US1766677A - Charge-supplementing apparatus for internal-combustion engines - Google Patents

Charge-supplementing apparatus for internal-combustion engines Download PDF

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US1766677A
US1766677A US181711A US18171127A US1766677A US 1766677 A US1766677 A US 1766677A US 181711 A US181711 A US 181711A US 18171127 A US18171127 A US 18171127A US 1766677 A US1766677 A US 1766677A
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air
exhaust gas
fuel
rotor
throttle
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US181711A
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Moore Arlington
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MAXMOOR Corp
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MAXMOOR CORP
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M23/00Apparatus for adding secondary air to fuel-air mixture
    • F02M23/02Apparatus for adding secondary air to fuel-air mixture with personal control, or with secondary-air valve controlled by main combustion-air throttle
    • F02M23/03Apparatus for adding secondary air to fuel-air mixture with personal control, or with secondary-air valve controlled by main combustion-air throttle the secondary air-valve controlled by main combustion-air throttle
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M26/00Engine-pertinent apparatus for adding exhaust gases to combustion-air, main fuel or fuel-air mixture, e.g. by exhaust gas recirculation [EGR] systems
    • F02M26/52Systems for actuating EGR valves
    • F02M26/63Systems for actuating EGR valves the EGR valve being directly controlled by an operator
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M26/00Engine-pertinent apparatus for adding exhaust gases to combustion-air, main fuel or fuel-air mixture, e.g. by exhaust gas recirculation [EGR] systems
    • F02M26/65Constructional details of EGR valves
    • F02M26/70Flap valves; Rotary valves; Sliding valves; Resilient valves
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02DCONTROLLING COMBUSTION ENGINES
    • F02D9/00Controlling engines by throttling air or fuel-and-air induction conduits or exhaust conduits
    • F02D9/02Controlling engines by throttling air or fuel-and-air induction conduits or exhaust conduits concerning induction conduits
    • F02D2009/0201Arrangements; Control features; Details thereof
    • F02D2009/0276Throttle and EGR-valve operated together
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y02TECHNOLOGIES OR APPLICATIONS FOR MITIGATION OR ADAPTATION AGAINST CLIMATE CHANGE
    • Y02TCLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION TECHNOLOGIES RELATED TO TRANSPORTATION
    • Y02T10/00Road transport of goods or passengers
    • Y02T10/10Internal combustion engine [ICE] based vehicles
    • Y02T10/12Improving ICE efficiencies

Definitions

  • My invention relates to a charge suppleinenting apparatus for internal combustion engines Aconsuming volatile liquid fuel, such as so-called gasoline, for example.
  • the object of the invention is the/.provif apparatus for supplementing the charge material supplied through the cus- Serial No.
  • the present -application is an advance upon and development of'my prior applications including, for example, application 173,388, iledMarch 7, 1927, for charge supplementing apparatus for internal power operation, metering mechanism operated adjunctively to throttling for controlling the make up and delivery of the past These various interdea suction fuel jet.
  • Fig. l is a part sectional and 'part side elevational view of a charge supplementing interposed between the exhaust and intake manifolds of an internal combustion engine.
  • Fig. 2 is a side View of the auxiliary fuel feeding means shown in Fig. 1.
  • Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig.
  • Fig. 4 is a section on the line 4 ⁇ 4, Fig. 3.
  • Fig. 5 l is a plan view of a modilied form o ⁇ f means for taking exhaust gas from the exhaust gas conduit.
  • Fig. 6 is a section on line 6 ⁇ 6, Fig. 5.
  • Fig. 7 is a longitudinal sectional view of a modified form of metering and heat eX- change appliance.
  • Fig. 8 is a side elevation of the appliance shown in Fig. 7.
  • Fig. 9 is a section on line 9-9, Figs. 7 and 8.
  • Fig. 10 is a section on line 10-10, Fig. 9.
  • Fig. 11 is a section on the line 1l-11,
  • FIG. 12 is an elevation of the means for operating the metering rotor.
  • Fig. 13 is a section on line 13-13, Fig. '7.
  • F Fig. 14 is a section on the line 14-14, of
  • F ig. 15 is a right hand appliance shown in Fig. 9.
  • Fig. 16 is an elevation of the ⁇ actuating mechanism for the apparatus of Fig. 1, shown in a separate View for the sake of clearness.
  • Fig. 17 is a side View of the actuating mechanism for the auxiliary fuel feeding means illustrated yin the upper portion of Figs. 18 to 22 inclusive are side views of cani devices of v end view of the in Orts.
  • igs. 27 and 28 are ⁇ sectional views of a In this way a portion of the exhaust cold air injector.
  • Fig. 29 is a perspective of an engine equipped with charge supplementing apparatus and apparatus for feeding auxiliary fuel as shown in section in Fig. 8.
  • Fig. 30 is a detail view of means for delivering auxiliary fuel to the intake manifold.
  • gas can be taken from the exhaust manifold with the velocity and kinetic energy of theV exhaust gas stream behind it, with little or no resulting constriction or backing up of theV exhaust gas stream in the exhaust conduit.
  • FIG. 1 Two forms of improved exhaust gas withdrawal means are illustrated, one in Fig. 1 and another in FigsBl-.
  • a hollow casting is bolted in between the exhaust manifold and the exhaust pipe.
  • the chambered casting solidly astened in being this position with olts, affords a firm and l substantialsupport on the en ine for my entire apparatus'when supplie for accessory equipment therewith of old engines already in service.
  • FIG. 1 Two forms of improved exhaust gas withdrawal means are illustrated, one in Fig. 1 and another in FigsBl-.
  • a hollow casting is bolted in between the exhaust manifold and the exhaust pipe.
  • the chambered casting solidly astened in being this position with olts, affords a firm and l substantialsupport on the en ine for my entire apparatus'when supplie for accessory equipment therewith of old engines already in service.
