US1747307A - Sounding board - Google Patents

Sounding board Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1747307A
US1747307A US45804A US4580425A US1747307A US 1747307 A US1747307 A US 1747307A US 45804 A US45804 A US 45804A US 4580425 A US4580425 A US 4580425A US 1747307 A US1747307 A US 1747307A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
sounding board
board
sounding
plies
cells
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US45804A
Inventor
Frank R Leland
Edmund C Charles
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
LAMINATED MATERIALS Co LT
Original Assignee
LAMINATED MATERIALS Co LT
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by LAMINATED MATERIALS Co LT filed Critical LAMINATED MATERIALS Co LT
Priority to US45804A priority Critical patent/US1747307A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1747307A publication Critical patent/US1747307A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D3/00Details of, or accessories for, stringed musical instruments, e.g. slide-bars
    • G10D3/02Resonating means, horns, or diaphragms
    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10CPIANOS, HARPSICHORDS, SPINETS OR SIMILAR STRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH ONE OR MORE KEYBOARDS
    • G10C3/00Details or accessories
    • G10C3/06Resonating means, e.g. soundboards or resonant strings; Fastenings thereof

Description

Feb. 18, 1930.

F. R. LELAND ET AL S OUNDING BOARD Filed July 24 1925 r y mwzwd M J INVENI'U vs:

Patented Feb. 18, 1939 U'ITED STATES PATENT OFFICE FRANK R. LELAND AND EDMUND C. CHARLES, OF NEW VIESTMINSTER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA, ASSIGNORS TO LAMINATED MATERIALS COMPANY, LTD., OF NEW WESTMINSTER, BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA, A CORPORATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA.

SOUNDING- BOARD Application filed July 24, 1925.

Our invention relates to an improvedsounding board for musical instruments such as pianos, harps, dulcimas, guitars, and the like. It has for its object to provide a sounding board which will improve the quality of the tone while at the same time greatly increasing the volume. The board embodying our invention greatly increases the durability of the instrument without increasing its cost.

Heretofore, sounding boards, particularly for pianos and the like, have been made from narrow strips of some long grained wood such as spruce or pine glued together, the strips being arranged diagonally, in most cases, of the board. On the back of the sounding board are usually secured ribs or braces also on the diagonal but transversely of the strips composing the sounding board, but the sounding board proper does not include the braces.

WVe have found by observation that the strips of spruce or pine composing the sound ing board expand or contract under the influence of moisture and changes in temperature, and that this causes strains due to the fact that the board tends to move independently of the main structure of the piano and of the strengthening ribs. These strains tend to crack or split the sounding board or buckle it and break it loose from the main structure of the piano. They also result in the breaking of the glue joints or the cracking of strips particularly in warm or moist climates. The result of this buckling or splitting is a structural break which is costly to repair since the entire piano has to be taken apart. If the break is not repaired, the sounding board rattles or buzzes and the tone qualities of the piano are seriously injured.

lVe have found that very much better results may be obtained by making a sounding board from a soft wood as free as possible from alternate hard and soft grains, said sounding board being composed of several layers with the grain running in two or more directions, the pores or cells of which have been permanently deformed by heat and pres sure. lVhile the causes of the improved results which we obtain cannot be stated with absolute certainty, we believe that they are due to the freedom of the board embodying Serial No. 45,804.

our invention from alternate hard and soft grains which we believe interfere with the vibrations of the sounding board, and also to the fact that the board is nearly uniform in all directions so that the tendency of the wood to dampen the vibrations in one direction is not greater than its tendency to dampen them in another direction. Furthermore, the increased strength which is obtained, as hereinafter described tends to increase the volume of tone, it being well understood that a diminishing of the thickness of the sounding board increases the volume of tone.

Accordingly, we prefer to make our improved sounding board as shown in the accompanying drawings in which our invention is shown as embodied in a sounding board for a piano.

The invention will be fully understood from the following oescription when taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, and the novel features thereof will be pointed out and clearly defined in the claims at the close of this specification.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1. is a rear elevation of a sounding board embodying our invention.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged section on the line 22, Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged view of a portion of the sounding board showing the arrangement of the several plies.

Fig. 4 shows another arrangement of plies.

