US1771457A - Automatic pipe organ - Google Patents

Automatic pipe organ Download PDF

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US1771457A
US1771457A US80747A US8074726A US1771457A US 1771457 A US1771457 A US 1771457A US 80747 A US80747 A US 80747A US 8074726 A US8074726 A US 8074726A US 1771457 A US1771457 A US 1771457A
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solo
pipe
stop
perforations
controlled
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Lewis B Doman
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Lewis B Doman
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10FAUTOMATIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    • G10F1/00Automatic musical instruments
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10FAUTOMATIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    • G10F1/00Automatic musical instruments
    • G10F1/02Pianofortes with keyboard

Description

July 29, 1930. L. B. DOMAN AUTOMATIC PIPE ORGAN Filed Jan. 12, 1926 6 Sheets-Sheet l 1, is, JLQI BY? g y v flrrzmvsys Io Minn I.
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llll ill Ill t une. ri i oaou ou x July 29, 1930. B. DOMAN AUTOMATIC" PIPE ORGAN 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Jan. 12, 1926 rudJlw OJ l July 29, 1930. B. DOMAN AUTOMATIC PIPE ORGAN Filed Jan. 12, 1926 s Sheets-Sheet 5 WIT/v ss July 29, 1930. B. DOMAN AUTOMATIC PIPE ORGAN Filed Jan. 12, 1926 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 zaiuuddw mam #ITNESS July 29, 1930'. L, B, DOMAN 1,771,457
AUTOMATIC PIPE ORGAN Filed Jan. 12, 1926 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 v I 61' N V'NT'OR 2%) v flrraz/vsvs flrrzmvsys y 1930. I.. B. DOMAN 1,771,457
AUTOMAT I C PIPE ORGAN Filed Jan. 12, 1926 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 w d VENT 0R Patented July 29, 1930 UNITED STATES LEWIS B. DOEAN, OF SYRACUSE, NEW YORK AUTOMATIC PIPE ORGAN Application filed January 12, 1926. Serial Io. 80,747.
This invention relates to an automatic pipe organ involving the use of one or more manual key-boards commonly known as manuale and a pedal key-board usually termed pedals together with a system of stops for selectively playing any particular part or combination of parts of a musical composition as may be desired, without in any way interfering with the voluntary operation and control of the keys of either of the manuals or pedals or any one of the stops in the usual manner for playing the same or any other musical composition.
i I This instrument contemplates the use of two sixty-one note manuals, a thirty note pedal action and sixty stops, making a total of two hundred and twelve different elements to be either voluntarily or automatically operated, one of the manuals being designated as the accompaniment manual and the other as the solo manual, and the main object of my present invention is to provide simple and etlicient means whereby all of these elements may be automatically operated and controlled by a relatively narrow music sheet and a correspondingly short tracker bar having a maximum number of, in this instance, ninetyive rows of perforations and tracker ducts respectively, but it will be evident from the following description that other perforations and ducts for special purposes may be added, if desired.
In other words. it is assumed that a music sheet providing for sixty-one rows of note perforations and a corresponding number of tracker ducts, is sufficient for playing any composition for the organ, certain ones of which are adapted for playing solo parts,
. others for accompaniment parts and still others for pedal parts, the remaining thirty-four rows of perforations and tracker duets being used in the selection and operation of certain solo divisions of the manuals I and pedals and also in the selection and operation of the stops, switches and canceling devices hereinafter'more fully described.
Another object is to provide means controlled by thenote perforations and tracker ducts for selecting from the sixty-one notes,
those or parts of those which are to be play d on the solo manuals or on the pedals and to utilize the same tracker ducts which select the solo parts for selecting the Various stops on which the various parts are to be played.
A further object is to provide means whereby a limited number of pipes may be made to serve as several stops as for example, from a set of ninety-seven pipes may be derived five or more stopswhich are available for use on either of the manuals or pedals without interfering with their use in the same or any other pitch on any other manual or pedal at the same time, all of which enables the instrument to be built in a comparatively small space and at relatively low cost and at the same time, secures greatly increased resource in tonal capacity and avoids the inconveniences and (liiliculties arising from the use of relatively wide music sheets. I
Other objects and uses relatin parts of the instrument will be ii in the following description.
In the drawings I Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view, partly broken away, of the major par-ts of the console of the organ.
Figure 2 is an enlarged diagrammatic view, partly in section, of certain parts of the console for selecting and controlling solosand accompaniments on the manuals, showing also portions of the pipe chest, contact box and electro-pneumatic controlling means therefor of the organ.
Figure 3 is an enlarged diagrammatic View, partly in section, of certainparts of the console for selecting and controlling the pedal solos and including portions of the pipe chest, contact box and electro-pneumatic operating means therefor. I
Figure 4 is a diagrammatic View, partly in section and partly broken away,-ofoertain to specific rought out parts of the console and organ for selecting and controlling the operation of the various stop-bars and contact box therefor.
Figure 5 is a diagrammatic view ot a music sheet showing a flimitedfnumber of note perforations and their possible divisions and also showing limited of additional rows of perforations for and controlling the solo divisions of the manuals and pedals, and stops and additional rows of perforations for canceling previously selected solos and stops.
Figure 6 is an enlarged diagrammatic view of the electric switches of one of the contact boxes and the operating pneumatics for said switches showing the method of selectively switching the notes of any one division from accompaniment to solo and vice versa.
Figure 7 is a rear elevation, partly broken away of a portion of the contact box for supporting the diagonally disposed bristles used for accompaniment and solo playing showing the manner of connecting bristles represent ing like notes in the several stops throughout the five octave range of the organ.
The instrument as a whole, may be divided broadly into two general units, one unit comprising what may be termed the organ parts and the other unit the console parts with suitable connections by which the two units may be installed or placed in juxtaposition or any practicable distance apart either at the same or at different levels. The parts of either unit may be arranged in many different relations or, in some instances, certain parts of either unit may be incorporated in the other unit, as may be found to be most expedient, or may contribute to greater efficiency, and for this reason, as well as for clarity of description, 30th units are shown more or less diagrammatically.
The majority of the movable parts of both units are pneumatically operated and other parts of the same units are electrically op erated to simplify the construction and to atford a wider range of relative installation of units but it is evident that many of the elec trically operated parts may be operated pneumatically and vice versa within the scope of the invention.
Organparts T- to form the chamber 3 in which the playing pressure for the pipes may be maintained by any suitable means not shown, while the section -6- contains the chamber 4 in which a relatively high pressure is maintained by the same or any other means not necessary to herein illustrate" or describe for the reason that any suitable device may be used for supplying air under pressure to either or both of said chambers.
The pipes of each set communicate with the correspondizw chamber 3- through tubular ports 8, one for each pipe, each port being extended into the chamber 3 for conducting air under pressure to the corresponding pipe.
The section "6 having a high pressure chamber -et. extends into the chamber -3 and is provided with a top wall -9 supported by posts -10 and having a plurality of pouches or diaphragms -11- each normally closing one of the ports 8 for preventing the passage of air from the chamber 3 to the corresponding pipe.