  • the inserted casting is designated generally by the reference numeral 10; it has a chamber 12 therein of a diameter somewhat reater than the bore of theexhaust manifod 14, and comprises ag Pitot "tube portion 16 formed as ali-integral partof the casting,r ⁇ and havin its mouth 18 directed against the iiow o? exhaust gas in the exhaust gas conduit 14.
  • the passage 20 in such member 16 is of substantially funnel formation, being of greatest, diameter at the mouth 18 and gradually tapering to a smaller section toward its opposite end, where it preferably terminates in an upwardly directed horn impact tube.
  • I l preferably designate this substantially semi-circular impact tube of Fig. 1 with gradually decreasing taper or funnel formation as the rams
  • a second form of the exhaustl gas withdrawal means is illustrated in Figs. 3, 5 and 6, which I prefer to designate as the escorter tube.
  • casting 10 to horn 22 is divided into substantially upper and lower halvesby the partial septum 32, providing a broad, ently curving inlet 34 directed against the ow of exhaust'gas in the exhaust conduit 19', and a similarly curved return passage 36 directed with the flow of the exhaust gas stream in the exhaust conduit.
  • septum 32 is forcibly driven out of horn 22 at 24 into the stove 28 when the passages therethrough are open, and a circulation of exhaust gas is secured through horn 22- and into and out of stove ⁇ 28 and back into the exhaust conduit at 36 when the outlet passage through stove 28 is closed or nearly closed.
  • the heat o a much larger part of the exhaust gases is ut1lized for 'preheating the air supplied to the intake.
  • septum 32 and the opening 39 around n v the end thereof leading 'back t6 the intake .conduit at 36 avoids putting substantial back pressure upon theI exhaust gases in the exhaust manifold.
  • Theexhaust geas horn is ⁇ surrounded by a )acketing mem r receiving warm air from around the exhaustconduit, and the passage fr om the jacketing member communicates wlth. an exteriorlyinsulated air passage surrounding the stove 28, thus securing effective heating of air passing through these passages.
  • the elbow jacket 42 surrounding the rams horn tube 22 of Fig. 1 communicates at 44 with the annular passage 46 surrounding stove .28 and leading to the reheated air metering port 48, and in this orm two surrounding air chambers 50 and 52 serve .for insulating and preventing undue heat loss. vThe same provision is made for heating air with a lateral horn'
  • the inlet fromy for example,
  • the metering mechanism is improved in several ways, including as it leaves the rotor,
  • aust gas and cold air is substantially transferred to the induction apparatus making use of .the kinetic energy of the exhaust gas to induce flow of cold air.
  • angular distances which may be greater or less than the corresponding angular move-I ments of the throttle, or produce a dwell e rotor toward the ing and in any engine can vary the metering rotor movement turning of the his'way, by simply replacing one simple cheap cam'with another,
  • cam operating means ir the metering rotor 60 is shown in Figs. 8 and 16, and comprises a lever substantially straight ing rotor larg and I, therefore, preferably v a a link 67 leading from the engine throttle c ank 68.
  • the other leg 70 o lever 62 contains a cam slot 72 for receiving the head 74 ot crank form of cam slot.
  • the leg 70 of lever 62 may be made subst antially rectangular as indicated at 70a,
  • the stathrough port a closer metering-control to 80" grommet 4ular I provide a distinct port 84 in the metering rotor coacting with stationary portI 84 for controlling the delivery of preheated air and exhaust gas direct to the delivery conduit 87 ⁇ separately 86a which controls the delivery of exhaust gas through stationary port 86 into admixture with cold air, and thence indirectly to the said delivery conduit.
  • the mixture of preheated air andhot exhaust gas formed in the rotor -cavity 85 is metered by this additional port 84*l upon its delivery to the conduit 87 leading to the en ine intake, and the leading edge 88 of this new port 84 in the rotor is preferably an inclined or cleaver edge, so that registration and resulting opening of the passage through orts 84 and 84a is gradual, ginning Tile at one end of port 84, and
  • the final heating air component by hot exhaust gas in-the rotor cavity and conse uent expansion of the air in 'such cavity prior to delivery through port 84 enables of the preheate 84* than at the air port 48, the air passing l48, though preheated, being denser than after being further heated by admixture with hot exhaust gas and elivery at 84.
  • mede?? port 82 are open to admitypreheated air l and exhaust gas to the rotor, and the mixture'thereof is metered to delivery pipe 87 by the advance or cleaver ledge 88 0i port 84 coming into registration with port 82.
  • Fig. 24 shows the further opening of these respective ports for a further partial throttle opening, whereas in Fig. 25, showing the situation for still further throttle opening, ports 84 and 84 have passed one another 4and are closed and port 8O is nearly closed, and in Fig. 26, showing' open all three ofp these ports are closed ofi.
  • the supplemental gases made use of at idling andf at low throttle openings are readily controlled as desired.
  • the stationary ports 92 and 94 in the cold air end of rotor sleeve 78 and the coacting ports 92 and 94a in the rotor 60 are preferably formed at center distances of substantially 180 apart asy shown in Fig. 11, so as to give av straight-through passage when open, and also to provide a double air seal at each side of the rotor when closed, and in and getting to delivery conduit 87 and thev intake passage duringidling, at which time the quantity of air that can be made use of is limited and it is essential that the air which is supplied shall be as hot as pos- Fory the Same reason Irpreferably enclosethe cold air end of the rotor 60 in a sealing cap or cover 96 (Fig. 9). With this arrangement I preferably arrange the return spring 98 for securing return of the rotor to closed position at the opposite end through the f i larger and behind said Fig. 9.
  • the light arrows 120 in Fig. 27 indicate that at the rotor position of Fig. 25 over Fig. 27 there is less than d air openings in the rotor are open to an extentsubstantially greater than the iii- ]ector passages 114 and 116, these ports become gates only, the full effective driving action is exhaust gas, as indicated by the ieavy arrows 122 on Fig. immediately over Fig. 26, and is effectively used for injecting cold air.
