actions at the beginning and end of the dance, the pictures, 15, showing such poses, can be placed on the same disk, adjacent and concentric with the pictures, 11, and the projector lens tube may be adjusted to aline therewith, if the apparatus has a single lens that is shiftable to the several positions required by the radial position on the carrier of the set or group of pictures to be projected. To give variety to the dancers performance there may be repeated alterations of the pictures of 90 the two sets, 11 and 15, at diflerent intervals and for any selected period of time.
Referring to what is shown in Fig. 1, the picture-carrier, 10, is shown keyed upon a shaft, 16, which is adapted to be' revolved at 95 the desired speed by appropriate connection with a motor, and supported in proper position for projection of the several concentric groups or sets of pictures, 11 and 15, as shown in Fig. 2 are three lenses, 17, 18 and 19, the 1 0 lens, 17, being for projecting the outermost group of pictures, 11, the lens, 18, being in position for projecting the innermost group, 15, and the lens, 19, for projecting the middle group ofpictures, 15, and the three lenses being mounted ninety degrees apart upon the box-like frame, 20, within which is situated the carrier disc shaft, 16, The frame, 20, is mounted for movement so that any one of the lenses, 17, 18 and 19, at a time may be focused on the screen and become the acting projecting lens-to project the group of pictures to which it is assigned upon the screen,
p swinging the frame,
and occupy that position,
13. The frame, 20,
is pivoted at its bottom upon a horizontal pivot, 21, so that by v 20, vertically, the lens 17, or the lens, 19, may be focused upon the Screen, 13, and said frame, 20, is mounted upon a vertical pivot, 22, in a supporting base, 23, so that the frame may be swung horizontally to focus the lens, 18, upon the screen, as I preferably arrange it, the movements of the frame, or another theaotive projecting lens, effect the cutting of the lamp of the lens that is to. become active into circuit, and the cutting out of circuit of the lamp of the other two lenses, so that no "attention on the part of the operator is required to out the lamps into and out of circuit. Preferably the normal position of the frame, 20, is to place the lens, 17 into focusing position and to close its lamp circuit so that that lens, 17, will be nor mally the active lens, and I so mount the frame, 20, on the horizontal pivot, 21, that automatically and normally it will swing to and when it,is in that position, a pair of contacts, 24:, that form a switch in the circuit in the lamp of lens, 17 will touohand thereby the circuit through such lamp be closed. By the upward swingthe lens is 'cut into circuit. For swinging the frame, 20, horizontally, inxorderto render the lens, 18, the active pro ecting lens, I
similarly provide a magnet, 28, in a circuit.
controlled by a switch, 29. The magnet, 28, when energized attracts an armature, 30, that projects horizontally from the frame, 20, and as in each of the other cases when the lens, 18, becomes the active projecting lens that circuit' is closed through its lamp. As the frame, 20, when swung horizontally is in the normal position as far as the closing of the circuit t rough the contacts, 24, is concerned,
I include in the circuit, which includes the 20, to render one lens.
ness of the carrier,
, and switches for the two lenses, 18 and 19.
When the magnet, 28, which is used to swing the frame, 20, is deenergized, the frame, 20, is swung to and yieldingly held in the normal position for rendering the lens, 17 the active projecting lens, by a coil spring, 35, which at one end is connected to a horizontal extension of the vertical pivot, 22, and at the other end to the supporting base, 23.
Since it is desirable in the interests of a clear projection to set the tube of lens, 18, with its axis at an angle, it is desirable also in the interests of .clearness to have the portions of the film which contain the pictures which are to be projected by that lens, set at an angle in the carrier disc, 10, which will make the plane of such portions of the films at right angles to the lens axis at the time the film portions are in alinement with the lens, as illustrated in Fig. 6, where a picture carrying film portion, 36, 1s shown set obliquely in an opening, 37, in the carrier, 10, and as the thick- 10, is considerably greater than the thickness of the film, the film portion, 36, is contained wholly within the plane of the opposite side of the disc, 10. Instead of setting the film portion, 36, at an angle it will be evident that by imparting a vertical swing to the frame, 20, at the same time it is moved horizontally, the lens, 18, need not be set at an angle, and that the plane of the film at right angles to the lensaxis may be maintained for proper projection upon the screen, 13.
