US1725576A - Combination stop mechanism for organs and the like - Google Patents

Combination stop mechanism for organs and the like Download PDF

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US1725576A
US1725576A US34971A US3497125A US1725576A US 1725576 A US1725576 A US 1725576A US 34971 A US34971 A US 34971A US 3497125 A US3497125 A US 3497125A US 1725576 A US1725576 A US 1725576A
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combination
stop
keys
actuators
members
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US34971A
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Frederick J Flaherty
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WELTE MIGNON CORP
WELTE-MIGNON Corp
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WELTE MIGNON CORP
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10BORGANS, HARMONIUMS OR SIMILAR WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS WITH ASSOCIATED BLOWING APPARATUS
    • G10B3/00Details or accessories
    • G10B3/10Actions, e.g. key actions, couplers or stops

Description

Aug. 20,
19,29 F. J. FLAHERTY 1,725,576
COMBINATION STOP MEGHANISM FORYORGANS AND THE LIKE Filed June 4, 1925 4 Sheets-Sheet l Aug. 20, 1929. F. J. FLAHERTY COMBINATION STOP MECHANISM FOR ORGANS AND THE'LIKE 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 4, 1925 gjm/vanto@ llg. 20, 1929- F.- J. FLAHERTY 1,725,576
COMBINATION STOP MCHANISM FOR ORGANS AND THE LIKE Filed June 4, 1925 4 Sheets-Sheet 5 "ni: Lild @L ,il
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gmentoz attivame- Aug. 20, 1929. v F. J. FLAHERTY 1,725,576Y
COMBINATION STOP MECHANSM FOR ORGANS` AND THE LIKE Filed June 4, 1925 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 vPatented Aug. 20, 1929.
UNITED STATES FREDERICK J. FLAHERTY, OF WOODSTOCK VALLEY,
MESNE ASSIGNMENTS, T lIELTE-MIGv A CORPORATION 0F DELAWARE.
COMBINATION STOP `MnoHANIs Application filed June 4,
Combination stop actions7 are those means, usually incorporated in instruments of the pipe organ type, which are so correlated with the stop keys and stops as to permit a setting of the stops into one or more selected combinations each of which is thereafter governed by a controlling member corresponding thereto.
This invention aims generally to improve the mechanisms hitherto proposed for this purpose in various material respects. One ot the particular objects is to provide, in a mechanism in which any one or more of the stop keys may be set to come on while other stop keys are set to go off when a predetermined combination operating element is actuated, a correlation Ot' part-s which additionally permits any one ot' the stop keys to be set into such relation to any one Ot' the combination operating elements as to be unaffected by the actuation of the latter.
In other words, it is particularly an object ot the invention to provide a combination stop mechanism wherein any one of the stops may be set to on position, to off position or to a neutral position with relation to any one of the combination operating elements.
The term stop7 as herein usedeomprehends a graduated group or set of pipes or other elements emitting tones having the same tonalquality, or a tremulant, coupler ete. together with the stop keys and connections between the respective stop keys and the corresponding set or group ot' tone emitting elements, swell shutters, etc. for controlling the operation ot' the latter by said keys.
Recognizing that the main features of the invention may be variously embodied I have shown three different embodiments, but wish it understood that these are merely exemplary and that changes in details may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined by appended claims.
In the accompanying drawings wherei like characters of reference denote corresponding parts in the several views F ig. l is a view partly in perspective and partly in section showing a part of one iorin of a combination stop action constructed in accordance with my invention.
Figs. 2, 3 and 4 are detail views, partly in CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR, BY NON CORPORATION, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.,
M FOR ORGANS AND THE LIKE.
1925. Serial N0. 34,971.
elevation and partly in vertical section. particularly intended to show a combination operating element and its power means in three dilferent positions, namely: when in oit position, Fig. 2; when in on position, Fig. 3; and while a setting is being made, Fig. 4. u `Fig. 5 is a detail view showing one suitable embodiment in which the combination operating elements are operated directly by hand pressure instead of through the medium of a. manually controlled power means of electro-pneumatic nature.
Fig. 6 is a section on the line 6-6 of Fig. 5.
Figs. 7 and 8 are detail views illustrative of a further typical embodiment; Fig. 7 being a view partly in elevation with a part of a front board broken away, and partly in vertical s-ction, and Fig. S being a vertical section on the line 8 8 of Fig 7.
Fig. 9 is a detail view particularly intended to illustrate a suitable form ot' connecting means between a manually operable controlling means and its corresponding combination operating element, the connection illustrated being adaptable to different embodiments of the invention typified by Figs. 5-8, inclusive.
Figs. l0, 1l and 12 are detail views showing the relation of certain elements and indieative of the relation thereto of certain other elements, with respect to three different typical combinations for which the parts have been set, respectively, and after they have been operated i'or playing purposes.