  • Fig. 3 I have shown a jacket 124 enclosing an insulating air space 126 surrounding the exhaust gas passage 128 to the injector to ensure delivery of the exhaust gas to the injector at the maximum temperature available.
  • I preferably 'make use of a cooler, comprising heat radiating fins 130, as shown in Figs. 7, 8 and 9, for cooling thesxhaust Cgas Aand/or the mixture of cold air and exhaust gas.
  • I may dispense with both cooling fins and insulating jacket, and make use of a plain casting as indicated atA 132, Fig. 1. It will be understood, however, that in each case the supplementary gases supplied when the compres-.
  • Thesupplementer gases are-preferably delivered to the intake conduit above the throttle. In effecting their delivery it is desirable that no substantial constrictions be imposed in the intake conduit passage for from the carburetor, also that the supplementer gases be discharged in the direction of stream flow in the intake conduit, and that in their discharge ⁇ the maximum agitation and gas admixture be attained. I may effeet these results to a suicient extent by Pipe 87 may be at-,
  • Figs. 3 and 4 The preferable arrangement, however, is shown in Figs. 3 and 4, in which the supplementer gases are delivered from pipe 87, through an annular passage 146 formed between the thin tube 148 for conducting the fuel and air stream from the carburetor, and the cylindrical walls of a casting 150 to which the supplemental gases are elivered substantially tangentially through the elbow 158 to which pipe 87 is connected.
  • I preferably form the intake conduit in this neighborhood with a first gradually enlarging part 154 followed by a gradually narrowing portion 156.
  • this neighborhood, together with the cyclonic agitation produced at the issuance of the supplementer gases from the annular nozzle 146 all serve to produce a highly effective admixture of: the supplemental gases with the fuel and air stream from the carburetor.
  • the thin tube 148 through which the fuel and air stream from the carburetor passes is surrounded at artial throttle openings with a hot mixture of hot exhaust gas and preheated air, 4which changes as the throttle is further opened to a cool mixture of exhaust gas and cold air.
  • the tube 148 being thin responds readily to its jacketing temperature and imparts heating to the fuel and air stream ⁇ for low partial throttle openings and correspondingly low initial cylinder pressures, whereas when the throttle is opened wider and the charge is desirably more dense .to get higher initial'pressures and substantially maximum volumetric efficiency, the fuel and air stream from the carburetor is automatically cooled by its jacketing gases, or at least is not materially heated. This automatically takes care of requirements for ,imparting heat to the fuel and air stream, making an efficient hot spot arrangement during lovsT load operation and a cold spot for higher load operation automatically adapted to the heat needs of the charge mixture.
  • he engine may even stop, vinstead of accelerating as desired.
  • auxiliary fuel feeding apparatus in Figs. 1 and 2.
  • Such apparatus as shown comprises a fuel well 158 having its outlet to thefintake conduit 160 through a pipe 162 com trolled by'a needle valve 164, and the supply of fuel tothe Well from a constant level source, a vacuum tank, adapted to normallymaintain a level in the well as indicated in dotted lines at 166'in Fig. 1, controlled by a second needle valve 168, which Valve 164 is spring 170 and valve 168 is y ly byla lighter spring 172, and the lever 174, pivotally connected to both valves, is operated by a plunger 176, also pivoted to said lever 174.
  • Plunger 176 is pivotally connected to a second lever 178, which has a roller 180 running in inclined slots 182 in said lever 178, and said roller is engaged by projections 184 and 186 of a cam 188, which is operated from the engine throttle as by a crank 190 and a link 192.
  • the intake conduit can be accomplished in various ways.
  • the pipe necessary to 4close cessive periods 162 for supplying the auxiliary fuel leads to and delivers from a plurality drilled holes 194 in the cross member 142 and the auxiliary fuel supply-may also be delivered from a jet 196 arranged centrally of the nozzle 140 provided for supply of supplemental gases to the intake conduit.
  • the auxiliary fuel pipe 162 has a" minute air vent 198 through the jet adjusting needle 200 and delivers the fuel, broken up with air bled through opena series of openings provided in the sleeve 204 surrounding the annular nozzle 156 provided for discharge of supplementing gases to the engine intake.
  • These modes of delivery are by way of example only, and various nozzles and arrangements for auxiliary fuel delivery may be resorted to, as for example I may makeuse of a simple tubular nozzle 2206 with the directed 4fuelopenings 208 as shown in Fig. 30, and thefuel may be delivered in various other ways.
  • auxiliary .fuel feeding means is not ⁇ claimed herein, havingbeen described and claimed .in my applications Serial No. 164,- 349, filed January 28, 1927, and 4Serial No. 176,410, filed March 18, 1927, and Serial No. 188,326, flied May ad, 1927. ,Y
  • valve means for controlling passage of air and exhaust gas into the stream to the engine cylinders, exterior-ly exposed replacable cam means adapted to be moved for operating said valvemeans, and
  • means for. supplying a fuel and air an annular nozzle for a mixture of' exhaust gas and air leading conduit about the walls thereof, said conduit having a first enlarging and then a contracting section beyond the nozzle outlet whereby the streams are churned together and thereby admixed.
  • aY tubular member through which the fuel and air stream from the carburetor is passed on the way to the means for delivering a substantially annular stream of exhaust gas and air about said tubular member and into admixture with the fuel and air stream beyond the end of the tubular member, and means for controlling the temperature of said mixture of exhaust gas and air to supply the same substantially hot for low engine loads and substantially cool for high engine loads.
  • a v,charge supplementer for internal combustion engines ⁇ , an intake, a venturi therein, an elongated tubular member in said intake through which the fuel and air stream from the carburetor is passed, the upper end of said ltubular member extending into said venturi 'in spaced relation thereto to form an' annular discharge orifice, means for delivering a substantiall annular stream ofexhaust gas and air to t e'engine intake around said tubular member and into admixture with the fuel and.

