US1786631A - Supporting pole for electrical conductors - Google Patents

Supporting pole for electrical conductors Download PDF

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Publication number
US1786631A
US1786631A US272841A US27284128A US1786631A US 1786631 A US1786631 A US 1786631A US 272841 A US272841 A US 272841A US 27284128 A US27284128 A US 27284128A US 1786631 A US1786631 A US 1786631A
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Prior art keywords
pole
insulating
tension
members
conductors
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Expired - Lifetime
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US272841A
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Ralph C Roe
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STEPHEN W BORDEN
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STEPHEN W BORDEN
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H02GENERATION; CONVERSION OR DISTRIBUTION OF ELECTRIC POWER
    • H02GINSTALLATION OF ELECTRIC CABLES OR LINES, OR OF COMBINED OPTICAL AND ELECTRIC CABLES OR LINES
    • H02G7/00Overhead installations of electric lines or cables

Description

Dec. 30; 1930. R. c. ROE
SUPPORTING POLE FOR ELECTRICAL CONDUCTORS m a a h li u 44 I a M p M p m@ s a N 4 i G l 8 F. gs 1 w Z%%@%fifi\\w$%p% 1 A -M m Y M D. H 2 M M W Z l r a Dec. 30, 1930. R. c. ROE
SUPPORTING POLE FOR ELECTRICAL CONDUCTORS Filed April 25, 1928 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 \NVENTOR W z. 02$
N FIG4 Dec. 30, 1930. R. c. ROE.
SUPPORTING POLE FOR ELEC TRICAL CONDUCTORS Filed April 25. 1928 4 Sheets-Sheet a INVENTOR 0&4 z W FIG 6 Dec. 30, 1930. c, O
SUPPORTING POLE FOR ELECTRICAL c oNDUc'roRs 4 Sheets-Sheet Filed April 25, 1928 F\G U |NVENT% W 6, w
FIG \0 i UNITED p;
ing at the insulating blocks.
Patented Dec. '30, 1930 RALPHVVC. Ron, OFVENGLEWOODQQNIEW"JERSEY, assmnoa-o on nam TO STEPHEN-Y a w. 18031315111, 01 SUMMIT, new JERSEY SUPPORTING 'i'onnron ELECTRICAL oonnuc'rons Application filed, Apri125, 1928. serialNo. 272,841.
. This invention relates to improvements in manufactured structures for supporting electrical wires such as poles, towers, cross-arms and suspension insulators. p
The object of theinventionis to improve such structuresby constructing them in such manner that a substantial amount of elec trical insulationis introduced between those port-ions thereof which are adjacent to the electrical conductors andithose portions which are in electricalcontact with ornearto the earth or which are in the electrical path be tween the conductor andtheearth, r The invention. comprlses thetypes of construction described and. claimed hereinafter in connection with the draw1ngs=and equrva-' lents thereo f of wlii'ch' V v Fig.1 a frontelevationofa hollow pole, consisting of three sections and having in sulating" blocks interposedbetween the sections and having tensionmembers terminat- Fig. 2 isa horizontal cross section taken at 2+2 of 1.
Fig. 3 is a vertical cross section between 11 and- 22of Fig. l andon the center line 33 of Fig.2. v
Fig. 4 isa frontelevation' of a threesection hollowpole with insulating blocks be tween the sections and; having the tension members equipped -with strain insulators, the I tension ineinbersbeing terminated at the ends of the complete assembly. v r
Fig. 5 is a horizontalcross section'taken at Fig.- 6 isaverticalcross section of the portion 22, 3 3 015 (36 of Fig. 5.
Tisaportion of a pole in whichthe exterior inembers are of metal of SllfilClGDb thickness to be self supporting and having insulating blocksbetween thc sections and means for attaching-the ad acent portions of the pole to the insulating blocks, a per tion'of the pole being cut awayto show the fastening. g
"Fig. 8 is a vertical cross section of Fig. 7 taken thrirthe centerrof thepole.
Fig. 9 isa front elevationfof aportion of a twosectionpole in which the bottom portion Fig. 4,]on the center line is of insulating inaterialand the top portion top and bottom of the ,pole. :There is no insulating blockbetween the sectionso f the pole. t
use as across-arm .or as a suspensionqlineinsu'lator. The exterior member is ofinsulating material and the tension V member .is provided withinsulating sections, a ,portonjof Fig. 510 isla structure of suitable form for theexterior. member being: cutaway to show ELIllIlSLllLtlIlg section.-
, Fig. 11 is, a vertical cross section thruIthe.
centerof a structure suitablefor usefas a suspensionline insulator, both the. exterior; compression member and the interior tension member. being of. insulating material, the balanceofthe hollow interior beingfilled with insulating orarc quenchingliquid.
, Fig. 12 illustrates the method ofusingthe structure of Fig.11 as a suspension insulator,
a steel tower being shown for illustrating purposes only.
Inrecent yearsthe use of wood poles and to :thet'act that Woodfpoles are becoming increasingly expensive, but because it is difficult to secure poles of sufficient height and strength forusein connection with present day high tension systems. Tubular metal polesandpolesconstructed ofconcrct-e and,
othertypesof meta-l polesand structures are now-being employed forsupporting high tensionwires.
structure of Fig. as a cross-armand the 1 Hightensionwires must be insulated from each other, and from the earth,-and the-ma w jor problemis to insulate them from the ea'rth.
For instance, if there is a potential of100,000
Voltslbetween two conductors vandlbetween v those conductors-and the earth, it isneces'sary tolprovi de foreach conductor an individual insulatorhaving an insulating value suitablefor a potential of 100,000 volts, whereas the. conductors would be suificiently insulated from each other if each were equipped with an insulator suitable for a potential of 50,000
volts, since the two insulators are in series with respeotto the potential between the two wires. Furthermore, there are other factors, such as induced voltages caused by lightning, etc., which still further increases the potential between the conductors and the earth without increasing the potential between conductors.
An individual pole or structure may support many conductors, let us say, for instance, nine conductors having a potential of 100,000 volts between conductors. It ismore or less apparent that if the nine conductors are each supported on a 50,000 volt insulator, and in addition a 50,000 volt insulator is installed in the pole or structure itself, between the lower portion of the pole and the upper portion to which the conductors are attached, substantially the same amount of insulation between conductors and earth is provided as will be provided if each individual conductor the earth.
The benefits derived from insulating the.
upper portion of a pole or tower supporting high tension conductors is by no means limited to the saving in the total amount of insulation required, as outlined above, but such construction makes it feasible to greatly reduce the maximum strain upon the insulators re sulting from lightning disturbances, this result being accomplished by the use of so called counter potential wires in a manner and by methods known to the art. Also, by means of properly arranged construction workmen are enabled to work upon conductors which arealive, either intentionally or otherwise, with relative safety as compared with working on a conductive type of pole or structure.
Heretofore the only construction used to bring about the desired result has been of a temporary nature consisting of replacing some of the metal members of a transmission line tower with wood timbers, the wood memhers being both in compression and tension, and the use of wooden cross-arms on steel towers.