The upper wall of the high pressure chamber -a forms the lower wall of the air chamber 3- and also supports the posts 10 so that the high pressure chamber 4 extends downwardly some distance below the air cnambcr 3- and is provided at its lower end with atmos iihere chambers l 2 each having opposed air ports -13 and 1 l one set for each pipe, in vertical ly spaced relation controlled by an armature valve -I5- 01" an electro-magnet 16.
The port l?- formed in the upper wall. of the chamber ].2 for connecting said chamber with the high pressure chamber 4. while the port 14ropens to the atmosphere, but is normally closed by the valve l5 acting under its own weight, and by air pressure from the chamber 4.
A tube -17-- extends through both of the chambers 4; and 3 and has its lower end connected to the chamber 12 and its upper end connected to the pouch -11- whereby the high pressure air, normally passing from the chamber through the port --13- into the chamber l2- and thence through the tube -17 to the pouch 11, serves to normally close the corresponding port r it being understood that the lower wall of the high pressure chamber -4 is provided with a plurality of ports 13 and -l -t-, clcctr0-magnet7-3-1(i and pipes l7 corresponding to the number of pouches -l1 and pipes 'A-; that is, one of each of those parts for each pipe while the chamber 4- may be common to all of the ports 13 and -14.
The pipe supporting section .7 carrying the relatively short tubes S-- is stat onary while the section -(l and parts carried thereby including the diaphragm 11-- may be removed from the section --5 and tubes 8 by downward displacement by simply removing the screws -7 to permit inspection or repairs of the enclosed parts without disturbing the pipes.
The distance between the lower end of the section 5 and lower ends of the tubes is constant and substantially equal. to the distance between the upper end of the section -6 and diaphraqms -11 so as to assure proper relation ietween the diaphragms and their corresponding tubes -8- when the section -6- is secured to the section -5-.
As previously stated practically all of the organ tones for any composition may be played within a range of five octaves elther through the medium of an accompaniment manual, a solo manual and the pedals, or automatically through the medium of a perforated music sheet and certain devices controlled thereby for selectively energizing the stop magnets whereby any stop may be played as solo, accompaniment or pedal individually or the pedals or pedal stops may be played simultaneously with either thesolo or accompaniment stops.
To this end, certain devices for selectively energizing the stop magnets -16 may be incorporated in the organ case, said parts consisting, in this instance, of a contact box -l8 upon which is mounted a plurality of parallel horizontal rows of U-shaped electric conductors 19 arranged in uniformly spaced relation vertically and the several rows insulated from each other by their supporting box, while those of each row, in this instance, sixty-one in number, are also arranged in uniformly spaced relation horizontally and insulated from each other by the same box and representing the sixty-one notes of the corresponding stop of a live octave organ, the conductors representing corresponding notes being preferably arranged in vertical columns one over the other.
These condutors -19- are preferably made of spring wire of uniform length and are secured near their closed ends to one of the upright walls of the box -18- so that their opposite arms may extend in parallelism some distance from said upright wall to permit them to move vertically into and out of contact with their respective stop bars as will be hereinafter more fully explained.
Stop bar action ranged in parallel diagonal planes relatively I to vertical and horizontal planes to bring the two arms or contactbristles -19'- and --19"- of each conductor -l9 in different vertical planes and also in different horizontal planes so that like bristles of each will be horizontally al'me'cl for simultaneous contact with their corresponding stop bars. while like 'h'istles'of the several rows will be verterial and are slidable endwise on the box' 18- directly over the free ends of their respective horizontal rows'of contact bristles 19'- and -19-and may therefore, be respectively designated as accompaniment stop selecting and solo stop selecting bars.
Each of the bars 20 and 20'- is provided with a plurality of metal contact members 23 s aced longitudinally to correspond to the liorizontal spacing of the contact bristles of its cooperative row but are electrically connected to each other and to the corresponding magnets 16-, leaving intervening insulated portions normally overlyin adacent contactbristles when the bars are ad usted to their inactive positions.
The stop bars 20- and -20'' of each set are operated by separate pneumatics 22 and 22 which in turn are controlled by separate electro-magnets -24- and -24=o, one for each stop bar, said magnets being mounted upon one or more wind chests -25- having a vacuum chamber V and separate valve chambers 25, one for each of the magnets 24-. and -24 Y Each valve chamber -25'- has a pairof opposed ports 26 and 26 leading respectively to the atmosphere and to the adjacent vacuum chamber V and controlled by an armature valve 27-- which normally closes the port 26 but is adapted to be operated by the energizing of its corresponding magnet 24 or 24 to open the port -26- and to close the adjacent atmosphere port 26.
, The pneumatics -22- and 22- are connected by separate tubes 22-. to their respective valve chambers -25- and are therefore normally open to the atmosphere through their normally open atmosphere ports 26- and thereby inflated or distended.
Energizing of any one of the magnets 24 or 24, will cause the, adjacent valve 27- to close its atmosphere port 26 and to open its port 26- for connecting said pneumatic with the vacuum chamber Vand deflating the same to operate the corresponding stop bar and to register its contact members 23 with the contact bristles of the adjacent horizontal row ready for playing the notes of the selected stop or stops for the accompaniment or solo manuals. i p v As previously explained, the contact bristles '19' and -1'9"+ are arr'an' ed in s parate vertical rows and those ofe'ac tical row are connected to a separate sticker -2l or 21' for simultaneous operatlon into and out of contact with the corresponding stop bars 20- and 20' tor selectively controlling the accompaniment and solo playing.
These stickers are connected to and are ac tuated by separate pneumatics -28 and 28 which in turn are selectively operated and controlled by separate electro-magnets 30 and 30, one for each pneumatic, said magnets being mounted upon one or more wind chests 29 having a vacuum chamber V- and a plurality of valve chambers 3l and 31, one for each magnet. connected by separate tubes 32- and 32 to their respective pneumatics 28 and 28, Figure 2.
Each valve chamber 31 and 3l' is provided with opposed ports 53 and 33 and an armature valve 3 i controlling the ports of each set, the ports 33 being normally open to the atmosphere to inflate their respective pneumatics 28 and -28 while the ports 33 connect their respective valve chambers to the adjacent vacuum chamber V.
The armature valves 34- normally close their respective ports 33' thus permitting atmospheric air to enter and inflate the corresponding pneumatics 28 and -QS but are adapted to be operated by their respective magnets --30 and 30' to close their atmosphere ports 33 and to open their companion ports 33' to connect their respective pneumatics with the vacuum chamber V and thereby to operate said pneumatics for the purpose previously ex plained.
In addition to the means for selectively operating and controlling the manual accompaniments and solos as previously described, suitable means is provided for selectively operating and controlling the thirty lower notes of the organ range or pedal ac tion independently of or simultaneouslv with either the manual accompaniment or manual solo parts, and to this end is provided a supplemental contact box 18' carrylng any suitable number of horizontal rows of: contact. bristles 19, step bars 20, and stickers 2l similar to the like parts previously described except that they are single instead of double.