Description

A. MOORE June 24, 1930.
ION ENGNES CHARGE SUPPLEMENTI'NG APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUST Filed April '7, 1927 8 Sheets-Sheet INVENTOR r/znyon /Voom da/4714 ATTORNgx/s A. MOORE june 24, 1930.
CHARGE SUPPLEMENTING APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL oo MBUS T Filed April '7, 1927 8 Sheets-Sheet INVENTOR ATTORNEY;
rz'ngion Moore BY @am A. MOORE l.lune 24, 1930.
Filed April f7, 1927 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR Ar/zngon Moore BY @j ATTORNEY5 .kine 24, 1930. A. MOORE NES MENTNG APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL GOMBUSTION ENGI CHARGE SUPPLE 8 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed April 7, 1927 INVENTOR June 24, 1930. -A. MOORE 1,766,677
Us FOR NTERNAL CoMBUsTloN ENGINES 8 Sheets-Sheet 5 CHARGE SUPPLEMENTING `APPAR'I Filed April 7, 1927 INVENTOR Ar/myon Moore ATTORNEYS June 24,1930. A, M9061.; 1,766,671
CHARGE SUPPLEMENTING APPA RATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES 8 Sheets-Shea?I 6 Filed April '7, 192'? INVENTOR /r/Uyfon /Vaore A. MOORE June 24, 1930;
L COMBUS'I'LION ENGINES CHARGE SUPPLEMENTING APPARATUS FOR INTERNA 8 Sheets-Sheer;
Filed April '7, 1927 OOOOOOOOOOO lNvENToR Ar/mgton Moore ATTORNEYS lll,
June 24, 1930. A, MOORET 1,766,677
LEMENTING APPARATUS FOR INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGlNES CHARGE SUPP 8 Sheets-Sheet 8 Filed April 7, -192'? Y INVENTOR BY n 061g@ w ATiToRNl-:Ys
Feten-ted June 24. 1930 UMTED STATES PATENT oFFIcE .ARLINGTON MOORE, on NEWYORK, N. Y.,
NEW YORK, N. Y., A oonPoRATroNoF DELAWARE .FMAXMOOR CORPORATION, OF GHARGE-SUPPLEMENTING v i Application filed April 7,
My invention relates to a charge suppleinenting apparatus for internal combustion engines Aconsuming volatile liquid fuel, such as so-called gasoline, for example.
The object of the invention is the/.provif apparatus for supplementing the charge material supplied through the cus- Serial No.
isf
tomary carburetor, by addition thereto of ranges of engine operation.
The present -application is an advance upon and development of'my prior applications including, for example, application 173,388, iledMarch 7, 1927, for charge supplementing apparatus for internal power operation, metering mechanism operated adjunctively to throttling for controlling the make up and delivery of the past These various interdea suction fuel jet.
subdivisions will be dependent functional a modified form of supplied during low i `ASSIGN'OR, BY MESNE ASSIGNMENTS, T0
APPARATUS FOR 'INTERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINES 1927. Serial N0. 181,711.
scribed in substantially the foregoing order. foregoing and related objects in accompanying drawings, in which:
Fig. l is a part sectional and 'part side elevational view of a charge supplementing interposed between the exhaust and intake manifolds of an internal combustion engine.
Fig. 2 is a side View of the auxiliary fuel feeding means shown in Fig. 1.
Fig. 3 is a view similar to Fig.
apparatus.
Fig. 4 is a section on the line 4`4, Fig. 3.
Fig. 5 lis a plan view of a modilied form o`f means for taking exhaust gas from the exhaust gas conduit.
Fig. 6 is a section on line 6`6, Fig. 5.
Fig. 7 is a longitudinal sectional view of a modified form of metering and heat eX- change appliance.
Fig. 8 is a side elevation of the appliance shown in Fig. 7.
Fig. 9 is a section on line 9-9, Figs. 7 and 8.
Fig. 10 is a section on line 10-10, Fig. 9.
Fig. 11 is a section on the line 1l-11,
1 showing Fig. 12 is an elevation of the means for operating the metering rotor.
Fig. 13 is a section on line 13-13, Fig. '7. F Fig. 14 is a section on the line 14-14, of
F ig. 15 is a right hand appliance shown in Fig. 9.
Fig. 16 is an elevation of the `actuating mechanism for the apparatus of Fig. 1, shown in a separate View for the sake of clearness.
Fig. 17 is a side View of the actuating mechanism for the auxiliary fuel feeding means illustrated yin the upper portion of Figs. 18 to 22 inclusive are side views of cani devices of v end view of the in Orts.
igs. 27 and 28 are `sectional views of a In this way a portion of the exhaust cold air injector. y
Fig. 29 is a perspective of an engine equipped with charge supplementing apparatus and apparatus for feeding auxiliary fuel as shown in section in Fig. 8.
Fig. 30 is a detail view of means for delivering auxiliary fuel to the intake manifold.
MEANS` FOR TAKING ExiiAUs'r GAS FROM 'rHnExHAUs'r CoNDUrr Where an impact or Iitot tube is inserted through the wall of an exhaust manifold to divert exhaust gas for use in charge supplementing, a certain amount of constriction of the exhaust manifold is unavoidable. According to the present embodiment of the invention, which is herein illustrated as more particularly suited for accessory apparatus for application to engines already in service, I interpose in the exhaust conduit, at the usual joint where the exhaust pipe is bolted on to the exhaust manifold, a chambered body of somewhat larger bore than the exhaust manifold, and make the connection for the impact or Pitot tube or the e uivalent thereofwithin this chamber, which in 4place constitutes substantially a local enlargement of the exhaust conduit.
gas can be taken from the exhaust manifold with the velocity and kinetic energy of theV exhaust gas stream behind it, with little or no resulting constriction or backing up of theV exhaust gas stream in the exhaust conduit.