My invention relates to a structure more particularlyadapted for use as a pole for systems where poles of medium lengths and strengths may be used to advantage although my construction may, with slight modifications, be used for insulating different portions of a steel transmission line tower. My structure may also be adapted for use as a cross arm or as a suspension type insulator.
In 11, C hollow, outer compression member of insulating material, such as porcelain.,-litted with end plates PP, and having tension insulators as S1 inside the compression member G. Since the insulator S1 is entirely enclosed its surface is normally dry, but the insulating qualities of the inner insulator SI maybe greatly improved by filling the balance of the space with insulating oil or other suitable liquid as L. In some it they not be economically sound to provide suiiicient insulation to prevent a flashorer oi the interior insulator under certain \0l'l321 conditions but it may be desirable to quoncn the are quickly and for such a purpose arc quenching material, such as carbon tetrachloride may he used in place of oil. W hen used as a suspension insulator the load is carried entin v by the tension member SI, and QZ-Ii. ;-Tl()r iiember C may be made relatively l girl: and inexpensive. V
l ig. 10 shows a type of construction adapted to be used as a cross-arm shown at CA, F 12. There are several materials from which the member C may be made such a s commi ial fiber, special compositions consisting of wood pulp, asbestos ihe itch, (four pounded and impregnated with asphaltic or bituminous conqiounc s, or mixed with Port- The strain insulator SI ma y be of wood is other suitable material. and a? many may he i'ised in series as may be desirable for any particular length of arm, or any particular fiashover voltage. The plates PP may be of any suitable unit tance over arm is greater om the wire to he noted that the leal-rage di insulator and along the cro than the shortest distance the steel tower. The leakage ance along the to sion members in the insulator and the crosr arm, is less than the distance over the outer surface, but the inner insulators: are always dry, an nece y may be immersed in oil. thus matting it possible to so deslgn structures that the effective flashover voltage will be the same for the interior and exterior pathsv If the insulating members SI are omitted from the tension member in Fig. 10, the insulating properties of the cross-arm will be considerably reduced but the structure will be considerably cheaper than, and will compare favorably with, wood cross-arms with respect to insulation, first cost and depreciation.
Fi l is a pole consisting of three sections, P1, P2 and P3. The outer compression member may he metal tubing, or may be con st acted of other materials or compositions either conducting or non-conducting. Insulating lJlOClES AA are placed between the ections, metal plateTP is placed at the top and "another plate BP at the bottom. Metal plates MP, Fig. 3, are placed on either side of the insulator A, and the interior tension members T, of both the abutting sections, pass metal plates MP, and are provided with a head or nut N on the outside of the metal plate. With this construction the insulating block is under compression strain only, and
the tension members of one section are insulated from hetension members of the adiacent section by proper positioningin the insulating block as shown'in Fig. 2.
The tension members of P1 pass thru the top plate TP and the insulator A1 and when tightened up they place the outer member of P1 in compression. Similarly the outer member of P2 is placed in compression, and at the same time sections P1 and P2 aresecurely fastened together, and in like manner section P3 is placed in compression and securely fastened to section P2. Additional sections nay be readily added tothe bottom of the pole. p
v In the complete assembly each section is insulated from the adjoining sectionwith respect to both the exterior and interior members and the top section. is insulated from earth by the accumulative values of the insulating blocks A1, A2, etc.
In Figs. 4, 5 and 6 a construction is shown in which the tension members'T are continuous from the top plate TP to the bottom plate BP, and in order that a conducting path will not be established from the top to the bo tom of the pole it is necessary to insert strain insulators, as S1, Fig. 6, inthetension members T. 'The tension members T pass thru the insulating block A, and thru the metal plate MP, and are fitted with threaded con-- plings or long nuts, UN, on the outside, bear ing against plate MP, the adjacent section of the tensionmember being likewise threaded into the coupling ON. By tightening the couplings CN, the respective sections of the pole are placed in tension, and by tightening the nuts N at the top and bottom 01": the pole, the entire assembly is placed in tension.v This type of construction has an advantage over that shown in Fig. 1 as it requires fewer holes in insulator A, and the insulator is, therefore, cheaper to make and less liable to breakage. The tension members T may be provided with oii sets or other spring devicesas shown at SP Fig. 6 in order to provide for member by meansof suitable bolts H passing thru the exterior of the pole and thru plate F.
tended to such a plate. h that the section P2 'be of metal, butit may It is not'essential that exterior member 'be of metal itbeing only necessary that it thru the insulating block A, and thru the be self-supporting in the sense that it requires no tension members extending from end to end thereof.
Fig.7 9 shows a pole of two sections, at least one of which, such as P1, is of insulating material. In this type of construction no insulating block is required between the seclar as MC may be used'to hold the two sections in proper alinement or a metal plate may be used and the tension members of portions P1 and P2 may be independently fas- It is not essential be of metal or' it may be of non-conducting material. I
I claim:
1. A pole, for supporting the trical conductors of an electrical distribution system, which includes two or more exterior, hollow, compression members as sembled end to end insulating blocks between the compression members and extending into'the interioroii' the pole; metal plates on the exposed end-s of the two terminal compression members tension members located inside the compression members, passing through the insulating blocks and attaching to the plates at either end of the assembly, each tension member containing an insulating portion located between the portions of the tension member which are attached to the respective end plates.
2. A pole, for supportingthe outdoor electrical conductors of an electrlcal distribution" system, which includes two or more'ertterior, hollow, compression members'assembled end to end, at least one of said members being outdoor ele cof insulating material; tension plates on the exposed ends of the two terminal members: tension members located in the interior of the pole and attached to the tension plates at each end of the pole; each tension member being provided with an insulating portion positioned between those portions of the tension member which are attached to the respective tension plates. I
In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification.
RALPHC. Ron.
US272841A 1928-04-25 1928-04-25 Supporting pole for electrical conductors Expired - Lifetime US1786631A (en)