Pedal 8010 selector That is, each conductor consists of a single spring wire cont-act bristle 19- instead of the U-shaped conductors 19 previously described and each horizontal row may have thirty contact bristles, one for each of the thirty lower notes of the organ range of eight octaves to beused for pedal solo playing or in conjunction with either the manual accompaniment or manual solo parts, those of the several rows representing like notes being arranged in vertical alinement and operatively connected to their respective stickers 21'- in a manner similar to those previously described.
Associated with the several horizontal rows of contact bristles l9 of the pedal action is a corresponding number of stop bars -QO', each having a number of contact members 23, one for each contact bristle of the cooperative row, the contact mem bers of each bar being electrically connected to each other and to a source of electric energy B while the contact bristles l9 are separately connected to their respective pipe-controlling magnets 1(S- for controlling the pedal pipes in a manner similar to that previously described, for the acconipaninient and solo playing.
The stickers -i2l are o1')eratively connected to and actuated by separate pneumatics 2t which, in turn, are controlled by separate electro-magnets 30, said magnets being mounted upon a supplemental wind chest Qf)- containing a vacuum chamber and a plurality of valve mem- 3l, Fig. 3, each connected by a tube to its corresponding pneumatic and provided with opposed ports -33- and 33 and an armature valve 34 similar to the like parts of the manual solo selectors previously described.
It is new evident that by moving any one off these bars 20 or Q() to one position for registering its contacts 23 with the adjacent contact bristles 19- or 19- of the corresponding conductors l9 and then moving any one or more of those bristles into contact with the registering contact member or members will close the circuit through and thereby energize the corresponding magnet or magnets l6- to sound the corresponding pipe or pipes "1 of that particular step.
For example, any contact bar 2dand cooperative row of contact arms -19- of the corresponding conductor l9 may be used to play the pipes of the correspomling stop as an accon'ipaniment, or any contact bar -20 and its adjacent arms l9"- of the same conductor l9 may be used to play the pipes of the same stop as a solo, while any contact bar 20 and corresponding row of bristles 'l9" of the contact box 1S may be used for playing the pedal pipes alone or in conjunction with the manual accompaniment or solo.
Uonsole parts The essential parts of the console are shown more or less diagramanitically and comprise an accompaniment manual C and a solo manual D, Figure 2, each having a series of, in this instance, sixty-one keys covering a range of five octaves, and a corresponding number of stop-controlling tablets E-, Figure 4, all of which parts are adapted to be operated for manual organ playing if desired, the stop tablets -E- being preferably arranged along the manual key-board.
The console also comprises a tracker bar *F'. Figures 1, :2, 3 and 4,and a erforated music sheet -G-, Figure 5, whic' is adaptcd to be moved across the tracker bar by any suitable mechanism, not necessary to herein with a corresponding number of rows of perforations similarly grouped and the several groups designated by corresponding titles, it being understood that for brevity and clarity,
, the music sheet shown includes onlya limited.
number of rows of perforations in the notes group, the solo division and stop group and the pedal solo division group.
The several note ducts of the tracker bar -F- are connected by separate tubes 35 to separate passages 35 in a vent chest 36,and the passages -35 are connected by separate tubes 36' to separatepneumatics 37- which are preferably assem-- bled in groups of threeiin each group within the vacuum chambers V of a plurality of, in this instance, twenty solo selector blocks -38, one for each group.
Each of the pneumatics 37 to operate and control a pair of normally open: electric switches -39- and 39-- whicharc connectedincircuit with their respective magnets and -30'- for controlling the operation of the corresponding pneumaties 28 and 28- Figure 2. y Vithin each block --38 is also mounted an additional pneumatic -37'-- and a. double switch having two terminals- 40 and 4-0" and a movable contact member -4;()"-- normally in contact with the terminal 40- and adapted to be operated by the pneumatic -3i"- to break said contact and to-c-ontact with the terminal 40"- for controlling the energizing of the switches 39 and -39- of the corresponding group.
For this purpose the movable members of the switches -39- and -39 group are electrically connected by wires 41 and 41'-: to the terminals (as and 40 respectively of the correspondis adapted I of each ing block-29 while the fixed terminals of the switches -39- and -391- of each group are connected by wires 42and 42' to their respective magnets 30-' and 30--, F ignre 2. i p
' It therefore, follows that if any one or more of the accompaniment sto bars -20 are adjustedt-o register their contacts -23 with the cooperative rows of bristles 19', and any one or more of the note perforations of the music is registered with its-corresponding ducts 'in the tracker bar, atmospheric air willbe admitted to the corresponding pneumatics -37 for closing both of the switches 39 and ?9 and thereby energizing the cooperative magnets 30 and their pneumatics 28 for lifting their respective bristles -19 into contact with the registering barcontacts -23- which, in turn, closes the circuits through the corresponding magnets 16and causes the sounding of theirrespective pipes -A.
Or, the same result may be produced manually by the operation of thekeys of the manual C'- through the medium of electric switches --c and wires c leading therefrom to the corresponding magnets -30, Figure 2, i in which the electric switches are separatelyoperable by their respective keys but in either case any note'or combination of notes throughout the entire range of the key-board may be played on anv accompaniment stop within its range.
During this accompaniment playing the pneumatics -37- and their respective switches may remain in their normal positions but, as previously stated, each pneumatic 37 controls its corresponding group of primary pneumatics '37'= and their respective pairs of switches 9 and 39 and determines the number of (in this instance twenty)- divisions or groups into which the sixty-one note ducts and note perforations of the tracker bar and music sheet, respectively, are divided.
These divisions and also the ducts and perforations of each I division are arranged in sequence fromleft to right corresponding to the ascending gradations of the chromatic scale such as (C, C#, D). (D#, E, F,) (F#, G, G#) and so on through the several octaves and it therefore follows that the notes of any one or more divisions of any one or more stops may be played as solo with any one or more different divisions of the same stop or a different. stop as accompaniment by adjusting the correspond ing stop bars to their playing positions and operating. the desired primary pneumat ics 37".
The music sheet G as illustrated shows only six of the twenty groups of rows right hand of the note perforations are a corresponding number of the twenty rows of solo division and stop perforations numbered 1, 2, 3 and so on to correspond with the number of groups, While the tracker bar is provided with similarly designated ducts l3- with which the corresponding perforations are adapted to register.
These twenty tracker ducts 4l3 are connected to a corresponding number of separate channels l3 in a pneumatic switch box: 'l-l-, each channel having a series of, in this instance three, pneumatic valves 4-5-, 1-5 and 45"- controlling a corresponding number of air tubes or conduits l6-, -'l6'-, and 46 which, in turn, are respectively connected to separate valve chests 47, -47- and '17.
The pneumatics -L, sl5- and of the several channels 43 are arranged in horizontal rows and those of the several rows are connected by separate ports --l8, et8- and l8" to adjacent air chambers 9, 49 and -l$), one for each row, each channel being provided with a restricted vent -4 t-.
he pneumatics 45 serve to open and close their respective tubes .(3 and are all controlled from a single valve chest 50 having separate valve chambers 51- and 5l, a vacuum chamber -V, an air chamber 52 and a primary pneumatic 52, the valve chamber 51 being con nected by a tube 50 to the air chamber .l9, Figures 2 and 4:, and provided with opposed ports leading respectively to the vacuum chamber V- and to the air chamber 52-.