. Two forms of improved exhaust gas withdrawal means are illustrated, one in Fig. 1 and another in FigsBl-. In each case a hollow casting is bolted in between the exhaust manifold and the exhaust pipe. The chambered casting, solidly astened in being this position with olts, affords a firm and l substantialsupport on the en ine for my entire apparatus'when supplie for accessory equipment therewith of old engines already in service. In theform shown in Fig. 1, the inserted casting is designated generally by the reference numeral 10; it has a chamber 12 therein of a diameter somewhat reater than the bore of theexhaust manifod 14, and comprises ag Pitot "tube portion 16 formed as ali-integral partof the casting,r` and havin its mouth 18 directed against the iiow o? exhaust gas in the exhaust gas conduit 14. The passage 20 in such member 16 is of substantially funnel formation, being of greatest, diameter at the mouth 18 and gradually tapering to a smaller section toward its opposite end, where it preferably terminates in an upwardly directed horn impact tube.
horn 22, which is interiorly threaded at 24, and serves for receiving the threaded neck 26 of the stove 28 of the metering and heat exchange appliance, which is designated generally by the reference numeral B0. For pui/#poses of identification, I l preferably designate this substantially semi-circular impact tube of Fig. 1 with gradually decreasing taper or funnel formation as the rams A second form of the exhaustl gas withdrawal means is illustrated in Figs. 3, 5 and 6, which I prefer to designate as the escorter tube.
Same comprises a chambered casting 10 bolted in place as before, or extension 22 interiorly threaded at 24 for attachment to stove 28. casting 10 to horn 22 is divided into substantially upper and lower halvesby the partial septum 32, providing a broad, ently curving inlet 34 directed against the ow of exhaust'gas in the exhaust conduit 19', and a similarly curved return passage 36 directed with the flow of the exhaust gas stream in the exhaust conduit. Exhaust as striking the` concave upper surface 38 o? septum 32 is forcibly driven out of horn 22 at 24 into the stove 28 when the passages therethrough are open, and a circulation of exhaust gas is secured through horn 22- and into and out of stove` 28 and back into the exhaust conduit at 36 when the outlet passage through stove 28 is closed or nearly closed. Under such circumstances which exist at and near closed positions of the throttle, as will be pointed out below, while only a small part of the exhaust gas passes throu h the stove'to the engine intake, the heat o a much larger part of the exhaust gases is ut1lized for 'preheating the air supplied to the intake. he provision of septum 32 and the opening 39 around n v the end thereof leading 'back t6 the intake .conduit at 36 avoids putting substantial back pressure upon theI exhaust gases in the exhaust manifold.
.Theexhaust geas horn is `surrounded by a )acketing mem r receiving warm air from around the exhaustconduit, and the passage fr om the jacketing member communicates wlth. an exteriorlyinsulated air passage surrounding the stove 28, thus securing effective heating of air passing through these passages.
The elbow jacket 42 surrounding the rams horn tube 22 of Fig. 1 communicates at 44 with the annular passage 46 surrounding stove .28 and leading to the reheated air metering port 48, and in this orm two surrounding air chambers 50 and 52 serve .for insulating and preventing undue heat loss. vThe same provision is made for heating air with a lateral horn' The inlet fromy for example,
roi" th in my prior application above referred to and do not require further detailed explanation.
METERING MECHANISM The metering mechanism is improved in several ways, including as it leaves the rotor,
ing the respective gases sulting retardation ofthe movement of exaust gas through the rotor, particularly at. an
aust gas and cold air is substantially transferred to the induction apparatus making use of .the kinetic energy of the exhaust gas to induce flow of cold air.
bility of the control afforded of the supplemental gases, operate the metering rotor by means ot' a cam, and interlink the cam with the throttle.
angular distances which may be greater or less than the corresponding angular move-I ments of the throttle, or produce a dwell e rotor toward the ing and in any engine can vary the metering rotor movement turning of the his'way, by simply replacing one simple cheap cam'with another,
istics of the apparatus in practically any desired manner,
e referred form of cam operating means ir the metering rotor 60 is shown in Figs. 8 and 16, and comprises a lever substantially straight ing rotor larg and I, therefore, preferably v a a link 67 leading from the engine throttle c ank 68. The other leg 70 o lever 62 contains a cam slot 72 for receiving the head 74 ot crank form of cam slot.A
e evident that by shaping the cam slot 72 as desired, substantially any preferred movement can be imparted from the throttle to rotor 60.
The leg 70 of lever 62 may be made subst antially rectangular as indicated at 70a,
d when so formed the. outlines of 5 upon actuation of the throttle.
his cam operating device for the meterely dispenses with need for different models for diil'erent engines, and enables requirements to bevl met which would otherwise be very difcult to take care 0f. i
Metering of mimi-ure of wt eil/:Must gas and pre/cated air conditions of light load or low part throttle With the present invention the stathrough port a closer metering-control to 80" reglstering 4ular I provide a distinct port 84 in the metering rotor coacting with stationary portI 84 for controlling the delivery of preheated air and exhaust gas direct to the delivery conduit 87 `separately 86a which controls the delivery of exhaust gas through stationary port 86 into admixture with cold air, and thence indirectly to the said delivery conduit.
The mixture of preheated air andhot exhaust gas formed in the rotor -cavity 85 is metered by this additional port 84*l upon its delivery to the conduit 87 leading to the en ine intake, and the leading edge 88 of this new port 84 in the rotor is preferably an inclined or cleaver edge, so that registration and resulting opening of the passage through orts 84 and 84a is gradual, ginning Erst at one end of port 84, and
gradually enlarging as the "port is further opened. By thus accurately metering the entire mixture oi gas assing at 84, 84a from therotor 60 to the elivery conduit 87, in addition to' sepay metering the preheated air as it is delivered tothe cavity 85 within the rotor, at 80l and the hot exhaust gas at the time of its delivery toA the cavity within the rotor at 82, I am enabled with little or no additional expense to secure a much more accurate andlcertain control of the supplementer gases which are supplied to the engine intake at idling and under low load conditions, at which it is desirable to have the additional gases and especially the air component under as complete control as possible. The final heating air component by hot exhaust gas in-the rotor cavity and conse uent expansion of the air in 'such cavity prior to delivery through port 84 enables of the preheate 84* than at the air port 48, the air passing l48, though preheated, being denser than after being further heated by admixture with hot exhaust gas and elivery at 84.