A simple and vary eflicient gearing for imparting the necessary step by step or intermittent rotation to the picture carrier disc 10, is indicated in dotted lines in Fig. 2, and comprises a wheel or disc, 38, upon the shaft, 16, with a continuous circular circumference and a disc,39,whioh is adriven disc,whose periphery is notched or recessed to provide a series'of separated portions or segments, 40, that have frictional peripheral contact with the disc, 38, and thereby rotate the latter so long as such projections or segments, 40, are in contact with the disc, 38. It will be seen that,
rotated in opposite drawings one way by which that can be done,
which is by means of a detachable connection,
' so that there may be substitution of one carrier disc for another and the connection shown is one especiall suitable, when the carrier disc instead of being made of a single member which carries all of the circular groups of pictures, is made of several memers of different diameters placed face to face and each carrying a circular group of pictures, the several members, which, of course, are of disc form exposing one beyond the circumference of the other, the group of pictures carried thereby. Referring particu-r larly to Fig. 5, there are three carrier disc members, 100, placed face to face upon the shaft, 16, the members having central holes of a diameter to receive the end of the shaft, and the innermost disc being en aged by one end of a coil spring, 41, whose other end is engaged by a shoulder, 42, on the shaft, so that the spring exerts an outward pressure against the members, 100. Resisting that pressure by engaging the outer face of the outer disc member, 100, is a latch device, 43, that includes a stem which extends axially within the interior of shaft, 16, Which is made hollow or tubular, and one or more radial projections, 44, on the outer end of the stem which project beyond the circular hole in the outer disc member, 100, and said latch device, 43, is pulled inward by a coil spring, 45,
fastened at one end to the latch stem and at the other end to a block, 46,-secured preferably adjustably within the shaft, 16, to enable the tension of the spring to be varied.-
The spring, 45, is stronger than the spring,
' 41, so that it resists the outward thrust of the spring, 41, upon the carrier. The carrier disc or discs, as clearly shown in Fig. 2, has a radial notch, 47, openingoutward from the central hole in the carrier of a size to permit the passage of the radial lug, 44, when in alinement-therewith, but b the turning of the radial lug, 44, it may be placed out of alinement' with said notch, 47, and engage a solid surface on the carrier ad'acent the central hole. The radial lu 44, is carried by a disc, 48, which by a hea ed pin or screw, 49,
. is pivoted to the stem of latch, 43. Preferably, as shown in the drawings, two lugs, 44, are employed arranged diametrically opposite, so that a balanced or equalized pressure is exerted by thelugs against the outer face of the outer carrier member disc, 100.
In Fig. 3 is shown rather diagrammatically, mechanism which may be used to run and to control the revolution of the carrier disc.
as shown in Fig. 3, the electric motor, 50, is
connected by belt and pulley gearingwith a shaft, 51, upon which is fixed the drivin disc,
39, shown in Fig. 2,so that said sha t and disc are continuously rotated. Secured to said shaft, 51, is a disc, 52, and it is so secured by one or more set screws, 52, may be rotatably adjusted on the shaft, 51, for a reason presently to appear. The disc, 52, has a radial notch, 54, on its periphery which when opposite a lug or rojection, 55, on a 1ever,'56, may be entered y said pro ection, and thereby the rotation of the 53, so that the disc,
disc, 52, stopped. It will be evident that by also used to actuate a switch, 57, in the motor circuit, 58, so that when the lever moves or of the rotation of the disc, 52,"
is moved to throw its stop projection, 55, into i the notch, 54, the switch, 57 will open, and thus the motor'circuit be broken and the motor deprived of power. And when the lever projection, 55, is moved out of the notch, 54, to release the disc, 52, the lever closes the switch, 57, and current is again supplied to the motor. When the projection, 55, is out of the notch, 54, the projection, 55, is adapted to press lightly against the periphery of the disc, 52, being caused to do so by a coil spring, 59, acting on the lever, and in order to reduce friction of the projection, 55, on the disc, 52, the projection, 55, may carry or be in the form of an anti-friction roller. The motor, 50, is a reversible one, and in the motor circuit is a reversing switch, 60, and
that switch when in each of its two circuit closing positions engages a push switch, 61,
in the motor-controlling circuit, and in that circuit is an electro-magnet, 62, which when energized moves the stop lever, 56, to carry its projection, '55, out of the notch, 54, of the disc, 52, and "to hold it in that position so long as the circuit is closed through one of the push switches, 61, or the other. The reversing switch, 60, when moved to break the lever towards and againstthe disc, 52. Of-
course, as soon as the circuit is closed again through the magnet, 62, by the swinging of the switch, 60, the stop lever, 56, is pulled out of interlocking engagement with the disc, 52, and it closes the motor circuit through adapted to swing the lever, 56, in the same direction in which it is pulled by the magnet, 62, when energized.