The particular embodiments hereinbeiore referred to will be described in detail, without, however, intending thereby to restrict the invention thereto.
In all the ligures of the drawings, 10-14 inclusive, designate stop keys which may be of any suitable kind, the ones illustrated being the pivoted tablets now preferred for .use in the modern pipe Organ. These stop keys are individually pivoted upon a common stationary shaft l5 so as to be severally movable about the shaft into on or off position, by the organist. They govern communication of the sets or groups of tone emitting elements, couplers, swells ete., respectively, with the wind system of the organ, it being understood in this connection Cil Vporated in the instrument.
that when the outer end of any tablet is depressed to its on position the particular stop controlled thereby is operative vand that when the outer end of saidl tablet is'raised to its off position the particlar stop controlled thereby is inoperative.
' Since the tone emitting elements, couplers, swells etc., through which they have communication with the wind system of the organ and the means operable under control of the stop keys to control said means of communication form no part of the present invention and are well known in the art, they have not been herein illustrated and need not be particularly described.
Each stop key is provided, as usual, with a spring a? (shown best in Fig. G) operatively related thereto to throw the key to either its on or off position when it has passed a position midway between the two, these springs thereby operating toV hold the keys against accidental displacement from their set positions, either on or off.
It will, of course, be understood that the number of stops and lstop keys varies in different organs and that each stop included in the organ will have Vits appropriate stop key, and, further, that wherever the' term stop or stop keys is used herein, it is intended to include not only thoseY stops which have reference to speaking-pipes or tone emitting elements, but also to the mechanical stops, as swells, couplers etc., which may be incor- As already stated, this invention has to do with certain improvements in the mechanisms hitherto proposed by which onel or more different combinations of stops may be prepared by the organist and severally brought into operation, during the playing of a composition, by the actuation' of the corresponding combination operating element, respectively predetermined for the purpose in the preparation or setting of the combinations. Y
A series of shafts 16 corresponding to the respective stop keys have their outer ends suitably connected to the inner ends of the latter, the means shown for this purpose comprising cranks 17 and links 18. Each of these shafts is provided along its lengthwith a'series of actuators B, each comprising two complementary members,` marked 19 and 20, respectively. Onemember, as 19, of each actuating element is fixed on its shaft 16 and theother member, 20,is supported by said shaft and has` pivotal movement relatively thereto. v j
Each of these "actuators also has atl each of its ends a means operative automatically to releasably lock their corresponding ends to each other `when said ends vhaveY been brought' into uxtaposition. A suitable'means for this-purpose comprises complementary cup-'shaped recesses and projectins formed on each end of the respective members 19 and 20 and adapted to interengage when brought into registrationwith'each other by relative movement of said members. Such `locking or fastening means are indicated at b, b in the drawings. Itis preferred in practice that each member 19 be composed of two sides spaced from each other to receive the complementary member 20 between them. Attention'is calledto the fact-that the members 19 and 20 of each actuator are relatively so shaped that between the two extremes of synchronously whenever rocking movementA yis imparted either to the stop key by the finger of the organist on said key or by pressure applied to the appropriateactuator B.
Pressure is applied to the actuators to move the correspondingstop keys by a means which includes combination operating elements here shown as a series of slides A, each comprising two members 21 and 22 arranged on opposite sides `of all of the shafts 16 and connected with each other for unitary movement, as by the end strips 23 and '211. The number of these slidesvaries in raccordance with the number of different combinations which the instrument'is constructed to provide for at vany one time. Each slide is suitably pressed resiliently outward, as by means of a. spring such as shown at X in Figs. 5 and 7. Each has one of its longitudinal members provided with a series of lateral projections 25 and its other 'longitudinal member provided with alike series of lateral projections 26. The series of projections 25, and also the series of projections 26, on each slide, correspond in number with the number of shafts 16, and the projections 25- are operatively related to' one end of the members 20 of the respective actuators B while the projections 26 are operatively related to the other ends of said members. The cooperative action of the projections and actuators will be hereinafter set forth. In the construction illustrated each Vslide A is formed of a'iiat plate and a longitudinal member27 of greater thickness than the platezsaid plate having a longitudinal opening 28b`ounded by the members 21 and 22 l V'lpwer edge' of the plate and having end-portions or members, 29 (Figs. 5 and 7 and 30, (Figs. 1 4) projecting outwardly in opposite directions therefrom-beyond the veri tical planes of the ends of the plate. In the l other', marked C, shown in Fig. 7, is fixed and is applicable to the construction shown in Figs. 1 4, inclusive, as well as to the construction shown in Figs. 7 and 8. Each spring X, inV all illustrated forms, has one oi its free ends connected to the rear end of the corresponding projection 29.