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Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2511221A (en) * 1946-06-28 1950-06-13 Rca Corp Antenna
US3079129A (en) * 1960-08-01 1963-02-26 Robert S Hulburt Fence construction apparatus
US3108656A (en) * 1959-08-12 1963-10-29 Asplundh Tree Expert Co Lifting apparatus for electric-line construction or maintenance workers
US3372448A (en) * 1964-11-18 1968-03-12 Fabrication De Produits En Bet Apparatus for prestressed concrete members of non-rectilinear shape
US4625839A (en) * 1983-12-19 1986-12-02 Bicc Public Limited Company Overhead trolley wire insulated support post
US4694621A (en) * 1984-11-07 1987-09-22 Locke Reginald A J Modular building connecting means
US20030000165A1 (en) * 2001-06-27 2003-01-02 Tadros Maher K. Precast post-tensioned segmental pole system
US6505450B1 (en) 1997-10-29 2003-01-14 Reginald A. J. Locke Masonry reinforcement system
US6871453B2 (en) 2003-03-19 2005-03-29 Reginald A. J. Locke Modular building connector
US20090019816A1 (en) * 2005-02-07 2009-01-22 Phil Lockwood Method of modular pole construction and modular pole assembly
US20110006538A1 (en) * 2007-08-29 2011-01-13 Vestas Wind Systems A/S Monopile foundation for offshore wind turbine
US20110265403A1 (en) * 2010-04-28 2011-11-03 Seo Ji Kim Precast concrete structure and method of constructing the same
US10167623B2 (en) * 2016-04-11 2019-01-01 Qingdao university of technology Prefabricated reinforced concrete-filled steel pipe sleeve joint