The motor circuit is also under the control of the phonograph stop lever, 64, which as shown in Fig. 3, is of the well known type that engages the periphery of the phonograph turntable, 65. A switch, 66, in the magnet circuit is arranged to be closed by the stop lever, 64:, when it is moved out of contact with'the turntable, 65, so that simultaneously with the release of the phonograph turntable the motor circuit is closed, and the motor supplied with energy. he magnet circuit also includes a hand switch, 67, to open and close it when desired.
As shown in Fig. 1, the screen, 13, may be formed upon or carried by the hinged cover, 75, of the phonograph, 14, so that the provision of the screen as a separate thing involving special supports may be unnecessary. The screen surface may be a permanent part provided which is of the cover, 75, or to enable the substitution of screens with varied surroundings or adornments or decorations, the screen may be a detachable screen or plate, which would thus allow interchangeability. indeed there could be a permanent screen surface on the cover, and a number of removable screens placed one upon the other on the cover, which would be a convenient way of storing them, the screens being simply shifted around to bring, the one desired to be used.
I have referred to the matter of pictures of a dancer to illustrate and exemplify the practice of my invention. As another exemplification of it I refer to the use of my invention by way of giving pictorial illustration of and information as to the progress of a horse race. Thus, in a horse race the important events in a particular race could be reproduced, as for example, the start, showing the relative positions of the horses, the finish, also showing the relative positions of the horses, and the relative positions of the horses between start and finish. Thus, each group of pictures could be associated with or identified with a particular horse known to be running in the race, and by changing the pictures projected from time to time during the race,
the relative movements of the horses so identified could be shown at a point remote or distant from the race track. It would be necessary merely for some one at the race track watching the event to signal the operator at the projecting machine the relative positions of the orses. The pictures, of course, need not be of the very horses competing in the race, and of course, under the circumstances they could not be pictures of the ac tual race, but previously taken, and prepared pictures could very satisfactorily be utilized,
- so that persons interested at places remote from the race track could have pictorially or visually shown to them the movements of the horses. Should it be desired to exhibit the pictures of the horses actually competing in the event, pictures taken of horses in previous events could be used, or for the purpose of providing the pictures, the horses could be run through a race especially staged for the purpose. By my invention it Will be seen that it is ossible in the projection of the pictures to exhibit the pictures in a different order, to show a different result occurring, or happen ing in the actual performance. Thus, to take the case of a horse race, assuming that two horses A and B start neck and neck, and later, say at the quarter stretch, A is ahead of B, and still later they are neck and neck, and finally B crosses the line first, the pictures could be exhibited in an order which would show A apparently leading in the quarter stretch, and while in the final result B would cross the line first there could be pictured a relative position of the horses different from that actually the case in the race. The interest and thrill in the performance could be maintained by showing the intermediate stages between beginning and ending the race, in which case at least three groups of pitcures would be required, the first for example, showing the horses starting off together, the second showing A ahead of B, and the third showing B ahead of A, so that there would be no violent or sudden transition from one incident or event to the other.
Referring to the case of the horse race, by way of example it will be evident that by suitable electrical devices the man at the race track can cause the desired operation of the distantly located apparatus for projecting the pictures of the race. It will also be evi dent that by telegraph, for example, he may i report to a distant operator the events of the race as it proceeds, and that the record of the events may be used for the projection of the pictures at subsequent time or times, so that as often as might be desired there could be an accurate and complete reproduction of the events of the race, as they transpired.
For the purpose of adding to the interest of the exhibition it may not be desired to stop the exhibition at a predetermined point, and in that case a to the disc, 68, which would close the notch therein corresponding to the notch, 54:, as for example, a slidable plate. 76, secured to the side of the disc, so that the projection corre sponding to the projection, 55, of lever. 56, of Fig. 3 could not enter the notch. Such a notch closed plate could be provided with some key-lock device to prevent anybody tampering with the machine, so as to convert it from one kind of action to the other.
It will be evident that by my invention great saving in the cost of production can be secured in the making of a picture record compared with the procedure which involves device would be applied avaaeos inventibn it desired to add variety to the motions of the pictures, as described above, without considering the advantages which the disk aflords for continuous display of the pictures without stoppage which reversal would entail. Of course, as above pointed out, the reversal of revolution of the disk has important advantages.