In the operation of preparing a combination, the particular slide A which has been selected to operate the combination is moved inward relatively to the actuators B and to place it in such position that its projections will substantially engage the upper ends of the members 20 of the corresponding actuators. lVhile the parts are in this position, the outer ends of the stop keys corresponding to the particular stops which are to come on are pressed downward to their.
fullest extent, while the outer ends of the stop keys which are to go oit under control of this slide are pressedv upward to their fullest extent, andthe outer ends of those keys which are to be neutral in this particular combination, are moved to a midposition. rhe described movement of the key or keys corresponding to the stop or stops which are to come on turns the corresponding shaft or shafts 16 and actuatormembers 19 and since the members 2O of said actuators are held against movement at this time by the slide it follows that the lower ends of the actuator-members 19 will be brought into juxtaposition with t-he lower ends o'll theA actuator-members. 20 by this downward movement of the keys. The parts are so correlated that at the end of this movement of the stop key or keys the holding elements b, bat the lowerends of the corresponding actuator-members will snap into engagement with each otherv so as to hold these ends together. The described movement of the key vor keys corresponding to the stops which are to go off under control of this particular' slide, turns the corresponding shaft or shafts 16V and actuatingmember or members 19, relatively to the corresponding member or members 20 and causes these members to be locked together at their upper ends instead of at their lower ends: and the descr-ibed movement of stop key or keys to mid-position places the members of the actuator or actuators corresponding to the keys so moved, in such relation to each other and to the slide that no movement of the slide will be communicated to said actuators.
`By way of concrete examples: let us assume that the organist desires to prepare three different con'ibinatior-.s t the stops controlled by the stop-keys marked 10-1-1, inclusive, in Fig. 1 of the drawing and that in one of these combinations, identified as first combination, the stops controlled by keys 10 and 12, are to come on while the stops controlled by keys 11, 13 and 14 are to go ofi when the particular slide A selected to operate this combination-is actuated; while in another combination, identilied as combination No. 2, the stops controlled by keys 10, 11 and 13 are to come on and the stops controlled by keys 12 and 14 are to go olif when the particular slide A selected for this operation is operated; and in still another combination, identified as combination llo. 3, the stop controlled by key 10 is to remain neutral, while the stops controlled by keys 12 and 14 are to come on and the stops controlled by keys 11 and 13 are to go otlwt the organist in preparing these combinations, proceeds as follows:
The particular slide which is to operate the first combination is moved inward and while it is being held in said position the organist presses the outer ends of stop keys 10 and 12 downward as far as they will go and all other stop keys upward as tar as they will go; in preparing' combination No. 2 he similarly piesses the outer ends of stop keys 10, 11 and 13 downward and the remaining stop keys upward, while the slide which controls this combination is in its inward position; and .in preparing combination No. 3 be places stop key No. 10 in a mid-position, presses stop keys Nos. 12 and 14 downward to their fullest extent and stop keys 11 and 13 upward tothcir fullest extent, while the selected slide is in its inward position. As already described, in preparing the first combination the members 19 and 20 ot' the actuators corresponding to keys 10 and 12 were locked to each other atf their lower ends, while the members 19 and 20 of the actuators corresponding to keys 11, 13 and 14 were locked to eacli other at their upper ends; and that in preparing combination number 2, the actuators correspondto keys 10, 11 and 13 have their members 19 and 20 locked to each other at their lower ends, while the similarinembers of the actuators corresponding to keys 12 and 14 are locked together at their upper ends; and
that -in preparing combination No. 3 theV members of the actuators corresponding to keys 12 and 14 are locked together at their lower ends, the members corresponding to keys 11 and 13 are locked to each other at their upper ends, while the members of the actuators corresponding to key '10* will be free fromv each other atl both ends 'of said actuator.
Ot course, itwill be understood` that when each combination has -beenprepar'ed all keys Vwhich had beenl moved from their normal off positions in setting the combination are returned to their said positions, respectively, and the slide which had been selected to operate said vcombination andwhichwas heldinward while the combinationl was being prepared, is' released and thereupon will be returned -to its outer position by its spring X.
Fromthe'foregoing it will be clear thatif the particular slide selected to operate or controll the first combination be Athereafter pressed 'inward'it will act upon vthe lower, locked togetherfends ot the actuators corresponding tokeys 10 and 12 and upon t-he"upper, locked together, ends or" the actuators corresponding to keys 11,13 and 14 in suchE mannenas to cause theV stops corresponding lto keysl() and 12 tospeak, and
the othersfto discontinue speaking, if they were on orto remain F ott it they were already rothv it, of course,being'under stood'that in this operation the keys 10 and 112 are moved to their on position and the keys 11, 13 and 14 'moved to their ott position, if on at this time, by the cooperative action of the saidslide and' actuators; andl similarly that when in the playing of the organ the particular slide selected to operate or control combination No. 2 is moved inwardit will act upon the lower, locked together, ends of the actuators corresponding to keys A10,- 11` and 13 "insuch manner as-to bring said keys into on position andi upon the upperl'ocked together' ends of the actuators corresponding to keys 12y and 14to move them Vto 5 ofi' p`osition; and, finally, that when the `*slide selected to operate or control combination vNo." `3 is moved inward by the organist to bring this combination into operation, stop keys 12 and 14 are loweredfto on position and stop keys 1l. and 131areraised to oit position, by the Yco-operative action o-s'a-'id slide and the actuators corresponding tosaid keys,
` while the `slidewill have no-etect whatever upon the actuatorsv correspondingto key and hence the stop controlledby'said key will remain on if lalready on or oit if it was off at this moment.