' This provision for metering the hot ex haust gas and preheated air can readily be traced across unrolled views Figs. 23-26, of the sleeve and rotor of the metering mechanism, the full line ports being the stationary or sleeve ports, the dotted line *ports being the rotor ports, and the cross-hatched parts indicating the extent of opening orv re 'stration of these ports. Thus at idling (Fgilg. 23), only the preheated air opening with the advanceslot portion 80c of preheated airport 80. and the narrowed advance portion of exhaust gas from the rotor port preheated air and exhaust direct admixture with the,
be had at port l sible.
mede?? port 82 are open to admitypreheated air l and exhaust gas to the rotor, and the mixture'thereof is metered to delivery pipe 87 by the advance or cleaver ledge 88 0i port 84 coming into registration with port 82. Fig. 24 shows the further opening of these respective ports for a further partial throttle opening, whereas in Fig. 25, showing the situation for still further throttle opening, ports 84 and 84 have passed one another 4and are closed and port 8O is nearly closed, and in Fig. 26, showing' open all three ofp these ports are closed ofi. By metering the preheated air and hot exhaust gas separately and admixing them in the rotor lcavity 85 and then metering the mixture as it passes from the rotor to the delivery pipe, the supplemental gases made use of at idling andf at low throttle openings are readily controlled as desired.
Straight-through passage in 'rotor for emy. met gas y l While the rotor may be of tubular' formation as heretofore, and is so shown in Figs. `1 ,and 7, I preferably avoid such tubular formation because of resulting production of eddy currents, and make the exhaust gas passage 90 (Fig. 3) .through'the rotor substantially direct thereacross, so that the exhaust Agas can .pass freely rotor with the full drive of the exhaust gas d gas behind them.
Cold air passageain mctermg mechanism The stationary ports 92 and 94 in the cold air end of rotor sleeve 78 and the coacting ports 92 and 94a in the rotor 60 are preferably formed at center distances of substantially 180 apart asy shown in Fig. 11, so as to give av straight-through passage when open, and also to provide a double air seal at each side of the rotor when closed, and in and getting to delivery conduit 87 and thev intake passage duringidling, at which time the quantity of air that can be made use of is limited and it is essential that the air which is supplied shall be as hot as pos- Fory the Same reason Irpreferably enclosethe cold air end of the rotor 60 in a sealing cap or cover 96 (Fig. 9). With this arrangement I preferably arrange the return spring 98 for securing return of the rotor to closed position at the opposite end through the f i larger and behind said Fig. 9.
INJECTION or yCOLD AIR BY ln ny prior disclosures reliance has been aced on the i'otary meter for metering conof rot-or the rotor crank 76, as shown in ExHAUsT GAS and for a further degree of opening of the metering rotor be 7ond such first admixture, the metering of the exhaust gas and air at and toward open throttle position being controlled entirely by the exhaust gas pressure and the d air pass his way the inthe exhaust 'gas quantities of cold smaller quantities of exhaust gas, Which is desirable, particularly in a low-compression Furthermore, the supply ot supdisclosed by gne, the apparatus being so constructed that the` sleeves and nozzles controlling the size of these passages can be removed and replaced at will with others of any desired size or co au. .such period the quantities ay let to open simultaneously and are shown partly open in Fig. 25, b
for exhaust gas to the opens along With the cold air ports 92 and 94. So long as these openings are not substantially in excess of the exhaust gas and cold the injector 118, the metering for the exhaust gas and cold air which come together at the injector 118 is done by the rotor, be-
The light arrows 120 in Fig. 27 indicate that at the rotor position of Fig. 25 over Fig. 27 there is less than d air openings in the rotor are open to an extentsubstantially greater than the iii- ]ector passages 114 and 116, these ports become gates only, the full effective driving action is exhaust gas, as indicated by the ieavy arrows 122 on Fig. immediately over Fig. 26, and is effectively used for injecting cold air.
passed and cold air induced, While passing through fixed openings 114 and 116 will increase with increase of Velocity and pres- Asureof the exhaust gas stream, and with increase ot stream Velocity toward the engine cylinders in the intake passages, the sup COOLER Inasmuch as maximum cold air supp depends upon efficient injection, and this supplying suiiicient cold air aust gas to reduce its temperature suliiciently to ensure getting full volumetric eiliair passages 114 and 116 oi' c p ii5 the fuel and air stream coming meter-ing mechanism ciencyv under-` relatively heavy load yconditions. p t
In Fig. 3 I have shown a jacket 124 enclosing an insulating air space 126 surrounding the exhaust gas passage 128 to the injector to ensure delivery of the exhaust gas to the injector at the maximum temperature available. With such arrangement, by delivering the exhaust gas at maximum temperature to the air injector nozzle, maximum shrinkage and airp injection are obtained. n
With high-compression engines, however, the proportion of exhaust gas to cold air which can be supplied at heavy engine loads without detonation is relatively higher.- In such cases andwhen the resulting temperature after passing through the in3ector nozzle cannot be readily kept below the condensation temperature of steam at the pressures encountered, I preferably 'make use of a cooler, comprising heat radiating fins 130, as shown in Figs. 7, 8 and 9, for cooling thesxhaust Cgas Aand/or the mixture of cold air and exhaust gas. For intermediate conditions of compression ratios I may dispense with both cooling fins and insulating jacket, and make use of a plain casting as indicated atA 132, Fig. 1. It will be understood, however, that in each case the supplementary gases supplied when the compres-. high enough to normally sion pressures are be accompanied by detonation, are cooled suiciently by admixture of cold air with the exhaust gas and by any needed amount of cooling through heat radiating surfaces to prevent substantial loss of volumetric eliicienc while at the same time providing heat su cient for gasifying the fuel.