Cited By (18)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2511221A (en) * 1946-06-28 1950-06-13 Rca Corp Antenna
US3108656A (en) * 1959-08-12 1963-10-29 Asplundh Tree Expert Co Lifting apparatus for electric-line construction or maintenance workers
US3079129A (en) * 1960-08-01 1963-02-26 Robert S Hulburt Fence construction apparatus
US3372448A (en) * 1964-11-18 1968-03-12 Fabrication De Produits En Bet Apparatus for prestressed concrete members of non-rectilinear shape
US4625839A (en) * 1983-12-19 1986-12-02 Bicc Public Limited Company Overhead trolley wire insulated support post
US4694621A (en) * 1984-11-07 1987-09-22 Locke Reginald A J Modular building connecting means
WO1989002013A1 (en) * 1984-11-07 1989-03-09 Locke Reginald A J Modular building connecting means
US6505450B1 (en) 1997-10-29 2003-01-14 Reginald A. J. Locke Masonry reinforcement system
US20030000165A1 (en) * 2001-06-27 2003-01-02 Tadros Maher K. Precast post-tensioned segmental pole system
US6871453B2 (en) 2003-03-19 2005-03-29 Reginald A. J. Locke Modular building connector
US20090019816A1 (en) * 2005-02-07 2009-01-22 Phil Lockwood Method of modular pole construction and modular pole assembly
US10550595B2 (en) 2005-02-07 2020-02-04 Rs Technologies Inc. Method of modular pole construction and modular pole assembly
US9593506B2 (en) * 2005-02-07 2017-03-14 Rs Technologies Inc. Method of modular pole construction and modular pole assembly
US10036177B2 (en) 2005-02-07 2018-07-31 RS Technologies, Inc. Method of modular pole construction and modular pole assembly
US9494131B2 (en) * 2007-08-29 2016-11-15 Vestas Wind Systems A/S Monopile foundation for offshore wind turbine
US20110006538A1 (en) * 2007-08-29 2011-01-13 Vestas Wind Systems A/S Monopile foundation for offshore wind turbine
US20110265403A1 (en) * 2010-04-28 2011-11-03 Seo Ji Kim Precast concrete structure and method of constructing the same
US10167623B2 (en) * 2016-04-11 2019-01-01 Qingdao university of technology Prefabricated reinforced concrete-filled steel pipe sleeve joint

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