Theslides A may beseverally operated inv various ways, or byv various means, two typical means being illustrated for-exemplary purposes. In one; of these means they are operated by force derived from electrically controlledpneumatics which are under con-v trol of t-he organist, lonesuitable means" for this purpose `being shown in Figs. 1-4, vin- They m'ay, however, be'- severally clusive. operated by torce derived from the fingers of the organist applied in a more direct manlation to'other lelements that each will have two? distinct land well deiined phases of i' movement in the same direction for certain purposes, one for the setting operation and the otherVfor theplaying operation, as in the constructions exemplified by Figs. 1 6, inclusive, or the same purposes may be accomplished by providing for additional movements of the stop keys in lieu ofthe able'` embodiment'in which each slide A has two distinct phases of movement inthe same direction imparted to it by van operating means'therefor which includes an electrically controlledipower pneumatic, P, connected to the outer end of the corresponding slidememberY 30 and having its-interior in operative relationship', through a port 31, with a Wind channel' 32 which has communication with a. chamber yM through a port 33 controlled bytwo valve members m and n. The valve member m has a port 34 andthe valve member n has a port 35. These valve members are slidable relatively toeach other and to vthe port' 33, the member n being connected by a-rod a with the movable member of pneumatic P, while the member m is connected by a rod in with the movable member of a pneumatic Q. `Tl1e .chamber M con.- tains-air at atmospheric pressure when the stop controlled -bythe corresponding slide A is not in any combination, and at other times contains air at pressure abovethat of the latmolsphere,inL vthe arrangement illustrated. lts *communication with the atmosphere is through a port'37, duct 38 and port 39.
end'to a pneumatic 43 whose' chamber isv ma`rked'43.` The pneumatic Q is at all times subject externally 'to thetension of the air in the chamber M while internally it is'subject at certain times to air at atmospheric The air at pressure above thatl ofthe atmosphere enters the chamber M' `ner thereto,'as shown in Figs. 5-9, inclusive. tvMoreover, they may beso larranged `with repressure introduced thereinto through channels 44 and 45 and a port 46 and at other times to the pressure of the air in the chamber O, which air enters the same through a, port Hand the said channels 45 and 44. These ports 46 and 47 are controlled by a valve 48mounted on a stem 49 which is operatively related to a pneumatic 50 whose chamber is'fjmarled 50.
R and S', designate two electro-magnets whose armatures 7 and a ferm, or are provided with, valve members. The valve member 7 operates between and is adapted to close two ports, 51 and'52, alternately; and the valve member s operates between and is adapted to cles'txvo ports 53 and 54 alternately. The ports 51 and are atmospheric ports respectively leading to chambers 55 and 56 which are also respectively tapped by the ports 52 and 54. The latter ports are in communication with the pressure chamber O through channels 57 and 57 respectively. Chamber 55 has communication with the chamber 43 of pneumatic 43 through channels 68 while other channels, 69, connect chamber 50' of pneumatic 50 with chamber 56. The magnet R is in an electrical circuit which starts from ra source ot electrical energy, as the battery 58, and traverses, in turn, wire 59, terminals 60 and 6W, wire 61, magnet R, and back to the source through wire 62. The magnet S is in an electrical circuit which starts from a source otl electrical energy, as the battery 63, and traverses, in turn, wire 64, .terminals and 65', wire 66, magnet S, and back to the source by way of wire 67. A suitable means for controlling the circuits which in turn control. the operation of the correspond- .ing slides A, comprises a plunger T which is preferably spring pressed outward and has its stem so correlated with suitable switches and 7l, Fig. l, for the respective circuits that it will close the circuit which energizes the magnet R when pressed in a certain distance and will close the circuit which energizes the magnet S when pressed in an additional distance.