- These ports are controlled by a valve 53 which normally closes the atmosphere port and opens the 'acuum port for normally deflating the pneumatics 45 and thereby opening the tubes 46 of that row.
The valve chamber 5l is connected by apassage 54.- and a restricted passage -54 to the pneumatic 52 and to the vacuum chamber V respectively and is also connected by separate tubes and 55- to similar but separate valve chests 56 and -56 which, in turn, are connected by tubes 57 and 57 to the air chambers 49 and l9 for a purpose presently described, the air tubes -55 and 5:' being controlled by separate poppet valves 58- and 5S in the chamber 5l'.
The valve chest l7-, Figure 2, is provided with a plurality of, in this instance, twenty vacuum chambers V, an air chamber -59, common to all of the vacuum chambers, valve chambers 59 connecting the corresponding chambers V and -59, and primary pneumatic chambers -60 which are connected by separate bypasses 60- to their respective valve chambers 59' and are provided with separate ports 6l, each connected to its corresponding tube l6 and controlled by a poppet valve 61'.
The valve chambers 59'- are provided with double valves 62 each controlling communication between its chambers V and -59 and also between said chambers and the adjacent by-pass -60- while each by-pass is connected by a tube 62' to its corresponding solo controlling pneumatic 37, Figure 2.
Associated with the solo division valve chest 47 is a solo cancel valve chest -63 having a vacuum chamber --V, a primary pneun'iatic 63' and a valve chamber -Gd provided with opposed ports -6s.'- and ()l leading respectively to the vacuum chamber V and to the atmosphere and controlled by a double valve 65, Figure :2.
The valve chamber -6-l is connected by a tube -($5 to the air chamber -5.) which is common to all of the valves (i2 and is normally open to the atn'iosphere through the port 6et" while the pneumatic 63 is connected by a tube 66 to the solo cancel tracker duct to be controlled by a perforation in the solo cancel row of the music sheet.
Now, if any one or more of the solo stop bars 20 are adjusted to register their contacts Q3- with the bristles -1$)" of the corresponding row, the registration of a perforation in any one or more of the twenty solo division and stop rows of the music sheet (Fig. with the corresponding duct -l:3 Figure 2, will allow atmospher' air to enter its tube l6, open the valve 61 and inflate the pneumatic 60 for operating the adjacent valve -62- to close its vacuum port and open its atmosphere port.
This allows the atmospheric air to enter the by-pass -60- and pneumatic 60 for closing the valve -61 and thereby allows the atmospheric air to pass through the tube 62' for inflating the solo controlling pneumatic 37'-, which causes the switch member -40 to break contact with the terminal 40 and to make contact with the terminal 40' so that the registration of any note perforation with its corresponding tracker duct in the selected solo division or group will cause the operation of the corresponding pneumatic 37 to close the switch 39 and 39' and thereby, through the closed contacts -40' and l0", energize the corresponding solo magnet -30'- for effect ing the operation of its selected set of bristles 19"- and consequent sounding of the corresponding pipe A as previously explained without in any way interfering with the free operation of any of the other divisions or groups for accompaniment playing.
Or, the magnets --30-'may be energized to produce the same tonal effects by the manual operation of the keys of the solo manual I) through the medium of electric switches d'- one for each solo key, and wires (l" and --42 leading to said magnets -30. 7
Any previously selected and operated solo controlling pneumatic and eilects produced thereby may be automatically canceled by the registration of a perforation in the solo cancel line of the music sheet with its corresponding tracker duct -66, Figure 2, whereby the valve -G5- will'be operated by the inflation of the pneumatic -63 to close its adjacent atmosphereport and connect its vacuum chamber V with the then open corresponding by-pass -60' for deflating the neumatics 60 and 37- connected hereto and allowing the contact member 40" to return into contact with the terminal -40-.
Pedal control It will be seen from the foregoing description that the twenty divisions or groups of three each of the note perforations and their tracker ducts, Figure 2,.may comprehend the entire compass of a five octave or sixty-one note organ and may be used for selectively playing the accompaniment or solo stops throughout the range of both the accompaniment and solo manuals but in as much as the lower thirty notes are also to be operated by the pedal action,
they may be divided into ten groups or I pedal solo divisions of three in each group by devices similar tothose previously described except that the accompaniment switches -39 contact terminal 40*, and also the accompaniment bars 20- and their respective rows of bristles -19" are omitted and the single solo parts used as in Figure 3 I c ,c That is, each air chamber -35 of the vent chest 36- within the pedal range is connected by a separate tube --36"-- toa corresponding number of primary pneu matics 37 which, in turn are arranged in groups of three in each group, within sep arate (in this instance ten) switch blocks -3S', one for each group, each block also containing an additional pneumatic -37""-. one for each group.
Each neumatic --37 controls a normally open electric switch 39-"- while the pneumatic 37" of each group controls normally open electric switch --401' and the three switches -39c-- of each group are connected in multiple with the corresponding switch 4l so that if any one of the switches '40-- is closed by the inv fiation of its corresponding pnemnabiac -37"' it will place all of the movable switch members of that group in electrical connection therewith.
Now, if any note perforation of that group is registered with its corresponding tracker duct it will cause the operation of the selected pneumatic -3'7"- and its, switch -39" for energizing the corresponding magnet 30' and playing the selected note of any particular stop which may be selected.
Otherwise, the parts for selectively operating, locking and canceling the pedal solo controlling pnenmatics -37*"-- and -37""- are similar to the parts for operating, looking and canceling the pneumatics 37- and 3'7 previously explained and aside from the differences noted, the same reference characters are applied to corresponding parts. I
' Stop bar action As previously stated. the pneumatic switch box 44 is provided with thirty channels. 43- leading totheir respective tracker ducts 43-, and controlled by thirty rows of perforations in the music sheet, twenty for the solodivision andstop selection and ten for the pedal solo division and stop. selec tion as shown in Figure 5, and, that each channel is connected by three tubes -L6, 46- and 46-, to the lock valve chainbersof the lock valve chests -47-, -47". and -Tl7"- all having similar parts designated by like reference characters while the three rows of air chambers 49-, -49' and 49-r are connected by tubes j-50",, 57'- and -57+ to their respective valve chests 5(l-, -56-- and --56'--. I
The valve chests 56 and -5 6- are similar and are used to. selectively control the operation of the pneumatics -45' and -45- of their respective rows, and thereby to selectively control the operation of the movable parts of the stop lock valve chests -47- and4Z"- corresponding to said pneumatics, r
For this purpose. each valve chest 5fiand -56' is provided with a valve chamber -67+ connected by opposite ports to a vacuum chamber V and to the atmosphere respectively by a double valve -67 cont-rolling both of said ports, and a pneumatic 67-'- for operating the valve -67f-V, the valve chambers 67 of the chest -56 and 56' being respectively connected by the'tubes 57and 57'5- to the air chambers 49 and 49"- for controlling the pneumatics -45- and -45"+ of the corresponding, rows, each chest being also provided with an air chamber -68 having a vent -68-v leading to c the vacuum chamber V--. and'an air passag$ 68- leading to the pneumatic y i v The tubes -55- and 55 controllmg the valves -58- and 58*, previously de scribed, are connected to the air chambers 68 of the valve chests 56 and 56 respectively, while the pneumatics -67- of the same valve chests are respectively connected by separate ducts 69 and -(39 to the tracker bar --F-, it being understood that one valve chest, as 56, controls all of the pneumatics 15 and that the other valve chest 56 controls all of the pneumatics l5".