Referring now to the drawings, at A is shown the sounding board complete, being composed of several plies or layers, as, for instance, seven,10, 11, 12, 13, 1 15 and 16, secured together by glue or cement films a. a. As will be seen in Fig. 3, the grain or adjacent plies or layers runs in opposite directions. In this figure, the plies are shown as having the grain running in two directions at right angles to each other. It will therefore be seen that sound waves may travel in two directions at right angles to each other with equal freedom. The plies are preferably made of some porous homogeneous wood which is as free as possible from alternate hard and soft grains as is the case in spruce, fir, and the like. Cottonwood is, as far as we lmow, the best wood for the purpose, since it is very porous and homogeneous wit-h relatively uniform density of grain. Furthermore, the pores or cells are of such a character as to respond readily to the heat and pressure treatment hereinafter described. The best results are obtained by employing a veneer cut circumferentially from the log since this increases the homogeneity of the wood by lessening the frequency with which alternate hard and soft areas occur, as compared with veneers which are cut diametrically of the log. l/Ve also find that the acoustic properties of the sounding board are very much improved by permanently deforming the pores or cells of the wood which is done by subjecting the sounding board to heavy pressure and toheat while the walls of the cells are in a soft condition due to the presence of moisture and holding the board under pressure until the moisture has dried out and the cells have taken on a permanent shape.

In making our improved sounding board, we cut circumferential sheets of veneer from a moist or green cottonwood log, spread the veneers with a suitable glue or cement made from a suitable animal or vegetable albumen, lay the veneers in suitable relations to each other and then subject the whole to high temperatures in a hydraulic press which will exert sufiicient pressure to collapse the cells of the several layers. The pressure and heat are continued until a sufficient amount of moisture is evaporated to render the deformation of the cells permanent. This treatment greatly increases the tone qualities of the finished sounding board. Thereafter, the edges of the panel may be trimmed off and ribs 17, 17, etc. are glued to the back of the board in the proper position if it is decided to use ribs, but the superior strength of our sounding board makes it possible to reduce the size and number of the ribs or perhaps to omit them altogether. This material also admits of a larger crown being put into the sounding board.

In Fig. 4 I have shown a portion of a sound ing board composed of six plies, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, and 23. The plate 18, 19 and 20 are arranged at 120 from each other, and the other three plies in similar positions.

We find that instruments fitted with sounding boards embodying our invention have greater volume of tone than those having sounding boards of ordinary construction due, we believe, to the uniformity and speed with which the sound waves can travel in all directions. These facts are readily ascertained by comparing two boards by means of atuning fork, when the greater sweetness of tone and the increased volume are at once apparent. They are also clearly apparent when a sounding board embodying our invention is placed in a small piano, which will then be found to have the tone qualities and volume of sound of a piano of considerably larger size. The increase in the volume and the improvement in quality are particularly valuable in small pianos in which the upper notes are usually thin, weak and harsh.

We find also that a piano provided with a sounding board embodying our invention will stay in tune much longer, and that the sounding board embodying our invention is practically uninjured by varying conditions of heat and moisture. Apparently, also, the sounding boards embodying our invention are considerably stiffer for the given thickness than spruce sounding boards, as it is found that after a considerable and equal number of tunings the boards embodying our invention will have sprung or changed form very much less, frequently only a third as much as the spruce sounding board. This is an important characteristic, since change of form inevitably results in a loss of tune.

.Ve also find that it is possible to use a thinner sounding board than has heretofore been possible. As a thin sounding board gives greater volume of sound than a thick one, this is great improvement.

#Vhat we claim is:

1. The method of making a sounding board which comprises cementing together a plurality of plies of open-pored'and relatively homogeneous wood arranged with the grain of adjacent plies at an angle to each other, and permanently deforming the cells of said plies by the application of heat and pressure.

2. The method of making a sounding board which comprises cementing together a plurality of circumferentially cut plies of veneer arranged with the grain of adjacent plies at an angle to each other, and permanently de-' forming the cells thereof.

3. The method of making a sounding board which comprises securing together with a waterproof cement a plurality of circumfen entially cut plies of cottonwood arranged with the grain of adjacent plies at an angle to each other, and permanently deformingthe cells thereof by the application of heat and pressure. V r

In testimony whereof we affix our signatures.

' FRANK R. LELAND.