lhen the wind system of the organ is under pressure, the controlling or actuatingr means of every stop which is not on has its elements in the position shown in Fig. 2, upon reference to which it will be noticed:
That atmospheric port 46 and pressure port 40 are closed while atmospheric port 37 and pressure port 4T are open. Hence, chamber M'will be closed against pressure chamber O and in communication with the atmosphere through port 39, channel 38 and port 37 5 while the interior of pneumatic Q will be closed against the atmosphere and in communication with pressure chamber O through channels 44 and 45 and port 47. The result, of course, is the expansion of saidpneumatic Q and the positioning of valve members m and n with their ports 34 and 35 in full registration with each other and with port 33 leading to channel 32. This channel now contains air at atmospheric.pressure and since the interior of pneumatic l) is in open communication with said channel and its exterior is at the same time (and, in fact, always) subject to air at atmospheric pressure it follows that the pressures within and without said pneumatic counterbalance each other. lVhile the pressu-res are thus counterbalanced the pneumatic is collapsed and held in collapsed condition, as by a suitable spring, as usual, aided if necessary by the spring X which resiliently presses the corresponding slide i outward. The corresponding slide, therefore, is in its outer position. At this time, of course, the magnets R and S are deenergized.
The procedure in setting the mechanism in the preparation of a combination is as follows:-
The organist presses inward to its fullest extent the particular plunger T which he has selected as the one to control the combination being made. This plunger' in its inward movement closes the circuits through the magnets R and S and thereby energizcs said magnets. The energizing of magnet R causes it to attract its armature fr and there- -by opens the atmospheric port 51 and closes thc pressure port 52 ot chamber 55. Communication of chamber 43 ot pouch pneumatic 43 with pressure chamber O is thus cut oil and at the same time said chamber 43 is opened to the atmosphere through port 5l, chamber 55 and channel 68. This rcsults in the deflation of the pneumatic 4B by the preponderating pressure in chamber t), and this deflation causes movement of valve members 4l and 42 and the closing of atmospheric port 37 and opening et pressure port 40; thereby placing chamber M in communication with pressure chamber O. As soon as communication of chamber M1 with pressure chamber O is established there will be an inrush of air under pressure above that et the atmosphere from said chamber M into channel 32, through the fully registered ports 34, 35 and 32. The particular power pneumatic P connected with said channel 32 is thus subjected to internal pressure sufficiently strong to inflate it. As it becomes intlated outward movement ot' its movable member draws with it the valve member n and thereby positions the port 35 in said valve member out oi registration with port 34 of valve member m, and thus cuts olf communication between the chamber M and the interior olf the power pneumatic P. This completes the first phase of inward movement of the slide A, it being, of course, understood that the inflation of said pneumatic caused it correspondingly to move the particular slide A to which it is connected. The parts are now in the position shown in Fig. 3.
The admission into chamber M of air at pressure above that of the atmosphere also resulted in a counterbalancing of the internal and external pressures to which the pneumatic Q is subjected, since the interior of said pneumatic is still in communication with pressure chamber O, through channels` 44 and 45 and port 47 It will be remembered, however, that in the setting operation the plunger T is pushed inward to its fullest extent and,A therefore, that the circuit through magnet `S is' closed at the end orp the inward movement of said plunger. this magnet opens the corresponding atmospheric port q53 and closes the corresponding pressure port t 54, thereby closing the corresponding chamber 50 or' pouch pneumatic 50 against pressure chamber O and opening it to the atmosphere. The eressure in chamber 0 will thereupon become effective upon said pneumatic to cause movement of the valve 48 to open atmospheric port 46 and close pressure port 47 of the corresponding chamber 50.- The interior of pneumatic Q is thus cut ofi" from communication with pressure chamber O and is vented to the atmosphere, whereupon the pressure in chamber M, which of course is still in communication with pressure chamber C, becomes effective to collapse said pneumatic, with the result that valve member m is moved, relatively to valve member n, `to a position which re-establishes communication of chamber M with chamber 32, through the ports 34, 35 and 33. This re-v sultsin an additional expansion or" pneu-` matic P and, in consequence, the second phase of inward movementof the corresponding slide A. The parts are now in the position shown in Fig. 4.
The correlation of the parts is such that both phases of inward movement of the slide are brought about in the setting operation while its iirst phase of movement only is accomplished in the playing operation. in other words, in the setting operation both magnets R and S are energized by the pushing inward orp the plunger T to the extent which closes both circuits, while in the playing operation-i. e. to bring the set combination into operationthe magnet R only is operated.
Vlhen the setting operation has been completed the circuits which energized the magnets R and S, respectively, are broken by the withdrawal of the corresponding plunger T. The de-energization of magnet S closes atmospheric port 53 and opens pressure port 54, thereby placing chamber 50 oit pouch pneumatic 50 under pressure equal to that in chamber O, whereupon valve 48 will close atmospheric port 46 and open The closing of the circuit through pressure port 47, thus increasing the pressure of the air in the interior of pneumatic Q to the same as that in chamber O. The de-energization of magnet Ri', which obviously occurs immediately after the de-energization of magnet S, causes the atmospheric port 53 to be closed and the pressure port 54 to be opened, thereby placing chamber 43 of pouch pneumatic 43 in communication with pressure chamber O.