The stop lock valve chests 47 and i7",, Figure 4, like the pedal solo division lock valve, Figure 3, are similar to solo division lock valve. Figure 2, previously described, and their various parts may therefore, be designated by the same reference characters.
The air chambers --59- of the valve chests -4.-7 and 4T are connected to separate valve cancel chests G3 which are similar to thos previously described and have their various parts designated by the same reference characters with the single exception that the tubes 6t3 leading to the tracker bar are connected to each other and to the tracker ductcorresponding to the row of perforations marked Stop cancel in the music sheet.
A stop contact box 38, Figure 4;, contains a vacuum chamber V, two sets of electric switches -'?O- and --'T) in this instance thirt in each set, and rorresponding sets of the same number of primary pneumatics Tland T1-, each adapted to operate its individual switch.
The electric switches -70 and TO are connected in the circuits of their respective electro-magnets -24- and -24ipreviously described, while the pneumatics 71- and 7l'- are connected by separate tubes 72 and 'T2 to their respective by-passes -60' of the valve chests et"- and -l7" thus completing the automatic stop control mechanism but if desired, the energizing of the same magnets for the same purposes may be controlled at will by the operation of any one or more of the stop tablets -E" and their respective electric switches c which are connected in circuit with their respective magnets.
In Figure 7, which is a rear face view of the contact box for the bristle, portions of each of the five octaves of the bristles for the several stops are shown reading from left to right, as part 1, part 2, part 3, )art at and part 5; part 1 being the treble end showing the bristles controlling the pipes C- and B; part 2, the bristles for pipes -C and -B- one octave lower; part i, the bristles for the 12th or 2% pitch pipes as G and F.;:;' and part 5, the bristles for the pipes C- and B, four octaves lower.
The bristles 19- of each row cooperate with a. corresponding number of pairs of stop rods 20 and 20' one of each pair being adjustable for accompaniment playing and the other for solo playing for the several stops or sets of pipes represented by the sev- --ral rows of bristles as previously explained and these several rows may be designated respectively from top to bottom as 2' pitch, 2% or 12th pitch, 4 pitch, 8 pitch and 16 pitch.
The bristles 19- representing like notes of the various horizontal rows representing the stops of different pitch, may be electrically connected in octaves or in any intermediate or mutation pitch by wires only one of which is shown in Figure '7 as connecting the -C bristles of the 16 stop, part 1, with the C- bristles of the 8' stop, part 2, the C bristles of the t stop, part 3, the G bristles of the 2 or 12th stop, part 4, and the -C- bristles of the 2 stop, part 5.
Operation In this particular instrument provision is made for the operation of sixty stops involving the use of a corresponding number of stop bars, some for controlling the accompaniment and others for controlling the solo parts, the sounding of each pipe of each stop being selectively interchangeable from accon'ipaniment to solo and vice versa by reason of the double contact bristles 19' and 19 having single loads 16 to their respective pipe magnets -l6-, Figure 2, as previously explained.
The operations of the accompaniment bars 20, Figure 4, are separately controlled by the onening and closing of the corresponding tubes -16- through the medium of their respective neumatics et5, while the operations of the solo bars 20' are separately controlled by the opening and closing of the corresponding tubes 46 through the medium of their respective pneumatics 45", Figure 4.
The selections of the solo divisions or groups of three notes each for any selected stop are controlled by the opening and closing of the corresponding tubes 46 through the medium of their respective pneumatics l5, Figure 4 all of which are normally deflated by vacuum pressure from the valve chest -50 to open said tubes as previously explained.
Under these conditions any one or more of the sixty stops may be brought into action by the registration of one or more perforations in any one or more of the twenty rows in the right hand margin of the music sheet with one or the other of the tracker ducts 43 of the corresponding stop-selecting ducts 46 or 4.6 and at the same time any one or more of the manual solo divisions may be automatically selected and operated by the registration of any one or more perforations in any one or more of the same rows with the ducts 43- of the corresponding solo division-selecting ducts 46-.
For example, assuming that all of the solo and accompaniment stops are canceled to bring all of the automatic playing parts to their normal positions as in Figure 1 and that it is desired to automatically play an accompaniment part on any particular stop, then a perforation in the moving music sheet registering with the tracker duct 69, Figure 4 will place all of the pneumatics 45 of the chamber -49- under vacuum pressure thereby opening all of the corresponding tubes -46-.
If, now, another perforation in the music sheet is brought into registration with the tracker duct 43- corresponding to the particular stop selected,the air pressure admitted to the adjacent tube -46 will temporarily open its check valve 61-, inflate the adj acent pneumatic 60- and lift the corresponding valve 62 to connect the atmosphere port --64"- of the cooperative valve chest -63-- with the corresponding pneumatic --71 of the switch box 38"- thpough the connecting passages -60- and 2-. a
The check valve 61'-- then closes by its own weight and air pressure, leaving the go pneumatic -71 inflated to close its switch 70 which, in turn, closes the electric circuit through its electro-magnet --24- and thereby operates the adjacent valve --27- to place the corresponding pneumatic -22 in as communication with the vacuum chamber for deflating the same and causing it to adjust its stop bar 20- to playing position, Figure 4.
Now, as the note perforations in the music sheet register with their respective tracker ducts 35-, Figure 2, air pressure through the tubes e35- and -36 will inflate the corresponding pneumatics -37- to close their respective pairs of electric switches 39- and -39' in the switch box -'38.
The switch members and -40- of each block 38 are connected in series with the switches 39- and -39'+- respectively of the corresponding group while the switch member -40" is normally in contact with the switch member 4()-- and out of contact with the switch member 40' and therefore the closed switch 39-- controlling the adjacent solo group selecting pneumatics -37'- is deadi.
Under these conditions the closed switches 39- will close the circuits through the corresponding electromagnets -30 and operate their respective valves 3 l'- thereby connecting their respective pneumatics -28- with the vacuum chamber V- of the chest -29-, Figure 2 for operating said pneumatics and their respective stickers -21 and causing the corresponding bristles -19- to make electrical connection with their contact members 23- on the previously adjusted stop bar 20-.
This closing of the bristles 19against the contacts -23 closes the circuit through the corresponding electro-magnet -16- for operating the adjacent valve --15 and causing the speaking of the pipe A- of the selected stop as an accompaniment part of the musical selection, during which the solo parts are rendered inactive by reason of the open switch at -40'-.
In like manner, any number of stop bars -20 mag be drawn individually or in combinations or playing the corresponding stop or stops as accompaniment as long as the solo selective pneumatics 37 remain in their normal positions with their switch members 40 in contact with the terminals 40-, it being understood thatthe switches 39-- and 39- are intermittingly closed and opened by the presence or absence of note-perforations in the music sheet registering with their respective tracker ducts -35-.