DELIVERY or THE SUPPLEMENTAL GAsEoUs MIx'rUREs rro ENGINE INTAKE The mixtures of gases provided by the including the injector are delivered through the delivery pipe 87 to the engine intake. tached to the appliance 30 either at the front or side, asi desiredthe front opening 134 being plugged when ,pipe 87 is connecte at the side opening 136 and vice versa. This facilitates the attachment of the apparatus as an accessory to various makes of engines, etc. i
Thesupplementer gases are-preferably delivered to the intake conduit above the throttle. In effecting their delivery it is desirable that no substantial constrictions be imposed in the intake conduit passage for from the carburetor, also that the supplementer gases be discharged in the direction of stream flow in the intake conduit, and that in their discharge `the maximum agitation and gas admixture be attained. I may effeet these results to a suicient extent by Pipe 87 may be at-,
enlarging the `intake conduit from dotted line to full line dimensions, as diagrammaticallyI indicated at 138, Fig. 1, and discharging upwardly through nozzle 140 formed in a cross member 142 and providing inclined or ritledvanes 144 to produce agitation and admixture of charge components.
The preferable arrangement, however, is shown in Figs. 3 and 4, in which the supplementer gases are delivered from pipe 87, through an annular passage 146 formed between the thin tube 148 for conducting the fuel and air stream from the carburetor, and the cylindrical walls of a casting 150 to which the supplemental gases are elivered substantially tangentially through the elbow 158 to which pipe 87 is connected.
The supplemental gases set into cyclonic agitation by tangential delivery to annular passage 146, issue from the annular passage 146 around the mouth of the thin tube 148 and become thoroughly admixed with the fuel and airstream. y
I preferably form the intake conduit in this neighborhood with a first gradually enlarging part 154 followed by a gradually narrowing portion 156. The expansion an contraction produced in |this neighborhood, together with the cyclonic agitation produced at the issuance of the supplementer gases from the annular nozzle 146 all serve to produce a highly effective admixture of: the supplemental gases with the fuel and air stream from the carburetor.
It will be observed thatithe thin tube 148 through which the fuel and air stream from the carburetor passes is surrounded at artial throttle openings with a hot mixture of hot exhaust gas and preheated air, 4which changes as the throttle is further opened to a cool mixture of exhaust gas and cold air. The tube 148 being thin responds readily to its jacketing temperature and imparts heating to the fuel and air stream` for low partial throttle openings and correspondingly low initial cylinder pressures, whereas when the throttle is opened wider and the charge is desirably more dense .to get higher initial'pressures and substantially maximum volumetric efficiency, the fuel and air stream from the carburetor is automatically cooled by its jacketing gases, or at least is not materially heated. This automatically takes care of requirements for ,imparting heat to the fuel and air stream, making an efficient hot spot arrangement during lovsT load operation and a cold spot for higher load operation automatically adapted to the heat needs of the charge mixture.
AUXILIARY FUEL SUPPLY by the throttle on th lOIl ' cylinder.- rIhis is advantageous fro standpoints, decrease of sure.
I preferab posely make carburetors customarily particul arge supplementing is much that the intake presm many arly' in the resulting and gine operaincreased initial cylinder presuse of of greate used, in
stantially complete cylinder filling low intake dotted lines venturi pass system as compared used.
depressie Fig. 1 I have indica respecti y go further than this and intake manifolds r bore diameter than order to' obtain a subpur- -and as n as is practicable. In ted in full lines and in vely relative carburetor age openings for use with my I have found that the advantage tures resulting from l sion can besecured to their optimui only with the especially low,
sacrifice of ability intake depression is upon opening'the throttle'from a running setting toka wider opening poses of obtaining acceler ticularly trueY if, as is desirable, th .retor fuel je a desirably economical happen at ti my supplementer ap started, at least not wi diiiiculty, and instead the throttle air will come through alone or l the heavier fuel lagging behind due to its greater i will initially choke t is adjusted lean to l mixture, an mes that en paratus is opened for that tem nertia, and t and spit and with the size ordinarily ous feaowered intake depresn extent to raise already particularly at starting, and
constant for puration. This is pare carbuprovide d it can gines equipped with cannot be thout a great deal of of accelerating when purpose, the argely alone,
he engine may even stop, vinstead of accelerating as desired.
In order to disp sort, I have devis fuel supply ated adjunctively Vt are automatical which o throttling, an
can be used to supply auxiliary limited quantities stream Within the i into suspension throttle is opened either for startin accelerating.
Upon deceleratin the throttle,
a reverse situation is ose of difficulties of this ed means for auxili ary ly operd which fuel in in the ntake conduit, when the g or for g or return movementof encountered: the fuel, by'reason of 'its greater inertia, tends even after t to continue to come he airis partially shu through t olf, soJ
i feeding of auxiliary vision for and\ that if auxiliary fuel were supplied upon such throttle movements, it would richen the IIllxture unduly. I therefore make provitake conduit and merely ,releasing it, or in other words, opening up the fuel passage when the auxiliary fuel is required, whereufpon.r it is positively fed under a gravity head and Without any delay such as would be incident to picking up or lifting fuel by suction on a jet.
I have illustrated a preferable form of auxiliary fuel feeding apparatus in Figs. 1 and 2. Such apparatus as shown comprises a fuel well 158 having its outlet to thefintake conduit 160 through a pipe 162 com trolled by'a needle valve 164, and the supply of fuel tothe Well from a constant level source, a vacuum tank, adapted to normallymaintain a level in the well as indicated in dotted lines at 166'in Fig. 1, controlled by a second needle valve 168, which Valve 164 is spring 170 and valve 168 is y ly byla lighter spring 172, and the lever 174, pivotally connected to both valves, is operated by a plunger 176, also pivoted to said lever 174. Plunger 176 is pivotally connected to a second lever 178, which has a roller 180 running in inclined slots 182 in said lever 178, and said roller is engaged by projections 184 and 186 of a cam 188, which is operated from the engine throttle as by a crank 190 and a link 192.'