Thisfresults in movement of valve members 42 and 41 to-close pressure port 40 and open atmospheric port 37, l respectively. Hence, communication of chamber M- with pressure chamber Ois eut oit and said chamber M- is vented to the atmosphere. Chamber M and pneumatic P now contain air at atmospheric pressure and pneumatic Q contains air at pressure above that of the atmosphere. The preponderating pressure in the pneumatic Q causes the expansion of said pneumatic, while the counterbalancing of pressures within'and without the pneumatic P permits the spring or springs which are operatively related to said pneumatic to become effective to deilate the same. The expansion of pneumatic Q moves the valve member m toward the right and the defiation of pneumatic P moves the valve member n similarly toward the right, thus restoring the parts to the position originally occupied by them (shown in- Fig. 2) ready to bring on the combination predetermined by the setting operation, whenever the circuit is closed through the magnet R without being closed through the magnet S.
It-will be understood that springs or the like may be provided wherever necessary or desirable to operate or assist in the operation of any of the pneuma-tics in one direction.
It is to be observed that the valve member m. has a depression 34 in its upper face and that the valve member 11, has an opening 36 in registration with said depression. This depression and opening are .in communication with the atmosphere through a channel 36. By means of this connection to the atmosphere a slight pressure is maintained upon the valve members operative to hold them in place whenever conditions of sure exist in the chamber M.;
Figs. '5, 6, 7, 8 and 9 illustrate a means for operating each slide A without the intervention of power pneumatics or electrical controls. This means comprises a plunger 100 for each slide, connected with the latter by a bell crank lever, one arm (101) of which is pivoted to the inner end of a projection 100 from the plunger, and the other arm (102) of which is pivoted to one end of an arm 103 whose other end is pivoted, at 104 presto an end ofthe corresponding slide A; Each v bell crank lever is pivoted at 105 to an appropriate part oit the organ structure.
These figures illustrate constructions which are alike in respect of the means last described but differ in respect of the means they disclose for permitting a setting of any of the stops in neutral position.
In the construction shown best in Figs. 5 and 6 the capability of the setting of the parts into the referred to neutral position without any liability of anyv fluttering of the stops corresponding to actuators which are in a neutral setting when the combinations including said actuators are operated, is made possibleby providing in the setting operation for an extent of travel of each slide additional to that thereafter required into bringing the stops into on or off condition, being in this broad respect the construction shown in Figs. bei., inclusive; but since the electrical controls and power pneumatics co-operating in the construction shown in Figs. 1-4 to move the slides are not employed and since means should be employed to define the phases of inward movement of the slides, when such movements are contemplated, there may be employed for the latter purpose, a stop means, such as the hereinbefore wall D resiliently pressed forward, by a spring or springs 201, into the path of rearward movement of the slide. The correlation of the slide and stop is such that when the slide and stop are both in their forward positions, they will be separated a distance which permits the slide to traverse its first phase of inward movement in the setting operation, before it comes into contact with the stop, the second phase of inward movement ofthe slide then requiring greater force to overcome the tension of the spring or springs (201). This wall thus defines the inner end of the first phase of inward movement of the slide and indicates when said movement has been completed, for convenience of the organist in operating the combination which has been set to be controlled by said slide. In the particular construction exemplif ing this form of the invention, the stop I5 is pivoted at itsupper end, (at d) and the inner end of the slide member 28 has a shoulder 203 to engage the stop. There may be one stop common to all the slides. or a separate stop for each slide, as desired. In other words, the stop may be a continuous member, different portions of whose length are in operative relation with the slides respectively, or in lieu of suoli continuous member, there may be employed a series of independently movable stops for the series of independently movable slides,respectively.
F igs. 8 and 9 exemplify a construction in which the resilient stop means operates upon the lstop keys. In this construction the opening 300 through which the finger portion of the stop key projects is provided above and below said portion with resilient fingers 301 and 302, respectively so correlated with the stop key and opening 300 that they will define the normal movement of the stop key i. e. the movement of the stop keys from or into its off position, while permitting additional movement of said key in the setting operation. It will be noticed in this connection that the opening 300 is enlarged at opposite sides of the stop key and contiguous to the outer portions of the fingers, as shown at 303 and 80.4, respectively, and have channels 305 and 306 which receive the bent free outer ends of said fingers when the key is pressed up or down beyond its before mentioned normal travel. Of course, it will be understood that there is one pair of these spring fingers for every .stop key. It will be noted that this embodiment typifies a construction in which the two phases of movement are of the stopkeys instead of the slides.