If it is desired to switch'from accompaniment to solo a perforation in the music sheet is caused to register with the tracker duct 69- to admit air to the pneumatic -67 of the chest 56- for operating the valves 67 and 53 and thereby causing all of the pneumatics 45"- to open their respective tubes -46" and at the same time causing all of the pneumatics 45- to close their tubes -46.
Now, if a perforation in the music sheet is caused to register with any one of the ducts 43-, air will be admitted to the corresponding tube 46-, opening the check valve 61'- and operating the pneumatic 60- and valve -62- to admit air from the chest -63- through the tube -72 to the corresponding pneumatic --7l--, Fig ure 4:. I
The admission of air to the pneumatic 7l'- will cause the closing of the switch thereby closing the circuit through the corresponding electro-magnet -24- which, in turn, will operate the adjacent valve -27- and place its pneumatic 24 in communication with the vacuum chamber V- of the chest 29 resulting in the operation of the corresponding solo stop bar 20. to its playing position.
The registration of the note perforations of the music sheet with their respective tracker ducts 35 will then cause the closing of the switches 39 and 39'-, as before, for energizing the electro-magnets 30- and thereby causing the operation of their corresponding valves 3 l and pneumatics 28 which, in turn, will operate the sticker 21' to engage the bristles 19-- with the contacts 23 of the previously drawn stop bar 20' and cause the speaking of the selected pipe for that particular stop for solo playing.
In like manner, all of the stop-bars 20- may be drawn individually or in different combinations for playing the individual solo notes of any selected group or combinations of groups.
In Figure 1, the five octaves of note ducts -35- of the tracker bar are shown as connected to a corresponding number of ducts 35 in the vent chest -36, while the twenty tracker ducts 43- at the right hand end and the ten tracker ducts -43 at the left hand of the tracker bar are connected to corresponding numbers of channels 4:3- in the switch box 44.
The five octaves of note ducts -35' in the vent chest 36 are arranged in groups of three in each group and those of each group are connected by tubes -36' to an equal number of the pneumatics -37 in each of the twenty switch blocks 38 so that the swenty switch blocks contain altogether sixty-one of the pneumatlcs 37. or one for each note of a five octive organ.
Each block 38 also contains one of the pneumatics 37- and these twenty pneumatics 37- are connected by separate tubes -62 to their respective by-passes of the valve chest 47 as previously described.
Each pneumatic 37- controls a pair of switches 39 and --39 while each pneumatic -37 controls all three pairs of switches 39 and -39' of its corresponding group for selectively soloizing the notes of any selected group throughout the five octaves.
The valve chest 47 which is connected to the solo selecting pneumatics 3".'"- is also connected by twenty of the tubes %6 to the corresponding twenty channels l3 of the switch board 44- for controlling the passage of air from their respective tracker ducts 43-- to said valve chest 4="*-.
The thirty lower notes or pedal ducts 35 of the vent chest 36- are connected by tubes 36 to a corresponding number of pneumat-ics 37- which are arranged in groups of three in each group in a manner similar to the grouping of the pncumatics 37-, previously described. those oi each group being contained in separate switch blocks 3S (ten in number) together with a single pneumatic 37, one for each group, Figure 3.
These ten pneuma'tics 3? are connected by a corresponding number of tubes -62 to a second valve chest -47- which in turn, is connected by tubes i6 to their respective channels 4;3 in the switch box 44 so that air admitted to any one of the corresponding tracker ducts -3 will cause the operation of its pneumatic 37 to close the adjacent switch t0"' ready for pedal-solo-playing of the notes of that group.
The three electric switches -39" of each group are electrically connected to the single switch 40-- of the same switch block -3S' and therefore, if any one of the switches -4t0"- is closed in the manner described, the closing of any one of the three switches -39"- of that group by air admitted to its pneumatic 3T through the corresponding tracker duct will energize its magnet 30'-, Figure 3, and thercby cause the selected pedal-bristles 19- to contact with the members 23 of the previously drawn stop-bar -20- and consequent speaking of the selected pipe of that particular stop as previously explained.
In like manner any one or more groups of pedal notes may be soioized while any of the accompanimen" or solo stops are drawn, it being understood that the simultaneous playing of pedal solo and accompaniment or solo notes in the same group is seldom if ever required and therefore, the note perforations are arranged to avoid those conditions.
Any one or all steps selected for playing may be cancelled at once and at any time during the playing operation 3;: providing the music sheet with the necessarv perforations to register with its tracks curt --6'-- at the proper time and thereby to cause the operation of the pneumatics -G3- and valves 65, Figure 4, for con ting he chambers 59 and GO-- with the vaciuun equalizing the air pressure in said chambers and also in the corresponding pneumatic -71 and allowing the switch -TO to open.
In a si.- ilar manner the parts for selecting the solo divisions and pedal-solo canceled by providing the music sheet perforations to register with the tracker ducts 66, Figure 2 or fi6--. Figure 3 for causing the switch members -40 and -et0- to their normal positions.
The valve chests -63 for canceling the accompaniment stops and solo stops are shown at the right hand of Figure 1 V the similar chests 63 for solo divisions and pedal solos are sli j wn at the left hand of the same figure.
In Figure 5 is shown a fraglnc d tion of a, music sheet G-- having ciglneen of the sixty-one lines of note pertoratiens di vided into groups of three lines each and the several groups numbered in sequence from left to righ the right hand mar of the sheet being provided with six of tne twenty lines oi solo division and stop periorzitions similarly numbered to represent the several groups of note perforations.
The left hand margin of the sheet is pro Ill) vided with four of the ten lines of pedal solo division perforations numbered in sequence from left to right and just at the left hand of the four more or less lines of perforations for the pedal cancel, sto cancel, solo cancel and solo to stop swltch.
The note perforations which are represented as clear represent accompaniment part-s; those with hyphen inserts solo parts; those with small circles (O) pedal parts and those with small circles and hyphens 6 solo and pedal parts played together.
These several lines of perforations as illus trated are arranged to show some of the many combinations which may be used in playin musical compositions.
For example, at the beginning of the selection, in cross line A--, are the cancel perforations for canceling the pedal, stop and solo actions respectively, followed by another cross line B- of perforations in the solo to stop switch line, and in lines 1, 3 and 4 of the solo adapted to register respectively with the tracker duct -69-, Figure 4, and with the three corresponding tracker duets -43-- for setting the pedal stop, the solo stop and the accompaniment stop to their playing positions and also for se lectively soloizing the notes in Div. 1.
A note perforation (a) beginning in cross line C- of Div. 1 line is selected to be played as pedal solo by a short perforation at the intersection of the same cross line with the corresponding pedal division line, but is canceled by the perforation in cross line E in the pedal cancel line.
Beginning at the cross line --D-- are accompaniment note perforations and a note perforation in Div. 4 line soloized by a perforation in the corresponding solo division line 4, other notes in Div. 4 and in Div. 5 being soloized by the perforations in line 4, cross line -D- and another perforation in cross line F, Div. 5.
At cross line G- and pedal division line 1 is a pedal solo selecting perforation for soloizing the perforation as .f in Div. 1, but is canceled by a pedal cancel perforation in cross line J-- so that the remaining por tion of the perforation --F will be played as accompaniment.