Certain features oil construction of the apparatus and the combination of sound and pictures contained in this application are not claimed herein, but are claimed in my copending application, Serial No. 158,253, filed December 31, W26,
ll claim:
l. The combination of a picture projecting I machine, a disk havin a notch operatively connected with the mac ine, an electric motor to drive the disk, a stop device adapted to bear against said disk and to interlock therewith at the notch and movable towards and from the same and a motor switch in position to be operated by said step device for and stopping of said electric motor, and a magnet for moving said stop device from said dis 3. The combination of a picture projecting machine, a disk having a notch operatively connected with the machine, an electric motor to drive the disk, a stop device adapted to bear against said disk and to interlock therewith at the notch and movable towards and from the i r;e,a motor switch in position to be operated by said stop device for starting and stopping of said electric motor, and
' means to render said stop device inoperative.
d. In motion picture projecting apparatus, the combination of mechanism for simultaneously moving a plurality of sets of motion pictures all of which pertain to the same event, each of the respective sets exhibiting diflerent movements which characterize the event, all sets constituting a unit for exhibiting a unitary event, and means for selectively projecting the respective sets in any desired order substantially on the same image receiving surface as a continuous exhibition of the related movements which characterize said unitary event.
5. ln motion picture projecting apparatus, the combination of mechanism for simultaneously movinga plurality of sets of motion pictures all of which pertain to the same event, each or the respective sets exhibiting difierent movements which characterize the event, all sets constituting a unit for exhibiting a unitary event and means for selectively projecting the respective sets in any desired order substantially on the same image receiving surface as a continuous exhibition of the related movements which characterize said unitary event, and adjustable means for causing the display of a selected one oi the pictures when the projecting movement of the pictures stops.
6. in motion picture projecting apparatus, the combination of mechanism for simultaneously moving a plurality of sets of motion pictures all of which pertain to the same event, each or the respective sets exhibiting difierent movements which characterize the event, all sets constituting a unit for exhibiting a unitary event, diderent lenses for the difierent sets each set having its own lamp and means tor selectively projecting the respective sets in any desired order substantially on the same image receiving surface as a continuous exhibition of the related movements which characterize said unitary event.
7; In motion picture projecting apparatus, the combination of mechanism for simultaneously moving a plurality of sets of motion pictures, all of which pertain to the same event, each of the respective sets exhibiting diflerent movements which characterize the event, all sets constituting a unit for exhibiting a unitary event, difierent lenses for the difierent sets, each set having its own lamp, and means comprising a plurality of switches for projecting the respective sets in any desired order substantially on the same image receiving surface as a continuous exhibition of the related movements which characterize said unitary event,
In testimony whereof I hereunto afix my signature.
SAMUEL F. STEIN.
no Y
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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2546054A (en) * 1941-05-14 1951-03-20 British Vibralux Ltd Optical projecting apparatus for a disk with concentric tracks of matter to be projected
US2957695A (en) * 1956-05-22 1960-10-25 Arizpe Harmodio De Valle Target projection apparatus
US3043190A (en) * 1958-08-01 1962-07-10 Gretag Ag Lighting arrangement for projector
US3215035A (en) * 1956-05-22 1965-11-02 Arizpe Harmodio De Valle Target projection apparatus
US3442584A (en) * 1965-04-01 1969-05-06 Zeiss Ikon Ag Carrying case for a motion picture projector
US3572915A (en) * 1960-08-01 1971-03-30 James F Butterfield Apparatus for producing forms and colors in motion

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2546054A (en) * 1941-05-14 1951-03-20 British Vibralux Ltd Optical projecting apparatus for a disk with concentric tracks of matter to be projected
US2957695A (en) * 1956-05-22 1960-10-25 Arizpe Harmodio De Valle Target projection apparatus
US3215035A (en) * 1956-05-22 1965-11-02 Arizpe Harmodio De Valle Target projection apparatus
US3043190A (en) * 1958-08-01 1962-07-10 Gretag Ag Lighting arrangement for projector
US3572915A (en) * 1960-08-01 1971-03-30 James F Butterfield Apparatus for producing forms and colors in motion
US3442584A (en) * 1965-04-01 1969-05-06 Zeiss Ikon Ag Carrying case for a motion picture projector

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