E. C. CHARLES.

US45804A 1925-07-24 1925-07-24 Sounding board Expired - Lifetime US1747307A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US45804A US1747307A (en) 1925-07-24 1925-07-24 Sounding board

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US45804A US1747307A (en) 1925-07-24 1925-07-24 Sounding board

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1747307A true US1747307A (en) 1930-02-18

Family

ID=21939976

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US45804A Expired - Lifetime US1747307A (en) 1925-07-24 1925-07-24 Sounding board

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1747307A (en)

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2469522A (en) * 1945-02-07 1949-05-10 Hardman Peck & Company Piano soundboard
US2529862A (en) * 1943-06-22 1950-11-14 Steinway & Sons Diaphragm unit and method of fabricating same
US3444771A (en) * 1965-12-17 1969-05-20 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg Piano soundboard assembly with auxiliary board
US3641861A (en) * 1970-06-01 1972-02-15 Wurlitzer Co Tone-balancing element
JPS63224902A (en) * 1987-03-13 1988-09-20 Saburo Egawa Wood bonding structure
US6060650A (en) * 1998-01-09 2000-05-09 Mathew McPherson Arrangement of a sound hole and construction of a sound board in an acoustic guitar
WO2001086623A2 (en) * 2000-05-09 2001-11-15 Mathew Mcpherson Arrangement of a sound hole and construction of a sound hole board in an acoustic guitar
US20030154843A1 (en) * 2001-12-12 2003-08-21 Mcpherson Mathew A. Bracing system for stringed instrument
US20040099122A1 (en) * 2002-11-26 2004-05-27 Mcpherson Mathew A. Neck connection for stringed musical instrument

Cited By (16)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2529862A (en) * 1943-06-22 1950-11-14 Steinway & Sons Diaphragm unit and method of fabricating same
US2469522A (en) * 1945-02-07 1949-05-10 Hardman Peck & Company Piano soundboard
US3444771A (en) * 1965-12-17 1969-05-20 Nippon Musical Instruments Mfg Piano soundboard assembly with auxiliary board
US3641861A (en) * 1970-06-01 1972-02-15 Wurlitzer Co Tone-balancing element
JPS63224902A (en) * 1987-03-13 1988-09-20 Saburo Egawa Wood bonding structure
JPH0458761B2 (en) * 1987-03-13 1992-09-18 Saburo Egawa
US6060650A (en) * 1998-01-09 2000-05-09 Mathew McPherson Arrangement of a sound hole and construction of a sound board in an acoustic guitar
WO2001086623A2 (en) * 2000-05-09 2001-11-15 Mathew Mcpherson Arrangement of a sound hole and construction of a sound hole board in an acoustic guitar
WO2001086623A3 (en) * 2000-05-09 2002-03-28 Mathew Mcpherson Arrangement of a sound hole and construction of a sound hole board in an acoustic guitar
US20030154843A1 (en) * 2001-12-12 2003-08-21 Mcpherson Mathew A. Bracing system for stringed instrument
US6943283B2 (en) 2001-12-12 2005-09-13 Mcpherson Mathew Bracing system for stringed instrument
US7268280B2 (en) 2001-12-12 2007-09-11 Mcpherson Mathew A Bracing system for stringed instrument
US20080006138A1 (en) * 2001-12-12 2008-01-10 Mcpherson Mathew A Stringed instrument braces with transverse openings
US7790970B2 (en) 2001-12-12 2010-09-07 Mcpherson Mathew A Stringed instrument braces with transverse openings
US20040099122A1 (en) * 2002-11-26 2004-05-27 Mcpherson Mathew A. Neck connection for stringed musical instrument
US6897366B2 (en) 2002-11-26 2005-05-24 Mathew A. McPherson Neck connection for stringed musical instrument

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US1554179A (en) Sound-absorbing material for walls and ceilings
Bucur The Acoustics of Wood (1995)
US5606142A (en) Shell resonant membranophone
US3302507A (en) Guitar, and method of manufacturing the same
Obataya et al. Vibrational properties of wood along the grain
US3915049A (en) Stringed musical instrument with aluminum made integral unit
Wegst Wood for sound
US7261947B2 (en) Plywood laminate having improved dimensional stability and resistance to warping and delamination
EP1182642B1 (en) Soundboard made with fibre composite
CN1261289C (en) Plate fabricated from upright core of bamboo and its mfg. method
US4079654A (en) Bracing structure for stringed musical instrument
US4178827A (en) Stringed instrument construction
SE7811930A (en) Seen that of timber manufacture planks or treskivor
US2544935A (en) Method of producing boards
US5461958A (en) Acoustic guitar assembly
ES2239579T3 (en) Multi-pump drum patch.
US1601915A (en) Bat
US1465383A (en) Composite lumber
Wegst Bamboo and wood in musical instruments
US3685385A (en) Guitar
US1506364A (en) Reed for saxophone or clarinet mouthpieces
Buksnowitz et al. Resonance wood [Picea abies (L.) Karst.]–evaluation and prediction of violin makers’ quality-grading
US3192304A (en) Sound producing banjo
US3858480A (en) Stringed instrument
US4018129A (en) End-pin holder for string instruments