In cross line H- and solo cancel line is a perforation for canceling the previously soloized notes, and at the same cross line and cross line HH, in solo division line -6- 1s a relatively longer perforation for soloizing the notes in Div. 6.
In solo division lines 3, t and 5 at cross lines -I-,-K and L are other perforations for soloizing the notes in the corresponding Div. 3, Div. 4, and Div. 5, the first part of one of the notes, as -j-, in Div. 3, cross line -M being played as solo and then canceled at M so that the middle portion of the same note is played as accompaniment, while the last partis again soloized by the perforation, at cross line N-N and division selecting line 3.
Other solo selecting perforations are provided at N-- line 2 and -O- line 1, for soloizing the notes in the corresponding Div. 2 and Div. 1 but are canceled and Div. 1 soloized at (OO) by reason of the longer perforation -7* thereby causing part of perforation -mto be played as solo and the remaining part as accompaniment.
At P- the stops previously drawn stops are canceled by perforation gexcept that #1 and #4 are held over and two new stops #5 on the right hand and #3 on the left hand divisions are drawn and at Q,- note (3 is selected to play pedal solo and manual but is canceled at leaving the central portion of note (y) to be played as accompaniment while at (S) the same note is again soloized without the pedal and is canceled at (T) an accompaniment (2) begins at (T) but at (U) all stops and solos are canceled and another perforation (ZZ) begins in the pedal cancel line for operating the roll to rewind the music sheet thus completing the playing and rewinding operations.
I claim:
1. In a player action for pipe organs, a. wind-chest having separate air chambers one above the other, the upper chamber containing air under playing pressure and having its top wall provided with a vertical port for directing air to a sound producing pipe, the lower chamber containing air under pressure greater than that in the upper chamber, a pneumatic supported within the upper chamber and cooperating with the lower end of said port for controlling the passage of air from the upper chamber to the pipe and normally communicating with the lower chamber to close the port, and means forming a part of the player action for closing said communication and venting the pneumatic to open the port. p
' 2. In a player action for pipe organs, a pipe chest comprising a pipe supporting section having relatively upright tubular ports for the pipes and a diaphragm supporting section having its diaphragms in direct coaction with and controlling the ports. said diaphragm supporting section being removable by downward displacement to withdraw the diaphragms from their respective ports without disturbing the pipe supporting section and pipes thereon.
3. In a player action for pipe organs, a pipe chest comprising a pipe supporting section having pipe ports in its top wall, a diaphragm supporting section removably secured to the underside of the pipe supporting section and forming therewith a pipe pressure air chamber, the diaphragm supporting section being provided with a higherthan-pipe-pressure-air-chamber, diaphragm pneumatics mounted on the diaphragm supporting section in direct cooperation with the lower ends the ports for controlling the pas *ge of air from the pipe pressure chamber LO their respective pipes and normally in communication with the high pressure air chamber through means carried by the diaphragm supporting section for closing the diaphragms ag; their respective ports, and means carried by the diaphragm supporting section for closing said communication and simultaneously venting the diaphragm pneuinaticsv l. In a player action for pipe organs, a pipe chest comprising a pipe supporting sec tion having a relatively fixed tubular port, a diaphragm controlling said port, a diaphragm supporting section removably secured to the lower end of the pipe supporting section and forming therewith a pipe-pressure-chamber, said diaphragm supporting section being providen with a higher-thanpipe pressure air-chamber normally communicating thru a passage with the diaphragm for closing the same againstits port, and means on the diaphragm supporting section for cutting off communication between the high-pressure-chamber and said passage and connecting the passage with the atmosphere to permit the opening of the diaphragm by the air in the pipe pressure chamber.
5. In a player action for pipe organs, a. sound-producing pipe, and web-controlled means for selectively sounding said pipe as sole or accompaniment.
In a player action for pipe organs, a set of pipes constituting a stop, and web controlled means for selectively sounding any one of the pipes as sole or accompaniment.
7. In a player action for pipe organ, a set of pipes constituting a stop, and web-controlled means for selectively sounding any one of the pipes as accompaniment and ther as solo at the same time.
S. In a player action for pipe organs. a sound-producing pipe. a solo selecting couple, an accompaniment selecting couple, means common to both of said couples and operable by either couple for sounding the pipe, and Web-controlled me cor selectively rendering either couple ac --ve.
9. In a player action for pipe or pipes constituting a stop, th d stop being arranged 11 groups, means for drawing the stop, and web-controlled means for selectively sounding the pipes of any group independently of the other groups.
10. In a player action for pipe organ, a sound-producing pipe and means for sounding the same including an accompaniment controlling couple, a solo controlling couple, web-controlled means for operating both couples simultaneously, and web-controlled means for rendering either couple active and the other couple inactive at the same time.
11. In a player action for pipe organs, a group of sound-producing pipes, means for sounding said pipes including a plurality of accompaniment controlling couples, one for each pipe, a plurality of solo controlling couples, one for each accompaniment couple, webcontrolled means for selectively operating the couples of each pair, and Webcontrolled means for rendering all of the ouples for either part active and those of he other part inactive.
12. In a pipe organ having a plurality of stops. web-controlled means for selectively (h-airing" the stops, means for selectively sermding tae pipes of the drawn stops, and b-con trolled H11. 11:; for coupling the pipes or each octave of each stop to the pipes of the next octave of another stop.
13. In a player action for pipe organs, webcontrolled means including an electromagnet for controlling the speaking of a pipe, sep arate electric contacts in the magnet circuit and representing different stops, and webcontrelled means for electrically connecting and disconnecting said magnet with either of said contacts.
14. In a player action for pipe organs having separate electro-magnets for controlling the sgileaking of individual pipes, each magnet circuitincluding therein a single conductor having a plurality of branches representing dillerent stops, and web-controlled means for closing said circuit thru any of said branches.
15. In a pipe organ having separate electro-magnets for controlling the speaking of individual pipes, each magnet circuit including therein a single conductor having a plurality of branches representing different stops, and web-controlled means for closing said circuit thru all of the branches simultaneously.
16. In a player action for pipe organs, separate electro-magnets, each controlling an individual pipe, each magnet circuit including therein a single conductor having a plurality of branches, each branch representing a different stop, stop bars representing differentstops and each provided with a contact member in the magnet circuit, each stop bar being adjustable to move its contact into and out of registration with its corresponding branch, separate devices for operating said branches into and out of engagement with the registering contacts of their respective stop bars and web-controlled means for operating said devices.
17. In a pipe organ having separate electromagnets, each controlling an individual pipe, each magnet circuit including therein a single conductor ha *ing a plurality of branches, each branch representing a dilferent stop, a corresenting different stops separate pneumatics for closing the contacts, and means for separately energizing the pneumatics.
19. In a player actionrfor pipe organs, a pipe, an electro-magnet controlling the soundmg of the pipe and including in its circuit separate sets of cooperative contacts representing different stops, additional electromagnets, one for each set of contacts means for selectively energizing the additional magnets, and separate devices actuated by .the
energizing of the additional magnets for closing their respective sets of contacts.