Turning movement of the cam 188 in a direction to force roller 180ftoward the lower end of the slot ways tion of plunger 176 and valves 164 and 168 to close the supply valve 168 and open delivery valve 164, whereas upon reverse or decelerating movement of the throttlev and corresponding movement of cam 188 the roller 180 moves toward the higher end of the slots 182 and merely rides up on thevcam pectively. i
pressed downwardly by a pressed upwardf 182 results in actua# i i. ing 198, through end plugged and having minute laterally movement in order to secure 'wider and does not come into action unless the throttle is openedwfairly wide.
f c of this An important characteristi auxiliary fuel feeding apparatus 1s that it is not the hrottle between sucof accelerating throttle delivery of fuel for purposes of acceleration, but one may accelerate and supply additional fuel therefor repeatedly witho vt intermediate closing or substantial closing of the throttle.
of the auxiliary fuel at The subdivision n delivery to the stream flow 1n the intake conduit can be accomplished in various ways. In Fig. 1 the pipe necessary to 4close cessive periods 162 for supplying the auxiliary fuel leads to and delivers from a plurality drilled holes 194 in the cross member 142 and the auxiliary fuel supply-may also be delivered from a jet 196 arranged centrally of the nozzle 140 provided for supply of supplemental gases to the intake conduit. 1
In the form of Fig. 3 .the auxiliary fuel pipe 162 has a" minute air vent 198 through the jet adjusting needle 200 and delivers the fuel, broken up with air bled through opena series of openings provided in the sleeve 204 surrounding the annular nozzle 156 provided for discharge of supplementing gases to the engine intake. These modes of delivery .are by way of example only, and various nozzles and arrangements for auxiliary fuel delivery may be resorted to, as for example I may makeuse of a simple tubular nozzle 2206 with the directed 4fuelopenings 208 as shown in Fig. 30, and thefuel may be delivered in various other ways.
The auxiliary .fuel feeding means is not` claimed herein, havingbeen described and claimed .in my applications Serial No. 164,- 349, filed January 28, 1927, and 4Serial No. 176,410, filed March 18, 1927, and Serial No. 188,326, flied May ad, 1927. ,Y
. It will be seen that all the functional subdivisions hereinabove coact to secure the beneficial results which have` been set forth, but it will at the same time be understood that changes and modifications can be resorted to Vwithin lthe' scope of my claims.
I claim:
1. In a charge supplementer forinternal combustion engines, valve means for controlling passage of air and exhaust gas into the stream to the engine cylinders, exterior-ly exposed replacable cam means adapted to be moved for operating said valvemeans, and
`means for operating vstream therethrough,
Ainto the intake 2 duit and said tubular portion .engine cylinders,
said cam-means adjunetively to engine throttling, whereby substantially tween the throttle and valve means may readily obtained.,
2. In charge supplementing apparatus for internal combustion engines, duit, means for. supplying a fuel and air an annular nozzle for a mixture of' exhaust gas and air leading conduit about the walls thereof, said conduit having a first enlarging and then a contracting section beyond the nozzle outlet whereby the streams are churned together and thereby admixed.
3. In a charge'supplementerfor internal combustion engines, exhaust gas into the stream to the en ine cylinders, valvular means vfor control ing the passage of exhaust'rgas therethrough, replacable cam means for operating said valve means, and means for operating said cam-means adjunctively to engine throttling, whereby substantially any desired interrelation between the throttle `and valve means may be readily obtained.
4. The combination with the intake conduit, throttle and fuel delivering means of an internal combustion engine, of a venturi member in said intake conduit beyond the throttle, a tubular portion disposed within said intake conduit beyond the throttle and extending into said venturi, said intake conforming a passage having a relatively constricted discharge orice substantially at the constriction of said venturi, and means for supply ing supplementary gases through said passage.
-. '5. In a chargesupplementer for internal combustion engines, aY tubular member through which the fuel and air stream from the carburetor is passed on the way to the means for delivering a substantially annular stream of exhaust gas and air about said tubular member and into admixture with the fuel and air stream beyond the end of the tubular member, and means for controlling the temperature of said mixture of exhaust gas and air to supply the same substantially hot for low engine loads and substantially cool for high engine loads. i
6. In a v,charge supplementer for internal combustion engines,\, an intake, a venturi therein, an elongated tubular member in said intake through which the fuel and air stream from the carburetor is passed, the upper end of said ltubular member extending into said venturi 'in spaced relation thereto to form an' annular discharge orifice, means for delivering a substantiall annular stream ofexhaust gas and air to t e'engine intake around said tubular member and into admixture with the fuel and. air stream any desired interrelation be-` an intake conf means for supplying i 1,766,67'7 beyond the end of said .tubular member, whereby heat interchange is effected between the stream of exhaust gas and air and the stream o'f fuel and air prior to the admix- .'ture ofi said streams, and means for controlling the temperature of said mixture of exhaust gas and air to sup `1y the same'hot for low engine loads an cool for high engine loads.
w In testimony whereof, I have signed my name hereto. i
. ARLINGTON MOORE.
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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3680534A (en) * 1970-03-30 1972-08-01 Chrysler France Device for the injection of gases into the feed system of an internal combustion engine
US3892070A (en) * 1970-05-08 1975-07-01 Ranendra K Bose Automobile anti-air pollution device
US20060124116A1 (en) * 2004-12-15 2006-06-15 Bui Yung T Clean gas injector

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3680534A (en) * 1970-03-30 1972-08-01 Chrysler France Device for the injection of gases into the feed system of an internal combustion engine
US3892070A (en) * 1970-05-08 1975-07-01 Ranendra K Bose Automobile anti-air pollution device
US20060124116A1 (en) * 2004-12-15 2006-06-15 Bui Yung T Clean gas injector

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