lVhether the two phases of movement are in the stop keys or in the slides, it is apparent that these movements are relative between the slides and stop keys. It should also be understood that the terms inward or outward, upper and lower, atmospheric pressure and pressure above that of the atmosphere are elnploycd herein in an illustrative sense and not with a purpose of restricting the invention to the particular arrangements of parts shown or to the use of the particular pressures named. It will also berunderstood that the constructions illustrated are merely exemplary and that the details may be changed and the invention otherwise and variously embodied without departing from its spirit or the scope of appended claims. For example: (l) the combination slides may be operated, when a motor is used, by one master motor instead of by small individual motors, and (2) the work done by the second touch applied to the plunger may be accomplished by using a single additional plunger or stop key, operative to control the second movement of the master motor, for instance. Finally, it will be understood that in certain instances it may not be impracticable to employ the actuators herein described without moans of the broad or specific character herein set forth for setting them, as
they may be set directly by hand, instead of by the stop keys, or conjoint action of stop keys and combination operating elements, although the advantages of the setting of the actuators without having to enter or to reach into the interior of the organ will be apparent.
Having now described the invention and set forth certain typical embodiments thereof what I believe to be new and desire to secure by Letters Patent, is :M
l. A combination stop mechanism for organs or the like comprising elements each Voperative with `relation to vthe actuators Which havebeen set to on or off position to-'move the other means accordingly and inoperative With relation to those actuators jwhich are set to neutral position.
3. A combination stop mechanism for'organs or the like, comprising actuators sete table into lonposition, of"position, or neutral position, and ystop keys and combination voperating kelements co-operatively operative to set any'iof said actuators into position lin Whichthe corresponding stop will come on -or go offundercontrol'of the combination operating elements or be unaffected by the operation of tlie latter.
4. A combination stop` mechanism Y`for organs or the like, comprising actuators set-V tableinto on position, off position, or neutral7 position, and stop keys `and combination operating elements, conjointly operative With relation to saidactuators to set` any of the latter into positions to cause the stopkeys to be moved to on or olf posi:v tion under control of the combination op-` erating elements, in accordance With the* settings of the actuators, the stop keys being also operative to set any of the actuators iiitopositioirvvithrelation to'the` combination-operating elements to be inoperative thereby.
5. A combination stop mechanism for organs or the like, comprising stop keys,com
bination operating elements and connections including reversibly operative actuators settable by theLv conjoint operation of said stop keys and combination operating elements and when so set are operativeto 'move the stopkeys onto on or olf position under control of said operating elements and also settable to neutral position so as to be unaffected by the operation of said elements.`
6. In a combination stopmechanism for organs or the like, a plurality ofreversibly operative actuators-each comprising a plurality of members movable together in the operation of the combination and relatively to each other into a position to render the actuator inoperative in either direction.
7. In a combinationl stop mechanism for organs or thelike, a series of actuators each comprising a plurality of relatively movable .members releasably ,securable to each other ,the corresponding shaft and a complementary member supported by the shaft and movable relativelypthereto, said .members correlated to be releasably securable to each other at either end, toI render the actuator reversibly operative, and settable to an in termediate position to be inoperative in either direction.
9. In a combination stop mechanism. for organs or the like, a plurality of shafts, a plurality of actuators on each of the same, each actuator comprising a member fixed to the corresponding shaft and a complement` ary member supported bythe shaft and movable relatively thereto, said members correlated to be releasably secui'able to each other at either end, to render the actuator reversibly'loperative, and settable to an in termediate position to be l inoperative in'` either direction, and` setting `.and operating means Y operatively connected to said actuators.'
10. In a combination stop mechanism for organsor the like, a plurality of shafts, a plurality of actuators on each of the same, each actuator comprising a member fixed to thecorresponding shaft and a complementary member supported by the'shaft and movable relatively thereto, said members correlated to be releasably securable to each other at either end, to render the actuator reversibly operative, and settable to an in Atermediate position to be inoperative in either direction, and setting and operating means including stop keys operatively connected to said shafts and operating elements movable relatively'to the shafts and having members engageable with the' ends of the actuators. Y
11; A combination stop mechanism for organs or the like, comprising reversibly operative actuators, respectivelyalso settable to neutral position, and setting and operating means operatively connected with each actuator and including elements Which have relative movement for the setting operation and move together for the playing operation and Whose extent of relative movement in the setting operation is different from that of their movement together for the playing operation.
12. lA combination stop mechanism for organs or the like, comprising reversibly operative actuators, respectively settable also to a neutral position, and relatively movable greater than that traversed by them in the playing operation.
14. A combination stop ,mechanism for organs and the like, comprising actuators settable into on position, ott position or neutral position, and combination operating elements having members engageable with the actuators tor the playing operation,
each combination operating element being movable relatively to the corresponding actuators in the setting operation and having in said operation a greater extent of movement than the distance traversed b vit in the play ing operation.
15. A combination stop mechanism for organs and the like, comprisingr actuators settable into on position, oli position or neutral position, setting iii-cans including stop keys having connection with the actuators and combination operating elements having members engageable with corresponding actuators, said combination operating elements being movable relativel-y to the actuators and stop keys in the setting operation and being operative to move said actuators and stop keys in the playing operation and having in the setting operation a movement of greater length than in the playing operation.