20. In a player action for pipe organs, a
pipe, an electro-magnet controlling the sounding of the pipe and including in its circuit separate sets of cooperative contacts representing different stops, means for shifting one of the contacts of each set into and out of registration with its companion contact, and
I meansfor closing registering contacts of each set separately.
21. In a player action for pipe organs, a pipe, an electro-magnet controlling the sounding of the pipe and including in its circuit separate sets of cooperative contacts representing different stops, means for shifting one of the contacts of each set into and out of registration with its companion contact, separate pneumatics for closing the contacts, and
means for selectively energizing said pneumatics.
22. In a player action for pipe organs, a pipe, an electro-magnet controlling the sounding of the pipe and including in its circuit separate sets of cooperative contacts representing different stops, additional electromagnets, one for each set of contacts, webcontrolled means for selectively energizing the additional magnets, and separate devices 31 actuated by the energizing of the additional magnets for selectively closing their respective contacts.
23. In a player action for pipe organs, a pipe, a plurality of electric switches representing different stops, and a double switch common to all of the first named switches, web-controlled means for selectively connecting each contact of the double switch with the one of the first named switches and for auto matically holding it in its adjusted position,
web-controlled means for closing the firstnamed switches, and means controlled by the closing of said switches for selectively sounding the pipe.
24. In a player action for pipe organs, a pipe, a plurality of electric switches representing different stops, and a double switch common to all of the first named switches, web-controlled means for selectively connecting each contact of the double switch with the one of the first named switches and for automatically holding it in its adjusted position, web-controlled means for closing the first-named switches, means controlled by the closing of said switches for selectively sounding the pipe, and web-controlled means for canceling the second-named web-controlled means.
25. A solo division and stop selection for pipe organs comprising a plurality of trans- .s:
lating devices, and a web-controlled air duct controlling said devices.
26. A solo division and stop selection for pipe organs comprising a plurality of translating devices, a web-controlled air duct controlling said devices, and web-controlled means for canceling one of said devices.
27. A solo division and stop selection for pipe organs comprising a plurality of translating devices, a web-controlled air duct controlling said devices, and web-controlled means for switching the air from one to another of said devices.
28. In a player action for pipe organs, a group of ducts, and means for selectively playing different stops from said group.
29. In a player action for pipe organs, a note duct, and web-controlled means cooperating with said duct for selectively playing different stops.
30. In a player action for pipe organs, means for selectively playing different stops including separate electric switches, each representing a different stop, web-controlled means for simultaneously closing both of the 1 switches, a double switch normally closing the circuit through one of the switches and breaking the circuit through the other switch, and web-controlled means for operating the double switch to break the normally closed circuit and to close the other circuit.
31. In a player action for pipe organs, a group of devices, each representing a different note and each operable to effect the playing of a stop, web-controlled means for effecting the operation of said devices individually, and web-controlled means for causing the devices of said group to effect the playing of a different stop.
32. In a player action for pipe organs, a plurality of groups of devices, each device representing a different note andeach operable to effect the playing of a stop, additional devices one for each group and each operable in conjunction with the devices of its group for effecting the operation of a different stop without interfering with the devices the other groups, web-controlled means for effect ing the operation of the first-nan'ied device; of each group and additional web-controlled means for effecting the operation of the second-named devices.
33. In a web-controlled player action for pipe organs, a note sheet having a group of note-controlling elements representing all of the notes to be played, and means for causing certain of elements to effect the playing of one of the organs and other elements to effect the playing of a different organ.
34:. In a record-controlled player action for pipe organs, a music sheet in which all of the notes to be played on all of the different registers, as Great, Swell, Pedal, Choir, etc, are arranged in one common group of perforations, means controlled by said perforations for selectively sounding the pipes, said music sheet having additional perforations and means controlled by the additional perforations for selectively switching from one register to another while any of the firstnamed perforations and any part of the length thereof remains in active position.
35. In a record-controlled player action for pipe organs characterized by the use of a music sheet having note perforations and additional short perforations, means conrolled by he additional perforations for selecting the notes to be played on different registers, said music sheet having a cancel perforation and devices whereby the short perforations will remain effective until canceled, and means controlled by a single cancel perforation whereby the ducts of the selected perforations may in the meantime be used for other purposes (as drawing stops) without interfering with their solo selecting control.
36. In a recod-controlled player action for pipe organs, means for controlling the speaking of the pipes of different pitch including a plurality of rows of electric conductors, one row for each pitch and those of each row arranged in octaves, one of the bristles of one row being electrically connected to other bristles of different rows for playing in differ-at pitches.
In a recordcontrolled organ player, two or more sets of tone emitting elements, some of the sets being suitable for playing accompaniment notes, other sets for playing solo notes, a tracker bar, a music sheet and mechanism controlled thereby and arranged to normally play accompaniment parts only, and means controlled by the music sheet whereby any note or notes or any parts thereof may be played as solo notes on a different or the same set of tone-emitting elements.
38. In a record-controlled organ player having two or more registers of pipes, a tracker bar, a music sheet having perforations for all the notes to be played arranged in one group and normally controlling one or more registers, and additional perforations controlling mechanism whereby any note or notes or any parts thereof may be switched to play on a different register or registers.
39. In a record-controlled organ pla er, the combination with an organ adapte to be played in different registers, as Great, Swell, Pedal, Higher, Echo, etc., of a player mechanism and a controlling music sheet therefor, the music having perforations for normally playing one register only, and mechanism including a plurality of additional perforations for switching parts of the mechanism to cause the playing of all or parts of certain notes on a different register.
40. In a record-controlled organ player, tl e combination with an organ having instrumentalities for sounding both accompaniment and solo notes, of a player mechanism and controlling music sheet therefor, said music sheet having perforations normally playing the accompaniment notes only, and a plurality of additional perforations ontrolling the playing of solo notes from ny or all of said accompaniment perforaions.
ll. In a record-controlled organ player having pipes or other sound-producing elements adapted to be played as accompaniment, solo or pedal, a player mechanism and controlling music sheet therefor, said player mechanism and music sheet being arranged to normally play accompaniment notes only, and other mechanism controlled by other perforations arranged and disposed in the music sheet to cause any of said accompaniment perforations or any part thereof to be switched to play solo or pedal notes within the range of the instrument.
42. In a record-controlled player action for pipe organs, a player mechanism, a tracker and a music sheet having perforations representing notes to be played on two or more registers arranged in one common group and normally controlling one register, additional perforations for causing any of the aforesaid perforations or any part of said perforations to be played on a different register whether or not the perforations representing notes to be played on the first-named register and perforations representing notes to be played on the last-named register open the tracker simultaneously.
In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand this lbll day of January, 1926.
LEW'IS B. DOMAN.
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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2574960A (en) * 1946-10-14 1951-11-13 Henry A Courmettes Cataract bifocal lens
US4859889A (en) * 1988-06-28 1989-08-22 General Electric Company Dynamoelectric machine

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2574960A (en) * 1946-10-14 1951-11-13 Henry A Courmettes Cataract bifocal lens
US4859889A (en) * 1988-06-28 1989-08-22 General Electric Company Dynamoelectric machine

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