1G. A combination stop mechanism for organs or the like, comprising combination setting and operating means, including com bination operating elements and electrically controlled means respectively operative to move said elements through two phases in the setting operation and one oit said phases in the playing operation.
17. A combination stop mechanism for organs or the like, comprising combination setting and operating means, including combination operating elements and electrically controlled means respectively operative to move said elements and each including a plurality of successively controllable circuits and connections between the same and the corresponding combination operating element operative to move the latter varying distances according to the number et the circuits closed.
18. A combination stop mechanism for organs or the like, comprising actuators settable into on position, off position or neutral position, combination operating elements having members engageable with the actuators for the playing operation, each combination operating element being movable relatively to the corresponding actuators in the setting operation, power pneumatics connected to the respective combination operating elements and electrically controlled control means for said power pneumatics, respectively, each control means including a plurality of circuits and operative connections to the corresponding power pneumatic to cause the latter to move the combination operating element a greater distance in the setting operation than in the playing operation.
19. In a combination stop mechanism for organs and the like, settable actuators and setting and operating means, operative with relation to said actuators and including combination operating elements, a power pneumatic tor each operating element, and control means for each power pneumatic, each control means having a plurality of relatively movable ported valves one of which is operated by the power pneumatic, a second pneumatic to operate the other valve, said valves conjointly controlling the air tensions within the power pneumatic, pneumatically operable valves to control the air tensions to which the second pneumatic is subjected and electrically controlled control means for the latter valves, including a plurality of successively controllable circuits both of which are closed in the setting operation and only one of which is closed in the playing operation.
2l). A combination stop mechanism for organs or the like comprising actuating elements each settable into an on position, an oit position or a neutral position, a slidable combination setting and operating element having members to engage said a2- tuating elements in its combination-setting and combination-operating movements, an operator-controlled inea-ns to operate said slidable element in one direction in the setting operation and for the playing opera* tion, means to move said slidable element in the opposite direction at the ends of the setting and playing operations, and an element movable relatively to the combination setting and operating element and co-operating therewith in the setting of the combination.
21. A combination stop mechanism for organs or the like comprising actuating elements each settable into an on position, an oil position or a. neutral position, a slidable combination setting and operating clement having members to engage said actuating elements in its combination-setting and combination-operating movements, an operator-controlled means to operate said slidable element in one direction in the set-V v ting operation and for the playing operation, means to move said slidable element in *n the opposite direction at. the ends of the setting and playing operations, and an element :movable relatively to the combination setting and operating element and co-operating therewith in the setting of the combination and movable with said combination seti ments each including a plurality of relatively movable members having means to releasably` secure them together at either end of the actuator, and relatively movable means co-operating With each other to move the actuator-members' into positions to cause their locking means to interengage at the selected ends of the actuators.
23. A combination stop mechanism for lorgans or the like, comprising actuating elements each including a plurality of relatively ymovable members having means to releasably secure them together at either end of the actuator, slidable members operative in the setting opera-tion to hold corresponding members 'of the actuators against movement, and stop keys operative in the setting operation in opposite directions to move the other members of the actuators into position to interlock with the held members of the actuators at one end or the other of t-he latter according to the direction of movement of the stop keys. Y
24. A combination stop mechanism for organs or the like7 comprising actuating elements each including a plurality of relatively movable members having means to releasably secure them together at either end of the actuator, slidable members operative in the setting operation to hold corresponding members of the actuators against movement, stop keys operative in the setting operation in opposite directions to move the other members of the actuators into posit-ion to interlock With the held members of the actuators at one end or the other of the latter accordingto the direction of movement of the stop keys, and operator-controlled means to operate upon said slidable members to -control the stops in accordance with the combinations set by the conjoint ope-rations of said slidable members and keys in the setting operation.
In testimony whereof I ai'lix my signature.
FREDERICK J. FLAHERTY.
US34971A 1925-06-04 1925-06-04 Combination stop mechanism for organs and the like Expired - Lifetime US1725576A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3386326A (en) * 1965-06-25 1968-06-04 Vernon F Braun Mechanical capture system
US3420131A (en) * 1965-05-12 1969-01-07 Wurlitzer Co Electronic organ preset and cancel mechanism
US3472114A (en) * 1963-06-17 1969-10-14 Warwick Electronics Inc Combination tab selector

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3472114A (en) * 1963-06-17 1969-10-14 Warwick Electronics Inc Combination tab selector
US3420131A (en) * 1965-05-12 1969-01-07 Wurlitzer Co Electronic organ preset and cancel mechanism
US3386326A (en) * 1965-06-25 1968-06-04 Vernon F Braun Mechanical capture system

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